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Classic English folk albums

red max 04 Jul 03 - 10:57 AM
GUEST,Rich A 04 Jul 03 - 11:22 AM
Stu 04 Jul 03 - 11:27 AM
GUEST,Rich A 04 Jul 03 - 11:37 AM
fogie 04 Jul 03 - 12:23 PM
RolyH 04 Jul 03 - 12:52 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 04 Jul 03 - 04:06 PM
GUEST,Chris B (Born Again Scouser) 04 Jul 03 - 04:23 PM
GUEST,Peter from Essex 04 Jul 03 - 05:06 PM
mouldy 05 Jul 03 - 02:21 AM
GUEST 05 Jul 03 - 03:02 AM
fogie 05 Jul 03 - 04:24 AM
Noreen 05 Jul 03 - 04:56 AM
Snuffy 05 Jul 03 - 08:13 AM
John Routledge 05 Jul 03 - 08:23 AM
Peter T. 05 Jul 03 - 09:24 AM
8_Pints 05 Jul 03 - 05:51 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 05 Jul 03 - 05:56 PM
Susanne (skw) 05 Jul 03 - 06:06 PM
8_Pints 05 Jul 03 - 06:08 PM
Naemanson 05 Jul 03 - 06:09 PM
alanabit 06 Jul 03 - 03:12 AM
Roberto 06 Jul 03 - 03:38 AM
Chanteyranger 06 Jul 03 - 04:38 AM
curmudgeon 06 Jul 03 - 07:52 AM
Peter T. 06 Jul 03 - 11:44 AM
8_Pints 06 Jul 03 - 01:45 PM
Santa 06 Jul 03 - 02:06 PM
Peter T. 06 Jul 03 - 04:23 PM
GUEST,Santa 07 Jul 03 - 04:52 AM
greg stephens 07 Jul 03 - 05:19 AM
red max 08 Jul 03 - 05:13 AM
Roberto 08 Jul 03 - 10:33 AM
Peter T. 08 Jul 03 - 10:45 AM
GUEST,JohnB 08 Jul 03 - 10:30 PM
Chanteyranger 09 Jul 03 - 12:40 AM
Gurney 09 Jul 03 - 03:58 AM
GUEST 09 Jul 03 - 06:40 PM
kytrad (Jean Ritchie) 09 Jul 03 - 07:10 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Jul 03 - 08:40 PM
GUEST 10 Jul 03 - 03:03 AM
GUEST,Anastassia 10 Jul 03 - 08:49 AM
greg stephens 10 Jul 03 - 10:17 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 May 09 - 01:10 PM
Fred McCormick 06 May 09 - 01:38 PM
Sandra in Sydney 06 May 09 - 06:34 PM
Little Robyn 07 May 09 - 02:34 AM
Fred McCormick 07 May 09 - 04:22 AM
Bryn Pugh 07 May 09 - 04:26 AM
GUEST,Smedley 07 May 09 - 04:32 AM
GUEST,Darren at Work 07 May 09 - 08:27 AM
TenorTwo 07 May 09 - 08:48 AM
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Subject: Classic English folk albums
From: red max
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 10:57 AM

"It is neither possible nor desirable to set up musical border checkpoints anywhere. However, there is that elusive and ever changing thing called identity"

Martin Carthy put this rather well in his sleevenotes to "Common Ground", an album of English music. What would you cite as the best albums with a strongly English identity? I'm thinking along the lines of…

Oyster Band "English Rock n Roll – The Early Years"
Martin Carthy "Crown of Horn"
Little Johnny England "Little Johnny England"
Shirley Collins "Love, Death & The Lady"
Mr Fox "Mr Fox"

Any others deserving a mention?


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Rich A
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 11:22 AM

Albion Band "Battle of the Field"
"The complete Brass Monkey"


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Stu
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 11:27 AM

Watersons - Frost and Fire


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Rich A
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 11:37 AM

The Watersons "Four pence and spicy ale"


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: fogie
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 12:23 PM

These are a few of my favourite albums
One or other of the radio ballads eg. singing the fishing
Anthems in Esen (my favourite)
Liege and lief
hark the village wait
Ballads and Broadsides
Fieldvole music
The Rose of Britains Isle
The Young Tradition
a song for all seasons

I could go on !


