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Origins: The Coolin

Related threads:
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Meaning of 'The Coolin' (72)
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GUEST,leeneia 13 Apr 03 - 09:50 AM
Sandy Mc Lean 13 Apr 03 - 11:54 AM
GUEST,mccooltheiceman 13 Apr 03 - 12:24 PM
John MacKenzie 13 Apr 03 - 01:34 PM
MartinRyan 13 Apr 03 - 02:11 PM
Felipa 13 Apr 03 - 02:19 PM
MartinRyan 13 Apr 03 - 02:26 PM
GUEST,leeneia 14 Apr 03 - 10:09 AM
Felipa 14 Apr 03 - 02:20 PM
GUEST,roisin_brown@yahoo.ca 12 Nov 04 - 09:10 PM
Jack Hickman 13 Nov 04 - 12:21 PM
GUEST,Guest 14 Nov 04 - 08:50 PM
Tannywheeler 15 Nov 04 - 03:38 PM
MartinRyan 15 Nov 04 - 04:05 PM
GUEST 15 Nov 04 - 07:09 PM
GUEST 29 Jun 08 - 03:17 PM
GUEST 29 Jun 08 - 03:21 PM
Stewart 29 Jun 08 - 04:25 PM
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Subject: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 09:50 AM

Just a quick question here: What is the The Coolin, besides a town in Idaho which just got a federal grant for sewers? I have a friend who is interested in the tune.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 11:54 AM

If you type coolin into the search engine at the top of this page you will find several threads on this topic.
To me Coolin (Cuilin) are mountains in Scotland.
                        Sandy


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST,mccooltheiceman
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 12:24 PM

'The feather of the longnecked Swans of Cool
Fall slowly in the lazy summer air
A longsweet Coolean song unsung
A Coulan day to dream upon'

The Coolan coolin in the frige for supper.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 01:34 PM

The Cuillins are a collection of mountains on the island of Skye.

It's the far Cuillins are pulling me away
As step I wi' ma chromach to the isles

Sure by Tummel and Loch Rannoch, and Lochaber I will go
By heather tracks wi' heaven in their wiles
If you're thinking in you inner heart, braggart's in my step
Ye'll never smell the tangle o' the isles.

If you look on your map of Scotland, you'll find all the places mentioned in this song, it's called "The road to the Isles"
Slainthe.....Giok


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 02:11 PM

If there's only one of them, on the other hand, it's probably This ONE!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: Felipa
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 02:19 PM

when you hear/read of The Coolin, it is not the Cuillin range in Skye, but refers to the hairstyle, a person with that hairstyle, the song or air in honour of that person ... completely different derivation. I trust Martin Ryan has directed you to an appropriate thread.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 02:26 PM

Felipa

I did, I did!

Regards
p.s. Did you go to Ballyliffin in the end?


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 10:09 AM

Re: "If you type coolin into the search engine at the top of this page you will find several threads on this topic."

Yep. And a whole lot of conjecture, mis-statement and wandering. I would just like to share a few words with live people on this topic. Some of them might actually speak or have studied Irish.

I think the references to a hairstyle seem the most credible.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: Felipa
Date: 14 Apr 03 - 02:20 PM

Martin and I are both alive agus tá Gaeilge againn, though Cúilfhionn is an archaic word. Please continue on the thread that Martin directed you to; it's more informative than this one.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST,roisin_brown@yahoo.ca
Date: 12 Nov 04 - 09:10 PM

An Chuilin means "The whispering Wind" it is an old Irish air and it has gaelic words which I learned when a girl at school but cannot remember them, if anyone knows these words and what they mean I would be grateful
Roisin


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: Jack Hickman
Date: 13 Nov 04 - 12:21 PM

Though I don't claim the following to be authoritative, I submit it for what it is worth.

The Coolin, referred to in the title in the well-known Irish air, is a type of pig-tail, or braid, favoured by Irish farm workers, to keep their hair from interfering with their work. When it was necessary for the worker to leave home for work, usually for long periods, it was customary to cut off the "coolin" and give it to his mother to remember him by.

This is likely the origin of the tradition of leaving a lock of one's hair as a remembrance.

Jack Hickman


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 14 Nov 04 - 08:50 PM

If this query refers to the well known Irish air, 'The Coolin', then it means a pretty maiden. The original meaning of the word was to do with 'blonde tresses down her back' but it became synonomous with the person, much like in English we often say 'did you see the blonde' when we mean a good looking young lady with blonde hair.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: Tannywheeler
Date: 15 Nov 04 - 03:38 PM

There is also a geographical area in the west of Ireland called The Coolin. We were near it in 1990, our only trip out of this country, so I could be misremembering the name, I suppose. We had a wonderful time. People so warm and kind, country so lovely. As a Texan some of my favorite features were coolness and the large amount of (cold) water!!    Tw


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 15 Nov 04 - 04:05 PM

Doolin?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Nov 04 - 07:09 PM

It figures! During the 70's there was no shortage of long flowing locks down in Doolin!!! Ha ha ha!!


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Jun 08 - 03:17 PM

No, No , No.

The Coolin or the Chuilfionn meaning the fair haired one is an Irish air dating back to the 1500's.

Its a beutiful romaintic tine and you can check it out at Youtube.. just type in the Coolin air


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Jun 08 - 03:21 PM

Sorry, me again, a "Coolin" was long flowing tresses or hair, not pigtails or the such and were worn by Irish Men.

Outlawed in the reign of Queen Elizabeth the first as all things Irish were.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Coolin
From: Stewart
Date: 29 Jun 08 - 04:25 PM

An Coolin (various spellings) is an ancient Irish air and song (verses written by Thomas Moore)

"In the twenty-eighth year of the reign of Henry VIII [i.e.,
1536-7], an Act was made respecting the habits, and dress
in general, of the Irish, whereby all persons were restrained
from being shorn or shaven above the ears, or from wearing
Glibbes or Coulins (long locks), on their heads, or hair on
their upper lip, called Crommeal. On this occasion a song
was written by one of our Bards, in which an Irish Virgin is
made to give the preference to her dear Coulin (or the youth
with the flowing locks), to all strangers (by which the English
were meant), or those who wore their habits. Of this song
the air alone has reached us, and is universally admired."
More information here at the Fiddler's Companion

Cheers, S. in Seattle


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