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Bimis ag ol

In Mudcat MIDIs:
Bimis Ag Ol
Bimis Ag Ol 2 (Cúisle an Cheoil)


GUEST,Seosamh 18 Apr 03 - 09:29 PM
masato sakurai 18 Apr 03 - 10:55 PM
masato sakurai 18 Apr 03 - 10:59 PM
Felipa 19 Apr 03 - 03:06 AM
open mike 19 Apr 03 - 03:08 AM
Felipa 19 Apr 03 - 03:20 AM
GUEST,Felipa 19 Apr 03 - 07:53 AM
Felipa 25 Apr 03 - 08:47 PM
MMario 25 Apr 03 - 09:08 PM
MMario 09 May 03 - 09:08 AM
MMario 15 May 03 - 03:27 PM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 16 May 03 - 04:42 AM
MMario 16 May 03 - 08:18 AM
GUEST,Virginia Blankenhorn 16 May 03 - 10:49 AM
Felipa 16 May 03 - 02:34 PM
GUEST,Virginia Blankenhorn 17 May 03 - 11:12 AM
MMario 18 May 03 - 06:24 PM
GUEST,Philippa 20 May 03 - 11:06 AM
MMario 20 May 03 - 11:36 AM
GUEST,Philippa 20 May 03 - 11:48 AM
MMario 20 May 03 - 12:01 PM
GUEST,John Hayes 19 Mar 07 - 07:45 PM
GUEST 26 Mar 08 - 07:17 PM
GUEST 18 Jun 11 - 03:58 PM
GUEST 20 Aug 16 - 01:53 PM
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Subject: Bímis ag ól
From: GUEST,Seosamh
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 09:29 PM

looking for the lyrics of Bímis ag ól...ag ól...ag ól...
bímis ag ól agus pógadh na mban
is there anyone outside who can help me???


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: masato sakurai
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 10:55 PM

Info on the tune is HERE (irishtune.info).

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: masato sakurai
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 10:59 PM

From folktrax:

BIMID AG OL'S AG POGADH NA mBAN - "Let us be drinking, drinking, drinking - and kissing the women" - Song & Double Jig - PETRIE AMOI 1855 1 p130 - BREATHNACH CRE 1 #17 p8 "Let us be drinking" - MITCHELL #36 p41 & #59 p56 "Garret Barry's Jig" from Willie Clancy -- Willie CLANCY (U-pipes) & Sean CASEY (fid) Clare rec by PK, London 1956: 173/ Willie CLANCY (U-pipes) of Co Clare rec 1958-73: CLADDAGH 4-CC-39 1980 CASS#0816 - ? John KELLY (fid): TOPIC 12-TFRS-504 1975 "When we were drinking and kissing the ladies" with "Old Tipperary"


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: Felipa
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 03:06 AM

words and music are in "Jimmy Crowley's Irish Song Book", Cork: Mercier, 1986


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: open mike
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 03:08 AM

outside??
are you inside??


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Subject: RE: Bímis ag ól
From: Felipa
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 03:20 AM

Crowley says the song is by Ó Liathain, Ó Riada and Ó Súilleabháin
Probably a modern adaptation (I believe I've seen other versions in print, but Crowley's is the one I've heard sung)

Breandán Breatnach wrote:
"17. Bímíd ag ól is ag pógadh na mBan ["Let us be Drinking and Kissing the Women" ...]. This jig is named after a song written by Eoghan Rua Ó Súilleabháin in about 1780. Petrie gave the song and a setting of the air in the "Ancient Music of Ireland" (P i, pp130/1). Stanford gives this setting and another setting closer to my one (P iii, 1063/4). Anyone who hears Willie Clancy playing this jig and other old Munster jigs of this kind on the pipes will agree with Petrie in what he has to say in a note under this air about the music and people of County Clare. There are also settings by O'Neill in the "Music of Ireland" (479) and in "Irish Music" (O'N ii, 9). Let us be drinking, I court the fair maidens and My name is O'Sullivan are other names he has on it."


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Subject: RE: Bímis ag ól
From: GUEST,Felipa
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 07:53 AM

is that why they named the brew "Beamish"?!

I have a book of poems by Eoghan Ruadh, but this one isn't in it. If I get the opportunity, I might ask Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin about the song's origin.
^^
from Cork singer Johnny Crowley, who learned it from Paul Frost:

BÍMIS AG ÓL
(Eoghan Ruadh Ó Súilleabháin) adapted by Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, Dónal Ó Liathan & Seán Ó Riada

Trathnóinín fhomhair ar leathtaoibh a róid
Do dhearcas an óig-bhean mhórthmharach dheas
Comh blasta is cóir do leabhair a beól
Ó téanam ag ól agus díolfhaid-sa as.

curfá / chorus
Agus bímis ag ól, is ag ól, 's ól
Bímis ag ól is ag pógadh na mban
Bímis ag ól is ag rince le ceol
Is nach aoibhinn an gnó bheith á bpógadh gan tart.