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: RolyH
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 12:52 PM

A Few More

Morris On
Burnt Offerings - Druids
Rout of the Blues - R&B Dransfield
Ballads and Songs - Nic Jones
Sweet Primroses - Shirley Collins
Welcome to Our Fair - Oak

And loads more


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 04:06 PM

Anything by Vin Garbut, because Vin is the "real deal", unlike so many English singers who - at some point - have (self)consciously invented their folksinger persona along with a voice that doesn't seem to belong in the real world. Vin Garbut gets lots of praise for being a great entertainer, but, for me, he is the great English folksinger - the real deal.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Chris B (Born Again Scouser)
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 04:23 PM

Rise Up Like The Sun - Albion Band
Young Hunting - Tony Rose
Gig CB - Giant! (Oh all right, that's one of mine).


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Peter from Essex
Date: 04 Jul 03 - 05:06 PM

Upstream - Bismarks
English Country Music
Any Copper Family recording
When The May is all in Bloom


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: mouldy
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 02:21 AM

All of the above plus
Anything by the Old Swan Band.
The collection album "Hidden English" (archive recordings).

Andrea


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 03:02 AM

Some fine albums. My only regret is that I already have most of them, and I was hoping for some suggestions for future purchases :-)
Fogie, RolieH, please DO go on!

I must confess the only VG album I have is "The Valley of Tees". While I agree he's great, there's a very strong Irish flavour there. Nothing wrong with that, of course

Great to see The Rose of Britains Isle getting the nod. Those albums John K made with Sue Harris are truly wonderful. Shreds & Patches and Among the Many Attractions are equally fine. I'd say Pete & Chris Coe had the edge over them, though

Please keep 'em coming


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: fogie
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 04:24 AM

I forgot Tim and Maddy's Folk songs of old Engand vol 2


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Noreen
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 04:56 AM

Nic Jones- Penguin Eggs.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Snuffy
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 08:13 AM

Try the Folktrax catalogue for an incredible wealth of original recordings of traditional singers and musicians


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: John Routledge
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 08:23 AM

Thanks for the clicky Snuffy

From my early days "Please to see the King" and "Below the Salt" by Steeleye Span were a wonderful halfway house between trad folk and the more electric recordings of later years.

Will have a think about what I would vote for today.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Peter T.
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 09:24 AM

As a foreigner, though I spent a lot of time in England, I don't seem to be able to get the hang of English folk music of the 50's - 80's. Obviously I didn't grow up with it, but if you were giving advice to someone starting out to listen to it, where would you start? (I have early albums by Ewan MacColl, and a couple of compilation albums, and even Penguin Eggs!). Nevertheless, I still don't seem to be able to "get it" -- any help? yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: 8_Pints
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 05:51 PM

I would include:

'Layers', and also 'All things in Common'(Chris Foster)
'Bare Bones' (Tony Rose)
'Nic Jones' (Nic Jones)
'Bandoggs' (Nic Jones, Pete & Chris Coe, Tony Rose)
'Celebrated Yorkshire Relish' (Derek & Dorothy Elliot plus Nadine)
'One Night Stand' (Dave Shannon & Fiona Simpson aka Therapy)
'Varry Canny' (Canny Fettle)
'Free & Easy' ( Johnny Collins, et al)
'Nowt So Good'll Pass' (Bob Fox & Stu Luckley)
'To Friend & Foe' (Graham & Eileen Pratt)
'The House Band' (Ged Foley, Iain MacLeod, Chris Parkinson, Jimmy Young)

Bob vG


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 05:56 PM

Why hasn't anybody tried to answer Peter T's question?


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 06:06 PM

What exactly is his question?


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: 8_Pints
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 06:08 PM

Not sure what you're driving at Tunesmith.

I believe that the albums I quoted do give a flavour for the diversity of English traditional music, apart perhaps from the Therapy LP that delivers contemporary material on side one and traditional on side two.

Northumberland is a part of England so I would argue that their repertoire is equally acceptable under Peter T's context.

