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Folk Pubs in England

Hester 05 Apr 03 - 05:30 PM
vectis 05 Apr 03 - 06:39 PM
Strupag 05 Apr 03 - 06:51 PM
BanjoRay 05 Apr 03 - 07:42 PM
Hester 05 Apr 03 - 08:52 PM
Hester 05 Apr 03 - 08:54 PM
Greycap 06 Apr 03 - 03:12 AM
breezy 06 Apr 03 - 03:52 AM
Jock Morris 06 Apr 03 - 04:45 AM
selby 06 Apr 03 - 08:07 AM
Teribus 06 Apr 03 - 09:36 AM
McGrath of Harlow 06 Apr 03 - 11:29 AM
Herga Kitty 06 Apr 03 - 11:51 AM
GUEST,Mr Red (at library) 07 Apr 03 - 07:30 AM
GUEST,Mr Red 07 Apr 03 - 07:34 AM
GUEST,Raggytash 07 Apr 03 - 09:20 AM
gnomad 07 Apr 03 - 09:42 AM
MairSea 07 Apr 03 - 09:43 AM
McGrath of Harlow 07 Apr 03 - 11:41 AM
IanC 07 Apr 03 - 12:07 PM
Hester 07 Apr 03 - 12:19 PM
GUEST,Peter from Essex 07 Apr 03 - 12:27 PM
Pied Piper 07 Apr 03 - 12:36 PM
Hester 07 Apr 03 - 01:03 PM
Les from Hull 07 Apr 03 - 01:09 PM
Pied Piper 07 Apr 03 - 01:16 PM
Hester 07 Apr 03 - 01:38 PM
bradfordian 07 Apr 03 - 02:30 PM
Les from Hull 07 Apr 03 - 03:59 PM
Hester 07 Apr 03 - 06:01 PM
Hester 07 Apr 03 - 06:11 PM
magician 08 Apr 03 - 03:58 AM
GUEST,Raggytash 08 Apr 03 - 05:37 AM
Pied Piper 08 Apr 03 - 08:27 AM
Hester 08 Apr 03 - 11:25 AM
Micca 08 Apr 03 - 12:17 PM
Raggytash 08 Apr 03 - 02:43 PM
Willa 08 Apr 03 - 03:56 PM
Willa 08 Apr 03 - 04:06 PM
Hester 08 Apr 03 - 04:32 PM
Hester 08 Apr 03 - 04:40 PM
Hester 08 Apr 03 - 04:48 PM
GUEST,Raggytash 09 Apr 03 - 03:39 AM
Mr Red 09 Apr 03 - 08:31 AM
Hester 09 Apr 03 - 12:03 PM
Micca 09 Apr 03 - 12:58 PM
Hester 09 Apr 03 - 03:42 PM
Raggytash 09 Apr 03 - 03:54 PM
Hester 09 Apr 03 - 04:10 PM
GUEST,noddy 10 Apr 03 - 03:55 AM
GUEST,noddy 10 Apr 03 - 03:56 AM
Hester 10 Apr 03 - 09:53 AM
Hester 12 Apr 03 - 11:13 AM
Marje 12 Apr 03 - 11:50 AM
Hester 12 Apr 03 - 05:57 PM
Mr Red 13 Apr 03 - 08:30 AM
Mr Red 13 Apr 03 - 08:40 AM
bradfordian 13 Apr 03 - 08:58 AM
GUEST,noddy 14 Apr 03 - 04:21 AM
Beardy 14 Apr 03 - 05:13 AM
Mr Red 14 Apr 03 - 06:21 AM
Hester 14 Apr 03 - 09:48 AM
GUEST,JohnB 14 Apr 03 - 12:37 PM
GUEST,JohnB 14 Apr 03 - 12:43 PM
Hester 14 Apr 03 - 04:01 PM
Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull 04 Jun 03 - 06:09 PM
John Robinson (aka Cittern) 05 Jun 03 - 09:26 AM
GUEST,JohnB 05 Jun 03 - 11:41 AM
Liz the Squeak 05 Jun 03 - 05:56 PM
Desert Dancer 27 Nov 05 - 05:21 PM
Little Musgrave 27 Nov 05 - 06:01 PM
Little Musgrave 27 Nov 05 - 06:05 PM
Desert Dancer 27 Nov 05 - 08:34 PM
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Subject: Folk Pubs in Britain
From: Hester
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 05:30 PM

Hi, all:

I'm planning a trip through England & Scotland next year, and I'm trying to remember the name of the folk music pub that everyone recommends in Whitby, Yorkshire.

