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Were you a kid in the 70's?

GUEST,Red Eye 05 Jun 03 - 03:06 AM
Mark Cohen 05 Jun 03 - 04:28 AM
GUEST 05 Jun 03 - 04:51 AM
GUEST 05 Jun 03 - 05:02 AM
Tam the bam fraeSaltcoatsScotland 05 Jun 03 - 08:38 AM
Rapparee 05 Jun 03 - 08:48 AM
Willie-O 05 Jun 03 - 08:52 AM
GUEST 05 Jun 03 - 11:16 AM
GUEST 05 Jun 03 - 12:00 PM
GUEST 05 Jun 03 - 12:02 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jun 03 - 12:51 PM
Tam the bam fraeSaltcoatsScotland 05 Jun 03 - 01:08 PM
Tam the bam fraeSaltcoatsScotland 05 Jun 03 - 01:09 PM
Kim C 05 Jun 03 - 01:25 PM
GUEST,ClintonHammond 05 Jun 03 - 03:16 PM
GUEST, heric 05 Jun 03 - 03:17 PM
Kim C 05 Jun 03 - 03:18 PM
Don Firth 05 Jun 03 - 03:58 PM
Burke 05 Jun 03 - 06:24 PM
TheBigPinkLad 05 Jun 03 - 06:33 PM
Don Firth 05 Jun 03 - 06:57 PM
SINSULL 05 Jun 03 - 07:17 PM
Burke 05 Jun 03 - 07:30 PM
GUEST,SINSULL 05 Jun 03 - 07:45 PM
Benjamin 05 Jun 03 - 08:21 PM
Don Firth 05 Jun 03 - 09:10 PM
Gypsy 05 Jun 03 - 11:27 PM
John MacKenzie 06 Jun 03 - 09:53 AM
Stu 06 Jun 03 - 11:29 AM
Phot 06 Jun 03 - 04:07 PM
GUEST,petr 06 Jun 03 - 04:16 PM
SINSULL 06 Jun 03 - 09:03 PM
Sorcha 07 Jun 03 - 02:00 AM
John MacKenzie 07 Jun 03 - 07:03 AM
Shields Folk 07 Jun 03 - 07:34 AM
Shields Folk 07 Jun 03 - 07:36 AM
Firecat 07 Jun 03 - 09:26 AM
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Subject: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST,Red Eye
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 03:06 AM

If you lived as a child in the 70's, looking
back, it's hard to believe that we have lived as long as we have...

As children: We would ride in cars with no seat belts or airbags.
Our cots were covered with bright coloured lead-based paint.
We had no child proof lids on medicine bottles, doors, or cupboards.
When we rode our bikes we had no helmets.
We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle.
We would spend hours building go-carts out of scraps and then
ride down the hill only to find out we forgot the brakes.
After running into the bushes few times we learned to solve the
problem.
We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as
we were back when the street lights came on. No one was able to reach us all
day.
No mobile phones.

We got cut and broke bones and broke teeth, and there were no
lawsuits from these accidents. They were accidents. No one was to blame, but
us.
Remember accidents?
We had fights and punched each other and got black and blue and
learned to get over it.
We ate patty cakes, bread and butter, and drank cordial, but we
were never overweight.
We were always outside playing.
We shared one drink with four friends, from one bottle and no
one died from this.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, video
games, 65 Channels on pay TV, video tape movies, surround sound,
personal mobile phones, Personal Computers, Internet chat rooms
... we had friends. We went outside and found them.
We rode bikes or walked to a friend's home and knocked on the
door, or rung the bell, or just walked in and talked to them. Imagine such a
thing.
Without asking a parent! By ourselves! Out there in the cold
cruel world.
Without a guardian - how did we do it?

We made up games with sticks and tennis balls, and ate worms,
and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many
eyes, nor did the worms live inside us forever.
Footy and netball had tryout and not everyone made the team.
Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment.
Some students weren't as smart as others so they failed a grade
and were held back to repeat the same grade. Tests were not adjusted for any
reason.
Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. No one to
hide behind.
The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard
of.
They actually sided with the law - imagine that!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and
problem solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years has been an
explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom,
failure, success and responsibility, and we earned how to deal with it all.
And you're one of them. Congratulations!

And just to make sure you have had enough... Just for a minute,
forget everything stressful and read this.
go back in time...
Before the Internet or the Apple Mac.
Before semi-automatics, joy riders and crack.
Before SEGA or Super Nintendo...
Way back.

