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Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre

DigiTrad:
THE MUCKIN'O GEORDIES BYRE


Related thread:
Tune Add: The Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre (28)


GUEST,Keith Lucas 06 Sep 03 - 10:33 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 06 Sep 03 - 11:13 PM
Malcolm Douglas 07 Sep 03 - 01:59 AM
Jim McLean 07 Sep 03 - 05:20 AM
Kevin Sheils 07 Sep 03 - 05:24 AM
Jim McLean 07 Sep 03 - 06:00 AM
GUEST,honestfrankie 07 Sep 03 - 11:08 AM
Jim McLean 07 Sep 03 - 11:42 AM
GUEST,Keith Lucas 08 Sep 03 - 11:33 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Sep 03 - 01:14 AM
GUEST,Keith Lucas 09 Sep 03 - 10:58 PM
GUEST,bigbadbev66@hotmail.com 23 Nov 04 - 08:25 PM
GUEST,shona 24 Nov 04 - 04:44 AM
GUEST,Guest, Lynn 26 Jan 05 - 11:49 PM
Lighter 27 Jan 05 - 12:07 PM
GUEST 29 Jan 05 - 04:38 PM
GUEST,Auldtimer 29 Jan 05 - 07:18 PM
GUEST 08 Oct 07 - 07:21 AM
goatfell 08 Oct 07 - 09:31 AM
Jim Dixon 09 Oct 07 - 10:10 PM
Jim Dixon 11 Oct 07 - 10:51 PM
Leadbelly 12 Oct 07 - 01:48 PM
Effsee 12 Oct 07 - 09:13 PM
GUEST,Andrew 01 Nov 07 - 05:16 PM
GUEST,RK in Denver 05 Jan 19 - 12:10 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: GUEST,Keith Lucas
Date: 06 Sep 03 - 10:33 PM

I have found several versions to this song, but I have as yet to find the words Andy Stewart uses when he sings the song. His words do not match any other words I have found so far. If there's anyone out there who knows the words Andy Stewart uses when he sings the song I would greatly appreciate hearing from you. Contact me via e-mail to celticwarrior@hotmail.com Slainte


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 06 Sep 03 - 11:13 PM

I've so far found two versions. One is a Scots Language version, which is the one in the DT. There seems to be a version which is essentially English.

Perhaps you could have a look at these and see if any are close? How much of a difference is there between either of these, and the one Andy Stewart sings?

Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
Lyr Add: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre - Mudcat Forum Thread
Muckin' with Scots Language Dictionary
Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre ~1700 - Scots
 
Jean Redpath's English Version
Scottish Radiance's English Version


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 07 Sep 03 - 01:59 AM

The history of the song is quite well explained in the DT entry. There is no "English version" as such, though two of the texts linked to above (neither, sadly, with any source acknowledged) are the older surviving song of that name from Johnson's Scots Musical Museum; a few words (two of which would probably be incomprehensible to the average Scot of today in any case) have been altered. The 1700 date in the fourth link is an error; the words given there are quite modern (20th century) and written deliberately broader than the older song. The 1700 song itself is lost, apart from fragments.

Andy Stewart used to sing a form of the modern words, with an amusing (first time around, anyway) break in which he "translated" part of the song into stereotypical "posh" English.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: Jim McLean
Date: 07 Sep 03 - 05:20 AM

Here is the chorus as sung by Andy Stewart and the posh English version referred to by Malcolm. The other verses I could post when I have time. He sings so quickly it's a struggle to catch all the words.

Siccan a suther was a'body in
Five mile awa ye could hear the din
Even the verra coo had tae grin
At the muckin o Geordie's byre.

Oh such a stramash was there to see,
Five miles away you could hear the melee
Even the domesticated animals were consumed with glee,
At he cleansing of George's cowshed.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: Kevin Sheils
Date: 07 Sep 03 - 05:24 AM

I like the idea of "stramash" being the posh English version.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: Jim McLean
Date: 07 Sep 03 - 06:00 AM

I think that's part of the humour and makes it funnier to hear a posh voice using such a Scottish word. (I'm still struggling with the transcription!)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: GUEST,honestfrankie
Date: 07 Sep 03 - 11:08 AM

Hello,

    I thought the line written below as "even the verra coo had tae grin" was "even the virago(scolding old woman) had to grin"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: Jim McLean
Date: 07 Sep 03 - 11:42 AM

Very funny honestfrankie! No, it's definitely 'the very cow (verra coo)' in East coast (Aberdeen?) accent. Or maybe the song is about the muckin' o' Geordie's virago?