I'd also love to hear local recommendations for folk pubs in or near various other places that I'll be visiting:

Bury St. Edmunds
Portsmouth
Bath
Nottingham
Bradford
York
Pickering
Newcastle
Edinburgh
Aberdeen
Inverness

As you can see, we're planning a pretty wide sweep, from the south to the north, we're driving, and our itinerary's flexible, so if you know of any odd little folk hideaways you think worth checking out, please let me know.

I'd also be interested in any folk revival history sites (e.g. places where Anne Briggs or Nick Drake performed, etc.)

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: vectis
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 06:39 PM

Tap and Spile in Whitby I believe. It's opposite the station.
The Railway in Portsmouth has been there for more years than I can remember.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Strupag
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 06:51 PM

Right Hester!
Here's your first tip!
Never Never Never refer to Edinburgh, Aberdeen or Inverness as England.
I'm sure that, if you ammend the title to your thread you will get a good hospitable response and welcome from us Scots folk.

Slainte

Andy


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: BanjoRay
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 07:42 PM

York - The Maltings, tuesday nights
       The Golden Ball, Sunday nights
Cheers
Ray


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in Britain
From: Hester
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 08:52 PM

Andy:

Sorry for the misunderstanding. It was actually an editing error. You'll notice that I DID, in fact, use the term "Britain" in my subject heading. However, I forgot to change the higher thread heading from just "England" to the more inclusive "Britain" when I decided to add some Scottish cities to the list in my question (which I had originally intended to be just about Whitby & area).

Unfortunately it does not appear to possible to edit a thread heading in Mudcat once it has been posted.

I'm half English and half Scottish by descent. I do understand the difference.

So, if you'd actually like to suggest some Scottish pubs, that would be very nice.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in Britain
From: Hester
Date: 05 Apr 03 - 08:54 PM

Vectis & Ray:

Thanks for the info!

Ta, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Greycap
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 03:12 AM

Bradford, The Topic Folk Club, - Thursdays, The Melborn Hotel, can't recall the street, but it's easily found in the middle of town.
Ripon - Sundays, 17 miles North West from York - The Oak Treem Copt Hewick ( just outside Ripon). Small but great.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: breezy
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 03:52 AM

dont bother with St Albans then!!

enjoy your visit

ignore strupag, didnt read your initial posting, or failed to understand.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Jock Morris
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 04:45 AM

In Edinburgh it depends just what type of folk music you want as to what pubs to go to. If you want a good going music only (very rare to hear a song) session then head to Sandy Bells pretty much any night of the week. If you want to hear more songs then The Royal Oak is probably a better bet; again pretty much every night of the week. On Thursdays there is a very good mixed session in the Antiquary. There are other sessions and performances on and the best place I know for getting info of them and the addresses for the pubs named above is gig guide

Scott


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: selby
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 08:07 AM

We have a wandering session on a Wednesday night therefore a date will allow us to point you to which Pub. We have a large Mudcat clan within our session, so it would be nice to put faces to names.
Keith


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Teribus
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 09:36 AM

Portsmouth:

The Railway Folk Club - If memory serves me right every Monday night now based in a pub called The Alma.

The Broadside Folk Club - every Wednesday night at The Old House at Home


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 11:29 AM

Would the Tap and Spile in Whitby be the pub outside folk festivals? The Whitby folk club meets in The Plough, almost next door. Here's a site with details of a fair number of sessions and clubs up that end of the country.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 06 Apr 03 - 11:51 AM

There is the Plough on Wednesdays, but Derek Elliot runs a club in the Tap and Spile on Sundays.

Kitty


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,Mr Red (at library)
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 07:30 AM

For Bath try my site. cresby.com. I am told that the Rising Sun (near Poultney Bridge) on a Sunday is Irish. And the Crown on Wed is open mike, Bell Sat lunch. If you have transport there are a few entries in the locale, eg Freshford,Pensford. But use the tel listed to check, these things change when you least expect it.

