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Favorite Celtic songs for singing

Tinwhistler 20 Aug 98 - 12:06 PM
Mo 20 Aug 98 - 12:27 PM
Alice 20 Aug 98 - 06:50 PM
Jerry Friedman 20 Aug 98 - 07:34 PM
Susan-Marie 20 Aug 98 - 09:34 PM
Kiwi 20 Aug 98 - 09:35 PM
Tinwhistler 20 Aug 98 - 11:15 PM
JB3 21 Aug 98 - 01:11 AM
alison 21 Aug 98 - 03:47 AM
alison 21 Aug 98 - 03:53 AM
Alice 21 Aug 98 - 10:15 AM
Michelle from Newfoundland 21 Aug 98 - 12:12 PM
Jon W. 21 Aug 98 - 12:52 PM
Alice 21 Aug 98 - 01:32 PM
Big Mick 21 Aug 98 - 02:44 PM
Tinwhistler 21 Aug 98 - 02:45 PM
Alice 21 Aug 98 - 05:58 PM
Alice 21 Aug 98 - 06:27 PM
Susan-Marie 21 Aug 98 - 08:48 PM
Maelgwyn 21 Aug 98 - 11:50 PM
Jonathan 22 Aug 98 - 05:46 AM
Sophie 22 Aug 98 - 10:18 AM
Jonathan 22 Aug 98 - 01:01 PM
Mo 23 Aug 98 - 05:25 PM
Martin Ryan 25 Aug 98 - 03:06 PM
Helen 26 Aug 98 - 07:25 PM
Jon W. 31 Aug 98 - 10:06 AM
Bruce O. 31 Aug 98 - 09:04 PM
Martin Ryan 01 Sep 98 - 06:28 AM
steve t 01 Sep 98 - 10:49 AM
steve t 01 Sep 98 - 10:54 AM
Maelgwyn 01 Sep 98 - 12:44 PM
Jonathan 03 Sep 98 - 03:05 PM
Susan-Marie 03 Sep 98 - 04:14 PM
Robalot@Compuserve.com 03 Sep 98 - 09:57 PM
Gunny 03 Sep 98 - 11:05 PM
alison 04 Sep 98 - 07:21 AM
alison 04 Sep 98 - 07:29 AM
Cuilionn 05 Sep 98 - 01:11 AM
Jonathan 18 Sep 98 - 02:57 PM
Kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org 19 Sep 98 - 01:14 PM
alison 19 Sep 98 - 08:44 PM
pegeen 19 Sep 98 - 08:54 PM
Barry Finn 19 Sep 98 - 10:21 PM
Kathleen 20 Sep 98 - 08:49 PM
Kathleen 20 Sep 98 - 08:56 PM
BRACKEN 21 Sep 98 - 03:13 AM
Jonathan 26 Sep 98 - 06:47 AM
Jonathan 26 Sep 98 - 06:49 AM
Alice 26 Sep 98 - 11:17 AM
Ciara 26 Sep 98 - 11:33 AM
Big Mick 26 Sep 98 - 08:49 PM
mcmud 27 Sep 98 - 12:47 AM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 27 Sep 98 - 05:03 PM
Jonathan 29 Sep 98 - 02:28 PM
John M 30 Sep 98 - 12:44 AM
John M 30 Sep 98 - 12:53 AM
John Nolan 30 Sep 98 - 03:32 PM
John Nolan 30 Sep 98 - 03:34 PM
John Nolan 30 Sep 98 - 03:35 PM
Mo 30 Sep 98 - 07:02 PM
John Nolan 30 Sep 98 - 07:09 PM
pegeen 05 Oct 98 - 07:59 PM
John M. 06 Oct 98 - 09:44 AM
Robert 07 Oct 98 - 02:36 PM
OSh 07 Oct 98 - 05:54 PM
pegeen 07 Oct 98 - 07:39 PM
alison 23 Dec 98 - 07:02 AM
Bill Cameron 23 Dec 98 - 12:52 PM
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Alice 23 Dec 98 - 01:03 PM
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Subject: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tinwhistler
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 12:06 PM

Well, we have a favorite whistles and whistle tune thread, and you're all so helpful...

Here's my dilemna. I love to sing, especially Celtic songs because the melodies are so beautiful. However, when I look over my list of songs, most of them are so melancholy. Beautiful, yes, but melancholy--I lost my love, my love died, the war rages on kind of songs.

Does anyone know any good, upbeat happy songs they can share? In particular, songs that are for women singers (not too high!) or unisex, perhaps with a twist of humor or irony or longing for home in a positive way? English or Gaellic OK. Just please give me the title, artist/CD so I can find it if I want to. Maybe a short description too.

Thanks Mudcatters. I'm so glad I joined!


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Mo
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 12:27 PM

Possibly the reason there's such a plethora of melancholy songs is that that's what Celts do best! Never happier than when we're miserable....

However, if you are looking for more up-beat songs how about "Ho-ro My Nut Brown Maiden", or the "Mingulay Boat Song"? Not necessarily everyone's cup of tea, but I don't think anyone dies in them. I couldn't say what Cd's you'd find them on as they are traditional songs.

A good source of more up-beat songs, though maybe not strictly Celtic are by a band called The Poozies (all female, very very good). They have two albums out "Chantoozies" and "Dansoozies" - sorry, I don't know the album label off hand as my copies have gone walkabout. By the way, I've only just discovered Mudcat - what a fabulous place! Hope some of this has been some help, Tinwhistler.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE LEPRECHAUN^^
From: Alice
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 06:50 PM

Welcome to the Mudcat, Mo.

A fun song is The Leprechaun, by Patrick Weston Joyce (1827-1914). The only recording I know of it is by Mary O'Hara. The words and music are in Vol. 3 of Herbert Hughes, 'Irish Country Songs'.

THE LEPRECHAUN
lyrics, Patrick Weston Joyce (1827-1914)
tune, taken down by Joyce from a Limerick ballad singer, 1853

In a shady nook one moonlit night, a leprechaun I spied,
With scarlet cap and coat of green, a cruiskeen by his side,
'Twas tick, tack, tick, his hammer went, upon a weeny shoe,
And I laughed to think of a purse of gold, but the fairy was laughing, too!

With tip-toe step and beating heart, quite softly I drew nigh,
There was mischief in his merry face, a twinkle in his eye.
He hammered and sang with tiny voice, and drank his mountain dew,
And I laughed to think he was caught at last, but the fairy was laughing, too! As quick as thought I seized the elf, "Your fairy purse." I cried.
"The purse", he said, "Tis in her hand, that lady at your side."
I turned to look, the elf was off! Then what was I to do?
O, I laughed to think what a fool I'd been, and the fairy was laughing, too!

