Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Lyr Add: The Nut-Brown Maid

DigiTrad:
NUT BROWN MAIDEN


Related threads:
Nut Brown Maiden -what 1940s film? (32)
Tune Req: Ho Ro Mo Nighean Donn Bhoidheach (22)
Lyr Req: Nut Brown Maiden (13)
Lyr Req: Ho Ro Mo Nighean Donn Bhòidheach (17)


poetlady 09 Oct 03 - 07:45 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 09 Oct 03 - 07:56 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Oct 03 - 08:04 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 09 Oct 03 - 08:04 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Oct 03 - 08:05 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 09 Oct 03 - 08:09 PM
masato sakurai 09 Oct 03 - 08:14 PM
GUEST 09 Oct 03 - 08:17 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Oct 03 - 08:30 PM
masato sakurai 09 Oct 03 - 08:43 PM
Joe Offer 09 Oct 03 - 09:42 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Oct 03 - 09:49 PM
poetlady 09 Oct 03 - 10:39 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Oct 03 - 10:48 PM
poetlady 10 Oct 03 - 12:39 AM
GUEST,robinia 10 Oct 03 - 03:29 AM
Snuffy 10 Oct 03 - 08:55 AM
masato sakurai 11 Oct 03 - 08:04 AM
masato sakurai 03 Nov 03 - 05:01 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: poetlady
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 07:45 PM

http://www.bartleby.com/243/69.html

This ballad is in the Oxford Book of Ballads. I don't think I've seen it anywhere else. Does anyone know anything about it?

 
I

He.  BE it right or wrong, these men among
On women do complain;
Affirming this, how that it is
A labour spent in vain
To love them wele; for never a dele        5
They love a man again:
For let a man do what he can
Their favour to attain,
Yet if a new to them pursue,
Their first true lover than        10
Laboureth for naught; for from her thought
He is a banished man.
 
II

She.  I say not nay, but that all day
It is both written and said
That woman’s faith is, as who saith.        15
All utterly decay’d:
But nevertheless, right good witnèss
In this case might be laid
That they love true and continùe:
Record the Nut-brown Maid,        20
Which, when her love came her to prove,
To her to make his moan,
Would not depart; for in her heart
She loved but him alone.
 
III

He.  Then between us let us discuss
        25
What was all the manere
Between them two: we will also
Tell all the pain in fere
That she was in. Now I begin,
So that ye me answere:        30
Wherefore all ye that present be,
I pray you, give an ear.
I am the Knight. I come by night,
As secret as I can,
Saying, Alas! thus standeth the case,        35
I am a banished man.
 
IV

She.  And I your will for to fulfil
In this will not refuse;
Trusting to show, in wordès few,
That men have an ill use—        40
To their own shame—women to blame,
And causeless them accuse.
Therefore to you I answer now,
All women to excuse:
Mine own heart dear, with you what cheer?        45
I pray you, tell anone;
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
V

He.  It standeth so: a deed is do
Whereof great harm shall grow:        50
My destiny is for to die
A shameful death, I trow;
Or else to flee. The t’ one must be.
None other way I know
But to withdraw as an outlaw,        55
And take me to my bow.
Wherefore adieu, mine own heart true!
None other rede I can:
For I must to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.        60
 
VI

She.  O Lord, what is this worldis bliss,
That changeth as the moon!
My summer’s day in lusty May
Is darked before the noon.
I hear you say, farewell: Nay, nay,        65
We dèpart not so soon.
Why say ye so? whither will ye go?
Alas! what have ye done?
All my welfàre to sorrow and care
Should change, if ye were gone:        70
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
VII

He.  I can believe it shall you grieve,
And somewhat you distrain;
But afterward, your painès hard        75
Within a day or twain
Shall soon aslake; and ye shall take
Comfort to you again.
Why should ye ought? for, to make thought,
Your labour were in vain.        80
And thus I do; and pray you to,
As hartèly as I can:
For I must to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.
 