I have posted threads on Scotland about two years back try a search.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,Mr Red
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 07:34 AM

If you are travelling north from Bath on a monday there is an English music session in Stroud that Rod Stradling runs. Let me know if you plan to be there I go quite often myself. Are you fussed


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,Raggytash
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 09:20 AM

The Black Horse in Whitby has a session on a Sunday afternoon and is well worth a visit in it's own right as it is a cracking little bar. The Endeavour also has sessions, althought these tends to be spontaneous and therefore cannot be pinpointed to a particular date and time .........but the one on Saturday night just gone was BRILLIANT


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: gnomad
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 09:42 AM

Whitby now has a Tuesday session too, at the First In, Last Out. There is also a good club at Mickleby (just a few of miles away) on Saturdays.

Add three weekends of folk activites per year to the week-long festival in August and you will see why so many folkies know the town well.

Hester: If you PM me a couple of weeks ahead I'll try & point you towards any one-off events that might suit.

Raggytash is right, Saturday was a good one.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: MairSea
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 09:43 AM

Hi there

In the Portsmouth area (within a radius of 15 - 20 mins drive)

Mondays: The Railway at the Alma Arms Portsmouth

Tuesdays: Nonsuch at the Working Men's Club, main car park square Bishop's Waltham
          Chichester Folk Club
          Ringwood Folk Club

Wednesdays: The Broadside at the Old hOuse at HOme
            The Famous Willows at Arundel - always worth a visit

Thursdays: ?

Fridays: The Fo'c'sle in the Duke of Wellington Southampton (follow the sounds os the campanologists
          **Woolston and Netley at the Prince Consort, Netley

All the above can be linked from www.barrattfolk.co.uk or on their respective websites except ** which isn't up and running yet.

Hope you have a great visit and maybe see you at one of the above venues - hope you can get through on the web link.

Love and peace


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 11:41 AM

Basically you stand in Whitby and head for the sound of music...


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: IanC
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 12:07 PM

Didn't think Whitby had a cinema!!!


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs, B&Bs & cider
From: Hester
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 12:19 PM

Thanks for all those great suggestions!

McGrath: Whitby sure does sound like a happenin' place!

I'll also be dropping by Robin Hood's Bay. Surely there must be a folk pub there, as that's where the McCarthy-Watersons live? Any good suggestions where to stay in RHB (with a private bath)?

Oh, and any suggestions for the best type of cider to order? Here in Canada, I drink Strongbow (because that's basically all the liquor store or the pubs sell).

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,Peter from Essex
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 12:27 PM

Next to the bus station, set back from the road. Old theatre convered to cinema, cafe and some function rooms. The festival used it for workshops a couple of years ago.

Back to the topic - for the Bury St Edmunds area check the Mardles magazine web site. NB sessions can be very transient so do phone the organiser before makinga special journey.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Pied Piper
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 12:36 PM

Not visiting Manchester hey?

Well then, I shan't tell you that we have sessions ever night and more than one on some days, or that there are lots of folk clubs that you can find out about here
So there.
PP


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Subject: Jack & Hammer in "Long Piddleton", Northants
From: Hester
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:03 PM

Speaking of pubs, I'm a fan of American author Martha Grimes' series of mystery novels named after British pubs.

My British itinerary will take me through Northants, and I'm wondering if anyone could suggest a town that Grimes might have based the fictional "Long Piddleton" on, or a Northants pub similar to her "Jack & Hammer", where I could raise a half-pint of Old Peculiar in salute to Melrose Plant.

Yes, indeed, I'm planning the weirdest Folksinger/Mystery Novel/Ancestor's Grave/Ancient Stone Circles/Robin Hood lore/Radiotelescope tour of Britain that you could ever imagine!

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Les from Hull
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:09 PM

If you're keen to meet fellow mudcatters, the East Riding of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire (Parts of Lindsey) Chapter have an excellent monthly session in the Sun in Beverley (East Yorkshire) on the first Sunday of each month under the iron fist of Chairman Deanmeister. There must have been about two dozen mudcatters among the 40 or more people contributing to the session.

Bear in mind that if you visit these fair isles during what we laughingly call 'summer' many of us are at various festivals, especially at weekends. You might want to include one or two of these to get a good idea of what happens on the folk scene over here.

On the subject of cider, Strongbow is widely available on draught. I quite like Dry Blackthorn (a bit drier), again widely available. In many of the real ale pubs (and most of the pubs recommended will be, these things go together) there will be a strong cider from an independent company. Beware of these, they are very strong 7%+ abv, and so twice as strong as average beer. They can be very nice though. Perhaps you should get in touch with Micca (Mudcat's UK cider expert).


