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Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carroll

DigiTrad:
UTAH CARROLL


GUEST,Jimbo 16 Jul 03 - 10:55 PM
GUEST,Q 16 Jul 03 - 11:39 PM
GUEST,Q 16 Jul 03 - 11:46 PM
masato sakurai 17 Jul 03 - 01:07 AM
GUEST,Dale 17 Jul 03 - 01:11 AM
masato sakurai 17 Jul 03 - 01:26 AM
GUEST,Q 17 Jul 03 - 01:39 AM
GUEST,Dale 17 Jul 03 - 02:28 AM
GUEST,Dale 17 Jul 03 - 02:39 AM
Stewie 17 Jul 03 - 03:34 AM
GUEST,Q 17 Jul 03 - 03:23 PM
Frankham 17 Jul 03 - 04:41 PM
GUEST 18 Jul 03 - 02:28 PM
GUEST,another guest 18 Jul 03 - 04:28 PM
Jon W. 18 Jul 03 - 04:36 PM
GUEST,Q 18 Jul 03 - 05:27 PM
GUEST 18 Jul 03 - 05:37 PM
GUEST 07 Sep 11 - 11:15 AM
GUEST,Peggy Reynolds 26 Nov 11 - 02:28 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 26 Nov 11 - 03:25 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Nov 11 - 12:33 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Nov 11 - 02:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Nov 11 - 02:48 PM
Lighter 18 Mar 14 - 06:44 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Jimbo
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 10:55 PM

My Dad use to sing this song. Anybody know the lyrics or chords?

thx.
Jim


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 11:39 PM

Arlo Guthrie's lyrics popped up as 1st item in Google- "Utah Carroll."
Utah Carroll
Almeda Riddle version is in the DT. Put utah carroll in the Lyrics and Knowledge Search, above.

The name in Fife and Fife, Cowboy and Western Songs, pp. 217-219, is "UTAH CARL." Printed with music. A very long song about a cattle stampede.
Try looking in Google for chords under both names.
.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 11:46 PM

Hooray! Listen to Almeda Riddle's recording here: Utah Carroll's Last Ride


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: masato sakurai
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 01:07 AM

UTAH CARROLL is in the DT.

Three versions of "Utah Carl" (with audio) are at The Max Hunter Folk Song Collection:

As sung by Reba Glaze, Springdale, Arkansas on July 23, 1958

As sung by Arlie Lynch, Rogers, Arkansas on August 13, 1958

As sung by Ollie Gilbert, Mountain View, Arkansas on May 26, 1969


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Dale
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 01:11 AM

Cartwright Brothers sound file on this page about When I Was A Cowboy CD.   Probably the earliest and maybe the best. 44 seconds

Much to recommend on this B&N page Shorter sample from the Cartwrights, two by Michael Martin Murphey and one each by Ed McCurdy & Skip Gorman. All excellent.

Didn't see a soundfile by Mary Robbins, but I expect there is one out there by him somewhere. Do a search for Utah Carol. This was the first version I ever heard.

There is at least one other version at the John Quincy Wolf site Jewel Hawkins Recorded in Batesville, AR 7/30/62 Could be more, I didn't check.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: masato sakurai
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 01:26 AM

From Folk Music Index to Recordings:
Utah Carl/Carroll [Laws B 4]

1. Native American Balladry, Amer. Folklore Society, Bk (1964/1950), p135
2. Albert E Brumley's Songs of the Pioneers #2, Brumley, Fol (1973), 39
3. Cartwright Brothers. When I Was a Cowboy; Songs of Cowboy Life, MorningStar 45008, LP (1984), cut# 1
4. Cleveland, Sara. Sara Cleveland, Philo 1020, LP (1975), cut# 1
5. Gorman, Skip. Trail to Mexico, Folk Legacy FSI-103C, Cas (1987), cut#A.08
6. Hamilton, Frank. Frank Hamilton Sings Folk Songs, Folkways FA 2437, LP (1962), cut# 7
7. Jarrett, Merrick. Old Chisholm Trail, Riverside RLP 12-631, LP (1956), cut#B.07
8. Johnson, Lucy and Waco. Music of the Ozarks, National Geographic Soc. 0703, LP (1972), cut# 7
9. McDonald, Reba. Ozark Folksongs. Volume II, Songs of the South and West, University of Missouri, Bk (1980/1946), p239/#206
10. Riddle, Almeda. Southern Folk Ballads, Vol. 1. American Originals: A Heritage..., August House, Sof (1987), p.154
11. Riddle, Almeda. Anglo-American Folksong Style, Prentice-Hall, Sof (1968), 6.18
12. Storm, Arnold Keith. Take the News to Mother, Folk Legacy FSA-018, LP (1964), cut# 8
See also The Traditional Ballad Index: Utah Carroll [Laws B4].