I'm talking about Hide and Seek in the park. The corner shop.
Hopscotch. Butterscotch. Skipping. Handstands. Football with an old can.
Beano, Dandy, Buster, Twinkle and Dennis the Menace.
Roly Poly. Hula Hoops. Jumping the stream, building dams.
The smell of the sun and fresh cut grass.
Bazooka Joe bubble gum. An ice cream cone on a warm summer night from
the van that plays a Tune.
Chocolate or vanilla or strawberry or maybe Neapolitan
Perhaps a screwball. Watching Saturday morning cartoons.
Short commercials. The Double Deckers, Road Runner, He-Man,
Zeebedee, Tiswas or Swapshop?. And 'Why Don't You'?
Or staying up for Doctor Who. When around the corner seemed far
away and going into town seemed like going somewhere.
Earwigs, wasps, stinging nettles and bee stings. Sticky fingers.
Cops and Robbers, Cowboys and Indians, and Zorro.

Climbing trees. Building igloos out of snow banks.
Walking to school, no matter what the weather
Running till you were out of breath, laughing so hard that your
stomach hurt. Jumping on the bed. Pillow fights
Spinning around, getting dizzy and falling down was cause for
giggles. Being tired from playing....remember that?
The worst embarrassment was being picked last for a team.
Water balloons were the ultimate weapon.
Football cards in the spokes transformed any bike into a
motorcycle. Choppers and Grifters.
Eating raw jelly. Orange squash ice pops.
Remember when... There were two types of trainers - girls and
boys, and Dunlop Green Flash.. and the only time you wore them at school was
for P.E.
You knew everyone in your street - and so did your parents.
It wasn't odd to have two or three "best" friends.
You didn't sleep a wink on Christmas eve.
When nobody owned a pure-bred dog.
When 25p was decent pocket money.
When you'd reach into a muddy gutter for a penny.
When nearly everyone's mum was at home when the kids got there.
It was magic when dad would "remove" his thumb.

When it was considered a great privilege to be taken out to
dinner at a real restaurant with your parents.
When any parent could discipline any kid, or feed him or use him
to carry groceries and nobody, not even the kid, thought a thing of it.
When being sent to the head's office was nothing compared to the
fate that awaited a misbehaving student at home.
Basically, we were in fear for our lives but it wasn't because of
drive-by shootings, drugs, gangs etc. Parents and grandparents were a much
bigger threat! - and some of us are still afraid of them!!

Didn't that feel good?
Just to go back and say, Yeah, I remember that!
Remember when.... Decisions were made by going " Ip dip dob out"
"Race issue" meant arguing about who ran the fastest.
Money issues were handled by whoever was the banker in "Monopoly".
The worst thing you could catch from the opposite sex was germs.
And the worst thing in your day was having to sit next to one.
It was unbelievable that 'British Bulldog 123' wasn't an Olympic
event.

Having a weapon in school, meant being caught with a catapult.
Nobody was prettier than Mum.
Scrapes and bruises were kissed and made better.
Taking drugs meant orange-flavoured chewable aspirin.
Ice cream was considered a basic food group.
Getting a foot of snow was a dream come true.
Older siblings were the worst tormentors, but also the fiercest
protectors.

If you can remember most or all of these, then you have LIVED.

Print this out and keep it...
"I DOUBLE-DARE YOU"


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 04:28 AM

Uh-oh, you know you're in trouble when people younger than you start getting nostalgic for the good old days!

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 04:51 AM

Just so ... but most of these things, my children would recognise and the oldest was born in 1980. I chose to live in a village is all.

Isn't this a BS?

:-)


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 05:02 AM

Sorry ... that was me. Can't get Mudcat to redo my cookie.

IanC


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Tam the bam fraeSaltcoatsScotland
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 08:38 AM

Not only was a child of the 70's but by the time 1979 I had Two nieces and a nephew, and I was 14 years old.
I'm not boasting or anythingm but that's what happened to me during the 70's when I was six years old I became an Uncle, and when I was 20 years old I had 7 nephews and neices, and now that I'm 37 years old I have three great nephews and 1 neice with another one on the way.

Tom


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Rapparee
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 08:48 AM

Try the 60s, 50s, 40s....


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Willie-O
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 08:52 AM

Great, you've turned the 70's into the 50's. Speaking of rosy-tinged granny glasses.