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Subject: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST,Keith Lucas
Date: 08 Sep 03 - 11:33 PM

Not really a request for the words. I just wanted to thank all of you who helped me find the words that Andy Stewart sings when he does the song Muckin O'Geordie's Byre..which was nothing like the words I had tracked down myself..A big thank you again :+) I do have one more small request that I hope someone can help me with? I need a good web site where I can pick up Scottish dialect and meaning to words that are in the song or any other Scottish songs as I have ben learning to play a lot of Scottish and Irish folk and I really enjoy singing them with the Baroque. It really messes people up when I sing a lot of the songs by Mackem & Clancy as I have a lot of their dialect down pretty good.. I still need some help with finding a good source for Scottish words and meanings thank you again.
                                        Slainte
                                           Keith


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Sep 03 - 01:14 AM

See Scottish Glossary. Useful, but no substitute for reading the stuff, with, if you really need it, the aid of a decent dictionary. (Alexander Warrack's Scots Dialect Dictionary is as comprehensive as most people will ever need). Do think twice, though, before singing songs in a form of language that doesn't come naturally to you. Understanding a song is far more important than learning to ape the pronounciation used on a particular recording of it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin O'Geordies Byre
From: GUEST,Keith Lucas
Date: 09 Sep 03 - 10:58 PM

Malcolm, thank you for your help and quick response to my request for a directory to Scottish dialect. I also appericate your advise on the singing of songs in a form of language that doesn't come naturally to a person. I have no problem singing any Irish or Scottish folk songs with either of the dialects so far. With me it depends on the speed of the song ex: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre by Andy Stewart for one and a little trouble with Mary Mac by Makem & Clancy, although I almost have the latter one down. Singing with either dialect seems to come fairly easy to me, I think for two reasons, the first is I play entirely by ear which helps a great deal with sounding out any song and second my great interest in anything Celtic, Scottish and Irish. I don't totally agree with you on the importance of understanding a song before attempting to sing it in it's paticular dialect, but only because I feel everything I sing,(if you understand what I mean by I feel everything I sing) so it is important to me to sing it the way it was done originally. I do agree it is important to understand the song in this way, ex:The dialect is important to me so I can understand exactly what the song is about, which makes Andy Stewarts version hilarious, but also if I were to perform the song out some where I could explain to the average person just what it was I was singing, which I think is also very important. I have really appreciated your help with my request and I hope you understand what I'm trying to say in this message as I sometime find it hard to try and explain my feeling for a song. Once again you have been a big help and I just wanted to say thank you. Keith


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST,bigbadbev66@hotmail.com
Date: 23 Nov 04 - 08:25 PM

i would really appreciate all the words and translation of Andy Stewart's version of Muckin O' geordie's byre even my scottish relatives dont know the words and we have an original 45 record the "b" side is a scottish soldier


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST,shona
Date: 24 Nov 04 - 04:44 AM

hi, im from that part of scotland (the north east) where this song originates from. it was written in doric (the dialect of the north east if you didnt know) but over the years some folk have kind of changed the words a wee bit and now its being sung all over! just a wee note, i think that the line sic'can a suther wis a'body in should be should be sic'can a sotter wis a'body in. a sotter being the doric for mess. if you have any queries on words or versions please feel free to email me at scottishvoice@hotmail.com i dont normally give out my email but i will for this, im a student studying scottish music and researching bothy ballads and songs from the north east. cheers. shona


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST,Guest, Lynn
Date: 26 Jan 05 - 11:49 PM

Hi, I'd love these lyrics also ... I have loved this song since I was a little girl as it seemed to be a "nonsense" song. Now that I am older and realize that there is definite meaning behind all of the words I would dearly love to be able to sing along and know what it is all about!!! I am guessing it is something about drinking since I think I can suss out "the only 'uns sober were the calf and the coo (cow)"


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Subject: Lyr Add: MUCKIN O' GEORDIE'S BYRE (from MacColl)
From: Lighter
Date: 27 Jan 05 - 12:07 PM

This is how I transcribe Ewan MacColl's version from the LP "Scots Drinking Songs."