VIII

She.  Now, sith that ye have showed to me
        85
The secret of your mind,
I shall be plain to you again,
Like as ye shall me find.
Sith it is so that ye will go,
I will not live behind.        90
Shall never be said the Nut-brown Maid
Was to her love unkind.
Make you ready, for so am I,
Although it were anone:
For, in my mind, of all mankind        95
I love but you alone.
 
IX

He.  Yet I you rede to take good heed
What men will think and say:
Of young, of old, it shall be told
That ye be gone away        100
Your wanton will for to fulfil,
In green-wood you to play;
And that ye might for your delight
No longer make delay.
Rather than ye should thus for me        105
Be called an ill womàn
Yet would I to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.
 
X

She.  Though it be sung of old and young
That I should be to blame,        110
Theirs be the charge that speak so large
In hurting of my name:
For I will prove that faithful love
It is devoid of shame;
In your distress and heaviness        115
To part with you the same:
And sure all tho that do not so
True lovers are they none:
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.        120
 
XI

He.  I counsel you, Remember how
It is no maiden’s law
Nothing to doubt, but to run out
To wood with an outlàw.
For ye must there in your hand bear        125
A bow ready to draw;
And as a thief thus must you live
Ever in dread and awe;
Whereby to you great harm might grow:
Yet had I liever than        130
That I had to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.
 
XII

She.  I think not nay but as ye say;
It is no maiden’s lore;
But love may make me for your sake,        135
As I have said before,
To come on foot, to hunt and shoot,
To get us meat and store;
For so that I your company
May have, I ask no more.        140
From which to part it maketh my heart
As cold as any stone;
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
XIII

He.  For an outlàw this is the law,
        145
That men him take and bind:
Without pitie, hangèd to be,
And waver with the wind.
If I had need (as God forbede!)
What socours could ye find?        150
Forsooth, I trow, you and your bow
For fear would draw behind.
And no mervail; for little avail
Were in your counsel than:
Wherefore I’ll to the green-wood go,        155
Alone, a banished man.
 
XIV

She.  Right well know ye that women be
But feeble for to fight;
No womanhede it is, indeed,
To be bold as a knight:        160
Yet in such fear if that ye were
With enemies day and night,
I would withstand, with bow in hand,
To grieve them as I might,
And you to save; as women have        165
From death men many one:
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
XV

He.  Yet take good hede; for ever I drede
That ye could not sustain        170
The thorny ways, the deep vallèys,
The snow, the frost, the rain,
The cold, the heat; for dry or wete,
We must lodge on the plain;
And, us above, no other roof        175
But a brake bush or twain:
Which soon should grieve you, I believe;
And ye would gladly than
That I had to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.        180
 
XVI

She.  Sith I have here been partynere
With you of joy and bliss,
I must alsò part of your woe
Endure, as reason is:
Yet I am sure of one pleasùre,        185
And shortly it is this—
That where ye be, me seemeth, pardé,
I could not fare amiss.
Without more speech I you beseech
That we were shortly gone;        190
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
XVII

He.  If ye go thyder, ye must consider,
When ye have lust to dine,
There shall no meat be for to gete,        195
Nether bere, ale, ne wine,
Ne shetès clean, to lie between,
Made of the thread and twine;
None other house, but leaves and boughs,
To cover your head and mine.        200
Lo, mine heart sweet, this ill diète
Should make you pale and wan:
Wherefore I’ll to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.
 
XVIII

She.  Among the wild deer such an archère,
        205
As men say that ye be,
Ne may not fail of good vitayle
Where is so great plentè
And water clear of the rivere
Shall be full sweet to me;        210
With which in hele I shall right wele
Endure, as ye shall see;
And, or we go, a bed or two
I can provide anone;
For, in my mind, of all mankind        215
I love but you alone.
 
XIX

He.  Lo yet, before, ye must do more,
If ye will go with me:
As, cut your hair up by your ear,
Your kirtle by the knee;        220
With bow in hand for to withstand
Your enemies, if need be:
And this same night, before daylight,
To woodward will I flee.
If that ye will all this fulfil,        225
Do it shortly as ye can:
Else will I to the green-wood go,
Alone, a banished man.
 