(I change the lyrics a little when I sing it. In the last verse, I sing "What's that?" he said, "A handsome lad, a-sittin' by your side?" I turned to look.... etc.)

Hughes adds this editorial note: "When Dr. Joyce published his collection of old Irish airs in 1872 he was unable to remember more than one line of the ballad to which the air had been sung both in Dublin and Limerick, and wrote the words here given. In his 'Ancient Irish Music' (1901 edition) he made the following remarks about the leprehaun: (sic) 'It may be necessary to state, for the information of those not acquainted with Irish fairies, that the leprehaun (sic) is a very tricky little fellow, usually dressed in a green coat, red cap, and knee breeches, and silver shoe buckles, whom you may sometimes see in the shades of evening, or by moonlight under a bush, and he is generally making or mending a shoe....' "

Another fun song is The Cork Leg. A more light-hearted approach to lost love are the songs Blarney Roses, and Let Him Go Let Him Tarry.

Alice in Montana


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 07:34 PM

No doubt many of the Irish people on the list are sick of this quotation from Chesterton, but how can I pass it up with a set-up like this?

The Great Gaels of Ireland
Are the men that God made mad,
For all their wars are merry,
And all their songs are sad.

(GKC was no more than half right.)

Anyway, for Irish songs in which your lover doesn't leave, your dog doesn't die, your pickup doesn't break down (oh, sorry, wrong genre), you might try Thomas Moore's Irish Melodies, for instance, "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms". I just searched for "Irish Melodies" and found only two songs from this collection in the DT! But also in the DT is the overlong but charming "Rory O'More".

A search of the DT for "@ribald" might turn up some good possibilities, if you like to sing such songs.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 09:34 PM

I'm also always searching for upbeat Celtic songs with strong female roles - here are some of my favorites:

"Willie Taylor" on Deanta's first album: woman dresses up as a man to find her true love, finds out he cheated on her, kills him. Very peppy tune.

"Jug of Punch" on one of Altan's albums: sung by a woman weaving although the text is about how much men love drinking and "a tidy wench".

"Come by the Hills", I heard it first by Loreena McKennit: lyrical verses about golden bracken and a land where legends never die.

"Band O' Shearers": don't remember where I learned it, it's a happy song about about shearing sheep and flirting with your fellow shearers.

"Maid on the Shore", versions by Stan Rogers and Solas: great song about a woman who "takes advantage" of a ship of pirates.

"The Gray Mare", Karan Casey on her solo album "Songlines": a funny song about a greedy young man who loses his chance to wed a beautiful rich girl because he asks for too much.

These are all in the DTbase. There are more - I find that it helps to identify artists who like these kind of songs, and learn from them. For example, Karan Casey seems to like songs that have a positive outlook, so I look forward to the next album by her or Solas.


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU AND I IN THE ONE BED LIE^^
From: Kiwi
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 09:35 PM

One of my favorite upbeat songs is "YOU AND I IN THE ONE BED LIE":

A nobleman's fair daughter was walkin' down yon lane
When up comes Captain Dixon, the keeper of the game
Says he unto his serving-man, "If it was not for the law
I'd have that maid within my bed and she'd lie next to the wall."

"Go away young man," says she, "and do not me perplex
Before I lie one night with you you'll answer questions six
Six questions you will answer, and I will make them all
Before you and I in the one bed lie and I lie next to the wall."

"What is rounder than a ring? What's higher than a tree?
What is worse than womankind? What's deeper than the sea?
What tree blooms first? What bird sings best? From where do dewdrops fall?
Then it's you and I in the one bed lie and I lie next to the wall."

"A globe is rounder than a ring, sky higher than a tree.
A girl is worse than womankind, hell deeper than the sea.
The yew blooms first, the thrush sings best, from heaven the dewdrops fall,
So it's you and I in the one bed lie and you lie next to the wall."

"You must get for me some winter fruit that in December grew
Find for me a mantle, a weft it never went through
A sparrow's horn, a priest unshorn, a bird without a gall
Then it's you and I in the one bed lie and I lie next to the wall."

"My father has some winter fruit that in December grew
My mother wears a mantle, a weft it never went through
A sparrow's horn's not hard to find, there's one in every claw
Melchizedek is a priest unshorn" - and he rolled her to the wall!

Another version of this is listed in the database as "Captain Wedderburn's Courtship".

Also fun is "Invitation To a Funeral" - if you're looking to hear the tune of it, it's the Temperance Reel.

Slán,
Kiwi


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tinwhistler
Date: 20 Aug 98 - 11:15 PM

Thank you all. Susan-Marie, three of the upbeat songs in my own collection are Come By the Hills, Jug O Punch and Maid on the Shore, so we're on the same track! Please keep me informed if you come upon anything else.

I'm of Irish ancestry and always thought it was just me that sometimes dwelled in melancholy--now I know it's in the blood!

Cheers, Sue


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: JB3
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 01:11 AM

I don-t know just how up-beat these are, but at least, no one dies in them:

Cliffs of Duneen
The Curragh of Kildare
Eileen A Roon
I Know Where I'm Going
Queen of the Heathery Hills

I haven't checked yet to see if these are in the DT, but will. I'll add in lyrics to those I can't find there.

A lovely song with a strong woman in it is Factory Girl. The version I sing is closest to FACTGRL2 in the DT.

By the way, do you sing The Waggoner's Lad?

One of the few English Ballads I sing, with a happy ending, is Willie of Winesbury.

Cheers!

June


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: alison
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 03:47 AM

Hi,

Star of the County Down. Nobody dies, everybody falls in love, (well probably) and thay all settle down to a life of married bliss. How un-Celtic can you get!!

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: alison
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 03:53 AM

Hi,

Of course we made up for all of that by giving it a beautiful sad minor tune(*grin*).

Slainte

alison


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE CORK LEG (Co. Tyrone version)
From: Alice
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 10:15 AM

I just checked the database and found that the Cork Leg lyrics there are different than the ones in Herbert Hughes. This from Vol.2, published in 1915. I heard this song on National Public Radio by an Irish soprano named Francis Lucy, making her American debut in New York on the radio. She sang a recital of classical pieces, and ended it with Irish songs. Using this piano accompaniment, she sang this version word for word. There is a slow, rolling portion of the accompaniment as it nears the end of the song. Hughes' notes on this song label it as "old song, Tyrone version".

THE CORK LEG
Tyrone county version

I'll tell you a story that is no sham,
In Holland lived a merchant man.
And ev'ry morning he says, "I am the
The richest merchant in Amsterdam."

chorus
Ri-tiddy till-o-ri-lo-ri-laddi-ti
Tiddy-till-o-ri-lo-ri-lee.