In a lea-rig aul' croft ayont the hill,
Just round the neuk frae Sprottie's Mill,
Tryin a' his life the time tae kill
Lived Geordie MacIntyre.
He had a wife as sweir as himsel,
A dochter as black as Auld Nick is in Hell,
There was plenty o' fun awa at this mill
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

CHORUS: Whaur the grate was tint, the besom was deen,
The barrow it wadna row its leen,
An' siccan a souter there never was seen
As the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

The dochter had tae strae an neep,
The auld wife started tae swipe the greet,
When Geordie fell skreit on a rotten neep
At the muckin' o Geordie's byre.
Then the greep cam Geordie's soo
An' she stood up ahint the coo
The coo kit it up and O whit a stew
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

The aul' wife she was booin' doon,
The soo was kickit on the croon,
An' shoved her heid in the wifie's goon,
An' then bin through Geordie's byre.
The dochter cam through the barn door
An' seein' her mother let oot a roar,
Tae the midden she ran an' fell owre the boar
At the muckin' o' Geordie' byre.

The boar he lep the midden dyke,
And owre the rigs wi' Geordie's tyke,
They baith fell intae a bumbie's byke
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
The cocks an' hens began tae craw
When Biddy astride the soo they saw
The postie's sheltie ran awa
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

Ae hunderd years have passed and mair
Where Sprottie's was, the hill is bare.
The croft's awa sae ye'll see nae mair
O' the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
His folk's a' deid an' awa lang syne,
Sae in case his memory ye should tine,
Jest whistle this tune tae keep ye in min'
O' the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

He sings "souter" (cobbler) but app. "sotter" (muddle) is intended.
Transcription errors, anyone?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Jan 05 - 04:38 PM

Thanks to Lighter but I am referring specifically to Andy Stewart's version. Other posters have posted lyrics much closer to what I am hearing in the song. Thanks for it tho. Anyone have Andy's lyrics? They sound hilarious!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST,Auldtimer
Date: 29 Jan 05 - 07:18 PM

There are many versions of this song. The two main ones are, the one given as from Ewan McCall was "put" together/written and performed by G.H.Morris and one "put"together/written and performed by Willie Kemp which has a chorus which ends "....ravalie next day was the moo 'o the coo, et the muckin' 'o Geordie's Byre" Andy Stewart's version would, I would think, be added and amended to suit a broader audience.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Oct 07 - 07:21 AM

In this tread: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7553 there is a version similar to Andy Stewarts, but could anyone help with the full text. I'm collecting the different versions of this song.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MUCKIN' O' GEORDIE'S BYRE (from W Kemp)
From: goatfell
Date: 08 Oct 07 - 09:31 AM

Lyrics and footnote copied from http://www.scotsindependent.org/features/singasang/byre.htm

THE MUCKIN' O' GEORDIE'S BYRE
Willie Kemp

When I want tae lauchin' I think on the scene
When a'body roun' aboot cam' ower tae clean,
But clairted themsel's richt up tae the e'en
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
The Rocher, wee Wullikie, and Mickie Doo,
The auld wife hersel' an' Teeny McCrew;
Wi' dozens o' ithers that left aff the pleugh
For the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

CHORUS: Oh! Siccan a sottar was a'body in,
Five mile awa' ye could hear the din;
Nae wunner the vera coo started tae grin
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

The whisky gaed roun' Tammy flein' the doo'
And aye as they drank, the mair they got fou'
The only anes sober, the calf an' the coo
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
Tammy roared oot "Ring the bell noo for mair"
Syne tuggit the coo's tail, and pu'd oot the hair;
When she kickit oot he gaed up in the air
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