XX

She.  I shall as now do more for you
Than ’longeth to womanhede;        230
To short my hair, a bow to bear,
To shoot in time of need.
O my sweet mother! before all other
For you I have most drede!
But now, adieu! I must ensue        235
Where fortune doth me lead.
All this make ye: Now let us flee;
The day cometh fast upon:
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.        240
 
XXI

He.  Nay, nay, not so; ye shall not go,
And I shall tell you why—
Your appetite is to be light
Of love, I well espy:
For, right as ye have said to me,        245
In likewise hardily
Ye would answere whosoever it were,
In way of company:
It is said of old, Soon hot, soon cold,
And so is a womàn:        250
Wherefore I to the wood will go,
Alone, a banished man.
 
XXII

She.  If ye take heed, it is no need
Such words to say to me;
For oft ye prayed, and long assayed,        255
Or I loved you, pardè:
And though that I of ancestry
A baron’s daughter be,
Yet have you proved how I you loved,
A squire of low degree;        260
And ever shall, whatso befall,
To die therefore anone;
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
XXIII

He.  A baron’s child to be beguiled,
        265
It were a cursèd deed!
To be felàw with an outlaw—
Almighty God forbede!
Yet better were the poor squyere
Alone to forest yede        270
Than ye shall say another day
That by my cursèd rede
Ye were betrayed. Wherefore, good maid,
The best rede that I can,
Is, that I to the green-wood go,        275
Alone, a banished man.
 
XXIV

She.  Whatever befall, I never shall
Of this thing be upbraid:
But if ye go, and leave me so,
Then have ye me betrayed.        280
Remember you wele, how that ye dele;
For if ye, as ye said,
Be so unkind to leave behind
Your love, the Nut-brown Maid,
Trust me truly that I shall die        285
Soon after ye be gone:
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
XXV

He.  If that ye went, ye should repent;
For in the forest now        290
I have purveyed me of a maid
Whom I love more than you:
Another more fair than ever ye were
I dare it well avow;
And of you both each should be wroth        295
With other, as I trow:
It were mine ease to live in peace;
So will I, if I can:
Wherefore I to the wood will go,
Alone, a banished man.        300
 
XXVI

She.  Though in the wood I understood
Ye had a paramour,
All this may nought remove my thought,
But that I will be your’:
And she shall find me soft and kind        305
And courteis every hour;
Glad to fulfil all that she will
Command me, to my power:
For had ye, lo, an hundred mo,
Yet would I be that one:        310
For, in my mind, of all mankind
I love but you alone.
 
XXVII

He.  Mine own dear love, I see the prove
That ye be kind and true;
Of maid, of wife, in all my life,        315
The best that ever I knew.
Be merry and glad; be no more sad;
The case is changéd new;
For it were ruth that for your truth
Ye should have cause to rue.        320
Be not dismayed, whatsoever I said
To you when I began;
I will not to the green-wood go;
I am no banished man.
 
XXVIII

She.  These tidings be more glad to me
        325
Than to be made a queen,
If I were sure they should endure;
But it is often seen
When men will break promise they speak
The wordis on the splene.        330
Ye shape some wile me to beguile,
And steal from me, I ween:
Then were the case worse than it was,
And I more wo-begone:
For, in my mind, of all mankind        335
I love but you alone.
 
XXIX

He.  Ye shall not nede further to drede:
I will not disparáge
You (God defend), sith you descend
Of so great a lináge.        340
Now understand: to Westmoreland,
Which is my heritage,
I will you bring; and with a ring,
By way of marriáge
I will you take, and lady make,        345
As shortly as I can:
Thus have you won an Earle’s son,
And not a banished man.
 