One day he sat as full as an egg,
When a poor relation came in to beg,
And kicking him out with a brogue and a keg,
And kicking him out he broke his leg.

chorus

He told his friends he had got hurt
"By a friend, I have lost a foot,
And up on crutches I never will walk,
For I'll have a beautiful leg of cork."

chorus

A doctor came on his vocation
And over it made a long oration,
And over it made a long oration,
And finished it off with an amputation.

chorus

When the leg was on and finished right,
When the leg was on they screwed it tight.
But still he went with a bit of a hop,
When he found the leg it wouldn't stop.

chorus

O'er hedges and ditches and scaur and plain
To rest his wearied limbs he'd fain.
He threw himself down but all in vain,
The leg got up and away again.

chorus

He called to them that were in sight,
"Stop me or I'm wounded quite"
Although their aid he did invite,
In less than a minute he was out of sight.

chorus

And he kept running from place to place,
The people thought he was running a race,
He clung to posts for to stop the pace,
But the leg it still kept up the chase.

chorus

Over hedges and ditches and plain and scaur,
And Europe he has travelled o'er
Although he's dead and is no more,
The leg goes on as it did before.

chorus

So often you see in broad daylight,
A skeleton on a cork leg tight,
Although the artist did not him invite,
He never was paid and it served him right.

chorus

----------------- (Although this version refers to an artist at the end, it has left out the verses which you find in the database, regarding the artist who specialized in making cork legs. )

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Michelle from Newfoundland
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 12:12 PM

Hi there!

This is my first visit to this site so I've just been bobbing around exploring when I stumbled on 'celtic song questions' ... yours being one of them.

First of all, are you familiar with Newfoundland? We are the most eastern province of Canada and have a hugh celtic tradition (probably because we are so close to Ireland, and we were settled primarily by the English, Irish, Scotish and French).

I am a female performed myself & have been singing traditional songs since I was a young girl. I could recommend alot of different artists & their material....some Irish, some Newfoundlanders. If interested you can email me at m.myrick@nf.sympatico.ca

Michelle


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jon W.
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 12:52 PM

A couple upbeat songs from Boys of the Lough: "The Bonny Laborin' Boy" from the CD "Fair Hills of Ireland" and "The Sea Apprentice" from "In the Tradition." Another happy song I've heard them do but don't know if it's on an album, and don't know the title, has to do with eloping "over the mountain". I'll try to post the lyrics next week, I've only got the song on a videotape of a concert broadcast.

My observation is that the Irish generally sing when they're sad and dance when they're happy (at least from the sound of the music).

Jon W.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Alice
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 01:32 PM

Another Thomas Moore song that isn't too melancholy and has a pretty tune is "The Pretty Maid Milking The Cow".

http://ingeb.org/songs/itwasona.html
(Cailín Deas Crúite Na Mbó, or colleen dhas cruthen na moe ) Pretty Maid Milking the Cow (or It Was On A Fine Summer Morning).

One of my favorite standards for both tune and lyrics that aren't sad is the old love song (not the rebel version) of the Foggy Dew.

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Big Mick
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 02:44 PM

Welcome/Failte,

Here are a couple that I sing in Gaelige, but there are also english translations. Ta mo Chleamhnas Deanta and Cunla. If you need the lyrics, drop me a line at mlane@accn.org.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tinwhistler
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 02:45 PM

I knew you'd not let me down, Mudcatters! Thanks to you all.

Alice-Pretty Maid Milking a Cow is a beautiful tune. I play it in figerstyle guitar as an instumental--does it have words? I guess it must, but I've never heard them. Isn't it also the song that belonged to the faeries and was so beautiful that whoever heard it was bewitched?

Looking through my Solas albums I found that you are right, Susan-Marie. Karan Casey seems to like upbeat songs. In addition to the ones you mention there's Nil Ni La, The Newry Highwayman (a little sad, but still upbeat), Adieu Lovely Nancy (one of my favorites to sing, but I change the words a little. I don't think the sailor intended to deceive!), ALilu na Bhana (beautiful). Can't wait til their next album!

Thank you for the lyrics, which brought a smile and made me chuckle.

Sue


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Alice
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 05:58 PM

Tinwhistler, the lyrics are at the URL I included in my previous message. Here is the address, again:

http://ingeb.org/songs/itwasona.html

More suggestions:

Mist Covered Mountains
Wexford Mummer's Song
The Spanish Lady
Westering Home
Ar Fol Lol Lol Lo
The Rose of Tralee
The Wild Mountain Thyme
The Singing Bird

alice in montana


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAID GOING TO COMBER (NEXT MARKET DAY)^^
From: Alice
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 06:27 PM

Tinwhistler, here is another one that is not a challenging range to sing, and isn't melancholy. I've never heard this one recorded, but I have the old sheet music. Email to me if you need the tune. acflynn@mcn.net

THE NEXT MARKET DAY
Ulster melody, fragment of old Tyrone ballad.

A maid goin' to Comber her markets to larn,
To sell for her mammy three hanks of fine yarn,
She met with a young man along the highway,
Which caused this young damsel to dally and stray.

Sit ye beside me, I mean ye no harm.
Sit ye beside me, this new tune to larn,
Here is three guineas your mammy to pay,
So lay by your yarn til the next market day.

They sat down together, the grass it was green,
And the day was the fairest that ever was seen,
Oh, the look in your eyes beats a mornin' o' May,
I could sit by your side til the next market day.

This young maid went home and the words that he said,
And the air that he played her still rang in her head,
She says I'll go find him by land or by sea,
Til he larns me that tune called, 'The Next Market Day'.

alice


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 08:48 PM

Sue, If you like Karan Casey's songs and singing I highly recommend her solo album. In addition to the Gray Mare there's also Martinmas Time and the Craggen White Hare, both upbeat songs about escaping from a band of men with bad intentions. Thanks for posing the question, I'm getting a lot out of the replies.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Maelgwyn
Date: 21 Aug 98 - 11:50 PM

Someone mentioned 'Newry Highwayman'. Boiled In Lead does a really wicked recording of it on the CD 'Antler Dance'. :)


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 22 Aug 98 - 05:46 AM

Shegui did a belter called Tagliony, (Sean Kane's singing)but I never did grasp the words to the first couple of verses. I would be well grateful if anyone has the words if they could post them, eh, Sean? Another cracker is the Twa' recruitin Seargeants. Wha' saw the 42nd is excellent if short. Jonathan.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Sophie
Date: 22 Aug 98 - 10:18 AM

Andy M.Stewart's Rambling Rover is quite cheery I would have thought. I'm female and not a very good singer and I can just about do it, so I guess you could as well. Lyrics are at http://www.mindspring.com/~cwalters/text/rover.txt Sophie


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 22 Aug 98 - 01:01 PM

Oh, and while I think about it there are a couple of A1 Breton songs; Tri Martolod & Son ar Chist'r in Breton and Les Ponts de Nantes in French. Jonathan.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Mo
Date: 23 Aug 98 - 05:25 PM

I've just remembered another one -Jock O'Hazeldean - lyrics are in the DT - it sounds like it's going to be fairly wrist-slitting right up to the final verse as the lady being sung to/about "lets the tears doonfa' " at the end of each verse - but, she does what she wants in the end! I find I have a bit of difficulty singing this as I suspect the range is really more suited to a man - it goes quite low - but it is stil a great song to sing. Best,


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 25 Aug 98 - 03:06 PM

"Taglioni" is basically a double-entendre type song, if I remember rightly - so it's easy to lose track of the words! Not sure if I have a set at home. Will check!