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 01:39 AM

The Almeda Riddle recording that I linked at the Wolf Collection site was made in Miller, Arkansas, 7/16/1953. Never commercially available?
Did she make a new recording for Southern Folk Ballads, vol. 1?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Dale
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 02:28 AM

Yes, that would be a different recording. So far as I know, none of the John Quincy Wolf recordings have ever been issued commercially. I'll alert Arkie to this thread, as he may have information about the various Ozark recordings and the musicians.

One recording that is not on the Folk Music Index list given by Masato is Aunt Ollie Gilbert Sings Old Folk Songs To Her Friends, Rackensack RLP-495.

Aunt Ollie Gilbert and Waco & Lucy Johnson recorded live versions at the Ozark Folk Center in the 70s, but I don't think Almeda Riddle did. I'll try to check on that later.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Dale
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 02:39 AM

Uhhh, that should be Marty Robbins in my post of 17 Jul 03 - 01:11 AM. Don't think Mary ever recorded it!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 03:34 AM

Dale,

The Cartwright Brothers recording is a good'un, but it was not the earliest. The very useful Meade et alia 'Country Music Sources' indicates that the earliest was by Charles Nabell under the title 'Utah Carl' in 1925 in St Louis [OK 7009]. I have never heard of him, have you? The next was 'Utah Carroll' by Carl T. Sprague in August 1927 in Savannah - I think I have that one on vinyl somewhere. The Cartwrights recording was made in December 1928 in Dallas. The other old-time recordings were by artists unknown to me: Marc Williams 1928, Frank Wheeler and Monroe Lamb 1929, The Wyoming Cowboy (Charles Baker) 1934 and Bill Bender 1939.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 03:23 PM

The song appeared in Lomax, Cowboy Songs, 1910, as "Utah Carroll." In that version, the little girl's name is Varro and the scene is Mexico rather than New Mexico. The blanket's color is not stated- closer to what a cowboy would write, since it is the object, not the color, that attracts some cattle. The "red" has been added to some later versions.

In 1938, in the revised edition by Lomax and Lomax, the litle girl's name becomes Lenore and the blanket is red. A tune is added, possibly from F. C. Thorne, Fort Worth, Texas ("part of the song was given to the compiler" by him). A note is added that J. T. Shirley, of San Angelo, Texas, says that a cowboy on the Curve T Ranch, Schleicher County, Texas, wrote the song. There is no indication of where John Lomax got his text. Lomax and Lomax in the 1938 revision dressed up a number of the songs from the original 1910 edition, sometimes joining several versions, as in this case.

Singers such as Almeda Riddle (1953 recording linked above) changed the locale to New Mexico, but it remained Mexico in her later commercial version.

Large ranches in northern Mexico provided many of the cattle shipped through Texas to the northern plains to feed the herded Indians on the reservations, supply northern ranches, or to the railheads. American cowboys went to Mexico to gather and work the cattle north to add to the Texas and New Mexico herds. A Mexican locale for the song is most likely if the song originated in Texas.
The version of "Utah Carl" in Fife and Fife, Cowboy and Western Songs, refers to "the Mexicans far-off lands." Utah Carl seems to be a later name.