XXX

Here may ye see that women be
  In love meek, kind, and stable;        350
Let never man reprove them than,
  Or call them variable;
But rather pray God that we may
  To them be comfortable;
Which sometime proveth such as He loveth,        355
  If they be charitable.
For sith men would that women should
  Be meek to them each one;
Much more ought they to God obey,
  And serve but Him alone.        360

 
GLOSS:  never a dele] never a bit.  than] then.  in fere] in company, together.  rede I can] counsel I know.  distrain] distress.  part with] share with.  tho] those.  hele] health.  yede] went.  on the splene] in haste.

 

I copied the lyrics from the cited source. It's set up as a table, so it's difficult for poetlady to post (we don't ordinarily allow tables).
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 07:56 PM

There is an English version of the Gaelic song " Mo Nighean Donn Bhoidheach" that uses this title.
          Sandy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:04 PM

Quiller-Couch included a lot of "literary" ballad-imitations. These have largely been dropped from the more recent edition, edited by James Kinsley (1969). The Nut-Brown Maid did not survive editorial re-evaluation, and I don't know any more about it. Unfortunately, "Q" didn't provide source information. He was not a scholar of Kinsley's stature.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:04 PM

Try searching in the DT using "Nut Brown Maiden" rather than "maid".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:05 PM

Completely different song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:09 PM

Yeh , Malcolm. It seems to be. Just the same title.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: masato sakurai
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:14 PM

See The Traditional Ballad Index: Nut-Brown Maid, The.

Nut-Brown Maid, The

DESCRIPTION: The man claims that women, given the chance, are never true. The woman cites the case of the Nut-brown Maid. They play through the story. The woman will follow her man, even to the greenwood, and will fight for him, etc. The ballad ends by praising women
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1707 ("The Muses Mercury"); earlier found in Arnold's "Chronicle" of c. 1521
KEYWORDS: infidelity love dialog outlaw
FOUND IN:
REFERENCES (2 citations):
Percy/Wheatley II, pp. 31-47, "The Not-Brown Maid" (1 text)
OBB 69, "The Nut-Brown Maid" (1 text)

Notes: Given its elaborate stanzaic structure, regular alternation of speakers, and elaborately formal language, it seems clear that this should be accounted a literary rather than a folk production. I know of no version in oral tradition.
A parody of this song, "The New Nutbrowne Maid," occurs as early as 1520. - RBW
File: OBB069

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2003 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:17 PM

The Rankins did a version of it. Gaelic words were on the cd booklet thing. I think there was a translation as well


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:30 PM

Do read the thread before posting. Doubtless the Rankins did record an arrangement of the extremely well-known Scottish Gaelic song that Sandy mentioned, but it is completely irrelevant to the question asked here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: masato sakurai
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 08:43 PM

Photo of "The Ballad of the Nut-Brown Maid", as printed in R. Arnold's Customs of London (Antwerp, 1503), is in G.M. Trevelyan's Illustrated English Social History: 1 (Penguin, 1964, p. 139).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Joe Offer
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 09:42 PM

I have included both "Maid" and "Maiden" threads in the crosslinks. The idea of the crosslinks is to help people find what they're seeking - not to strictly divide one song from another.

Is there a tune for "The Nut-Brown Maid"? There are no tunes at all in Quiller-Crouch.

-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 09:49 PM

And then there's The nut brown maid has gowd and gear,---"
(Lord Thomas and Fair Eleanor (Annet), Child # 73)

Where did these nut brown maids come from?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: poetlady
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 10:39 PM

I was going to check The Oxford Book of Ballads for a tune next time I go to the library. Some of the songs in the book have tunes and some don't. I suppose I could try to post it if there is. Never having posted a tune before, though, "try" is a key word. :)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Oct 03 - 10:48 PM

It might not be a bad idea to explain that those links all deal with a completely unrelated song, though.

I was wrong to dismiss this text so readily. It is indeed old; but not particularly so in this form. Quiller-Couch (though he neglected to acknowledge any source) quoted it from Bishop Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (vol. II), where it was collated, it appears, from the text given in the Prolusions of 1760 (itself a collation of two texts printed in Richard Arnolde's Chronicle, perhaps of c.1521) and variant texts in a further two editions of Arnolde. Quiller-Couch also included the text in his edition of The Oxford Book of English Verse (1900; now deservedly superceded), where he again names no source but describes the piece, without evidence (Percy thought that Arnold(e) wouldn't have printed it unless it was already old, but that is unproven), as "15th century".