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TOWN I LOVED SO WELL (Coulter
From: Helen
Date: 26 Aug 98 - 07:25 PM

A song which has always been one of my favourites is The Town I Loved So Well - it has the depressing second last verse but ends with a hope for more peaceful times. It's in the database.

Helen

THE TOWN I LOVED SO WELL
(Phil Coulter)
As recorded by Phil Coulter on "Words & Music" (1981)

In my memory I will always see
The town that I have loved so well
Where our school played ball by the gasyard wall
And we laughed through the smoke and the smell.
Going home in the rain running up the dark lane
Past the jail and down behind the fountain
Those were happy days in so many, many ways
In the town I loved so well.

In the early mornin' the shirt factory horn
Called women from Creggan, the Moor and the Bog
While the men on the dole played a mothering role
Fed the children and then walked the dog
And when times got tough there was just about enough
And they saw it through without complaining
For deep inside was a burning pride
In the town I loved so well.

There was music there in the Derry air
Like a language that we could all could understand
I remember the day that I earned my first pay
When I played in a small pickup band
There I spent my youth and to tell you the truth
I was sad to leave it all behind me
For I'd learned about life and I found a wife
In the town I loved so well:

But when I returned how my eyes how they burned
To see how a town could be brought to its knees
By the armoured cars and the bombed-out bars
And the gas that hangs on to every breeze
Now an army's installed by that old gasyard wall
And the damned barbed wire gets higher and higher
With their tanks and their guns
Oh my God, what have they done
To the town I loved so well?

Now the music's gone but they carry on
For their spirit's been bruised, never broken
They will not forget but their hearts are still set
On tomorrow and peace once again
For what's done is done and what's won is won
And what's lost is lost and gone forever
I can only pray for a bright brand new day
In the town I loved so well.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TRIP OVER THE MOUNTAIN^^
From: Jon W.
Date: 31 Aug 98 - 10:06 AM

Here are the lyrics for the Boys of the Lough song I mentioned earlier. I think I'll try and cobble together an ABC of the tune and post the whole song in a separate thread later.

OVER THE MOUNTAIN
As sung by Christy O'Leary & Boys of the Lough

One night as the bright moon arose in the sky,
I first took a notion to marry.
I put on my hat and away I did fly,
You might think I was in a great hurry
When I got to a place where I often had been,
My heart gave a leap when my darling I seen,
She opened the door and I bade her good night,
Saying "Come with me over the mountain"

Ah what sort of a push has got into your head,
I am glad for to see you so merry.
It's now twelve o'clock and I should be in bed,
Ah speak low or you'll waken my mammy.
If you think that I'm jesting, my jesting is true,
I've courted nine months, faith, I think it should do.
And before I do sleep I'd be married to you,
If you'll come with me over the mountain.

If I were to make an elopement with you,
It might well be attempted with danger.
The country would prattle and tattle us, too,
All my friends they would frown and no wonder.
Ah, just let them prattle and tattle away,
Consult with yourself now, it's very near day.
And I don't give a pin what the whole of them say,
If I once had you over the mountain.

But I am resolved now at home for to stay,
for I think it more fitting and better.
So fare thee well darling I now must away,
and so that put an end to the matter.
Oh stop, stop a moment while I get my shoes,
My heart gave a leap when I heard the glad news.
She ran to the door saying "Maybe I choose
To elope with you over the mountain."

By this time the moon had gone down in the sky,
And the morning star brightly was shining.
We both made away with the greatest of haste,
For a wedding our two hearts were pining.
The suthard came two us without much delay,
He married us both on that very same day,
And it's often we chat when we've little to say,
Of the trip we made over the mountain.


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Subject: Lyr Add: AINGIR GHEAS CHRÚITI NA MÓ
From: Bruce O.
Date: 31 Aug 98 - 09:04 PM

[This traditional text, from JFSS. 1920, takes the song to the point where the young man has enticed the pretty milkmaid into an inn for a drink. The rest is not given, and I have no other text.]

AINGIR GHEAS CHRÚITI NA MÓ.
[The Pretty Milkmaid or The Pretty Girl Milking the Cow]

Er mo heasduil trí Bwailhi na Múirni,
'S mé 'g avarc erchu'mchnoca cheóig,
Shea do ghearcas an aingir wouíl wu'inti
Ba gheanavuil gnúish agus clo':
Mo hata ghom bahas go rúigeas,
'S is tapuig dom d' úlha shí 'n óig,
'S is dearafa 'mw' aiginigur smúinggeas
Er aingir gheas a chrúiti na mó.

Do stadasa shealad a smu'inggi,
Agus a machnav cár húirlig shí 'm hreó;
Shea do ghearcas an dartuiri du'r duv
Na haici, ghá tiúnlac sa ro'd,
A cahav a gheartana liúm-sa,
Do laguig har dúchas mé 'm hno',
Agus do ha'ruig mé i greahanuiv dlúha
Lee taingheav don chúiling desh óg.

"Arcuim-she, wascalach wu'inti,
Fis t'ainimi hu'irt dom i dreó;
Cá cahir, cá bwaili puirt túaha,
Cá fearanta dúchas dot órd?
An tu Palas chyn chailci, nú Júná,
Hug shealad sa dlúhammuig wóir,
Nú an aingir taá 'r bara na dúnach
Hug Paras na lúngg lesh er bóod?"

Do reaguir go tapuig mé an chu'ilion:
"Ni creachdáca á núaruish mé fós;
Er healad do chaihing mo chu'rsa,
Le shealad am chúav ig Wócs;
Coesh Leavuing na vearanta [?ta' v' earanta] du'chas.
Agus ás son go Cu'm is grach treo',
Gur v' í ainim do chleachtuim-she húirt orom
Aingir gheas Chrúiti na Mo."

