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Lyr Req: The T and P Line

GUEST 01 Aug 03 - 05:45 AM
masato sakurai 01 Aug 03 - 06:41 AM
masato sakurai 01 Aug 03 - 06:56 AM
Jim Dixon 12 Aug 03 - 01:19 AM
Stewie 12 Aug 03 - 10:10 PM
Goose Gander 08 Jan 10 - 03:03 AM
Goose Gander 08 Jan 10 - 10:44 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jan 10 - 01:16 PM
Goose Gander 06 Nov 11 - 01:40 AM
GUEST,999 06 Nov 11 - 09:49 AM
Jim Dixon 06 Nov 11 - 08:00 PM
GUEST,999 06 Nov 11 - 09:31 PM
Goose Gander 06 Nov 11 - 10:53 PM
GUEST 07 Nov 11 - 08:50 AM
GUEST,T J MAYES 10 May 12 - 04:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 May 12 - 05:18 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Aug 03 - 05:45 AM

just looking for the lyrics and any other info about this song I once heard on a library of congress recording called railroad songs and ballads      thanks   mac truck


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: masato sakurai
Date: 01 Aug 03 - 06:41 AM

It's on Various Artists: Railroad Songs and Ballads (Rounder 1508, 1997).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: masato sakurai
Date: 01 Aug 03 - 06:56 AM

The same recording (sung by Mrs. Mary Sullivan) is at Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection (Library of Congress).


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE T AND P LINE (from Mary Sullivan)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Aug 03 - 01:19 AM

Transcribed by me from the sound recording at The Library of Congress American Memory Collection. Doubtful or missing words or phrases are marked (?).

THE T AND P LINE
(As sung by Mrs. Mary Sullivan; recorded at Smiths Corners in Shafter FSA Camp; from "Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection, 1940-1941")

I left there one beautiful night.
The stars in the heavens was shining bright.
I was riding the bumpers, which suited me fine,
Much better than the handouts on the T and P Line.

I landed in Welford (?) about three p. m.
The cops watched me and I watched them.
I made them no effort; I give them no sign
That I had been bumming on the T and P Line.

I decided to dress up in style,
Not look like a bummer, no, not by a mile.
Rear back on my budget (?), give each man a dime,
And that would beat bumming on the T and P Line.

A ten-dollar suit and a five-dollar hat,
A high-standing collar and a fine cravat,
A new pair of boots, how the leather did shine!
Much better than the handouts on the T and P Line.

I met up with a man by the name of Will Wright.
He says, "I will hire you if you will work right."
"Well, I will work right and put in good time,
Much better than the handouts on the T and P Line."

I got in the wagon and home with him went.
The work he gave me God to me had sent.
The work it was easy and it suited me fine,
Much better than the handouts on the T and P Line.

Will Wright had a daughter at the age of sixteen,
The fairest and prettiest that ever I seen,
And when I was with her, I was always on time,
Much better than the handouts on the T and P Line.

Me and Ethel begin to chat.
I helped the other rigs (?) do this and do that.
Her kisses were sweet and her features was fine,
Much better than the handouts on the T and P Line.

I was called to the office, to the office one day.
Will Wright says, "What's this I hear the folks say?
They say you're a bummer all dressed up for blind, (?)
That you have been bumming on the T and P Line."

"Well, I don't know as that concerns you.
I do all the work you require me to do.
If my work it don't suit you, just give me my time,
And I'll remain bumming on the T and P Line."

I went by the house to bid Ethel farewell.
The grief and the sorrow no tongue can ne'er tell.
There were tears in her eyes and so were in mine.
She says, "You're no bummer on the T and P Line."

I struck out right down the highway.
I could think of nothing but Ethel that day.
I love her till ... (?) and I'll see her sometime
If I have to bum my way on the T and P Line.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: Stewie
Date: 12 Aug 03 - 10:10 PM

Corrections to Jim's transcription from the transcription in the booklet insert to the Rounder CD:

Stanza l, line 1: 'I left Beard one beautiful night'
S1, L2: 'were'

S2, L1: 'Wellford'
S2, L2: 'The cop watched me and I watched him'
S2, L3: 'I made him no effort, I gave him no sign'

S3, L3: 'Rare (sic) back on my budget, give each man a dime'

S4, L2: 'A high-standing collar and a flying cravat'

S7, L2: 'that ever I've seen'

S8, L2: 'I helped gather eggs, do this and do that'

S9, L3: 'all dressed up for blind' is correct

S12, L3: 'I love her till yet (sic), and I'll see her some time'


--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: Goose Gander
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 03:03 AM

As far as I can tell, 'T and P Line' is a single-source ballad/song. Does anyone know anything about this one? It does sound like a hillbilly song from the 1930s, but I can't find anything about it beyond Mary Sullivan's recording.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: Goose Gander
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 10:44 AM

Here's a working link for the song . . .