Bhí tabhairne san áit, gan mhoill orainn dul sall
I gcomhluadar galánta ag diúgadh gan stad
Puins dúinn ar bord is ea d'ordaigh mo stór
Agus bímis go ceolmhar go nglaofaidh an coileach

Bhí an Spéirbhean lem' ais go luisnitheach geal
A beola caordhearg, graon branda ina glaic;
Do phógas a beól is gur fonnmhar a póg
"Tóg bog é, a stúmpa, nó díolfaidh tú as!"

Bhuail fear liom inne is é ag ól cupán tae
Is é a bhí go tréith agus breoite go maith
Dá n-ólfadh sé taosc de phoitín Chúil Aodha
Níor fhada dó ag léimt is ag tóraíocht na mban.

Sinn sínte go sóch tar éis iomad den ól
Ach ar buile a dó, ar an ndoras do bhuail cnag
An Sáirsint ar toir, barantas ina dhóid
Ach d'éalaigh gach geocach thar clathacha amach.


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Subject: RE: Bímis ag ól
From: Felipa
Date: 25 Apr 03 - 08:47 PM

Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin says he's not THE Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin in question, who was a W Cork poet. So he couldn't give me any more information than that. Given that Seán Ó Riada was also cited, it was a logical connection for me to make - two men whose careers almost overlapped (Ó Riada was only 40 years old when he died in 1971) and both known for linking classical and traditional music. But it turns out the connection was wrong.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 25 Apr 03 - 09:08 PM

okay - I'm going to have to force myself to learn this one...(yeesh - I have trouble with ENGLISH - but I'll get points with the Scottish court at my next ren-faire if I learn this!)


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 09 May 03 - 09:08 AM

from the sectionalized web-wide ABC index:

X:1
T:Bimid ag ol is a' pogadh na mban
Z: id:dc-jig-5
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:G Major
zF|DGA B3|cBc d3|DGA B2d|cAG AGF|!
DGA B3|cBc def|gbg afd|cAF G:|!
zD|GBd g3|gfd =f^ff|GBd g3|gfd cAG|!
GBd g3|gag f2g|abg afd|cAF G:|!
AG|FGA A2c|BAG cAG|FGA ded|cAF GAG|!
FGA cAG|Ade f3|gag fed|cAF G:|!


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 15 May 03 - 03:27 PM

X:1
T:BimisAgOl
N:'Jimmy Crowley's Irish Songbook'
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:D
A,2D2E2|F2E2D2|E2F2G2|
w:Trath-nói-nín fho-mhair ar leath-taoibh a
A4zA|A,2D2E2|F4A2|G2E2C2|
w:róid Do dhearc-as an óig-bhean mhórth-mhar-ach
D4D D|A,2D2E2|F2E2D2|E2F2G2|
w:dheas Comh_ blas-ta is cóir_ do leabh-air a
A4B2c2|d2e2d2|c3B A2|G2E2F2|
w:beól Ó_ téa-nam ag ól ag-us díol-fhaid 'sa
G4E E|C2D2E2|E4G2|F4D2|
w:as. Ag-us bím-is a-gól, is ag~ól, 's
F6|C2D2E2|E4A2|F3E C2|
w:ól Bím-is ag ól 's~ag póg-adh na
D6|C2D2E2|G6-|G4F2|
w:mban Bím-is ag ól_ is~ag
E2A2B2|c2B2c2|d2e2d2|c3B A2|
w:rince_ le ceol Is nach aoi-bhinn an gnó bheith á
G2E2C2|D6-|D4z2
w:bpó-gadh gan tart._


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 16 May 03 - 04:42 AM

I struggle even with ABC notation, so can some kind soul save me a lot of effort (especially with the Crowley version) by indicating whether the verse is sung to the same air as the chorus or not? IO have the tune of the latter in my ear from hearing the Clancy recording, though I haven't listened to it for years.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 16 May 03 - 08:18 AM

midi should be up sometime this weekend.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: GUEST,Virginia Blankenhorn
Date: 16 May 03 - 10:49 AM

Two further sources for you to look at, if you've got a good library near you:

A a fragment of a song by this title appears in a collection of songs from Irish-speaking areas of Galway and Mayo, Amhrain Mhuighe Seola, that was published in 1923 by Eibhlin Bean Mhic Choisdealbha (Mrs Eileen Costello). Fortunately the volume was republished in 1990 by Clo Iar-Chonnachta, and you may be able to find it in a library with good holdings in Irish stuff. somehow the title has remained the same, although the refrain verse seems to be missing. Both the tune and text are given.