Cé gur cáitti le shealead am ghnúish mé,
Ba hapwig mear lúfar mo hóid:
Do freabas le meanamuin chúichi
Agus do ghairimeas cúpala póg.
"A haishci na garad" shea dúert lium,
"Ná masluig mo chlú-as ghod gheóin;
'S ty snamuihi heana le cúiling,
Agus eadaruivi blúiri bdog óg."

"A haishci na garad" shea du'ert léi,
Stad shealad am chlúit-she go fóil,
'S nár cheapasa bearta na dlúih-chilish
Do harac er chúiling 'ot o'rd;
Er wahiv a tailiv ná fúicing-she
T' avuil i gúnggaracht fwí vrón;
Agus leanav má hagan sa túgara,
Gur b' áhir chun cúnta mé leó."

D' aharuig a haigini liúm-sa,
'S is gairid gur shciúird lium a ród;
Tig a tavuirni do casag er dúish shing,
Agus do ghairimeas crúsca er e mór.

The Next Market Day, given above, 'fragment' given by Hughes, and sung by the McPeakes as "A Maid going to Comber" (from 1st line). For the full original see The Comber's Whistle on my website.

Seduction of the milkmaid on her way to market is a pretty old theme. See also:
Haselbury Girl (DT), Maid of Tottenham (DT), Carman's Whistle (my website), Down in/ Within the North Country (my website)/ and The Farmer's Daughter of Merry Wakefield (my website) probably all stem from a 16th century ballad, "Malkin was a Country Maid", of which only one verse seems to be extant (my website). However, there were undoubtably even earlier versions.

Nellie coming home from the wake (O. J. Abbott), and The Game of All Fours (Purslow's Marrow Bones) are also quite similar seduction pieces, as are the two 16th century versions of Watkin's Ale (my website). In The Nightingale's Song (traditional version in DT, broadside version on my website) the setting is considerably different, but the contents of the song are much the same. Cf. also "Dabbling in the dew makes milkmaids fair".

I have no doubt that others can add more very similar pieces of seduction of the traveling maid or milkmaid.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 01 Sep 98 - 06:28 AM

Jon W.

"suthard" is probably "sagart" as explained in your other thread.

Jonathan

I'll post "Taglioni" to a Lyr. Add. thread.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: steve t
Date: 01 Sep 98 - 10:49 AM

It is a common misconception that there exist happy Celtic songs. For example, many people will steadfastly maintain that there is NO FOURTH VERSE to Star of the County Down:

So here I stand with my hat in hand, while my heart knows deep, dark blight
For my Irish lass, curse her heart of brass! tripped and died in the bar last night
Still her ghost doth say: twill soon be our wedding day, but I'll sadly call whiskey my bride
And in far off lands, sure I'll ring my hands, drain a glass and shout, Christ, I tried!

But in the folk tradition, you don't have to sing all the verses if you don't want to :-)


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: steve t
Date: 01 Sep 98 - 10:54 AM

The Fair Flower of Northumberland is on my mind right now. It's not all happy. Fact is, it's kinda shocking near the middle. But I always find the final verse rather uplifting.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Maelgwyn
Date: 01 Sep 98 - 12:44 PM

Has anyone mentioned 'Dark Eyed Sailor' yet?


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 03 Sep 98 - 03:05 PM

Martin, thanks for Taglioni. I'll post what I can make out of Sean Kane's version when I get the Vinyl urge. (the temptation to say "groove" there was almost irresistible.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 03 Sep 98 - 04:14 PM

OK, all this discussion of Star of the County Down has me wanting to learn it. Would someone please recommend a good, readily available recording of it? I'll be at the Irish Folk Festival in Maryland this weekend, maybe I'll request that someone sing it (fourth verse and all!)


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Robalot@Compuserve.com
Date: 03 Sep 98 - 09:57 PM

Sure'n I'm mighty tweaked no one has thought to name that ald classic "Whiskey in the Jar" sure, the lads in trouble deep by the end, but the tune is a lively one for all a that!


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Gunny
Date: 03 Sep 98 - 11:05 PM

"Irish Heartbeat" by Van Morrison and the Chieftains has a pretty good rendition of "Star of the County Down", as well as the upbeat "I'll Tell Me Ma", a happy, easy song to sing and play. (Lyrics for both here in DT).


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: alison
Date: 04 Sep 98 - 07:21 AM

Hi,

Loved the fourth verse Steve. Now that plus the other two in the middle that no one ever sings makes the grand total of 6.

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: alison
Date: 04 Sep 98 - 07:29 AM

Hi,

If you check out the "Roger Whittaker" section of your record store. He did a lovely version of "star of the County Down."

Just checked the database it only has one of the two verses I was talking about.... it has the "I've travelled a bit one"

The one which isn't there goes.

"She'd a soft brown eye and a look so sly
And a smile like a rose in June
And you hung on each note from her lily white throat
As she lilted an Irish tune
At the pattern dance you were held in a trance
As she danced through a reel or a jig
And when her eyes she'd roll, she'd coax upon my soul
a spud from a hungry pig."

Makes you wonder why people tend not to sing this verse, eh??!!

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Cuilionn
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 01:11 AM

Favorite songs o' guid cheer tae sing...hmmm. After three grand weeks wi' a piper/fiddler/singer friend, we came tae th' conclusion that ev'ry tune we're drawn tae falls intae ane single catagory. We call it "Minor Modal Maudlin." Ye can occasionally supplement that wi' additional descriptors sic as "Mysterious" oor "Murderin'". Th' fact o' the matter is that, as a singer whae cannae read music verra weel, I depend on th' singin' o' ithers tae lairn mair sangs. Performers get sae muckle mileage oot o' th' drama o' those maudlin sangs, that they tend tae latch ontae them an' trot them oot whene'er they can. Amang Scots Gaelic singers, for instance, how mony varsions o' Ailein Duinn/Dark Alan dae we hae runnin' aroond th' noo? An' I'm beginnin' tae wince ev'ry time I hear "She Moved Through The Fair." I've been readin' buiks fu' o' notes on field recordins frae Scotland an' Nova Scotia, an' I'm findin' some brilliant lyrics, baith th' maudlin sairt an' mair merry. But maist o' th' performers I hear are wrappit up in coverin' th' weel-kent standards, sae I cannae dae mair than guess at these ither tunes. Tae those o' ye whae perform AND read music, I'm beggin' ye...dig oot some o' these gaitherin's o' auld sangs, an' mak a handfu' o' them yer ain. Gie puir illiterate folk like me a chance tae hear sumpit that isnae dane by sae mony. O' course th' crowd will clamour for their favorites, but breathin' life back intae some forgotten tunes will be nourishin' tae all o' us. That said, I'll retreat agin tae my plaice i' th' cinders an' gae back tae rakin' th' fire!

