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Origins: Shepherd Lad

DigiTrad:
BLOW AWAY THE MORNING DEW
CLEAR AWAY THE MORNING DEW
JOCK SHEEP
KATEY MOREY
THE BONNY SHEPHERD LAD
THE NEW MOWN HAY


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Field of Dew / Baffled Knight (Child #112 (6)
Lyr Req: Katie Morey (from Doc Watson) (3)
WHY not fear the rumpling of her gown-O? (10) (closed)


Thomas the Rhymer 19 Nov 03 - 10:15 PM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Nov 03 - 11:37 PM
Thomas the Rhymer 20 Nov 03 - 02:22 AM
Thomas the Rhymer 08 Dec 03 - 08:26 PM
DonD 20 Sep 04 - 05:15 PM
GUEST,Phillip Malcolm Ddouglas 16 Mar 07 - 11:58 AM
robinia 16 Mar 07 - 09:02 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Sep 07 - 05:21 PM
Mary Humphreys 20 Sep 07 - 05:30 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Nov 07 - 03:40 PM
GUEST,Peter the remixer 30 Dec 08 - 01:57 PM
GUEST,ScottishYearner 08 Apr 11 - 04:19 PM
JeffB 08 Apr 11 - 06:26 PM
JeffB 08 Apr 11 - 06:29 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: SHEPHERD LAD (from The Battlefield Band)
From: Thomas the Rhymer
Date: 19 Nov 03 - 10:15 PM

I have been taken by this song, recorded by the Battlefield Band. Is there anyone out there in Mudcat land that can tell me where it comes from? ttr

SHEPHERD LAD

Once there was a shepherd lad kept sheep upon the hill
An he's laid his pipe and crook aside and there he's slept his fill.
He woke up on a riverbank on a fine May mornin,
And there he spied a lady swimming in the clothes that she was born in.

So he raised his head from his green bed and he approached the maid.
"Put on yer claithes, my dear," he says, "and do not be afraid.
It's fitter for a lady fair to sew a silken seam
Than to rise on a fine May morning and swim against the stream."

"Well, if you'll not touch my mantle and you'll leave my claithes alane,
Then I'll give you all the money, sir, that you can carry hame."
"I'll not touch your mantle and I'll leave yer claithes alane,
But I'll tak you out of the clear water, my dear, to be my ane."

So he's taen her oot o the clear water and he's rowed her in his arms.
"Put on yer claithes, my dear," he says, "and hide your bounteous charms."
He put her on a milk white steed and himself upon another,
And it's all along the way they rode like sister and like brother.

They rode intae her faither's gate and she's tirled at the pin,
And ready stood a porter there to let the fair maid in.
When the gates were opened, it's so nimbly she stepped in.
She said, "Kind sir, you are a fool without and I'm a maid within.

"So fare thee weel, my modest boy. I thank you for your care,
But if you had done as you desired, I'd never have left you there.
I will sew no silken seam on a fine May morning.
You can bide your time till your time runs out, so take this as fair warning."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Nov 03 - 11:37 PM

Do they acknowledge no source in sleeve notes? That would be rather bad form nowadays.

This is Child 112 (Roud 11), The Baffled Knight, Blow Away the Morning Dew, and many other titles, found quite widely in both England and Scotland, and occasionally in the USA and Canada. Without any background information I'd guess that this particular text is a re-written collation based on There Was a Silly Shepherd Swain (Johnson, Scots Musical Museum 1796 V 490-1 no.477) and the sets of The Shepherd Laddie and Jock Sheep in the Greig-Duncan collection (and maybe Herd and Bell, I suppose); but that's only a guess. They could have got it from little green men from Mars. Is there really no information on the record?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: Thomas the Rhymer
Date: 20 Nov 03 - 02:22 AM

Thanks, Malcolm... I'll look em up!

Nothing was mentioned about a source on the CD I have... "Happy Daze"... other than:

"This is the only song we know about skinny dipping in Scotland, a chilly and ill advised pursuit in the best of weather! It features a twist on the common ballad tale of a nasty young man who takes advdntage of a girl. In fact, the shepherd lad is far too modest for this lassie... fitted thetraditional words to a tune of John's.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: Thomas the Rhymer
Date: 08 Dec 03 - 08:26 PM

Refresh... Anyone else?