The worst thing you could catch from the opposite sex was germs.
or the clap>

Taking drugs meant orange-flavoured chewable aspirin.
Right. Not in my 70's!

When any parent could discipline any kid, or feed him or use him
to carry groceries and nobody, not even the kid, thought a thing of it.

that was sure swell...but I was the kid and I thought a thing or two of it, so did my friends.

Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. No one to
hide behind.
The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard
of.

where the hell did you grow up anyway? somewhere where adults hit kids and didn't do anything to help them if they were having problems? How delightful that must have been. I get all warm and fuzzy...

Much of what you relate actually does ring true for me, (a kid in the 60's) but overall it appears that you're launching a campaign to bring back the good old days that never were.


This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and
problem solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years has been an
explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom,
failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.
And you're one of them. Congratulations!

For what? Not being dead yet? Anyway, hello, the generation you're talking about became today's parents and leaders who make our society what it is, which seems to be what you're demeaning by comparison. If you don't think kids and young adults today have "freedom, failure, success and responsibility," and coping skills, you don't know the same young people I know.

Willie-O


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 11:16 AM

ah yes...those nice summer days where you didn't have a care in the world...bees buzzing...cricks and rivers and lakes to swim in...baseball in the local field....all the neighbourhood kids would gather and play....parades sponsored by the local chapter of the KKK....god i miss those times....


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 12:00 PM

The worst thing you could catch from the opposite sex was germs.
or the clap> Not AIDS though Willie.

Taking drugs meant orange-flavoured chewable aspirin.
Right. Not in my 70's! So what drugs did you do when you were a kid Willie, LSD?

When any parent could discipline any kid, or feed him or use him
to carry groceries and nobody, not even the kid, thought a thing of it.

that was sure swell...but I was the kid and I thought a thing or two of it, so did my friends.
Thats the way it was in England Willie, you Americans have never experienced this way of life. Obviously.
Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. No one to
hide behind.
The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard
of.

where the hell did you grow up anyway? somewhere where adults hit kids and didn't do anything to help them if they were having problems? How delightful that must have been. I get all warm and fuzzy... England and English morals Willie, a cuff on the ear from the local Bobby was enough to sort out a misbehaving youngster, nowadays it's community orders.

freedom, failure, success and responsibility," and coping skills,

England Willie, footie in the street, kerb ball, paper chase. |That was freedom. Failure, you didn't get another go because you failed, you failed. Period. Oh dear another Yank expression that has crept in to our language.

You obviously grew up in an American 'hood' that consisted of a basketball court and drug dealing youths, in gangs, beating the hell out of one another. Much the same as England today. I wonder where we got that from. Thanks America for nothing.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 12:02 PM

youre quite welcome.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 12:51 PM

Another pointless baseless maudlin meandering list posted by another guest.

Yawn


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Tam the bam fraeSaltcoatsScotland
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 01:08 PM

So why did you post anything on it, if you thought it's pointless, then don't write anything on this post, because that's what I do.
If I think it's pointless, I don't tell millions of people.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Tam the bam fraeSaltcoatsScotland
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 01:09 PM

I just don't post on anything that I think is pointless.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Kim C
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 01:25 PM

Teenage boys the world over jockey for position and get into mischief. It's the way of childhood. America doesn't have a corner on that market. And neither do boys... girls get into plenty of mischief too.

Anyhow..... I remember when the schools used to give us a day off AND a free ticket to the Tennessee State Fair. Our parents dropped us off at 9, gave us some pocket money, and picked us up at suppertime. Nowadays I don't reckon anyone would dream of leaving a 9-year-old unattended at the fair.

My brother, who is a very liberal-minded person, and a kid in the 60s, told me one day he was shocked at what he saw on MTV when he was channel surfing. "When I was a kid," he said, "Lucy and Ricky couldn't sleep in the same bed and they were MARRIED!"


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST,ClintonHammond
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 03:16 PM

*Singing*

"Once I used to join, every boy and girl was my friend.
Now there's revolution, but they don't know what they're fighting.
Let us close our eyes; outside their lives go on much faster.
Oh, we won't give in, we'll keep living in the past.
Oh, we won't give in, let's go living in the past.
Oh, no, no, we won't give in, let's go living in the past."


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST, heric
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 03:17 PM

Factlet: First married couple in bed together on TV series: The Brady Bunch


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Kim C
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 03:18 PM

The WHOLE Bunch?


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Don Firth
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 03:58 PM

The Seventies!?? Mere infants! How about the Thirties?