T and P Line

As sung by Mary Sullivan at Smiths Corners in Shafter FSA Camp, 8-9-41.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: the T and P line
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 01:16 PM

The T and P is identified as the Texas and Pacific Line in Norm Cohen, "The Long Steel Rail."
Cohen lists it with the same skeletal information posted above.

The railroad song, "Only a Brakeman," includes a verse (in one version) that mentions the Texas and Pacific, but it is not related to the song of this thread.

Only a brakeman gone on before,
Only a brakeman we'll never see no more,
He was doin' his duty on the old Tee Pee train,
But now he is sleepin' on the old state plain.

Vance Randolph, Ozark Folksongs, vol. 4, "Only a Brakeman," coll. 1927, with musical score (complete song).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: Goose Gander
Date: 06 Nov 11 - 01:40 AM

Archie Green asked me to trace this song. Seven years later, I have (almost) nothing more than Mary Sullivan's recording. One possible source: 'Hobo From the T & P Line' by Almoth Hodges on 'Rose Grew Round the Briar' (Yazoo 2030). Haven't heard the recording, mainly due to my ongoing poverty.

Does anyone know anything about this song?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: GUEST,999
Date: 06 Nov 11 - 09:49 AM

We may have come up trumps here. The following link goes to a PDF file. It is slow to load--took about 45 seconds. However, starting on page 13 is the song with some history of it.



http://www.loc.gov/folklife/LP/AFS_L61_opt.pdf


Found it thanks to a line from the transcription Jim did back in 2003. Many thanks, JD.

I have no idea how to cut and paste from PDF files. Perhaps someone who does could do so. Incidentally, the whole PDF file would be worth 'saving', imo, because there's lots of folksong history in it.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE T. & P. LINE (from Mrs. Mary Sullivan
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 06 Nov 11 - 08:00 PM

Here's the relevant text from that PDF:


B8—THE T. & P. LINE. Sung by Mrs. Mary Sullivan at Shafter, Calif., 1941. Recorded by Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin.

Mrs. Mary Sullivan from Warm Springs, Tex., was one of the best folksingers encountered in California's Farm Security Administration camps on the eve of World War II. Her "T. & P. Line" was unfa­miliar to me until, to my pleasure, I "discovered" it while editing this recording. In addition to her number an Arkansas tape made during 1954 by Virgil Lane was available to me (AFS 11894A40). The first transcription of the piece in a folksong collection reports it as a Texas cowboy item carried to Utah. As frequently happens in searching for song history one must turn to commercial records. Eugene Earle, president of the John Edwards Memorial Foundation, supplied me with tape copies of two discs related to the song collected in Cali­fornia, Arkansas, and Utah. Earle's tape whetted my curiosity, for one record indicated that composer's credits were shared by Almoth Hodges and Bob Miller. The former is unknown; the latter is well known, and Robert Shelton marks his role. Re­cently, Dean Turner, a Texas singer "re-wrote" "The T. & P. Bum" from his memory of hearing it in the late 1920's, and recorded it for a current folk-country label.

A comparison of the seven "T. & P." songs known to me reveals considerable variation in text, and perhaps some confusion with respect to the railroad's name. Collectors Todd and Sonkin heard ''T. & P.," but astute listeners to Mrs. Sullivan's rendi­tion might concur with the person who transcribed the Hodges-Miller piece for copyright registration (December 28, 1929) by hearing "T. M. P. Line" in some of the stanzas. However, no western line with these initials can be found in standard railroad refer­ences. It is possible that Mrs. Sullivan and Hodges either learned or conceptualized "T. M. P." (or even "T. N. P.") instead of the famous Texas & Pacific abbreviation, but we lack any statements from the performers which would indicate their intent.

Almoth Hodges with Bob Miller's Hinky Dinkers, "The Hobo from the T. & P. Line," Brunswick 399.

Clayton McMichen, "Bummin' on the I. C. Line," Varsity 5097.

Dean Turner, "The T. & P. Bum" on Dean Turner and His Guitar, Bluebonnet BL 102.

Rocky Mountain Collection (Salt Lake City, 1962), p. 23.

Robert Shelton and Burt Goldblatt, The Country Music Story (Indianapolis, 1966), p. 188.

1. I left Beard one beautiful night.
The stars in the heavens were shining bright.
I was riding the bumpers, which suited me fine,
Much better than the handouts on the T. & P. Line.

2. I landed in Wellford about three p.m.
The cop watched me and I watched him.
I made him no effort, I give him no sign
That I had been bumming on the T. & P. Line.

3. I decided to dress up in style,
Not look like a bummer, no, not by a mile,
Rare back on my budget, give each man a dime,
And that would beat bumming on the T. & P. Line.

4. A ten-dollar suit and a five-dollar hat,
A high standing collar and a flying cravat,
A new pair of boots—how the leather did shine,
Much better than the handouts on the T. & P. Line.

5. I met up with a man by the name of Will Wright.
He says, "I will hire you if you will work right."
"Well, I will work right and put in good time."
Much better than the handouts on the T. & P. Line.

6. I got in the wagon and home with him went.
The work he gave me, God to me had sent.
The work it was easy and it suited me fine,
Much better than the handouts on the T. & P. Line.