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Pied Piper
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:16 PM

I'm afraid Old peculiar is not what it used to be. They've lowered the gravity so you have to drink 10 pints to induce coma rather than 6.
Did I mention that we have lots of Klezmer music in pubs in the Manchester area?

All the best

PP


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in Britain
From: Hester
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 01:38 PM

Hi, Les:

Thanks for the cider caveat. A cousin who lived in London had a nasty experience with the strong stuff many years ago, and she'd already warned me. Two half-pints nursed over an evening is my limit anyway.

I'm afraid I'll be a bit early for the festival circuit. I'm planning on the month of May (which spans my 41st b-day and 15th wedding anniversary).

BTW, what's the weather like at the end of April in southern England, and at the end of May in Scotland? Gore-tex jacket enough, or should I bring my ear-muffs like a true Canadian hoser? A friend who lived in York told me the daffodils bloomed there on her b-day in March, which puts your spring about a month ahead of my local schedule (although this year the winter's been so long and bitter the daffs may not poke their heads up until May!)

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: bradfordian
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 02:30 PM

If you do get into ROBIN HOOD counrty, the Robin Hood Folk Club (Sat) or Carrington Triangle FC (wed) are good places. Details HERE and HERE


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Les from Hull
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 03:59 PM

We have festivals in May, like the Moor and Coast Festival in Whitby on the first weekend in May (including a National Holiday on the Monday). That might be useful if you're planning to go through Whitby and Robin Hood's Bay. The weather will be like it always is - variable. Whitby seems to have its own weather - it's often doing different things to the rest of the country! But plenty of people camp at the festival, if that's a measure of the weather at that time. Ear-muffs should not been required! And the daffodils have been out for ages here.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Hester
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 06:01 PM

Hi, Bradfordonian:

I'll certainly be going to Robin Hood country. Robin lore is a main theme of my trip: from Kingston-upon-Thames (a major centre for the 16th century May Games) to Aberdeen (where Robin & Little John presided at civic festivities on Sundays in May), with Rockingham, Sherwood & Barnesdale forests along the way!

And I won't be ignoring the Yorkshire connection, either! I hope to visit Robin's putative grave at Kirklees, very close to Bradford.

In fact, Bradford's on the list, for family reasons. My grandmother was born there in 1891, and worked in the local woollen mills from the age of 12 until 17, when she immigrated with her family to Canada, to work in the textile mills here.

Anyone know any songs from the Yorkshire textile mills, in her honour? I've been listening to Anne Briggs' "The Doffing Mistress", and it's quite jolly.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Hester
Date: 07 Apr 03 - 06:11 PM

Sorry, fumble-fingers here hit "enter" accidentally before I'd actually finished my last post.

Bradfordonian: I couldn't get your first link to work. Drat! I'd really like to know more about the Robin Hood folk club!

Les from Hull: Nice to know there may be some festivals happening in May. However, I don't expect to get to Whitby until mid-May.

Oh, and since we're on the topic of Robin Hood, I might as well take the opportunity to promote my discussion group, "The Greenwood"
, where we deal with every possible aspect of the RH legend, from the medieval ballads to modern pop culture versions, plus related British history, lore, and calendar customs.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: magician
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 03:58 AM

While you are in the Whitby area, pop along to The Globe, in Guisborough. We are looking to put a session night on on a Friday night, should be good fun.

Regards,

Gillie


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,Raggytash
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 05:37 AM

There is a Folk Club in Robin Hoods Bay on a Friday night in the Dolphin, there are numerous bed and breakfast accommodation house but they are popular it may be prudent to book in advance.
The links between Robin Hood and the bay are tentative to say the least and thats being generous !
If you want to find festivals go to the Google search engine, typr in froots and look up there festival list it's quite comprehensive. As Les from Hull said the first weekend in May (which also has a bank holiday on the monday) see the Moor and Coast Festival at Whitby, Holmfirth, about 20 miles from Bradford has it's festival 2 weeks later and there are a whole host of festivals from May onwards the length and breathd of our wonderful country.
Ciders tend to be about 5% by volume alcohol in bars (draught)except in the West Country were Scrumpy may be found, this is NOT for amateurs. Bottled or tins of Cider can range up to 11% by volume, these are normally consumed by the Alkies who linger in some of our towns. They and the cider they drink are best avoided