My main form of transportation was my little red wagon. My two sisters traveled on roller skates (remember skate keys?). Some kids had bicycles. My dad drove a 1930 Packard. One helluva car! But not only did it not have an automatic transmission, if I remember right, it didn't even have synchro-mesh. I don't think it had occurred to anyone to put a radio in an automobile yet. Going for a Sunday drive was real entertainment (not that much traffic, and touring around looking at things you hadn't seen before was fun).

Speaking of entertainment, there was the big Zenith console radio with the "Magic Eye" tuner (keep twisting the dial until the little green line is as narrow as you can get it). For those who don't know what a radio is, it was sort of like television, but without pictures. You made the pictures in your head. There were certain advantages to this: I knew that behind his mask, the Lone Ranger looked like me. So did the Green Hornet. On Sunday evening, October 30, 1938 (the evening before Hallowe'en, and I was seven years old), we heard the famous "Mercury Theater on the Air" broadcast of The War of the Words by H. G. Wells. We listened to the Mercury Theater every Sunday evening and we knew it was just Orson Welles doing his thing again. Surprised the heck out of us and amused us no end when the morning papers arrived and we learned that huge numbers of people had come unglued and panicked! Orson Welles had scared the crap out of the whole country!

Sunday morning funnies were greatly anticipated. I was hooked on Buck Rogers (James T. Kirk was pretty pale compared to this guy! The late Seventies TV "Buck Rogers" series with Gil Girard got it all wrong. Girard was a smug twit compared to the real steely-eyed, firm-jawed Buck Rogers). I sent in 25¢ and a stack of bubble-gum wrappers and got a Buck Rogers atomic disintegrator pistol (this was long before the Manhattan Project, and only theoretical physicists, science fiction writers, and fans of Buck Rogers were familiar with the word "atomic"). Put a flashlight battery in it and it flashed a light and buzzed whenever you pulled the trigger. If any Martian Tiger-Men invaded the neighborhood, I was ready for 'em! I also remember the first appearance of Prince Valiant, one of the best drawn comic strips of all time.

You could go to a drug store, sit at the counter (soda fountain), and order a milk shake or malted milk. They didn't extrude flavored plastic into a paper cup back in those Glorious Days of Yesteryear. The soda jerk would put big scoops of real ice cream into a large stainless steel can, followed by real milk, followed by a couple of big squirts of syrup, then he or she would attach the can to a mixer and mix the whole thing up. They'd pour the mixture into a 16 oz. glass, give you a big straw, and leave the can on the counter with you. Sometimes the shake was so thick it was hard to get thought the straw, but there was no law that said you couldn't just pick it up and drink it. But drinking it through the straw was a sort of a test. The rude noises you made with the straw when you hit bottom were a particularly bitter-sweet pleasure. It meant that the glass was almost empty, but the taste was marvelous and you wanted to get it all! But you weren't through yet. You could almost refill the 16 oz. glass with what was left in the can. Mmmmmmmm Good!! Burp! Waddle out of the drugstore with a beatific smile on your face.

Hamburgers came with an 8 oz. patty of real ground beef (not a "quarter pound" of ground miscellaneous animal parts mixed with wet cardboard) served on what we now call an "oversized bun," and you could get it with mustard, ketchup, lettuce, sliced tomato, sliced onion, and pickle, or any combination thereof—tailor made before your very eyes. They didn't start throwing hamburgers out the window at passing cars until decades later. A particular favorite of mine (still is) is the chiliburger. Served on a platter, the above described 8 oz. patty is place on the bottom half of the bun with the top half sliced in two and set on either side, like parentheses. Then a bowl of chili is poured over the whole thing, and it's topped with shredded cheese or chopped onion or both. I loved 'em with a passion, but I haven't seen one in years. Can't find 'em on the menu. Definitely not served from a drive-thru window   Throwing a chiliburger out a window at a passing car might by kinda messy.

Comic books were 10¢. I had a copy of Action Comics—the very first appearance of Superman. Many months later it went out with a stack of other comic books to be replaced by new ones. That issue of Action Comics is now worth thousands!