"Utah Carl" in Randolph, Ozark Folksongs, vol. 2, is fairly close to the Riddle, Lomax and Fife texts.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: Frankham
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 04:41 PM

Hi,

It's on my latest CD. You just might be one of the very few people who will ever hear me do it. :)

Frank Hamilton


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Jul 03 - 02:28 PM

The song was done by Marty Robbins as "Utah Carol". Bear Family collected all (even vaguely) Western material from Marty and put them on a 4 CD set. Spendy, though.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,another guest
Date: 18 Jul 03 - 04:28 PM

'Utah Carol' sung by Marty Robbins [audio] is at The Record Lady's All-Time Country Favorites (Real Country Archives Page 12).


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Subject: Lyr Add: UTAH CARROLL
From: Jon W.
Date: 18 Jul 03 - 04:36 PM

Here is a version as sung by the Deseret String Band (AKA the Bunkhouse Orchestra), a local old-time/cowboy group here in Utah. They credit it to the Cartwright Brothers, and the tune and at least the first verse is identical to the sound clip by them, the link posted by Guest Dale above.

UTAH CARROLL

In a far-off western country, where friends are few and dear,
And the cattle roam in thousands, and the skies are always clear,
We were rounding up one morning, and the work was almost done,
And the cattle all stampeded, 'twas a wild and maddened run.

The boss's little daughter was holding on one side,
She tried to check the cattle, 'twas a wild and dangerous ride.
Beneath the lass's saddle, early on that fatal morn,
I'd placed a scarlet blanket, a mistake I'll always mourn.

When the cattle saw that blanket, it piqued their maddened brain,
They bore down on the lassie, and death rode wild again.
The boss's little daughter rode the best horse all around,
But he stumbled in a dog hole, and threw her to the ground.

The cattle thundered toward her, and she surely would have died,
But someone spurred his cow horse like lightning to her side.
He leaned down from his pony, and caught her from the ground,
But the cinches broke beneath them and once more hurled them down.

From the dust sprang Utah Carroll, the blanket waving gay,
He led off at an angle, and the cattle came his way.
His task was then accomplished, and the child safe on the side,
He turned to face the cattle, now a wild and maddened tide.

His pistol flashed like lightning, and it sounded loud and clear,
He failed to stop the cattle, but he dropped the leading steer.
A thousand hooves a-pounding, and a thousand slashing horns,
Snuffed out the life of Utah, the bravest hero born.

In a far-off western country, where friends are few and near,
Stands a humble little headstone 'neath a sky that's always clear,
And the rancher's little daughter now often goes to pray,
For the man who died so freely to save her life that day.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 18 Jul 03 - 05:27 PM

Marty Robbins- possibly the worst version. Honky Tonk dance music!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Jul 03 - 05:37 PM

Possibly the worst guest, Q ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 11:15 AM

Has anyone ever heard a version of Utah Carl, or Carroll, where Lenore also dies in the stampede?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carrol
From: GUEST,Peggy Reynolds
Date: 26 Nov 11 - 02:28 PM

I would like the guitar chords to the original version of utah carl and his last ride on the trail. Marty robbins sings it. But the music and chords are intirely different than the original version sang by Ollie Gilbert in mountain view ark. in the wolf collection Does anyone have them ,or know where I can get them? Thanks Peggy


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Subject: Chords Add: THE BALLAD OF UTAH CARROLL / CARL
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 26 Nov 11 - 03:25 PM

Guest Peggy:
The original version of Utah Carroll (Carl) appeared in Lomax, 1910, without score or chords. (Slightly revised, with score, Lomax and Lomax, 1938) but without chords.
Margaret Larkin (1931) used similar but not identical meter for the tale, and published chords.

I listened to Olie Gilbert # 1, and it seemed to be very close to Larkin.
You can try Larkin's chords and see if they suit you. I have put the chord before the word in the following:

Utah Carroll #2/4 (sung narrative style)

Oh, (G)kind friend you may ask me what (C)makes me sad and (G)still,
And (Bm)why my brow is (Em)dar-kened like (A7)clouds upon a (D7)hill,
Run (G)in your pony closer and (C)I'll tell you the (G)tale,
Of (C)U-tah Carroll my (G)partner, and his (C)last ride on the (G)trail.