Gabh spòrs,

--Cuilionn


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 18 Sep 98 - 02:57 PM

Faur is a'body?


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 01:14 PM

steve t - Great verse! I'll have to print it out and send it to a friend of mine - "Star of the County Down" is one of the signature pieces of the band that he plays in, and I'm sure he'll be delighted to throw out that verse in the pub when the Guinness has flowed freely. :)

alison - What's the other verse that no one ever sings? Do you know it?

Slán, Kiwi


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: alison
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 08:44 PM

Hi Kiwi,

Go back up through the thread, I already printed it (4/9/98)

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: pegeen
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 08:54 PM

Hi - I am new here but really enjoy my music! I have been trying to track down a song sung in pubs and festivals around Pennsylvania - Chorus is as follows:

"All God's creatures get to sing in the choir "Some sing lower some sing higher Some just sing on the tlelphone wire Others clap their hands or paws or claws Or whatever they've got"

It really is a cute sung song at Irish festivals - little kids love it - I have the music in my head but not the rest of the words. Any help appreciated


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Barry Finn
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 10:21 PM

pegeen, the song you're looking for is in the database (click here). Do a search (using the box in the upper right hand coner) , enter into the box [A place in the choir]. If you're looking for a song or info on one post it as a seperate thread, you'll have far better luck than if it's buried at the bottom of a long thread. Barry


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Kathleen
Date: 20 Sep 98 - 08:49 PM

My little sister is convinced that there are no happy Celtic songs, so this thread made me laugh. Has anyone mentioned: Enniskillen Dragoon; On the Banks of the Roses; A Forg Went A-Courtin' (o.k., someone dies in that one); Johnson's Motor Car; Nell Flaherty's Drake; and my favorite Scottish song: Will Ye No Come Back Again. All of these were done by the Clancy Brothers, except maybe Will Ye No. . .

later

kathleen


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Kathleen
Date: 20 Sep 98 - 08:56 PM

I forgot one and the title still eludes me but the words are:

Ye Jacobites by name, lend an ear, lend an ear Ye Jacobites by name, lend an ear Ye Jacobites by name, your faults I will proclaim, Your doctrines I mun blame, you shall hear, you shall hear Your doctrines I mun blame, you shall hear.

There are more verses, but I didn't even check to see if it's listed here. Sorry. Oh yeah, it's the Frog not the Forg that went a-courtin'

later

kathleen


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: BRACKEN
Date: 21 Sep 98 - 03:13 AM

In search of happy celtic tunes I would refer you to a non electronic source and that is the Soodlum books. There are at least three or four, 100 Great Scottish Songs and Soodlum's Selection of Irish Ballads Volumes 1, 2 and 3. They also have put out a tape that goes along with the books to give you the tunes if you don't read music but play by ear (like me). There are many happier tunes in these such as Band O'Shearers, Buy Broom Beesoms, The Lea Rig, Maids When Your're Young, Mally Leigh (Archie Fisher did a nice recording of that one), Mary Mack, The Merchant's Son, The Jolly Beggarman, I could go one. As a performer I am always looking for traditional tunes that few and hopefully no one else is performing I do have a couple of other more obscure books which have some happy tunes if you need more.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 06:47 AM

Looking for the lyric to The Lass o' Erin's Isle (Two summers now have passed and gone) Jonathan


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 06:49 AM

Looking for the lyric to The Lass o' Erin's Isle (Two summers now have passed and gone) Jonathan


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Alice
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 11:17 AM

kathleen... the Clancy Brothers did record it. They called it "Bonny Charlie" (Will Ye No Come Back Again) in their recordings and songbook. Not quite a happy song, though. It is a beautiful tune and a good singalong.

Jonathan... did you search the database for lyrics and the forum for other threads of the Lass O' Erin's Isle? As Barry noted, your request will be buried in this discussion, but the answer may be just a few keystrokes away.

I'm glad to see this thread on up-beat happy songs still thriving!! I have not been joining in on too many other thread discussions lately. This one still keeps the atmosphere going of the old Mudcat I dearly love.

(I may be repeating myself, this thread is getting long)
More upbeat songs:

Eileen Oge
Will You Come to the Bower
The Holy Ground
Agricultural Irish Girl
Let Him Go Let Him Tarry
Have a Drink of Whiskey

alice in montana


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Subject: Lyr Add: Dónal Agus Mórag
From: Ciara
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 11:33 AM

Altan performs a song on Celtic Odyssey called "Dónal Agus Mórag". It's a really spirited and upbeat wedding song from Ulster. I love it and it's one of the few songs which aren't very sad! The words are:

Bhí móran daoine uasal ann
Bhí tuatanaigh na h-Alban ann
Bhí 'n maistir scoile is an ministir ann
Bhí an laoch Mac Amhlaigh ann

Curfa:

Dónal, 'sé Dónal, 'sé Dónal a rinne an bhainis
Dónal agus Mórag a rinne an bhainis ainmeall

Bhí cearcan ann, 's bhí géanna ann
Bhí corr is doisín sgairbh ann
Seo bha iad is bhí car a' bí ann
'Sé cearc na n-éan a b'fhearr dhuibh ann

Dónal, 'sé Dónal, 'sé Dónal a rinne an bhainis
Dónal agus Mórag a rinne an bhainis ainmeall

Bhí bradáin 's bric ón Éirne ann
Is flúirse feoil na bhfia n-éan ann
Feol mart 's lao, ba bhlasta bhí
Bhí uanfheol friochta is oisfheoil ann

Dónal, 'sé Dónal, 'sé Dónal a rinne an bhainis
Dónal agus Mórag a rinne an bhainis ainmeall

Bhí 'n dí go fial 's go fairsing ann
Bhí brannda is fíon na Spáinne ann
Bhí póitín stil is mead le mil
Bhí beoir is leann na h-Éireann ann

Dónal, 'sé Dónal, 'sé Dónal a rinne an bhainis
Dónal agus Mórag a rinne an bhainis ainmeall

HTML line breaks added. -JoeClone, 17-Apr-01.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Big Mick
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 08:49 PM

Great song, Ciara. By the way, I live in Michigan and my 6 year old daughters name is Ciara. She is named after a lovely young lady from Drogheda. She always gets very excited when she sees others with her name, as it is not very common, spelled properly, here in the States.

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: mcmud
Date: 27 Sep 98 - 12:47 AM

Has anyone mentioned Raggle Taggle Gypsy on Planxty albums? Also, The Rambling Siuler, off their After the Break Album.

