Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?

Related threads:
Folklore: Rhyming Slang - is it still used? (43)
Lyr Req: cockney rhyming slang songs (87)
Lyr Req: song in rhyming slang (32)
BS: Scots Rhyming Slang??? (66)


Peter T. 25 Jun 03 - 12:29 PM
Sooz 25 Jun 03 - 12:39 PM
Micca 25 Jun 03 - 12:46 PM
Peter T. 25 Jun 03 - 12:50 PM
Les from Hull 25 Jun 03 - 01:28 PM
Geoff the Duck 25 Jun 03 - 01:50 PM
GUEST,bluecat 25 Jun 03 - 02:26 PM
HuwG 25 Jun 03 - 04:43 PM
TheBigPinkLad 25 Jun 03 - 04:49 PM
C-flat 25 Jun 03 - 05:13 PM
TheBigPinkLad 25 Jun 03 - 05:35 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Jun 03 - 06:09 PM
Les from Hull 25 Jun 03 - 06:19 PM
Gareth 25 Jun 03 - 06:33 PM
Geoff the Duck 26 Jun 03 - 04:23 AM
Dave Bryant 26 Jun 03 - 04:50 AM
GUEST,Rich A 27 Jun 03 - 08:37 AM
Steve Parkes 27 Jun 03 - 08:56 AM
Steve Parkes 27 Jun 03 - 08:57 AM
GUEST,Irish guest 27 Jun 03 - 11:08 AM
Sir Roger de Beverley 27 Jun 03 - 11:14 AM
Rapparee 27 Jun 03 - 11:43 AM
Doktor Doktor 27 Jun 03 - 12:03 PM
Lanfranc 27 Jun 03 - 12:47 PM
Nigel Parsons 27 Jun 03 - 01:29 PM
GUEST,Den at work 27 Jun 03 - 03:45 PM
HuwG 28 Jun 03 - 01:21 PM
JohnInKansas 28 Jun 03 - 02:46 PM
Amos 28 Jun 03 - 03:07 PM
Charley Noble 28 Jun 03 - 08:25 PM
Nigel Parsons 29 Jun 03 - 02:21 PM
Nigel Parsons 29 Jun 03 - 02:43 PM
HuwG 30 Jun 03 - 10:09 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:







Subject: BS: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Peter T.
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 12:29 PM

A report on British TV's Big Brother suggests that one of the housemates was caught in the act of committing a "furtive Jodrell". Can I assume that this is Cockney rhyming slang for self induced radio astronomy? yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Sooz
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 12:39 PM

Indeed it is.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Micca
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 12:46 PM

also known as a J.Arthur or a Sherman, it is rhyming slang for "dating Mrs Palm and her 5 lovely daughters"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Peter T.
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 12:50 PM

Classic. A friend of mine, many years ago, used to call it taking a Polaroid (since it was done in camera, I guess).

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Les from Hull
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 01:28 PM

That J Arthur Rank was 'from Hull' as well. Just thought I'd toss that in.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 01:50 PM

As for being Rhyming Slang - let us say it is all Cock and no Knee! ;@)
Quack!
GtD.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: GUEST,bluecat
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 02:26 PM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: HuwG
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 04:43 PM

All the above confirms that a "Jodrell" is not something you want to be caught doing. They all omit to mention what the reference is. The answer is Jodrell Bank, the home of what has since been renamed the Lovell Radio Telescope.

There was similar discussion in the pages of the Guardian some years ago, when Steve Bell's lovable cartoon character, former Able Seaman Reg Kipling, also used the phrase. Some people then suggested that a "Sherman" was an american ("Sherman Tank" = "Yank") and that a "J. Arthur" was indeed the sin of Onan.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 04:49 PM

Also known in northern (England) parts as a 'Yorkshire Penny' or ham shank.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: C-flat
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 05:13 PM

Also known in northern (England) parts as a 'Yorkshire Penny' or ham shank.
Before anyone asks, the Big Pink Lad is referring to the long established "Yorkshire Penny Bank"
My favourite expression for this pasttime is "choking Kojak"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 05:35 PM

Passtime? Vocation, shurely ;o)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 06:09 PM

I would venture to guess that the above discussion is entirely unintelligible to most Americans, who typically don't know how rhyming slang works, and don't know that "wank" means masturbate.

Having never heard of the Jodrell Bank, I would be at a loss myself without the explanation.

Is there any part of American culture that's unintelligible to most Brits? I can't think of any.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Les from Hull
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 06:19 PM

Like the rest of the world we are well exposed to US culture. As much as I can think of is the references on US TV shows that we get to other US TV shows we don't get. But we just ignore that in our typically British fashion as being something we don't need to bother about!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Gareth
Date: 25 Jun 03 - 06:33 PM

Or try "A nifty fifty"

or "99, Change Hands !"

or "Bashing the Bishop"

My God - has the 'Cat come to this !!!

Gareth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 26 Jun 03 - 04:23 AM

Most of American culture that's unintelligible to me ;@).
Mind you, most of what happens in the deep south - (somewhere near Sheffield?) is pretty strange, and as for the far East (Hull).....
Quack!
Geoff the Duck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 26 Jun 03 - 04:50 AM

Was it Dorothy Parker who called her parrot Onan - because it "Cast it's seed on the Ground" ?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: GUEST,Rich A
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 08:37 AM

Down here in the deep south (sheffield) the end of a Jodrell is called the 'Glory Stroke' hence the Sheffield based folk/rock ceilidh band 'The Glorystrokes'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 08:56 AM

... or the Barclay's [Bank], as dear old Kenneth Williams used to call it.