A. M. Freeman collected a version of the text given by an earlier writer in his collection of songs from Ballyvourney, Co. Cork, published by the Journal of the folk Song society in 1921 (vol 6, no. 24/25). Freeman tells us that the song was "modelled on an older one" and "was made about 1875 by a certain John Murphy, to a woman called Hannah Creedon, who was housekeeper at the Ballyvourney Hotel." I have no idea whether this is true, or whether it simply reflects the desire of his informant to provide good background, as often happens. It seems likely that the refrain stanza may be older than the other verses, and could have served as a model for more than one song of this title.

Freeman gives both tune and words, which he collected from a woman named Peg O'Donoghue in Ballymakeery. As is typical with airs from this part of Ireland, the air to the refrain stanza is different from that of the verses; and singer beware: the range of the air is quite wide (and octave plus a fifth). They breed 'em strong in Cork!

Virginia


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: Felipa
Date: 16 May 03 - 02:34 PM

Virginia, nice to see you here again - I hope you look back at this thread because I suspect you might have something to say about Máire Ní Mhaoileoin


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: GUEST,Virginia Blankenhorn
Date: 17 May 03 - 11:12 AM

Heavens, how can you possibly remember me?

Anyway, I did have a look at Maile Ni Mhaoileoin, which I wish more people sang these days.

Virginia


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 18 May 03 - 06:24 PM

midi posted


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Subject: RE: Bímis ag ól
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 20 May 03 - 11:06 AM

A song called "Bímis ag Ól" from Cúisle an Cheoil published by An Roinn Oideachais (Dept of Education) in Dublin, 1976 and now published by An Gum (see Cupla Focal or Litriocht). The book has 56 songs, with tunes (dot and fa-so- la) and chords and sources given. In Irish Gaelic only.

This song doesn't go to the tune I know to Bímis ag Ól, which is the one Jimmy Crowley sings, and the chorus is different. Apart from the last three words, the chorus is not translatable!
But this tune does sound familiar ? the part for the verse is a bit like one of the tunes to which 'An Saighdiúr Tréighte' is sung. The source for this song in Cúisle an Cheoil was Costello, Amhráin Mhuighe Seola, a reprint of which is available from Cló Iar-Chonnachta (and no, I have not approached CIC about a commission!)

In the last verse it says "woman, I haven't drunk your sheep" but goes on to warn that before the fair is over "I will drink the price of your two shoes" ? and shoes were quite a valuable commodity at the time.

BÍMIS AG ÓL

Tá lása den draoib ar mo hata
Tá mo charabhat scaoilt' ar mo scóig,
Mo pheiribhic tá 'na shipwracka
Is stroicthe atá mo chasóg

< i> Curfá (chorus)
Furaigidí rudaí furó
Furaigidí rudaí furaodaí
Is furó is bimis ag ól.

Bhéarfainnse trí ba uaim féin duit,
Is tarbh 'na dhéidh sin sa ród,
Seisreach de chapaill ar thaobh conic.
Dá mbeifeá gan glaoch go ti'n óil.

A chailleach, níor ól mé do chaora,
Níor ól mé do phunt ná do ch'róin,
Ach a chailleach sul 'bhfágfad an t-aonach,
Ólfaidh mé luach do dhá bhróg.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 20 May 03 - 11:36 AM

X:1
T:BÍMIS AG ÓL
N: Cúisle an Cheoil published by An Roinn Oideachais (Dept of Education) in Dublin, 1976
I:abc2nwc
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:C
z4zG|A d d d e d|c A zG2G|A d d e d B|c3z(c d)|
w:Tá lá-sa den draoib ar mo ha-taTá mo cha-ra-bhat scaoilt' ar mo scóig, Mo_
e d c A G E|E D2z2D|D A G E D D|D3z"^Curfá"(c B)|
w:phei-ri-bhic tá 'na ship-wra-cka Is stroic-the a-tá mo cha-sóg Fu_
A D D E D C|C E2zzG|A D D G A B|c3z(B c)|
w:-rai-gi-dí ru-daí fu-rao-dai Fu-rai-gi-dí ru-daí fu-ró Fu_
d e d c A G|E D2z2D|D A G E D D|D3-D2z
w:-rai-gi-dí ru-daí fu-rao-daiIs fu-ró is bi-mis ag ól._


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 20 May 03 - 11:48 AM

thanks, Mario. Are you ready to follow this one? (I couldn't make out which was the melody line in Petrie!)

In Petrie's Ancient Music of Ireland published in 1855 (but look for more recent reprints), there are English-language lyrics for "Bímíd ag ól, ag ól, ag ól", with just the chorus in Irish. Petrie credits the lyrics to Eoghan Ruadh Ó Súilleabháin, but I don't know of Ó Súilleabháin, who is best known for Irish-language Aisling poems, writing in English (?). Indeed the first version posted speaks in lyrical terms of encountering a beautiful woman. The words of the verses below don't correspond to any of the Irish language verses already posted.