Bob vG


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Naemanson
Date: 05 Jul 03 - 06:09 PM

I don't understand the question. What's to get? I'm from the USA and I think I understand the music. What am I missing, Peter? Can you elaborate on your question?

On another point, besides the clicky up there, are most of these currently available?


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: alanabit
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 03:12 AM

I know it's not traditional, but I have always thought of Johnny Coppin's "Roll on Dreamer" as being a quintessentially English folk album. The concerns are those eternal ones of the seasons, the changing shape of the land and the circle of life and death. That's folkie enough for me!


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Roberto
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 03:38 AM

Here's my choice. I haven't put in this list very important recordings of English traditional music that are in collections that include music and songs from also Scotland and Ireland (The Voice of the People series, for instance)and America too (The Long Harvest recordings, by Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger, for instance). Some of the recordings in my list are in LP format, but still available, with a little luck, at eBay's auctions or at Gemm's. Thay are treasures worth searching for. It has been difficult to exclude from this list many other beautiful recordings. I have put in the list maximum three recordings for artist. Roberto

Anthologies

1.        A Selection from The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs (rec. 1985,1993,1994), with Martin Carthy, Roy Harris, Jez Lowe, Linda Adams, John Bowden, Fellside, FECD47
2.        The Bird in the Bush, Traditional Songs of Love & Lust, Erotic Folk Songs (1966), with Anne Briggs, Louis Killen, A. L. Lloyd, Frankie Armstrong, Norman Kennedy, Topic TSCD479
3.        Blow the Man Down, A collection of Sea Songs & Shanties, with Louis Killen, Ian Campbell, Ewan MacColl, Harry H Corbett, Sam Larner, Bob Davenport, The Watersons, Bob Hart, A. L. Lloyd, Bob Roberts etc, Topic Topic TSCD464
4.        Deep Lancashire, with Harry Boardman, Oldham Tinkers, Pete Smith etc, 1968 e 1970, Topic, TSCD485
5.        Hidden English, a celebration of English traditional music, with Joseph Taylor, Copper Family, Walter Pardon, Cyril Poacher, Bob Hart, Harry Cox, Sam Larner, Fred Jordan, Pop Maynard, etc, Topic, TSCD600
6.        Old English Nursery Rhymes, Vivien Ellis and Tim Laycock with The Broadside Band, 1996 (Saydisc, CD-SDL 419)
7.        Round Cape Horn, Traditional songs of sailors, ships and the sea, with Ewan MacColl, A. L. Lloyd, Louis Killen, Peter Bellamy, Roy Harris, The Watersons, Mike Waterson etc, Topic, TSCD499
8.        Sea Shanties, with Roy Harris, A. L. Lloyd, Ian Manuel, Bernard Wrigley, Martyn Wyndham-Read, Topic 12TS234 (LP)
9.        Sea Songs & Shanties, Traditional English Sea Songs & Shanties from the last days of sail, 1950-60, with Bob Roberts, Copper Family, Harry Cox etc (Saydisc, CD-SDL 405)
10.        The Tale of Ale, The Story of the Englishman and his beer, 1976, with Vic Gammon, Peter Bellamy, Roy Harris etc (Free Reed)
11.        The Valiant Sailor, Songs & Ballads of Nelson's Navy, with Frankie Armstrong, Roy Harris, A. L. Lloyd, Martyn Wyndham-Read (Topic 12TS232) (LP)
12.        Voices, English Traditional Songs, with Maddy Prior, Cyril Tawney, The Watersons, A. L. Lloyd, Roy Bailey, Martyn Wyndham-Read, Frankie Armstrong, John Kirkpatrick, Roy Harris, Jez Lowe, Dave Burland, June Tabor, Shirley Collins, Martin Carthy, Peter Bellamy, Linda Adams, etc, Fellside FECD87