The parody mentioned above, The New Nutbrowne Maid, seems to have been first printed by John Scot about 1520. Apparently it was a religious re-write, "upon the passion of Cryste".

So far as I can tell, no tune is known. I confess to seeing no particular interest in this "ballad"; it is scarcely surprising that it did not survive in oral tradition. Percy, however, saw in it virtues which are lost on me:

"The sentimental beauties of this ballad have always recommended it to readers of taste, notwithstanding the rust of antiquity which obscures the style and expression."

Perhaps I am just a reader without taste. Wordsworth, it appears, was impressed by it; but then, he was impressed by quite a few things in his youth (including opium, which explains one or two things) which he later grew out of.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: poetlady
Date: 10 Oct 03 - 12:39 AM

Thank you kindly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: GUEST,robinia
Date: 10 Oct 03 - 03:29 AM

Where do these nut-brown maids come from? Well, it doesn't hold true for "Lord Thomas" (where the brown girl is the one with gold and gear) but there can be a natural association with the out-of-doors. "Ho-ro, my nut-brown Maiden" (as translated from the Gaelic in the popular Scottish Students Songbook) contrasts Highland Mary, 'down from the bonnie glen', to Lowland maidens in "Glasgow and Dunedin" (Dundee?). In German folksong I think the association is even clearer. Sorry I don't have the song at hand, but at Sunny Camp last weekend there was a great German song session and I seem to recall a popular one about "mein schwarzbraun Madel" -- eyes, hair and (implied, I think) skin because the song had a lot of woodland (and gypsy?) references. (Damn, now I have to look it up. . . )


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: Snuffy
Date: 10 Oct 03 - 08:55 AM

Dunedin = Edinburgh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: masato sakurai
Date: 11 Oct 03 - 08:04 AM

From A "Working" KWIC Concordance to Francis James Child's The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (p. 2048):

nut-brown [29], Nut-brown [1] (30)
99K.14    1    /Then Johnie drew a nut-brown brand,/And strook it
73F.29    1    /`Vo be te you, nut-brown bride,/An ill death you
73B.28    1    /Then out and spak the nut-brown bride,/And she spak
73B.30    1    /Then out and spake the nut-brown bride,/And she spak
73G.24    3    bed,/Sweet Willie and the nut-brown bride/In a chamber
73F.26    3    bed,/Sweet Willie and his nut-brown bride/In ae chamber
73E.31    3    bed,/Sweet Willie and the nut-brown bride/In their chamber
73E.25    1    /But up and stands the nut-brown bride,/Just at her
73[I.33]) 3    /An how like ye yer nut-brown bride,/Lies in yer arms
73G.22    1    /The nut-brown bride pat her hand in/
73F.28    1    /`Vo be to you, nut-brown bride,/Wi yer oxen
73E.10    1    /`O I sall wed the nut-brown maid,/And I sall bring
73E.9    4    for my benison,/The nut-brown maid bring hame.'
73E.7    3    sall I bring hame?/The nut-brown maid has sheep and
73E.9    1    /`The nut-brown maid has sheep and
73E.8    1    /`It's an ye wed the nut-brown maid,/I'll heap gold
73F.3    1    /`Oh will I merry the nut-brown maid,/Wi her oxen
73H.8    1    wis,/It's I will marry the nut-brown may,/. . . . .
73G.5    5    to me;/O will I marry the nut-brown may,/An lat Fair
73F.7    3    /But ye will merry the nut-brown may,/For she hes my
73G.6    2    has ousen, Willie,/The nut-brown may has key;/An ye
73G.6    1    /`The nut-brown may has ousen,
73H.7    3    hae;/But if ye marry the nut-brown may,/My blessin an ye'
73F.7    1    /`But ye will merry the nut-brown may,/Wi her oxen and
73F.4    3    wun;/But if ye merry the nut-brown may,/Ye will get her
169B.14   1    /Then John pulld out a nut-brown sword,/And it was
69C.13    1    /Then out he drew a nut-brown sword,/I wat he stript
133A.12   2    staffe,/And Robin had a nut-brown sword;/So the beggar
88D.25    1    /`Gin nut-brown was his hawk,' she
88D.24    1    /` Nut-brown was his hawk,' they