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Pied Piper
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 08:27 AM

Folk events in Britain This should give you lots of ideas.
All the best
PP


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Subject: Manchester / Robin Hood's Bay
From: Hester
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 11:25 AM

Pied Piper wrote:

>>>Not visiting Manchester hey? Well then, I shan't tell you that we have sessions ever night and more than one on some days, or that there are lots of folk clubs that you can find out about here
So there. PP <<<

Hi, Pied Piper:

My husband's pushing for a side trip to Jodrel Banks Observatory, so we may get to Manchester yet. Thanks for all the info.

and Raggytash wrote:

>>>The links between Robin Hood and the bay are tentative to say the least and thats being generous!<<<

True, but it's such a dramatically pretty spot, I couldn't miss it! And the local legend regarding its founding is pretty terrific. And with one of the later ballads telling the story of Robin trying his hand at fishing out of Scarborough, it's not too far a stretch to see how a nearby fishing village might acquire his name.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Micca
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 12:17 PM

Hester, If you are anywhere near London than Sharps FC at Cecil Sharp House, the HQ of the English Folk Dance and song society takes place on Tuesday evening about 8, there is often a few mudcatters present, while not a pub, it does happen in the Bar, the serve ordinary Cider, ie Strongbow. and is worth a visit.
Now on the subject of Ciders, in Yorkshire(Whitby etc) look out for Camerons Pubs that serve a very pleasent draught cider called Copperhead, Potent but tasty, Unless you are a dedicated Cider drinker and have a cast-iron constitution avoid cider from small 8 gallon pipkins on the bar, with quaint names like "Biddenden", or "Gibbon strangler" as they are often very highly alcoholic, and can be up to 3 times stronger than beer!!
Do not drink Cider out of Pewter tankards, you get a very clean tankard and a stomach full of heavy metal salts, Stainless steel or Glass is safest. If you come to London Pm me and we can meet.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 02:43 PM

A more recent song which is possibly quite accurate had the line
"the dirty robbin' bastard that he was" possible a good deal more accurate than him fishing out of Scarborough!
Sorry I cannot recall more of the song perhaps a separate thread might bring it to light. I heard it in folk club in manchester in the 70's


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Willa
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 03:56 PM

Hester. Mill songswere not always jolly. You might find these useful.thread.cfm?threadid=45879#679134 @displaysong.cfm?SongID=4762
thread.cfm?threadid=2173#8033


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Willa
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:06 PM

Hester; not doing too well here. I'll try again!

thread.cfm?threadid=45879#679134
@displaysong.cfm?SongID=4762
thread.cfm?threadid=2173#8033


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Subject: RE: Robin Hood
From: Hester
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:32 PM

Raggytash wrote:

>>>A more recent song which is possibly quite accurate had the line
"the dirty robbin' bastard that he was" possible a good deal more accurate than him fishing out of Scarborough!
Sorry I cannot recall more of the song perhaps a separate thread might bring it to light. I heard it in folk club in manchester in the 70's<<<

Hi, Raggytash:

Hmmm... the idea of "accuracy" in folklore seems a bit out of place to me. I'm not among the historicist contingent that believe in a "real" Robin Hood. Sure, there were real outlaws in the medieval woods of England, but no single one of them "was" Robin Hood (although many bore that name). Looking at the earliest extant ballads, it is apparent that Robin was a symbol of resistance against greedy clerics, corrupt officials, and unfair land-use policies. He represented a sylvan utopia in contrast to agricultural servitude, town life, and court excesses. He was only a "dirty robbin' bastard" from the perspective of the wealthy and powerful abbots, bishops, sheriffs and merchants that he robbed. The "folk" did not see him in that way, since the Gest tells us that:

For he was a good outlawe,
And dyde pore men moch god

Indeed, Robin was pious and chivalrous, and would not rob a travelling party that included women:

Robyn loved Oure dere Lady:
For dout of dydly synne,
Wolde he never do compani harme
That any woman was in.

And he forbade his men to rob or harm common people (or even the lesser gentry so long as they behaved themselves):

But loke ye do no husbonde harme,
That tilleth with his ploughe.