Single artists and groups

13.        Roy Bailey, New Bell Wake, 1976
14.        Peter Bellamy, Wake the Vaulted Echoes, 2CD (Free Reed)
15.        Peter Bellamy & The Young Tradition with Shirley and Dolly Collins, The Holly Bears the Crown, 1969, Fledg'ling Records FLED 3006
16.        Anne Briggs, A Collection, Topic TSCD504
17.        Dave Burland, A Dalesman's Litany, (rec. 1971), Leader LERCD 2029
18.        Eliza Carthy, Anglicana, 2002 (Topic) TSCD539
19.        Martin Carthy, Martin Carthy, 1965, Topic, TSCD340
20.        Martin Carthy Byker Hill, con Dave Swarbrick, 1967, Topic, TSCD341
21.        Martin Carthy Signs of Life, 1998 (Topic) TSCD503
22.        Shirley Collins,The Power of the True Love Knot, Fledg'ling Records FLED 3028
23.        Coope, Boyes & Simpson, Hindsight, 1998, No Masters NMCD11
24.        The Copper Family,The Copper Family of Rottingdean, Early Recordings, Come Write Me Down, 1950s-1960s (Topic) TSCD534
25.        Harry Cox, The Bonny Labouring Boy, 1945-1970 2CD (Topic) TSCD 512D
26.        Critcs Group (Frankie Armstrong, John Faulkner, etc), Waterloo: Peterloo, English Folk Songs and Broadsides 1780-1830, Argo, ZDA86 (LP, 1968)
27.        Barry Dransfield, Wings of a Sphinx, 1996, Rhiannon RHYD5010
28.        Fairport Convention, Liege & Lief, Island remasters, IMCD 291/586 929-2
29.        Jo Freya, Traditional Songs of England, 1993 (Saydisc, CD-SDL 402
30.        John Goodluck, The Suffolk Miracle, (CD edition available at www.john.goodluck.btinternet.co.uk)
31.        Roy Harris Champions of Folly (LP Topic, 12TS256)
32.        Roy Harris The Bitter and the Sweet (LP Topic, 12TS217)
33.        Roy Harris The Rambling Soldier, Life in the lower ranks 1750-1900 through soldiers' songs, 1979 e 1997 (Fellside, FECD17)
34.        Wallace House, Robin Hood Ballads, 1953 (Folkways, F-6839)
35.        Carolyne Hughes Carolyne Hughes & Family, two CDs available, Folktrax FTX-043 and FTX-143
36.        Nic Jones, Ballads & Songs, Leader LERCD 2014
37.        Nic Jones, Penguin Eggs (rec. 1980), Topic TSCD411
38.        Nic Jones, Unearthed 2CD, Mollie Music MMCD02/03
39.        Fred Jordan, Songs of a Shropshire Lad, Folktrax, FTX-130
40.        Louis Killen, The Rose in June, 1989 and 2000, Old and New Tradition ONTCD2005
41.        Sam Larner, Now is the time for Fishing, 1958,'59,'60 (Topic), TSCD511
42.        A. L. Lloyd, Classic A. L. Lloyd (Fellside, FECD98)
43.        A. L. Lloyd, England & Her Traditional Songs, A Selection from the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs, 1960, 2003 (Fellside, FECD173)
44.        A. L. Lloyd, Leviathan! Ballads & Songs of the Whaling Trade (rec. 1967), Topic, TSCD497
45.        Ewan MacColl & A. L. Lloyd, Blow Boys Blow, Tradition TCD 1024
46.        Ewan MacColl, The Manchester Angel, Tradition 2059 (LP)
47.        Pop Maynard, Down the Cherry Tree, Musical Traditions, MTCD 400
48.        Old Swan Band, Still Swanning...After All These Years, Free Reed, FRCD31
49.        Frank Purslow & John Pearce, Rap-A-Tap-Tap, English Folk Songs Miss Pringle Never Taught Us (Folktrax, FTX-219)
50.        Tony Rose, Young Hunting, 1970 (LP, Trailer LER 2013)
51.        Tony Rose Under the Greenwood Tree (LP, Trailer LER 2024)
52.        Tony Rose On Banks of Green Willow (LP, Trailer LER 2101)
53.        Martin Simpson, The Bramble Briar, 2001 (Topic) TSCD513
54.        Steeleye Span, Hark! The Village Wait, 1970
55.        Steeleye Span, Please to see the King, 1971
56.        June Tabor, Aleyn, 1997, Topic TSCD490
57.        Kathryn Tickell, The Kathryn Tickell Band, Black Crow CRO CD 227
58.        The Watersons, Early Days Topic TSCD472
59.        The Watersons, For Pence and Spicy Ale TSCD462
60.        The Watersons, Frost and Fire, Topic TSCD136
61.        Mike Waterson, Mike Waterson (rec. 1977), Topic TSCD516
62.        Norma Waterson, Bright Shiny Morning, 2000 Topic, TSCD520
63.        Waterson:Carthy Common Tongue, 1996 Topic, TSCD488
64.        Waterson:Carthy Broken Ground, 1999 Topic TSCD509
65.        Waterson:Carthy A Dark Light, 2002 Topic TSCD 536
66.        Bernard Wrigley, The Phenomenal B.Wrigley (1971) + Rough and Wrigley (1974), LOOFY 003/004