I play it regularly, and I'm hoping for the best... ttr


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: DonD
Date: 20 Sep 04 - 05:15 PM

I suddenly found myself singing this ballad, after countless years of neglect. I learned it first I think from a recording by Richard Dyer-Bennett, almost but not quite a contemporary of Child.

I was puzzled back then, as I am now, by the last verse -- the famous chiding that he who will not when he may, shall not when he would. What I don't understand is the previos line: There's a flower in our garden that's called the marigold.

Is there some significance metaphorically, herbally, or in the language of the flowers that connects marigolds to the notion of boldness, or on the contrary, to excessive reluctance?

Or is it merely to create a rhyme? Which would presume that 'would' was pronounced as 'wold' back (as they say now) in the day.

Any thoughts? Any florists out there?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: GUEST,Phillip Malcolm Ddouglas
Date: 16 Mar 07 - 11:58 AM

Hi would someone please post the chords and words to this awesome song?

Thanks in advance!
PMD


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: robinia
Date: 16 Mar 07 - 09:02 PM

A Scottish lass is much more down to earth. Instead of "if you would not when you might," she goes in for barnyard taunts, along the lines of:

Ye're like a cock my faither had,
    it crowed an' waved its camb.
An' ne'er a hen trod in the yard --
      an' I think ye're just the same


Wonderfully, well, cocky.   As sung by Cilla Fisher and Artie Trezise, it's my favorite version.


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Subject: Lyr Add: Blow Away the Morning Dew (for schools)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Sep 07 - 05:21 PM

Lyr. Add: BLOW AWAY THE MORNING DEW (for schools)
Arr. S. Baring Gould and Cecil J. Sharp

Upon the sweetest summer time
In the middle of the morn,
A pretty damsel I espied,
The fairest ever born.

Chorus:
And sing blow away the morning dew,
The dew, and the dew.
Blow away the morning dew,
How sweet the winds do blow.

She gathered to her lovely flowers
And spent her time in sport;
As if in pretty Cupid's bowers
She daily did resort.

The yellow cowslip by the brim,
The daffodil as well,
The timid primrose, pale and trim,
The pretty snowdrop bell.

And ever, ever as she did
Those pleasant flowers pull,
She rais'd herself and fetch'd a sigh
And wished her apron full.

Then did her offer to pluck
Of every flower that grew,
No herb nor flower then I missed
But only bitter rue.

Both she and I did bow in pain
To gather quite a store,
Until the modest maiden said,
"Kind sir, I'll have no more,"

Yet still did I with willing heart
Essay some more to pull.
"No thank you, sir," she said, "we part,
Because my apron's full."

She's gone with all those flowers sweet,
Of white, of red, of blue,
And unto me about my feet
Is only left the rue.

From S. Baring Gould and Cecil J. Sharp, nd (1930s?), "English Folk-Songs for Schools," J. Curwen & Sons, London.
No. 16, pp. 34-35, with score.

Is this an invented version by Gould and Sharp? Somehow I doubt that it was a collected song. Quite an insipid departure from Child 112.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: Mary Humphreys
Date: 20 Sep 07 - 05:30 PM

Q, I suspect this version was heavily bowdlerised for children to sing without the teacher getting embarrassed. It was probably the only way that Sharp could get his collected songs into print. The tunes were usually left intact, it was the words that suffered.
Mary


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BAFFLED KNIGHT Child #112D
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Nov 07 - 03:40 PM

The text of THE SHEPHERD LAD follows pretty closely to Child's # 112, THE BAFFLED KNIGHT version D:

D

a. Herd's Ancient and Modern Scots, p. 328, 1769.
b. Dixon, Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of the Peasantry of England, p. 123, Percy Society, vol. xvii; Bell, p. 80.

1 THERE was a shepherd's son
Kept sheep upon a hill;
He laid his pipe and crook aside,
And there he slept his fill.
Sing, Fal deral, etc.

2 He looked east, he looked west,
Then gave an under-look,
And there he spyed a lady fair,
Swimming in a brook.

3 He raisd his head frae his green bed,
And then approachd the maid;
'Put on your claiths, my dear,' he says,
'And be ye not afraid.

4 ''Tis fitter for a lady fair
To sew her silken seam
Than to get up in a May morning
And strive against the stream.'

5 'If you'll not touch my mantle,
And let my claiths alane,
Then I'll give you as much money
As you can carry hame.'