The first on the beesom was Teeny McCrew,
Sittin' doon on the stibble end 'cause she was fou'
And she kickit up sic a hullaballoo
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
She yowled like a hip in distress in a gale,
And aye on the sair bit Teeny wad wail;
So they bandaged her up wi' her auld bridal veil
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

The bobby cam' roun' tae quell doon the soun'
The cratur got lost whaur the rucks hae their foun'
He fell intae the midden and was likely tae droon
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
The weicht o' him syne sent the barrow in bits,
The wheel cairred on and the auld wife it hits;
Losh! ye should hae seen how she did the splits
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

Geordie lay doon sayin' he wanted tae dee,
Syne wanted the lave o's a fareweel tae gie
Fell asleep in the strae wi' the barley bree
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
He dreamt and said "Mistress, I'll kiss ye the noo,
But losh! what's gane wrang? ye've an awfa' wet moo"
When he crackit a spunk, he was kissin' the coo
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

Ane by ane coupit ower in the griep,
Ane by ane they a' fell asleep;
By and by the moon took a peep
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
On the riggin' an owlet lat oot a "Yahoo"
But they didna' need ony hush-ee-balloo;
Reveille next day was the moo o' the coo
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

Footnote : A splendid song by Willie Kemp, 'The King o the Cornkisters', who was a great favourite of my grandparents. I spent many a happy hour on their wind-up gramophone playing the songs of William Kemp and the comedian Harry Gordon. Happy memories.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MUCKING O' GEORDIE'S BYRE (1816)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 09 Oct 07 - 10:10 PM

From The Pocket Encyclopedia of Scottish, English, and Irish Songs, Glasgow: Andrew & James Duncan, 1816 (found with Google Book Search):

MUCKING O' GEORDIE'S BYRE

1. As I went over yon meadow,
And carelessly passing alang,
I listen'd with pleasure to Jenny,
While mournfully singing this sang:

CHORUS: The mucking o' Geordie's byre,
And the shoaling the gruip sae clean,
Hat aft gart me spend the night sleepless,
And brought the saut tears frae my een.

2. It was nae my father's intention,
Nor was it my mither's desire,
That e'er I should fyle my fingers
Wi' the mucking o' Geordie's byre.

3. Though the roads were ever sae filthy,
Or the day sae scoury and foul,
I wad ay be ganging wi' Geordie;
I lik'd it far better than school.

4. My brither abuses me daily,
For being wi' Geordie sae free;
My sister she ca's me hoodwinked,
Because he's below my degree.

5. But weel do I like my young Geordie,
Although he was cunning and slee;
He ca's me his dear and his honey,
And I'm sure my Geordie loo's me.

This piece is another of the productions of Balloon Tytler. In addition to the information BURNS gives respecting this singular character, in his note on the Bonnie brucket lassie, page 136, the Editor is enabled to add the following from a short account of him written by Dr. CURRIE.——JAMES TYTLER was the son of a country Clergyman in the Presbytery of Brechin. He received a classical education, and was brought up to the profession of medicine, which he followed for some time in Leith, in Berwick, and in Newcastle. Not meeting with success, however, in consequence of a too great attention to religious disputes, he abandoned this profession, commenced author and printer at the same time, and, for a while, continued regularly to print and publish his own works. His publications ultimately brought him into the notice of the booksellers, and from them he afterwards found constant employment in compilations, abridgements, translations, and miscellaneous essays. During his literary career, his labours, for their magnitude and extent, were truly astonishing; but as they scarcely produced him the means of subsistence, in consequence of the parsimony of his employers, he turned a portion of his attention to chemistry, electricity, and mechanics, in which sciences he made some useful discoveries that he thought might be turned to advantage. But the roguery of an individual to whom he communicated one of his most important discoveries, and the total failure of many of his other schemes, at length began to prey upon his spirits; and, though otherwise a man of great modesty of disposition and integrity of character, he finally suffered his social propensities to violate the rules of sobriety. "Forgetting his old friends, he associated with discontented persons, and entered into a deliberate exposition of the abuses of government in 'A Pamphlet on the Excise,' and more systematically in a periodical publication, entitled, 'The Historical Register,' which gratified malignity by personal invective and intemperance of language. He was concerned in the wild, irrational plans of the British convention, and published 'A hand bill addressed to the people,' written in so inflammatory a style, as rendered him obnoxious to government. A warrant was issued to apprehend him, and he left his native country and crossed the Atlantic for America, where he fixed his residence in the town of Salem, in the state of Massachusetts, where he established a newspaper in connexion with a printer, which he continued till his death, which happened in the year 1805, in the 58th year of his age."