7. Will Wright had a daughter at the age of sixteen,
The fairest and prettiest that ever I've seen;
And when I was with her, I was always on time,
Much better than the handouts on the T. & P. Line.

8. Me and Ethel begin to chat.
I helped gather eggs, do this and do that.
Her kisses were sweet and her features was fine,
Much better than the handout s on the T. & P. Line.

9. I was called to the office, to the office one day.
Will Wright says, "What's this I hear the folks say?
They say you're a bummer all dressed up for blind,
That you have been bumming on the T. & P. Line."

10. "Well, I don' t know as that concerns you.
I do all the work you require me to do.
If my work it don't suit you, just give me my time,
And I'll remain bumming on the T. & P. Line."

11. I went by the house to bid Ethel farewell.
The grief and the sorrow no tongue can ne'er tell.
There were tears in her eyes and so were in mine.
She says, "You're no bummer on the T. & P. Line."

12. I struck out right down the highway.
I could think of nothing but Ethel that day.
I love her till yet, and I'll see her some time
If I have to bum my way on the T. & P. Line.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: GUEST,999
Date: 06 Nov 11 - 09:31 PM

Jim, you are a gem. Many many thanks.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: Goose Gander
Date: 06 Nov 11 - 10:53 PM

Thanks, Jim.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Nov 11 - 08:50 AM

Excellent!

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: GUEST,T J MAYES
Date: 10 May 12 - 04:54 PM

I have been searching for years...I just had my 82nd birthday....for someone who knew something about this little song. My Mother sang it to my sister and me - and I to my kiddos and grandchildren, but could never find out where it came from. She told me she used to sit on her grandfather's lap and he sang this song to her..that would have been about 1910 or 1911. Because he also told her that he lived with an Indian tribe in South Texas in the 1850's and 60's, she thought it was something that came from his early life. Sure wish I could hear the melody that the words are sung to. My Mother had a beautiful voice and she sang this as he taught her. Now...I hope you will respond .....email to tj.mayes@yahoo.com

Here are the words as I learned them...they differ a bit and I just found a site where LulaBelle & Scotty did it in 1946. It was "jazzed up" a little with all the tom toms and yells in the background...but very close.

                         INDIAN NAPONEE

WAY OUT ON AN INDIAN RESERVATION
FAR AWAY FROM CIVILIZATION
WHERE THE PALEFACE SELDOM TROD.

WHITE MAN WENT TO FISH ONE SUMMER
MET AN INDIAN MAID OF HONOR'S DAUGHTER
OF THE BIG CHIEF "SPARE THE ROD".

WHITE MAN THREW SOME LOVING GLANCES
TOOK THIS MAIDEN TO WARRIOR DANCES
SMOKED HIS PIPE OF PEACE
TOOK CHANCES LIVING WITH HER
IN A TEPEE MADE OF FUR.

HE RODE WITH HER ON AN INDIAN PONY
GAVE HER DIAMOND RINGS OF PHONY
AND HE SANG THESE LOVING WORDS TO HER.

"YOU'RE MY PRETTY LITTLE NAPONEE
WON'T YOU TAKE A CHANCE AND MARRY ME
YOUR FATHER'S A CHIEF
AND IT'S MY BELIEF
FOR A VERY MERRY WEDDING

HE'LL AGREE THOUGH YOU'RE A DARK LITTLE INDIAN MAID
AND I'LL SUNBURN TO A DARKER SHADE
WEAR FEATHERS ON MY HEAD
PAINT MY FACE AN INDIAN RED
IF YOU'LL BE MY NAPONEE"

SORRY TO SAY, BUT HE'S DONE GONE AND CAUGHT HER
SOON HE WAS MARRIED TO THE BIG CHIEF'S DAUGHTER
HAPPIEST COUPLE MOST EVER DID YOU SEE.

THEN PAPOOSES CAME IN NUMBERS
RED SKIN YELLS DISTURBED HIS SLUMBERS
AND THE FEATHERS DROOPED UPON HIS HEAD.

INDIAN WARRIERS KILLED AND RAIDED
NAPONEE GREW OLD AND FADED
JUST ABOUT LIKE ANY OTHER SQUAW.

TOO LATE NOW, BUT STILL HE'S A WISHING
THAT HE'D NEVER GONE A FISHING
MET THIS INDIAN MAID
AND SANG THESE LOVING WORDS TO HER.

(REPEAT CHORUS....YOU'RE MY PRETTY LITTLE NAPONEE, ETC.

I hope all of this makes sense....as I told you, I'm an old woman..ha..and when old, old memories are revived, it's a good feeling when you can review them. I was never aware that this "little ditty" was actually recorded and sung for the public for so many years. I would be interested to hear any comments you have.

THANKS A BUNCH,
NANA MAYES
and sometimes


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The T and P Line
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 May 12 - 05:18 PM

Please transfer "Indian Naponee" to thread 58001, My pretty little Indian Napanee.
My pretty ...Napanee


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