Petrie wrote: "The lively and very characteristic melody which follows was noted last year from the singing of the Clare peasant, Teigue Mac Mahon, and it was remembered by Mr Curry, to whom I am indebted for a copy of the words now commonly sung to it. These words, which were written, about the year 1870, by Owen Roe O'Sullivan, are of little merit, but they preserve the chorus or burden of an older, and perhaps the original, Irish song; and they are not wholly devoid of interest as exhibiting the qualifications on the possession of which the hedge schoolmasters ? the Irish lyrists of the last [18th] century ? were, as it may be assumed, but too generally accustomed to pride themselves.

BÍMID AG ÓL, AG ÓL, AG ÓL

My name is O'Sullivan, a most eminent teacher;
My qualifications will ne'er be extinct;
I'd write as good Latin as any in the nation;
No doubt I'm experienced in arithmetic.

chorus
Is bímíd ag ól, ag ól, ag ól,
Is bímíd ag ól 's a' póga' na mban;
Bímíd ag ól 's a' rainnceadh [rinnce] le ceól;
'S nár bhfearr ' bheith ag ól ná bás 'fághail [fail] dhon tart?

-        And let us be drinking, drinking, drinking; And let us be drinking and kissing the women;
-        Let us be drinking and dancing to music; Is 't not better be drinking than dying of thirst?

I'd write a good letter, on paper or parchment;
I'd construe an author, and give the right sense;
I court fair maidens, unknown to their parents,
And gaze on their charms without evidence.

I'm counted the valiant at congregations;
I beat the courageous, and humble the bold;
No doubt I'm descended of noble Milesians;
By heroic fame my name is enrolled.

I am proficient in bright elocution;
By Prosody's rules I govern my tongue;
I journalize book-keeping without confusion;
I'm son to the Muses from Parnasus sprung.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: MMario
Date: 20 May 03 - 12:01 PM

I think I figured out the melody line - by process of elimination as there just aren't enough notes in the other lines - the bass clef is definately piano chords. I'm not going to try to set the lyrics to this one though - and the start of the chorus is marked in the music - so *that* is a definate.

interesting that the time is given as dotted quarter = pendulum 27 inches. truly the length of the note....

X:1
T:BÍMID AG ÓL, AG ÓL, AG ÓL
N:Petrie's Ancient Music of Ireland
I:abc2nwc
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:F
f f f f f f|_e e d e2c|f g f|f e d c2d/2 e/2|
f f f f f f|f _e d e2c/2 B/2|A A A B G G|
c B A B2"^Chorus:"G|F F F A2A|B2A G2F|F F F A2A|
B2A G3|F F F A2A|B A B c2f|f _e d e d c|B G F F2z


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Subject: RE: Ag Taisteal na Blarnan
From: GUEST,John Hayes
Date: 19 Mar 07 - 07:45 PM

Hi all,

I am looking for the text of Ag Taisteal na Blarnan, which is an old air sung with a lyric by Ó Súilleabháin. Various artists have had their go at it in recent times, The Chieftains, O'Riada, etc..

Any ideas?

By the way, Bim Is Ag Ol is sung with a different lyric in certain Castele Hostelries in Connemara, where they say that O'Sullivan wrote his own version of it, and a fun one at that, but certainly not the oldest! The melody as they perform it, is probably fourteenth or fifteenth century martial mead quarters balladry.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Mar 08 - 07:17 PM

To Philippa, Thanks for the words to the song--

Eoghan Ruadh Ó Súilleabháin is the same as Owen Roe O'Sullivan, who was lived in Kerry, but a century earlier than 1870; he is considered by most Irish commentators to be a great poet, as in the aisling songs; he was a country schoolmaster who read and wrote Latin, Greek, English and Irish, but he was also a famous womanizer and drinker of County Kerry. He is still a folk hero there. The song sounds just like something he'd write.


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 03:58 PM

Eoghan Ruadh Ó Súilleabháin, for those who don't know, is also known as Sean O'Di, as in th efamous ballad. Eoghan rose with the men of Mayo in 1798, and was executed by the English forces when the French retreated adn abandoned the IRish Insurgents. Eoghan was a masterful poet in Gaelic, and reputedly, a bardic singer. All of the ladies loved their Sean O'Di!


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Subject: RE: Bimis ag ol
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Aug 16 - 01:53 PM

To the GUEST of 18 June 2011: Ó Súilleabháin's rising with the men of Mayo in 1798 was quite a feat, considering that he'd died of a fever in 1784.


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