Anybody remember Big-Little books? About 3 3/4 by 4 1/2 inches (approx.) and about 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick, hard cover, printed on pulp paper, with text on the left page and an illustration on the right, running maybe 300 pages. Sort of half-book, half comic book. Great titles, like Batman and The Cheetah Caper, Buck Rogers and The Moons of Saturn, Dick Tracy and the Racketeer Gang, Mandrake the Magician, Red Ryder and The Fighting Westerner, Tarzan and The Mark of The Red Hyena, Terry and the Pirates and Mountain Stronghold, The Green Hornet, The Lone Ranger and the Black Shirt Highwayman, and Tiny Tim and Mechanical Men. I had a bunch of 'em. Collectors' items now.

My weekly allowance was 25¢.

I've got lots more, but maybe later. All that nostalgia about chiliburgers got me thinking about lunch. . . .

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Burke
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 06:24 PM

This reads like e-mail forwarded messages. A Google search shows it's been around at least since January. Here's what I've found out about it. I found it at the bottom of this page

Below is an article, which recently appeared in a magazine for parents in the UK. It is thought provoking in relation to the balancing act that parents find themselves in modern times. I hope you find it interest

A Lesson for the Learning? - T.K. Wright

If you lived as a child in the 70's or the 80's, looking back, it's
hard to believe that we have lived as long as we have........


The whole thing sounds more like to 50's & 60's to me than the 70's or 80's. I wonder who Wright is & when s/he was born.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 06:33 PM

I've got one still. You whip it and it makes a sound a bit like a crushed velvet slipper.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Don Firth
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 06:57 PM

Yeah, Burke, obviously Red Eye had an urge to post something, but was suffering from writers' block. Cut-and-paste. And it covers more than just the Seventies.

Can't say that I mind all that much. It did give me an opportunity to go on a nice nostalgia trip. No cut-and-paste with mine, though. I was there. I could go on for pages, but I won't unless someone asks for more.

I do know of one (1) place here in Seattle where they make milk shakes the way I described, but they're kinda stingy compared to the ones you used to be able to get. As far as I know, the last place in Seattle that had chiliburgers on the menu was Bob Murray's "Dog House," but that went out of business in the early Nineties.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: SINSULL
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 07:17 PM

Hey Don. Remember when Penny Candy costs a penny? Candy lipsticks, Lik-A-Maid, Peppermint Pillows so big you couldn't fit the whole thing in your mouth and it disappeared like cotton candy, Rootbeer Barrels, licorice pipes, chocolate cigarettes and bubblegum ones too.

45RPMs were three for a dollar at the local candy store (limited selection) or $1 a piece at the record store.

At my first job, ladies had to wear gloves, high heels, and skirts to work. No hair rollers. Or you could be fired - literally! The good old days - you can keep them, thank you.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Burke
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 07:30 PM

Don, your nostalgia trip was way more interesting as well.

I think the milk shakes you mention are still made, they just don't make quite so much & the container stays in the back room.

I identify as growing up the the 60's. I must admit that 1st hamburger I remember was a Royal Castle square. McDonald's & Burger King that came soon afterward to our neighborhood were a big step up. I just loved those really long McD's french fries. We did go to the A&W drive in a fair amount. I loved the draft rootbeer in the frosted mug!

I walked or rode my bike to school that was only a few blocks away. The skates with keys were still around. Our shoes had hard soles & edges that would catch the clamp.

Prince Valiant was my mom's favorite. We moved to a city where the newspaper did not carry it in 1968. My aunt clipped them out of her Sunday paper every week & would send us a big pile all at one time. We all read & enjoyed them. She did this for at least 12 years, but I'm thinking after Mom died, she sent them to my sister instead.

I don't know about your Big-Little books. I had the Dick, Jane, Sally & Spot readers. I did watch a lot of TV as well, even on black & white. Our friends had an early color set that never had the colors right.

My dad would not have a radio in the car until he had no choice for our 1972 purchase. I felt so deprived! I learned to drive on an automatic & can barely handle a stick.

Sometimes in the fall a message will circulate about what the current year's college freshmen have experienced & what is just ancient history. It's always interesting. Makes one feel like a geezer & humbled all at the same time. They've grown up just always knowing how to do some things with technology that I struggle with or haven't even tried.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST,SINSULL
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 07:45 PM

Burke,
I had forgotten the first color TVs. I remember watching "Children Of The Damned" and everyone had pasty green faces.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Benjamin
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 08:21 PM

Actually, I wasn't a kid during the 70's! I was born in 1980.
BMW


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Don Firth
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 09:10 PM

I have a neighbor who is into collecting comic books and graphic novels. She has the full collection of the Fantagraphics reprints of Prince Valiant, all forty-six volumes, including the ones that are now out-of-print.   At $16.95 a volume, it's a little too rich for my blood, but whenever I need a fix, I just call Nora and she drops by with an armload. Check 'em out. I have a copy of The Collected Works of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, a collection of a few years' worth of daily and Sunday strips, with a foreword by Ray Bradbury.