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MUCKIN' O' GEORDIE'S BYRE (1829)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Oct 07 - 10:51 PM

From "The Scottish Songs" by Robert Chambers, 1829:

THE MUCKIN' O' GEORDIE'S BYRE.

1. THE muckin' o' Geordie's byre,
And the shoolin' the gruip sae clean,
Has gar'd me weit my cheeks,
And greit wi' baith my een.

CHORUS: It was ne'er my father's will,
Nor yet my mother's desire,
That e'er I should fyle my fingers,
Wi' muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

2. The mouse is a merry beast,
The moudiewort wants the een;
But the warld shall ne'er get wit,
Sae merry as we hae been. CHORUS

[Footnote:] From Herd's Collection, 1776.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: Leadbelly
Date: 12 Oct 07 - 01:48 PM

Very many years ago I listened to this song of Andy Stewart on the radio which reached a higher place in the british hit-parade. Although not being able to understand one single word of the lyrics I was fascinated by the melody and its rhythm and-in total- Andy's performance.
Nevertheless, I do believe he/this was a one-hit wonder. That's right?

Manfred from Germany


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: Effsee
Date: 12 Oct 07 - 09:13 PM

"Nevertheless, I do believe he/this was a one-hit wonder. That's right?

Manfred from Germany "

Yeh, along with :-
The green Hills of Tyrol
Donald, whaur's yer troosers?
The rumour
and probably a few others that escape me at this time.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MUCKIN' O' GEORDIE'S BYRE (from A Stewart
From: GUEST,Andrew
Date: 01 Nov 07 - 05:16 PM

This is the version sung by Andy Stewart.

Noo whan A want tae lauchin' A think o' tha scene
Whan a body roon cam o'er tae cleen
Boot cairted thamsel's richt up tae tha e'en
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre.
Wee Wullikie, The Rocher, and Wallie tha Doo,
The aul wife hersel' an' Teeny McCrew;
And naebody ele that coud haff aff tha plou.
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre.

Siccin a sotter was a' body in
Five mile awa ye could hear tha din
E'en tha verra cou had tae grin
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre

Noo tha bobby cam doon tae quell doon the soun
The craiter gat lost whar the rucks hae thair foun
He fell intae tha midden and was liken tae droon
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre
Tha weicht o' him syne sent tha barra in bits
Tha whirl cairried on an tha aul wife it hits
Losh ye shoud hae seen hou she did tha splits
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre

Siccin a sotter was a' body in
Five mile awa ye could hear tha din
E'en tha verra cou had tae grin
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre

Tha whisky gaed roon Tammy flee' in tha doo
And aye as they drank tha mair thay gat fou
Tha anerly anes souber tha cauf an tha cou
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre
Tammy rowt oot ring tha bell fer mair
Syne tuggit tha cou's tail an poud oot tha haer.
She kickit oot he gaet up in tha air
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre

Siccin a sotter was a' body in
Five mile awa ye could hear tha din
E'en tha verra cou had tae grin
At tha muckin' o' Geordie's byre

Oh such a stramash was there to see,
Five miles away you could hear the melee
Even the domesticated animals were consumed with glee,
At the cleansing of George's cowshed.

Oh, oh oh, Siccin a sotter was a' body in
Five mile awa ye could hear the din
Even the vera cou had tae grin
At the muckin' o' Geordie's byre


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre
From: GUEST,RK in Denver
Date: 05 Jan 19 - 12:10 AM

Electric Scotland has this version, AND the link to Andy Stewart singing it so one can follow along.

https://www.electricscotland.com/poetry/henderson/singalong/page73.htm


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