I think it's genetic, too. Aside from the latter tune, and Willie and Mary (on Deanta's latest recording, and initially sad but with a happy ending), I don't much like the more upbeat tunes. -Jill McMahon


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 27 Sep 98 - 05:03 PM

I like the Irish love songs, but as I said in another thread they are rarely sung in pubs over here because (1) there is too much din and (2) everyone wants to hear the usual rebel songs.

I think there was a separate thread on Star Of The County Down, and as I mentioned there I can see no resemblance whatsoever between the tune of that song and the tune to Banks of Newfoundland.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Jonathan
Date: 29 Sep 98 - 02:28 PM

Got the Lass of Erin's Isle! Thanks everyone. J. Speaking of resemblance; take Andrew Lammie, speed it up & substitute the lyrics & you have Farewell to Nova Scotia. Neat.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John M
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 12:44 AM

Old Woman From Wexford, and The Town of Ballybay, ( Spelling ? ) are funny tunes. If they are not in the D.B., ask this guy Joe Offer to get them for you, if he can't ( yeah right ) I'll type them up. Good Luck !


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John M
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 12:53 AM

You don't have to bug Joe! They are there if you check, I don't know how to drag hypertext to the letters here or I would have done it for you.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John Nolan
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 03:32 PM

My favorite Celtic song - one widely sung in Scotland - is Fritz. Surprisingly, it's not in the database.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John Nolan
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 03:34 PM

My favorite Celtic song - one widely sung in Scotland - is Fritz. Surprisingly, it's not in the database.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John Nolan
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 03:35 PM

My favorite Celtic song - one widely sung in Scotland - is Fritz. Surprisingly, it's not in the database.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Mo
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 07:02 PM

Don't be shy John - give us the words,and the tune if you can and we can all share it! Mo


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John Nolan
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 07:09 PM

OK,Mo...
Fritz a grand auld team tae play for,
Fritz a grand auld team tae see,
And if you know their history,
It's enough tae make yer heart go oh, oh, oh, oh...
We don't care what the animals say,
What the hell do we care?
For we only know, there gaun tae be a show,
And the Glasgow Celtic wull be there!


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: pegeen
Date: 05 Oct 98 - 07:59 PM

Thanks to everyone joining the discussion - particularly Barry Finn! you made my night fine lad!! I just wasn't working the base properly ( what else is new?) I must agree that the Celts are a mournful lot - it is difficult to find something that is fun without gagging on the unicorn song ad nauseum.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: John M.
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 09:44 AM

Shel Silverstein - Unicorn author, is a far cry from being a Celt ! I wish we could claim him though, his poems, are brilliant.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Robert
Date: 07 Oct 98 - 02:36 PM

One of mt favorites is a tune by the name of "Sarah" an acapella tune which I choose to sing when-ever I can.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: OSh
Date: 07 Oct 98 - 05:54 PM

There are many great, happy Celtic songs. A good source is the Clancy Brothers who sing such standards as "Dicey Riley," Galway Races," "Bog Down in the Valley," "Gypsy Rover" "I'll tell my Ma," 'Brennan on the Moor" (song of a highwayman and a daring escape), "Big Strong Man," "Holy Ground" "Jolly Tinker" "Bold Thady Quill" and "Take her up to Monto" to name a few. Heck, even some of the songs were people "die" are pretty upbeat, such as "The Mermaid," and "Irish Rover" (a standard).


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: pegeen
Date: 07 Oct 98 - 07:39 PM

Dear OSh Yes I agree and I have most of the one's you mentioned in my repetoire - always brings the house down - particularly "Seven Drunken Nights"


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: alison
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 07:02 AM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Shel Silverstein
From: Bill Cameron
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 12:52 PM

John M, anyone who would praise the writer of (excerpt)

"That man is big and ugly, and he's mean and grim.
He's gonna kick your ass with his artificial limb!
But next morning bright and early, I ran off with Peg Leg's girly,
And I also took his wooden leg, just to play it safe
But there weren't no time for laughter, cause he started hoppin after
And I keep on goin faster, but he won't give up the chase.

And I'm a three-legged man with a two legged woman,
Bein chased round the country by a one-legged fool
He's hoppin, and a floppin, and he shows no sign of stoppin
And I tell ya boys this life is hard & cruel."

-Shel Silverstein

probably listens to Art Thieme's recordings when no one else is around.

(like me)

Bill


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Bill Cameron
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 01:01 PM

But to get to topic: happy Celtic songs (especially Scottish) are like happy blues, or the legendary "pleasant hangover". They may exist, but are anomalies.

And most of them are happy for rather wrong reasons. ("Welcome Royal Charlie").

Dourly yours its a poor excuse for pickin a man's pocket etc etc]

Bill


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Subject: Lyr Add: The Blarney Roses^^
From: Alice
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 01:03 PM

This thread is getting long, so I don't know if this one was already mentioned....

Where the Blarney Roses Grow

I requested this awhile back, and Frank Maher emailed them to me (thank's Frank).

I checked and did not find it in the database.
alice
----------
Hi Alice,
Here are the Lyrics to the Blarney Roses as taken from an Old Connie Foley Record.

'twas over in old Ireland not far from Cushindall,
One Morn I met a Coleen There,the Fairest of Them All,
'twas with My Young Affections and My Money She did go,
And She told Me She belonged to where the Blarney Roses grow.

Can anybody tell Me where the Blarney Roses grow,
It may be down in Limerick Town, or over in Mayo,
It's somewhere in the Emerald Isle but This I'd like to know,
Can anybody tell Me where the Blarney Roses grow.

Her Cheeks were like the Roses and Her Hair a Raven Hue,
And when She had done with Me,sure I was raving too,
She left Me Sorely Stranded, not a Cent she left You know,
When She told Me She belonged to where the Blarney Roses grow.

Can anybody tell Me where the Blarney Roses grow etc.

There's Roses in Killarney and the same in County Clare,
But 'pon My Word These Roses Boys, I can't find anywhere,
She Blarneyed Me and by the Power, She broke My Heart You know,
Did This Coleen that belonged to where the Blarney Roses Grow.

I hope I got all of the Words right.The Record was a bit scratchy
All the best
Frank Maher


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: johnm
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 08:25 PM

Just received a disc by Diarmuid O Suilleabhain and the notes to a song "An Gamhnaichin" describe it so: "This is a hilarious bawdy song which used to be sung by Tadhg O Riordain fraom Cuil Aodha." Only the Irish is given,no English translation.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: johnm
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 08:36 PM

That disc is "Bruach na Carraige Baine". Second fun song is My Pup Came Home From Claedeach John


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Annraoi
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 09:24 PM

johnm, Exact Disc Ref. The ref. to Pup from Claedach intrigues me. Ref, le do thoil ? Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Annraoi
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 09:24 PM

johnm, Exact Disc Ref. The ref. to Pup from Claedach intrigues me. Ref, le do thoil ? Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: silverdragon
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 10:25 PM

do anyone knows the lyrics of the plains of Kildare played by Paul Brady and Andy Irvine? please help me!