When I was about eleven, one of my uncles, who was in the Merchant Marine at the time, gave me a foot-high stack of pulp science-fiction magazines. Amazing Stories, Planet Stories, Weird Tales—great stuff! My mom was really mad at him for giving me that "trash." I spent many a night under the covers with a flashlight. Early stories by Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Edmond Hamilton. . . .   

Root beer. A&W was good stuff. When I was in high school (late Forties), we used to hit the XXX Drive Inn out on Lake City Way and N.E. 80th Street (XXX was a brand of draft root beer, long before it became a movie rating). Big frosty mugs. They had car-hops there. You pulled up and flashed your headlights, the car-hop (attractive young woman dressed in shorts in the summertime, slacks in the winter, complete with an apron with pockets and a change maker on her belt) would take your order (burgers, fries, root beer, milk shakes, whatever), then bring it to you on a tray that hooked over your window and propped against the side of the car.

The scoop on Big Little Books. And here's an enviable library thereof. I can't remember what they cost. Thirty-five cents, maybe. Now a lot of them are going for $75.00 or more, sometimes much more. I think my mom threw away a bloody fortune when she figured I'd outgrown them. But then, who knew?

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Gypsy
Date: 05 Jun 03 - 11:27 PM

man, i'll take the good NEW days. Don't know where the author was during the 70's but twasn't MY neighbourhood. Yep, i'll take RIGHT NOW with teenagers far more learned and intelligent than i ever dreamed of at that age, getting equal wage for my work, good friends and good music. I'll also take not being expected to be pregnant, if that is my choice. Yeah, give me now over yesterday anytime.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 06 Jun 03 - 09:53 AM

I'm in my 6th decade of being a kid, it's great.
Giok


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Stu
Date: 06 Jun 03 - 11:29 AM

Tiswas. Every time.

Long live the Phantom Flan Flinger, Florrie Flan and the Baby Bucket Bunger.

stigWeard


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Phot
Date: 06 Jun 03 - 04:07 PM

Growing up in the East End of London, I remember car free streets, where you could play footie until your Mum called you in for tea, [jam sandwiches and orange squash!] Lorries that sold bottles of Corona, or R Whites lemonade door to door, where your dream car was a Ford Escort Mexico or a Mini Cooper, every door was open, and next doors Mum was allways Auntie.

Moving to Somerset in 1974 I thought was the end of the world, wide open spaces, wild animals, [cows and sheep!] small village with just one street lamp.......I could go on for hours!!

Best time of my life.

Cracking thread, keep it up!


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: GUEST,petr
Date: 06 Jun 03 - 04:16 PM

of course nostalgia is about the good things.
When people look back to their childhood, say in the 30's they
dont mention the lynchings, sexism etc.
I still enjoyed reading dons posting.
I grew up in the 60&70's, I remember when candy bars were 10cents Canadian, as well as a bag of chips or a pop. and definitely spent most of my time out bike riding or hanging out with friends.
I enjoy hearing my dads stories about when he was a kid during the war
in Europe, there was no school for 3 years, imagine being 12 and not
having to go to school.
petr


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: SINSULL
Date: 06 Jun 03 - 09:03 PM

5c/bag for Spero Chips, the greasiest thing on the planet.


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Sorcha
Date: 07 Jun 03 - 02:00 AM

No, I was a kid in the 50's/60's. It was better then. I know. I was there..............


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 07 Jun 03 - 07:03 AM

Listen to Granny, she's right y'know.....Giok


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Shields Folk
Date: 07 Jun 03 - 07:34 AM

I still wear green Flash Sandshoes!


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Shields Folk
Date: 07 Jun 03 - 07:36 AM

2p for a bag of Chipmunk Crisps, "Hark the rattle of Chipmunk Crisps"

And I had extended forks on my Chopper!


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Subject: RE: Were you a kid in the 70's?
From: Firecat
Date: 07 Jun 03 - 09:26 AM

Born in '84, so I'm a child of the 90s (and to a lesser extent the 80s, cos I can remember a tiny bit of it) and proud of it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Not criticising people who can remember the 70s, but I'm happy being a 19 year old in 2003!


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Mudcat time: 23 April 7:42 AM EDT

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