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Subject: Lyr Add: UTAH CARROLL (from Lomax)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Nov 11 - 12:33 PM

From Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads by John A. Lomax (New York: Sturgis & Walton Company, 1910), page 66:


UTAH CARROLL

1. And as, my friend, you ask me what makes me sad and still,
And why my brow is darkened like the clouds upon the hill.
Run in your pony closer and I'll tell to you the tale
Of Utah Carroll, my partner, and his last ride on the trail.

2. 'Mid the cactus and the thistles of Mexico's fair lands,
Where the cattle roam in thousands, a-many a herd and brand,
There is a grave with neither headstone, neither date nor name,?
There lies my partner sleeping in the land from which I came.

3. We rode the range together and had rode it side by side.
I loved him as a brother; I wept when Utah died.
We were rounding up one morning; our work was almost done,
When on the side the cattle started on a mad and fearless run.

4. The boss man's little daughter was holding on that side.
She rushed; the cattle saw the blanket; they charged with maddened fear.
And little Varro, seeing the danger, turned her pony a pace,
And leaning in her saddle, tied the blanket in its place.

5. In leaning, she lost her balance and fell in front of that wild tide.
Utah's voice controlled the round-up. "Lay still, little Varro," he cried.
His only hope was to raise her, to catch her at full speed,
And oft-times he had been known to catch the trail rope off his steed.

6. His pony reached the maiden with a firm and steady bound.
Utah swung out from the saddle to catch her from the ground.
He swung out from the saddle; I thought her safe from harm,
As he swung in his saddle to raise her in his arm.

7. But the cinches of his saddle had not been felt before,
And his back cinch snapped asunder and he fell by the side of Varro.
He picked up the blanket and swung it over his head
And started across the prairie; "Lay still, little Varro," he said.

8. Well, he got the stampede turned and saved little Varro, his friend.
Then he turned to face the cattle and meet his fatal end.
His six-shooter from his pocket, from the scabbard he quickly drew,?
He was bound to die defended as all young cowboys do.

9. His six-shooter flashed like lightning, the report rang loud and clear.
As the cattle rushed in and killed him, he dropped the leading steer.
And when we broke the circle where Utah's body lay,
With many a wound and bruise his young life ebbed away.

10. "And in some future morning," I heard the preacher say,
"I hope we'll all meet Utah at the round-up far away."
Then we wrapped him in a blanket sent by his little friend,
And it was that very red blanket that brought him to his end.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Utah Carl
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Nov 11 - 02:06 PM

Lyr. Add: UTAH CARL
Gordon Coll.

1
And so you ask me, little friend, why I am silent, sad and still,
Why my brow is always clouded, like the darkness on the hill.
Well, pull in your pony closer while I tell you a simple tale,
Of Utah Carl, my pardner, and his last ride on the trail.
2
'Midst the cactus and the thistles of the Mexicans' far off land,
Where the cattle roam in thousands in many a bunch and band,
There's a grave without a headstone, unmarked with date or name,
There my pardner sleeps in silence- there's the place from where I came.
3
Long we roamed the range together, for we've ridden side by side;
I loved him like a brother and I wept when Utah died.
Side by side we rode the roundup, roped, cut out, and burned the brand;
Through storm and weary darkness we joined the night herd's weary stand.
4
When the stampede came so sudden and the cowboys form the mill,
There's a ringing voice that is silent- Utah Carl lies cold and still.
Once his voice controlled the stampede as it rang out loud and clear,
And when the cattle heard, it overcame their maddened fear.
5
Every boy upon the cow range knows how bravely Utah died,
And they pass his grave in silence, and they speak his name with pride.
For he fell as cowboys should, never blanched or quaked with fear,
When he heard the steers upon him and the rush of death was near.
6
We were rounding up one morning and our work was almost done
When on the right the cattle started in a wild and maddened run.
The boss's little daughter, who was holding on that side,
Started to turn the cattle, and 'twas there my pardner died.
7
On the saddle of the pony where the boss's daughter sat
Utah Carl that very morning had thrown a red blanket,
Thus the saddle might be earier for Lenore, his little friend,
And the blanket which he placed there brought my pardner to his end.
8
As Lenore rushed in her pony to the cattle on the right
The red blanket slipped from beneath her, catching on her stirrup tight.
When the cowboys saw the blanket everyone there held his breath;
For should now her pony fail her, none could save Lenore from death.
9
There is nothing on the range that will cause a steer to fight
Half as quick as some red object, when it's waved within his sight.
When the cattle saw the blanket almost dragging on the ground
They were maddened in an instant and they charged it with a bound.
10
Lenore saw the threatened danger, quickly turned her pony a pace,
Then leaning from the sadddle tried the blanket to displace,
But in leaning lost her balance, fell in front of the wild tide,
When, "Lie still, Lenore, I am coming," were the words my pardner cried.