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 04:38 AM

I would add my all-time favorite recording of sea music, Ewan MacColl and A.L. lloyd: "Whaling Ballads," sadly long out of print. A mix of English, Scottish, and American songs, with great English style and interpretation.



Chanteyranger


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: curmudgeon
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 07:52 AM

To Roberto's fine list I would add:

English Street Songs - Lloyd
English Drinking Songs - Lloyd
Bad Lads and Hard Cases    MacColl

These were my introduction to English folk song. I have them on very ancient Riverside LPs and do not know if they have been reissued on CD.

PeterT - Read Lloyd's book "Folksong in England." It's out of print but reading copies usually can be found at bookfinder.com. Also read Lloyd's notes on many albums of his and MacColl's; they are a goldmine of information and background on the songs and their sources -- Tom


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Peter T.
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 11:44 AM

Thanks for the assistance, I better get Lloyd's book. It wasn't a great question, I admit. What I meant to say was that there is a sort of story line in American folk that I grew up with, Woody Guthrie and the variations and the turn into electric and stuff, I relate to immediately, as well as blues, etc. I think I can also get a reasonable handle on Irish music.

The British scene escapes me -- the relationship between the trad stuff, and how it got electricked or whatever it is people refer to in England, is obscure to me. There are all these players like Martin Carthy, Davy Graham, Sandy Denny, Steeleye Span etc., etc. (mentioned above). Something obviously important happened in the early 60s, but I am missing a whole set of pieces of the puzzle, that I think might help me get interested in the music. I lived in England during the 70's and could never get into it at all. The music seemed to wander between heartiness and a kind of faux medievalism that still baffles me. There are also obviously regional things going on that complicate getting a basic thread through the evolution of the genre. I don't mean to offend, it obviously means a lot to many people here -- just how it strikes a complete outsider. I keep thinking there must be a simple metaphor or explanation or something that would give one a key to starting to listen to the stuff intelligently.


I will also have to listen to some of the albums listed above!

yours,

Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: 8_Pints
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 01:45 PM

Peter,

I think the term you used, "the evolution of the genre" hints at what you were expecting to analyse.

The reality is the folk revival breathed life into the repertoire of traditional songs that would otherwise have been buried and lost to the generations that grew up in the '50s, '60s and 70's.

What we now have is an eclectic selection of performance styles that can range from unaccompanied song to the full blown 'pop' treatment as in the 'Pogues'.

That doesn't necessarily mean there have been 'improvements' in the genre, merely that there are different interpretaions.

I would argue that the challenge is in taking a song and delivering its meaning in an entertaining way that still maintains its integrity & beauty.

If true I guess this would imply that you would want to be a performer rather than a consumer: am I right?

Bob vG


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Santa
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 02:06 PM

Basic thread? What if there wasn't one? I think that there was a mosaic, of lots of different things happening in different places. Some commercial, some not, some local, some national. The names that mean things to me would include Steeleye Span, Fairport Convention, Sandy Denny, but also the High Level Ranters, Johnny Handle, Bob Fox, from the North East, the Blackpool Taverners and Strawhead from the North West, Shirley Collins, Cyril Tawney, The Spinners, Jake Thackeray, The Corries, Ewan McColl and Peggy Seeger.