nut-browne (14)
73A.7    5    /I wad hae ye marrie the nut-browne bride,/And cast Fair
73A.7    3    /I wad hae ye marrie the nut-browne bride,/And cast Fair
73A.21    1    /She sat her by the nut-browne bride,/And her een
73A.4    3    to mee;/O sall I tak the nut-browne bride,/And let Fair
73A.6    3    mee;/A, sall I marrie the nut-browne bride,/And let Fair
73A.9    3    mee;/O sall I marrie the nut-browne bride,/And set Fair
73A.11    3    o hand;/And I will tak the nut-browne bride,/Fair Annet
73A.5    1    /`The nut-browne bride haes gowd and
73A.7    2    has oxen, brother,/The nut-browne bride has kye;/I wad
73A.7    1    /`The nut-browne bride has oxen,
73A.22    3    /And reaching by the nut-browne bride,/Laid it on Fair
73A.23    1    /Up than spak the nut-browne bride,/She spak wi
73A.27    3    /And drave it into the nut-browne bride,/That fell deid
112A.10   1    /He pulled out his nut-browne sword,/And wipt the


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Nut-Brown Maid
From: masato sakurai
Date: 03 Nov 03 - 05:01 AM

"The Nutbrowne Maide" is in F.J. Child's English and Scottish Ballads, vol. 4 (1860, pp. 143-157; earlier and different edition from The English and Scottish Popular Ballads), with this note:
THE NUTBROWNE MAIDE.
WE owe the preservation of this beautiful old ballad to Arnold's Chronicle, of which the earliest edition is thought to have been printed in 1502. In Laneham's account of Elizabeth's visit to Kenilworth, the Nutbrown Maid is mentioned as a book by itself, and there is said to be at Oxford a list of books offered for sale at that place in 1520, among which is the Not-Broon Mayd, price one penny; still, the ballad is not known to exist at present in any other ancient form than that of the Chronicle. We have no means of determining the date of the composition, but Percy has justly remarked that it is not probable that an antiquary would have inserted a piece in his historical collections which he knew to be modern. The language is that of the time at which it was printed.
    The ballad seems to have been long forgotten, when it was revived in The Muse's Mercury for June, 1707, (Percy.) There Prior met with it, and, charmed with its merit, he took the story for the foundation of his Henry and Emma. Capel, in 1760, published a collated text from two different editions of the Chronicle,--we suppose that of 1502, and the second, which was printed in 1521, and exhibits some differences. Percy adopted Capel's text with a few alterations, (Reliques, ii. 30.) The text of the edition of 1502 has been twice reprinted since Percy's time: in the Censura Literaria, vol. i. p. 15, and by Mr. Wright, in a little black-letter volume, London, 1836. We have adopted Mr. Wright's text, not neglecting to compare it with that of Sir Egerton Brydges.
    It will be interesting to compare with this matchless poem a ballad in other languages, which has the same drift;-- Die Lind im Thale, or Liebesprobe, Erk, Deutscher Liederhort, p. 1, 3; Uhland, No. 116; Hoffmann, Schlesische V. L., No. 22, Niederlädische V. L., No. 26; Haupt and Schmaler, V. L. der Wenden, i. 72 (Hoffmann).
    In the sixteenth century a ridiculous attempt was made to supplant the popular ballads in the mouths and affections of the people by turning them into pious parodies. The Nut-Brown Maid was treated in this way, and the result may be seen in The New Notborune Mayd, printed by the Roxburghe Club, and
by the Percy Society, vol. vi.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 17 April 10:29 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.