(To be continued...)


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Utah Carl (cont.)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Nov 11 - 02:48 PM

Lyr. Add: UTAH CARL (cont.)
Gordon Coll.

11
About fifty yards behind her Utah Carl came riding fast,
Though he little thought that moment that the ride would be his last.
Many times from off his saddle he had caught a trailing rope-
To raise Lenore at full speed was, he saw, his only hope.
12
As his horse approached the maiden, sure of foot with sturdy bound,
Low he swung from off his saddle to catch Lenore from the ground.
As he hung from off his saddle every cowboy held his breath,
For the feat that he was trying was a feat for life and death.
13
Low he swung as fast he passed her and he caught her in his arm,
And I thought he was successful and was safe from further harm.
But such weight upon the cinches had never been felt before,
And the hind cinch snapped asunder as he fell beside Lenore.
14
As Lenore fell from her pony she dragged the blanket down,
It fell there close beside her as she lay upon the ground.
Utah Carl picked up the blanket, and again, "Lie still," he said-
Then, runing across the prairie, waved tha blanket over his head.
15
When he started 'cross the prairie every cowboy gave a cry;
He had saved the boss's daughter, but they knew he had to die.
He had turned the maddened cattle from Lenore, his little friend,
And he heard the steers upon him, but he stopped to meet his end.
16
Quickly then from out his holster Utah Carl his pistol drew,
He was bound to die while fighting, like a cowboy bold and true.
The pistol flashed like lightning, the reports rang out loud and clear,
Still on the herd came rushing, though he dropped the leading steer.
17
Quick the cattle were upon him, and my pardner had to fall-
Never more he'd cinch a broncho, never give a cattle call.
For he died upon the range, and it seemed most awful hard-
I could not make the distance in time to save my pard.
18
When we broke into the circle on the ground my pardner lay,
From a dozen cuts and bruises his young life flowed away.
I knelt there beside him, and I knew his life was o'er
As I heard him faintly murmer, "I am coming, lie still Lenore."
19
And these were Utah Carl's last words, he had gone that endless trail,
And she sought his eyes with reverence while his face grew thin and pale.
He had closed life's final roundup at the Master's dread command,
And my tears came down in silence as I clasped my pardner's hand.
20
There's somewhere a grand, bright future, so I've heard the preachers say,
And I know that my young pardner won't be left on that last day.
And if but an unknown cowboy, he was ready here to die-
I know that my young pardner has a home beyond the sky.

Robert W. Gordon Collection 1005, Library of Congress.
Melody from the 42-volume Fife Collection.

Reproduced in A. E. and A. S. Fife, 1969, Cowboy and Western Songs, A Comprehensive Anthology, Bramwell House, reprint.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ballad of Utah Carroll
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Mar 14 - 06:44 PM

From B. E. Denton, "A Two-Gun Cyclone" (1927), pp. 138-141:

                      UTAH CARL'S LAST RIDE

"So you ask, my little friend, why silent, sad and still?
Why my brow is always clouded, like the darkness on the hill?
Pull in your hoss closer and I'll tell a simple tale,
Of Utah Carl, my pardner, and his last ride on the trail.

Amid the cactus and mesquite in old Mexico's fair land,
Where the cattle roamed in thousands in many a bunch and band,
There's a grave without a headstone, unmarked by date or name,
There my pardner sleeps in silence; that's the place from whence I    came.