A single basic thread? No way.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Peter T.
Date: 06 Jul 03 - 04:23 PM

Sorry, again, bad choice of language. A kind of coherent story one could plug into, I guess. Is there a song or two, or style that many people took on and said -- Oh, that is what we can do with this -- and other people followed suit in different regions. Did it start as one or two kinds of sound or ways of singing and/or instrumental accompaniment during the revival, and then alter as people decided to go their own ways, discovered new/old/more appropriate instruments, etc? Did different regions come to the fore at different times, or was there one big rush? Naive questions, I know.

yours,

Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Santa
Date: 07 Jul 03 - 04:52 AM

In one sense, I'd say that England's music in the 50s-80s followed a basically similar path to that of America, except that perhaps it started from a deep low. There's no UK equivalent of country music, to span the gap between popular and traditional. Maybe skiffle in the 50s.

Certainly as far as folk rock is concerned, then you have to consider the influence of the Mersey Beat, and Bob Dylan, especially Bob Dylan, on those who encountered traditional folk via (say) Ewen McColl. But folk rock really is just the career paths of three bands: Steeleye, Fairport and the Albion. There were other good ones, but not I think on the same scale. You need to think of the troubadors - Al Stewart, Ralph McTell - singer/songwriters of contemporary folk. Then the pure traditional singers like Anne Briggs and Shirley Collins. The popular "easy listening folk" such as the Spinners, Taverners, (OK, the Corries are Scottish, but the principle is the same.)

But what you will find is an intertwining of styles, with musicians such as Martin Carthy moving fairly freely between the different "folk categories".   Look too closely and you will only find the individual careers of specific artists: if mosaic is not a perfect analogy then perhaps a rope comes to mind - made up of different strands that start and stop. But ropes have edges, and folk music doesn't: it fades into other styles, like most music.

You might like to consider the band genealogies provided in Topic's special releases covering Martin Carthy and Fairport Convention.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: greg stephens
Date: 07 Jul 03 - 05:19 AM

There never was such a thing as English traditional music, it's a big country(though it may not look like one from an American standpoint, say) with a lot of regions merging imperceptibly into each other.So a great performer with a Lancashire background will not necessarily tell you much about life on the Sussex downs.
   Having said that, I think there is one performer from the folk revival who most successfully constructed/invented/distilled something very very English from a lot of separate strands, and that is (alas,was) Tony Rose. He worshipped deeply at the shrine of the Tyne as a young lad, and successfully married those mannerisms with a very Somerset view of life, having picked up a load of other stuff along the way. I woud suggest a listen to what Tony did to "Just as the tide was flowing" and "Limbo" for examp[le, and then see what Eliza Carthy did to the same songs on "Anglicana"(nailing her colours firmly to the English mast).
   That sort of thing will give you a wonderful broad historical view of England.For a look at the England of my own lifetime, however, I'd always say Ray Davies and the Kinks hit the nail on the head.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: red max
Date: 08 Jul 03 - 05:13 AM

Nice list, Roberto. It might seem an odd question, but aren't you the guy I sent a Frogmorton CDR to?


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Roberto
Date: 08 Jul 03 - 10:33 AM

To red max: no, I'm not the guy tou sent a Frogmorton CDR to.
To curmudgeon: I had Lloyd's English Street Songs and English Drinking Songs in the list, but then I decided not to mention more than maximum three records for each artist, not to make the list too long. But yes, they are excellent recordings.
To chanteyranger: only recently I've had a copy of Thar she blows! Whaling ballads, by A. L. Lloyd and Ewan MacColl. I like it very very much, together with A Sailor's Garland (Prestige / International INT 13043, or Transatlantic XTRA 5013, 1966) and the Stinson recordings (Haul on the bowlin', vol.1, and Off to sea once more, vol.2), all by Ewan MacColl & A. L. Lloyd. But I've put in the list only Blow, Boys, Blow (Tradition) because of its availability. But I'm happy you mentioned the whaling ballads by LLoyd and MacColl. It is a pity that so many great recordings remain unavailable in CD format. Roberto


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Peter T.
Date: 08 Jul 03 - 10:45 AM