"No more ye shall no gode yeman
That walketh by grene wode shawe,
Ne no knyght ne no squyer
That wol be a gode felawe.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: Mills & child labour
From: Hester
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:40 PM

Hi, Willa:

Thanks for those links. And yes, the Doffing Mistress does seem to have an uncharacteristically positive tone. Mill work was noisy and gruelling and involved a high degree of child labour. My grandmother was a very intelligent person, and she bitterly resented being forced to leave school at the age of 12 to take up such drudgery.

I found the movie "Fairy Tale: A True Story", set in a Yorkshire mill town at the beginning of the 20th century, to give a very moving portrayal of how such mill work would end childhood, and all its dreams and imagining, for the young workers. What interested me about that movie was that apparently even the lower-middle class children of a manager at the mill would face this fate.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Robin Hood ballads / Cider advice
From: Hester
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:48 PM

Raggytash, I took your advice and started a new thread about Robin Hood songs.

And Micca: Thanks for your cider expertise!

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,Raggytash
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 03:39 AM

Hester,
The song the which I refer was VERY tongue in cheek, why let the truth get in the way of some serious mickey taking (poking fun)
I appreciate that folk lore invented characters to represent good and evil.
Hope you have a great time when you get over here, have you sorted your intinery yet, does it include either the Moor & Coast or Holmfirth festivals if so we may well meet

Luck Good with the rest of your search

Raggy


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Mr Red
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 08:31 AM

I would recomend Stowford Press (contains only cider) made by Westons and found in a fair number of pubs Weston's Cider, it is dispensed from a tap with a mimic oak straight-sided barrel.
Bulmers Strongbow (contains added sugars and artificial sweeteners) is more ubiquitous and you are unlikely to get more than one option..

In Bath you may find Thatcher's - avoid Cheddatr Rose (orange ish) - trust me - but Harvester is nectar in any language.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Hester
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 12:03 PM

Raggy: no firm dates yet - after all, it's over a year away.

Mr. Red: you and Micca are giving me a powerful thirst! And I shouldn't say that Strongbow is my ONLY option. I've had some very nice ciders from the Canadian apple-growing districts of Niagra and the Okanagon, but they don't receive wide distribution and aren't readily available in Toronto liquor stores or pubs. My samples have come as gifts from friends who visited the orchards.

BTW, given my Robin Hood fetish, any suggestions for a medieval style "brown ale"? And do any pubs serve mead?

Cheers, Hester (who hardly ever drinks, really!)


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Micca
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 12:58 PM

Hester, in some of the Toronto Pubs they did some Ciders made from Single apple varieties, (Like Granny smiths or another I cant remember the name of)They were real nice and refreshing, served 2 bottles in a (UK)pint mug with Ice!!and quite strong!


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Subject: RE: Cider Pubs in Toronto
From: Hester
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 03:42 PM

Micca: quick! What were the names of those Toronto pubs? I need to visit them immediately.

Hmmm... cider over ice ... that does sound refreshing!

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Raggytash
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 03:54 PM

Hester,
As luck would have it there is a shop half way down the bank (hillside) in Robin Hoods Bay that sells a whole variety of flavoured meads from Lindesfarne (or Holy Island)where they were originally brewed by monks.
Mead can be found in many different flavours, blackcurrant, raspberry, cherry, to name but some of the choices available


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Subject: RE: Lindesfarne Mead
From: Hester
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 04:10 PM

Oh, Raggytash:

Robin Hood's Bay sounds like heaven. Once I get there, I may not leave.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 10 Apr 03 - 03:55 AM

visit Chester not only is it a beautiful city wih Roman walls cathedral river racecourse all in the city centre. there is music every night of the week in town or within 10 minutes drive You can get Folk Blues Jazz or almost anything else.. Best of the lot is Tuesday at The Ship Victory in Gorse Street Car Pak? Any thing goes and the landlord is Very friendly.
For more info track down FOLK ORBIT on the web covers all the north west England venues.

In Scotland you must visit The Crown in Aberfeldy on a Thursday Night or The Taybank Hotel in Dunkeld on a Friday or really any day or night. Watch out for a band called Tarneybackle they are making waves all of them good .they have a site for details.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 10 Apr 03 - 03:56 AM

Oh forgot to mention the Heugh Hotel in Stonehaven near Aberdeen.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Hester
Date: 10 Apr 03 - 09:53 AM

Hi, Noddy:

Thanks for the tip about Tarneybackle. I'll keep an eye out for their gigs.