6 'O I'll not touch your mantle,
And I'll let your claiths alane;
But I'll tak you out of the clear water,
My dear, to be my ain.'

7 And when she out of the water came,
He took her in his arms:
'Put on your claiths, my dear,' he says,
'And hide those lovely charms.'

8 He mounted her on a milk-white steed,
Himself upon anither,
And all along the way they rode,
Like sister and like brither.

9 When she came to her father's yate
She tirled at the pin,
And ready stood the porter there,
To let this fair maid in.

10 And when the gate was opened,
So nimbly's she whipt in;
'Pough! you're a fool without,' she says,
'And I'm a maid within.

11 'Then fare ye well, my modest boy,
I thank you for your care;
But had you done what you should do,
I neer had left you there.'

12 'Oh I'll cast aff my hose and shoon,
And let my feet gae bare,
And gin I meet a bonny lass,
Hang me if her I spare.'

13 'In that do as you please,' she says,
'But you shall never more
Have the same opportunity;'
With that she shut the door.

14 There is a gude auld proverb,
I've often heard it told,
He that would not when he might,
He should not when he would.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: GUEST,Peter the remixer
Date: 30 Dec 08 - 01:57 PM

I have here a very good version of the Sheperd Lad I came accross recently whilst on my travels.

Gmaj7                     F#7                           Bm7
Once there was a shepherd lad kept sheep upon the hill
Gmaj7                                 F#7                      A13b9
An he's laid his pipe and crook aside and there he's slept his fill.
Gmaj7                   F#7                   Bm7
He woke up on a riverbank on a fine May mornin,
Gmaj7                         F#7          A13b9
And there he spied a lady gay, swimming in a brook

Bm7                      D    Em                         F#7
Blow the winds I oh, Blow the winds I oh
Bm7                   Em                           C13                      Bm
Clear away the morning dew and blow the winds I oh


It makes the playing so much easier if you tune your guitar down to D G D# C F


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: GUEST,ScottishYearner
Date: 08 Apr 11 - 04:19 PM

I adore this song. Still have it on a cassette tape from recording "The Thistle & Shamrock" 10 years ago. Thanks for sharing all this.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: JeffB
Date: 08 Apr 11 - 06:26 PM

In August 1908 Cecil Sharp got this version of "Steal away the Morning Dew" from a Mrs Price of Compton Martin, a village on the northern slopes of the Mendips :-

1 There was a farmer's son kept sheep all on the hill,
    he walk-ed out one May morning to see what he could kill.

chorus Oh roll me in the morning dew, the dew and the dew,
         steal away the morning dew, how sweet the winds do blow.

2   He look-ed high, he look-ed low, he cast an underlook,
      and there he saw a pretty maid all in the watery brook.

3   "You leave alone my mantle dress, you leave alone my gown,
       and if you will take hold my hand I will be your own."

4   He mounted on a milk-white steed and she upon another,
    and there they rode along the road like sister and like brother.

5. And there they rode along the road til they came to some fields of hay,
    "Isn't this a pretty place for boys and girls to play?"

6. "You stop til you come to my father's house, then you shall have a crown,
      there I will engage with you a thirty thousand pound."

7.   And when she came to her father's house so lively she did run -
      none was ready as the waiting-maid to let this lady in.

8.   She mounted off her milk-white steed and then she did step in,
      she said,"You are a rogue without and I'm a maid within."

9.   "My mother got a flower inn her garden call-ed Marigold,
       if you will not when you may you shall not when you wold."

10. "My father got a cock in his barton call-ed double-game.
       He oftimes crew but never tread a hen - I think you're just the same."

It is said the girls would wash themselves in the dew of 1st May, as it was supposed to be especially good for the skin.

I'm not 100% sure if Mrs Price sang "will" or "wold" in v. 9.

A friend tells me that "Marigold" meant a person of uncertain sexuality. The "double game" cock is a bit obscure, but I wonder whether Mrs Price actually sang "double comb", i.e. a particularly impressive bird with a double comb on his head (see Robinia's post of 16 March 07 above). This one has no libido however, so the insult seems to mean that the young man just hasn't got what it takes.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shepherd Lad
From: JeffB
Date: 08 Apr 11 - 06:29 PM

PS V.6 "... AND thirty thousand pound."


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