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: johnm
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 11:45 PM

annraoi Bruach na Carraige Baine Diarmuid O Suilleabhain Clo lar-Chonnachta 1995 MOC Music 1995.. You can get it from Dufour Editions Inc. PO Box Chester Springs Pa 19425 1 800 869 5677 item CICD 115 for the Disc or CIC 115 for the cassette in its Irish Book and Music Catalog--great catalog by the way. If you want I can post the song in a day or so. John


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From:
Date: 24 Dec 98 - 12:41 PM

English, not Celtic, but no one seems to have mentioned the great Frankie Armstrong, who specializes in strong-women type neglected ballads; her "William Taylor" is the standard, in my book; and of course there is "Nine Times a Night ..."

If I were rich, I would go to England and find a way into her workshops ...


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Reta
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 11:18 PM

Gosh, what a list! I just feel I must put in something to keep the thread alive.

How about the beautiful, funny love song, THE SPINNING WHEEL?

I fell in love with it's lovely melody and funny romantic words many years ago. It was the first "real" Irish ballad I had ever heard, sung by our new neighbor in Ireland. It started a great love affair with the Irish music for me. I still love it. It must be in the database. If not, I can put it on for you.

This is a great thread. I have really enjoyed it.

Blessings Reta


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: schmuze
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 02:20 PM

Re: Mo's ideas Ho-ro My Nut Brown Maiden, you'll find on a Corries' album and the other one on a record by the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. Hope you find them!


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,jeff-cole@supanet.com
Date: 01 Mar 04 - 12:30 AM

Any one got the words to 'Ye Jacobites by name lend an ear lend an ear. Ye Jacobites bt name lend an ear.? I believe this was performed by the Mc.Cowmans?


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 01 Mar 04 - 12:36 AM

You will find "Jacobites' in any decent edition of Burns. It was written by Rabbie.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 01 Mar 04 - 12:38 AM

Also in the digitrad at 0.0831. Enter title in search window.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,lumatt@rogers.com
Date: 05 Jan 06 - 11:54 AM

I need the lyrics to the scotish song "Westering Home". do you have it?
Thank you
Mary Olivo


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,searching
Date: 20 Apr 10 - 09:26 PM

I'm searching for a song and wondering if anyone knows it. I don't remember exactly how it goes, but it's about a sailor who came to shore fell in love with a woman, but the sea was his true love so he went back to it. She dressed up as a sailor and worked on his ship and he discovered her and they lived happily ever after. I really loved the song and I can't find it now. Thanks!
Please see this thread (click)


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Nick E
Date: 20 Apr 10 - 10:36 PM

Rambles of spring
Come to the bower.
Come Along
Come to the bower


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Leadfingers
Date: 21 Apr 10 - 05:20 AM

Makes a change to find an old threat about 'Celtic' songs where nearly all the songs ARE more or less Celtic - Though of course Bill Staines and Shel Siverstein WERE inserted !
How DID Shel's 'Unicorns' become Celtic ??


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tradsinger
Date: 21 Apr 10 - 06:10 AM

Define 'Celtic' (and duck quickly).

Tradsinger


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tootler
Date: 21 Apr 10 - 07:03 PM

Any song or tune from the British Isles that is not from England.

Plus.....any song or tune that actually is from England, but somebody has sworn blind is Irish.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Leadfingers
Date: 21 Apr 10 - 07:09 PM

Britanny , as well as large chunks of Eastern Canada have VERY strong Celtic connections


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,Allan
Date: 22 Apr 10 - 02:53 AM

"Any song or tune from the British Isles that is not from England."

So songs in Cornish wouldn't be Celtic but things like The Dowie Dens of Yarrow would be - even though the former is from a Celtic language tradition and the latter isn't? One wonders if the original poster was meaning Celtic (as in from a Celtic language tradition) or Celtic (as in those parts of the Isles which aren't England) or Celtic (as in he means basically just Irish and Scottish type music ). I suspect it might be the latter but it is a confusing term whcih means different things to different people


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Tootler
Date: 22 Apr 10 - 11:13 AM

Guest Allan,

I hope you realised I was being flippant.

The term "Celtic music" is, IMO, essentially meaningless. I believe it is one of those terms ("World music" is another) dreamed up by marketing people to categorise music for sale so they can put it in a box.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Leadfingers
Date: 22 Apr 10 - 11:36 AM

Sadly , these days , Celtic Music simply means its been recorded by an Irish singer or band !
Hence the inclusion of SO many contemporary songs from all over the world !


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,Allan
Date: 22 Apr 10 - 05:37 PM

"I hope you realised I was being flippant. The term "Celtic music" is, IMO, essentially meaningless."

Yes I guessed it was kind of tongue in cheek and I agree it is pretty meaningless or at very best confusing.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: GUEST,Steve
Date: 23 Apr 10 - 07:39 AM

And no Welsh songs mentioned to boot, perhaps because they are upbeat! Or is it the need for a full choir? Cwm Rhondda anyone?


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Allan Conn
Date: 03 Mar 11 - 08:36 AM

"So songs in Cornish wouldn't be Celtic but things like The Dowie Dens of Yarrow would be"

And presumably the Dowie Dens would be Celtic but a Border Ballad from the English side in the same tradition and sung in basically the same language wouldn't be :-)


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: harmonic miner
Date: 03 Mar 11 - 10:38 AM

"Maids When You're Young Never Wed an Old Man" springs to mind because I'm listening to the Dubliners with Luke Kelly at present.

A bit of a can of worms opened there at mention of 'Celtic' songs but I think most people know what you mean. Apparently not all the 'celtic' nations are genetically 'celtic', is is more of a cultural thing bt is very hard to define. Always very hard to say where a song is 'from'

They say the sad songs go deepest. But nothing wrong with a bit of huomour.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Brian Peters
Date: 03 Mar 11 - 11:14 AM

...except that 'Maids When You're Young' would appear most likely to have had an English origin. Go here for the generally impeccable Malcolm Douglas's note on the song.


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Stringsinger
Date: 05 Mar 11 - 12:28 PM

The Lark in the Clear Air
The County Down
The Ash Grove
Red Is the Rose
Open The Door Quietly (nobody seems to know this song)
John Reilly


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Subject: RE: Favorite Celtic songs for singing
From: Thompson
Date: 05 Mar 11 - 05:26 PM

Some of the old songs, no longer sung, are beautiful, like Last Rose of Summer (Nina Simone has a lovely version) and Snowy-Breasted Pearl.


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