There's been some real bishop-bashing going on recently, of course. It hasn't been revealed whether he (and/or his partner) are in the commercial money-lending business.

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 08:57 AM

Sorry -- I meant "merchant banking"!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: GUEST,Irish guest
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 11:08 AM

Also known here as the five knuckle shuffle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Sir Roger de Beverley
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 11:14 AM

I claim the prize as the only person at the recent Beverley Folk Festival to introduce a song with the phrase "bashing the bishop". The fact that it was the homo-erotic version of "Roll in my sweet baby's arms" only adds spice to it.

Rog


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Rapparee
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 11:43 AM

Understand American culture?? I was born and brought up here and *I* don't understand it!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Doktor Doktor
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 12:03 PM

As in my unfortunate Aussie friend - who was able to access bank ATMs over here.

Quote (loud Aussie voice) "I'm desperate! - I really need a Barclays ..... "


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Lanfranc
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 12:47 PM

The collective noun for Bankers has long been a "wunch"!

All these posts and no-one's mentioned Captain Pugwash.

There, I've done it - that feels better!

Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 01:29 PM

A quick check of the DT fails to bring up a certain "Rugby" song, but there is one which not only uses 'Wank' rather than any euphamism, but also manages to use "Barclay'ed" for the past tense. IIRC

In Market Street Manchester, one summer's night
There was only one cab in the rank.
The driver was reading "The News Of The World"*
While quietly enjoying a wank
He was dreaming that Venus was kissing his penis,
His hand moved so fast it perspired.
When a waitress named Lena, with tits like Sabrina*
Came over and gently enquired
"How much will you charge me to Oldham?"
The cab driver nearly dropped dead.
So great was his shock, he let go of his cock,
And Barclayed his gear knob instead.
"That's alright, quite alright, I'm not busy tonight.
So I won't charge you nothing to hold 'em,
If I can hold yours as well"

*News Of The World: a down market Sunday 'News' paper (All the news that isn't fit to print)
*Sabrina: well endowed actress seen as a glamourous member of the Sixth Form in "Blue Murder at St Trinians"


Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: GUEST,Den at work
Date: 27 Jun 03 - 03:45 PM

As the little lad said to his mother when she disturbed him in the bath, "its mine and I'll wash it as fast as I like". We have referred to it as punishing Percy in the palm, swinging the one eyed milkman or pulling the bellhead.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: HuwG
Date: 28 Jun 03 - 01:21 PM

Not too sure at this point whether Jodrell Bank or strangling the chicken represents thread drift; but just to be on the safe side:


Jodrell Bank


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 28 Jun 03 - 02:46 PM

But I thought that the Brit opinion was that "American culture" was an oxymoron(?) - hardly worth asking about.

Most of the "inscrutibles" I encounter here seem to arise in "clique" subcultures, particularly in those who adopt bizarre behavior and language in a deliberate attempt to isolate themselves as a distinct(ive?) ethnic (or gang) group. Attempting to understand would be "intrusive." The slang that makes it into mainstream use gets into the international market so quickly that young Brits probably know it better - and sooner - than older 'mercans.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Amos
Date: 28 Jun 03 - 03:07 PM

Let me get this straight, you lot. If I understand correctly an actyivity of self-abuse or whatever is referred to as 'wanking" and the principle of rhyming slang led it to be referred to as "bank", which in turn led to references to both Barclay's Bank (a mercantile establishment) and Jodrell Bank (site of early post-WW2 radio astronomy station), which turn became identified with strangling the chicken, which is therefore also identified with anything mercantile and anything relating rto radio astronomy so really it's all the same asa each other, isn't it? Have I got that clear? Oh and the Bank is called that because it was an old word for a valley, not a bank in the usual marine sense at all. All straight? So wanking is the same as banking is the same as radio-astronomical research is the same as a valley i the same as an ATM machine. Perfectly clear?

If not, someone needs to send out for pizza with a clue.

A

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Charley Noble
Date: 28 Jun 03 - 08:25 PM

Thanks, Nigel, for clarifying all of the above.

Sure wish more people (those from away) spoke as clearly and distinctly as we do in Maine.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 29 Jun 03 - 02:21 PM

Charley:
We have the same problems, "People don't talk proper, like what I does!"

Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 29 Jun 03 - 02:43 PM

Of course, there is always Polari which could be described as "the queens' English"

Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: What is a 'furtive Jodrell'?
From: HuwG
Date: 30 Jun 03 - 10:09 AM

Purely as asides by now, but ... I was walking on the moors near Ramsbottom (no, that is a town north of Manchester) yesterday, and climbed the Peel Tower, a local monument. In spite of lots of haze, the dish at Jodrell Bank was visible at a range of 48 miles.

The best reference to J. Arthur Rank I have heard was a quote from Kenneth Williams in the film, "Carry on up the Khyber". As a slave announces visitors to an Indian palace by banging a gong, Kenneth says, "I wish he wouldn't keep doing that. Rank stupidity !"

I regret that I once worked for Barclays Bank. Their association with self-abuse is nothing to do with rhyming slang, in my opinion.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 29 March 3:33 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.