Every cowboy on the range knows how brave that Utah died,
And they pass his grave in silence, and they speak his name with pride.
For he died as a cowboy should, without a flinch or fear,
When he saw the cattle comin' and the rush of death was near.

Long we roamed the range together, for we've ridden side by side;
I loved him like a brother and I wept when Utah died.
Side by side we rode the roundup, roped, cut out, and burned the brand;
Through storm and weary darkness we joined the night herd's weary stand.

We was roundin' up one mornin' and our work was almost done
When the cattle started onward in a wild and maddened run.
And The Boss' little daughter was ridin' on that side,
She started in to turn the cattle, and that's where my pardner died.

On the saddle of the pony which the Boss' daughter sat
Carl that very morning had thrown a blanket red,
So the saddle might be easy for Lenore, his little friend,
And the blanket which he put there brought my pardner to his end.

When the stampede came so sudden and the cowboys form the mill,
There's a ringing voice that is silent- Utah Carl lies cold and still.
Once his voice controlled the stampede as it rang out loud and clear,
And when the cattle heard, it overcame their maddened fear.

As Lenore rushed her pony into the cattle on the right
The blanket slipped beneath her and caught the stirrup tight.
When the cowboys saw the blanket, all held their breath
If now the pony should fail here, none could save Lenore from death.

There's nothin' on the cow range that will cause the cows to fight
Than some red object, when it's waved within their sight.
When the cattle saw the blanket draggin' on the ground,
They were maddened in an instant and chased it with a bound.

When Lenore saw the comin' cattle, quickly turned her pony's face,
As she leaned from out her saddle; tied the blanket in its place,
But in leanin' lost her balance, fell in front of that wild tide,
"Lie still!" "I'm comin'!" were the words my pardner cried.

About fifty yards behind her Utah Carl came ridin' fast,
Though he never thought that moment, the ride would be his last.
Many times from out his saddle, he had caught a trailin' rope,
Now to catch Lenore at full speed, was he saw his only hope.

As his hoss approached the maiden, sure on foot with steady bound,
Low he leaned from out his saddle to catch the child from the ground.
Low he leaned as swift he passed her and caught her in his arm,
And I thought he was successful, and was safe from further harm.

But such weight upon his cinches never had been felt before,
And the hind cone snapped asunder, and he fell behind Lenore.
When Lenore fell from her pony, she had dragged the blanket down,
And it fell close down beside her as she lay upon the ground.

Utah Carl picked up the blanket and again, "Lie still!" he said,
And he ran across the prairie, waved the blanket o'er his head.
As he ran across the prairie, every cowboy gave a cry;
He had saved the Boss' daughter, but we knew he had to die.

He had turned the cattle from Lenore, his little friend,
And now they rushed upon him, and he turned to meet his end.
Quickly then from out his scabbard Utah Carl, his pistol drew,
He was bound to die a-fightin', like a cowboy bold and true.

And his pistol flashed like lightnin', the report rang loud and clear,
But still the herd kept rushin'; Utah dropped the leadin' steer.
Soon the cattle was upon him and my pardner had to fall
No more will he cinch a bronco, no more give the cattle call.

Soon we broke into the circle; on the ground my pardner lay,
From the dust and wounds and bruises, his life slipped away.
As I knelt there beside him, Oh! I knew his life was o'er
As I heard him whisper faintly, "I will come, lie still Lenore."

These were Utah Carl's last words, he had gone the endless trail,
And he closed his eyes in reverence and his face turned ashy pale.
Yes, he died upon the range, and it seemed so awful hard,
But I couldn't make the distance in time to save my pard.

So we closed the final roundup, at my mistress' dread command,
And my tears run down in silence as I clasped my pardner's hand.
We had rode those ranges over, we had rode them side by side,
I loved him like a brother, and I wept when Utah died.

There is somewhere a bright future,I've heard the preacher say,
And I think my young pardner won't be left out on that day.
He was but an unknown cowboy, he was ready though to die.
And I think that my young pardner has a home beyond the sky.


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Mudcat time: 21 February 2:52 AM EST

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