Thank you for the fine responses to my idiot questions. Much appreciated. I have already printed the thread out. Any other help or guidance would be most welcome.

yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,JohnB
Date: 08 Jul 03 - 10:30 PM

What about "Deep Lancashire" a compilation. I didn't see Morris On mentioned either I don't think.
JohnB


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 09 Jul 03 - 12:40 AM

Roberto, an excellent list you have there. I wasn't aware of the lloyd's "Street Songs" Lp. Yes, so much great stuff yet to be reissued on CD. What is it that prevents the old Stinson/Riverside, etc. MacColl and lloyd recordings from being reissued on cd? legal rights? Lack of demand? lost master tapes? The last time Whaling Ballads was released was, I believe, 1972, on the Washington label, that's now long defunct. I used to check it out of the public library until someone either stole it, lost it, or wrecked it. Many thanks to Liam's Brother who got me a tape of it.

Peter T. I have to second the motion on A.L. lloyd's book, Folk Song In England. It's clear and concise, and what a great source A.L. lloyd was. Is your question, though, one of defining English traditional music, or does English music not strike a responsive chord with you and you're asking more what is it that makes it compelling to its devotees?

Chanteyranger


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Gurney
Date: 09 Jul 03 - 03:58 AM

Lots of good stuff here, including my alltime favourite LP 'Nowt So Good'll Pass.' Bob Fox & Stu Luckley. Why Aye.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Jul 03 - 06:40 PM

Tim Laycock's 'Fine Colours' has to go down as my favourite and the one I'd like to have with me on a desert island.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: kytrad (Jean Ritchie)
Date: 09 Jul 03 - 07:10 PM

Where does skiffle fit in? I had been told that skiffle was the beginning of the Folk Revival in England.   Jean R.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Jul 03 - 08:40 PM

The revival of the 1940s-50s, certainly; a lot of people discovered it by that route. I'm just a little too young for that, but I do play with people who started out with Skiffle and Blues styles at that time. Bert Lloyd wrote, in 1959:

"... many young people, whose musical nourishment had been limited to whatever came to them in canned form from the Charing Cross Road, are looking to folk music for something that they can take and re-make as their own. The ceilidh, the folk-singing party, is becoming a part of urban social life, and the voice of the revival folk-singer makes itself heard in youth hostels, city pubs, skiffle cellars, even in jazz clubs. It is a curious but welcome phenomenon, this revival of folk music as a city music. It seems that many taking part in that revival have come to appreciate British balladry through their interest in jazz. A search for the roots of jazz leads to American folk song, and a search for the roots of American folk song leads the astonished enthusiast back home to his own traditional music."

Of course, it was all going on anyway, but it would be through Skiffle and the like that many people came to discover their own tradition. I picked up some old copies of English Dance and Song a while back; the edition for April/May 1953 has a photo of you on the cover, playing dulcimer at the Albert Hall. Just over a year before I was born! It's good to know that you're still doing it. Your influence on the revival in Britain is more considerable than generally realised, I think.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jul 03 - 03:03 AM

Pentangle - the first album
Dorris Henderson/John Renbourn - "There you go"
Steve Benbow - "Journey into the sun"
Robin And Barry Dransfield - (The first album!)


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Subject: Sorry for the offtopic, but...
From: GUEST,Anastassia
Date: 10 Jul 03 - 08:49 AM

PLEASE, we need your help! We are Russian musicians, playing ethnic, espessialy Celtic music. You can see address of our Web-site at the bottom of the message. We loved very much the song "Hindero Horo" from Maire Ní Chathasaigh's "New strung harp" but we can not find the lyrics in the Internet. There are not too many experts of Scottish Gaelic in Russia :), even those who understand something by ear can not complete the text. Would you be so kind to contact us with Maire or somebody who can share the text with us? Guys from snowy country never forget you!