My mom loved Chester when she visited the U.K. several years ago. I'm not sure it will fit on my itinerary this time, but there's always a next time!

Hmmm... Dunkeld (Oh what a parish, a terrible parish!) I may just have to drop in there on my way from Perth to Aberdeen.

Thanks, Hester


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Subject: RE: British Map Co-ordinates
From: Hester
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 11:13 AM

I keep coming across websites about British places that include a numerical code which I assume is a map co-ordinate. E.g. This cyber tour of Robin Hood sites in Yorkshire.

Since they don't say WHICH map the co-ordinates refer to, I'm assuming it's something absolutely standard that everyone (but me) knows about, probably published by the British government.

Does anybody know where can I purchase of copy of the map(s) by mail?

Thanks, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Marje
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 11:50 AM

Hester asked about UK grid references on maps, and where to buy the maps.

These references are used on Ordnance Survey maps, which cover all of the UK - excellent maps that are(or ought to be) the envy of the world. You can get them in various scales but the most useful general one is the Landranger series (1:50,000).

You can buy some of them from Amazon, but a bigger selection at the URL which follows (I have tried without success to make a blue clicky. It just comes out in plain text but I'm sure you can work out what to do with it).

http://www.mapsworldwide.co.uk/

Good luck!


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Subject: RE: Maps
From: Hester
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 05:57 PM

Thanks, Marje:

That's terrific.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Mr Red
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 08:30 AM

Raggytash
mead is fermented from honey (only), meads flavoured with fruit are called melomel & metheglin (A spiced or medicated variety of mead, originally peculiar to Wales. SOED). Honey would have been the original source of added sugar to increase the potential alcohol. As I can vouch, honey+water on it's own is a difficult thing to ferment because of the dirth of nutrients so mead was prized. They even had honey and apple fermentations which I think is a melomel or cyser - my SOED CD ROM does list most of these terms. But as Grant (not Graunt) Baynham sings - "It all come back ter the falling over factor, and the fact that it gets yer drunk"

Hester -
the OS grid reference can be used on map sites like multimap try this for Bath city centre


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Mr Red
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 08:40 AM

techie problem for Joe Offer.
I just put this blickie as the last text on the post (maybe without a cr and it vanished. (there was a spelling mistake in the HTML tag but even the text failed to show)

Bath city centre Poultney Bridge West of centre of map Hopefully

rhubarb, rhubarb. - (just to box the link in text)


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: bradfordian
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 08:58 AM

Same with STREETMAP.CO.UK eg Nottingham Castle & Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem ON CASTLE ROAD
Brad.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 04:21 AM

The Raven Folk Club is celebrating 25 years of music and song starting on Friday 25 April.

The line up is very impressive All evenings events start at 8.30 prompt at the Cross Keys on Lower Bridge Street In Chestser.

Friday 25 April Folk Club with Guests TAGGART AND WRIGHT and resident Band FULL HOUSE.

Saturday 26 a session in the bar followedby a concert with BERNARD WRIGLEY. Food will be supplied.

Sunday 27 April A session in the bar followed by a concertin theveing with guests PHIL BEER AND DEB SANDLAND.

Appearing every now and then through the weekend are Ye Time Bandits and The Restless Bentleys.

Now thats what I call a line up . More details on the Raven web Page.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Beardy
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 05:13 AM

Should you happen to be in the Hull-Beverley area recommended pubs serving real draught cider (not keg...fizzy crap!) are
Hull:- Three John Scotts; Admiral of the Humber ;Zaccariah Pearsons (All Wetherspoons); Olde Black Boy; New Clarence; Tap & Spile;
The Whalebone (best of the lot IMO).
Beerley:- Cornerhouse; Sun Inn
Gilberdyke:- CrossKeys
Also you may wish to try some real perry (NOT Babycham), made from pears rather than apples.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Mr Red
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 06:21 AM

Beardy you forgot to annuciate Gilberdyke, Hester will be talking Yorkshire as a second language, In Beaverlac (sic) they pronounce it Gibberdyke.

**BG**


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Subject: RE: Yorkshire dialect
From: Hester
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 09:48 AM

Hey, Mr. Red:

My grandma never lost her Yorkshire accent, even though she lived 83 years in Canada. Having grown up hearing those garbled syllables over the Sunday roast, I expect to handle the language issue fairly well. In the meantime, I keep in practice by watching Heartbeat and Dalziel & Pascoe.

However, I have a friend who went to study at the University of York. When she arrived, she took a cab from the train station to the uni. The driver chatted to her all the way in a strong Yorkshire accent and she started to panic, thinking she would never understand a word spoken to her in that city. Of course, her profs were toffs with accents that were more or less RP, so she had no problem.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,JohnB
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 12:37 PM

You should try "Barn Owl" cider Hester, far better than Strongbow and available through the LCBO. I think you are in Ontario from another posting. In England I used to like "Dry Blackthorn" which someone mentioned earlier, goes great with a good Curry.
We could/should be in England next year about the same time with our Morris side, .
JohnB


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,JohnB
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 12:43 PM

Hit the wrong thing, I was trying to give a link toOrange Peel Morris So if anyone needs a Border Morris side for a Festival or a Pub for a night in May 2004, let us know, we'll see if we can make it.
JohnB


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Subject: RE: Morris & cider in Toronto
From: Hester
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 04:01 PM

Hi, John:

Thanks for the cider recommendations and the Morris link. Is Barn Owl what you drink when you wassail the apple trees?

I'd come across the Orange Peel website before, and I'm very intrigued by the May Morning in High Park photos. Will you be doing that again this year? I hope so. I live near the park and would love to see the dancers.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull
Date: 04 Jun 03 - 06:09 PM

heshref


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: John Robinson (aka Cittern)
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 09:26 AM

The Melborn in Bradford is on White Abbey Road. The pub hosts the Topic Folk club on Thursdays and I believe they now have a website (www.topic-folk-club.org.uk).

If you are visiting the Bradford area you might also want to take a look at The Grove, Holbeck, Leeds. A lovely little pub with some kind of music happening most nights, including a Folk Club on Fridays.

The Grove gig list is featured on several websites - but I can't ever remember the URLS. A google search will get you there.

Hope this helps.
John Robinson


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: GUEST,JohnB
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 11:41 AM

Sorry Hester, I was laid off from my job, so I never saw the thread until today. Hope you missed High Park this year it pissed down with rain and we got soaked. Try Brampton Folk Festival in June, Millrace in August or Labour Day weekend for thr Toronto Ale.
JohnB


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 05:56 PM

RE Martha Grimes

The wossname and Bladebone is still a pub and still open, as is the Widow's Son.

There are two 'I am the only running footman' pubs, no idea if either is still in operation, but both are in the West End of London.

Long Piddleton is probably based on Piddlehinton or Piddletrenthyde in Dorset, along the Piddle Valley.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 27 Nov 05 - 05:21 PM

Mudcat, font of all important worthless knowledge...

I couldn't remember the name "Old Peculier" (of Martha Grimes's Melrose Plant). Google having failed me, I thought I'd post a Mudcat inquiry, but trying to be a good little 'cat, I did the forum search first. Here it is, of course. :o)

~ Becky in Tucson
where the Beverage House carries Old Peculier/Peculiar


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Little Musgrave
Date: 27 Nov 05 - 06:01 PM

Hester
you wanted to find Robin Hood's grave in Kirklees. To narrow down your search, you need to be just outside of Huddersfield, West Yorks in an area called Cooper Bridge. The road you want is th A62 to Leeds. At Cooper Bridge roundabout look out for the Dmb Steeple (a 10-12 ft column with a sphere on top!) This has connections to local Luddite folklore, as it is in the field beyond that many Luddites met prior to attacking the mill at nearby Robertown, which led to a pitched battle between Luddites and local militia armed with muskets. Follow the sins towards Leeds, and immediately on youe left is a pub called the 'Three Nuns', which refers to the abbey at Kirklees. Behind the pub is a field, and at the edge of the field, just in the treeline is Robin Hood's grave. It is marked on Ordinance Survey maps for the area, but is on private property, so you will need to seek permission beforehand, of (as I did) take your life in your hands and tresspass. Good luck in your search.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Little Musgrave
Date: 27 Nov 05 - 06:05 PM

Dmb steeple should read 'Dumb Steeple'. Sorry.


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Subject: RE: Folk Pubs in England
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 27 Nov 05 - 08:34 PM

Little & others, please note this is an old thread I refreshed in a fit of BSing. Sorry.

-- unless folks care to add updates in case anyone else is curious.

~ Becky in Tucson


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