Thank you in advance,


Anastassia (Russian-Celtic harper :)

http://mervent.celtic.ru


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: greg stephens
Date: 10 Jul 03 - 10:17 AM

Skiffle certainly kick-started the English folk revival from say 1956 onwards,because the vast majority of the revival people at that time found their way to American folk-song first while playing in skiffle groups . They(or we,to be accurate) moved from there into English folk.
   However, the skiffle groups tended to stick to American songs, so you'ld be hard put to find much English material in the repertoires of the skifflers: as people learnt English songs they forsook skiffle and started folk-groups or sang on there own. In fact,off hand I can only remember the Vipers Skiffle Group doing Maggie May as the only observable skiffle "hit" (of a minor kind) that was an English folk-song. But I expect someone will soon be by to add to the list.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 06 May 09 - 01:10 PM

Refreshing these old threads...


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Fred McCormick
Date: 06 May 09 - 01:38 PM

Finest English folk album ever? Harry Cox. English Folk Singer. EFDSS. LP 1004

Hotly pursued and in no particular order by:-

George Dunn. Leader. LEE 4042        
Frank Hinchliffe. In Sheffield Park: Traditional Songs from South Yorkshire. Topic. 12TS 308        
Joe Hutton of Coquetdale. Mawsom and Wareham. MWM 1024        
Phil Tanner. EFDSS. LP 1005        
William Kimber. Absolutely Classic. EFDSS. CD 03
Sam Larner. Now is the Time for Fishing: Songs and Speech by Sam Larner of Winterton, England. Topic TSCD 511
Walter Pardon. A World Without Horses: A portrait of a traditional singer. Topic. TSCD 514
Walter Pardon. A Proper sort. Leader. LED 2063        
Billy Pigg. The Border Minstrel. Leader. LEA 4006        
Cyril Poacher. The Broomfield Wager. Topic. 12TS 252        
Betsy Renals/Sophie Legg/Charlotte Renals. Catch me if you can. Veteran VT119
Unto Brigg Fair: Joseph Taylor and other Lincolnshire Singers recorded in 1908 by Percy Grainger. Leader. LEA 4050        
Various. A Century of Song. EFDSS. CD02

Every one a gem. Who said we had no tradition in England.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 06 May 09 - 06:34 PM

wow! what a list

thanks to all, & to Crow Sister for refreshing the thread

sandra (who only has a few of those albums - 8! So far ...)


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Little Robyn
Date: 07 May 09 - 02:34 AM

Almost anything recorded by Bill and Helen Leader.
I was going to suggest Unto Brigg Fair and Billy Pigg but Fred beat me to it.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Fred McCormick
Date: 07 May 09 - 04:22 AM

Sandra. Don't forget Voice of the People, which reissued a lot of the above, and a lot more besides. VOTP wasn't confined to England of course but that certainly doesn't detract from the series.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 07 May 09 - 04:26 AM

Alastair Anderson on English Concertina.

(Off topic, but I wouldn't be without these in my collection : Masters of Irish Music - Seamus Tansey, Seamus Ennis).

Martin Carthy and Dave Swarbrick : Prince Heathen, Skin and Bone.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Smedley
Date: 07 May 09 - 04:32 AM

If anyone is interested in what English musicians are doing to draw from this 'tradition' right now, rather than concentrating on those admittedly excellent older albums listed in this thread, take a listen to a male/female duo called Megson. Their album' Smoke of Home' is self-written songs which are deeply saturated with an understanding of folk roots and an unashamd interest in contemporary working-class North-East England, while the subsequent album 'Take Yourself A Wife' has them singing & playing songs from that region which were written in the 19th century.

I sound like their press agent - sorry! - but they are outstanding & highly underrated.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: GUEST,Darren at Work
Date: 07 May 09 - 08:27 AM

I'd certainly consider Spiers and Boden LPs classically modern English albums - not to everyones taste I know but I up there with some of the golden oldies

I don't think it's been mentioned but Pigeon on the Gate from Veteran is an excellent snapshot of East Anglian melodeon playing from a living tradition recorded mainly in the 50s IIRC.


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Subject: RE: Classic English folk albums
From: TenorTwo
Date: 07 May 09 - 08:48 AM

The band's been mentioned, but not the album - and I didn't realise until very recently (got a new "convert your vinyl to CD" turntable) how much it had influenced what I enjoy and what I perform:

Druids: Pastime with Good Company

T2


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