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Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'

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WHY BOB YOUR HAIR, GIRLS


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cwesley@earthlink.net 09 Sep 98 - 10:37 PM
Joe Offer 10 Sep 98 - 02:58 AM
Joe Offer 10 Sep 98 - 03:01 AM
Doctor John 10 Sep 98 - 02:24 PM
dick greenhaus 11 Sep 98 - 12:55 PM
12 Sep 98 - 09:52 AM
cwesley@earthlink.net 12 Sep 98 - 03:08 PM
Jim Dixon 26 Sep 08 - 03:55 PM
GUEST,Louie Blyton 30 Oct 08 - 09:33 AM
dick greenhaus 30 Oct 08 - 01:48 PM
GUEST,Kevin Hearle 23 Aug 17 - 08:05 AM
Mrrzy 23 Aug 17 - 09:15 AM
GUEST 23 Aug 17 - 04:42 PM
Acme 24 Aug 17 - 07:19 AM
GUEST,henryp 26 Aug 17 - 01:08 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 26 Aug 17 - 09:55 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 26 Aug 17 - 09:59 PM
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Subject: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From: cwesley@earthlink.net
Date: 09 Sep 98 - 10:37 PM

Hello!

My name is Aaron Wesley, and I am a Junior at Southwest High School in Green Bay Wisconsin. I am currently taking a Literature course, for which we had to read the Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. Included in this classic novel are several song titles. I have been searching for the lyrics to these songs, but unfortunately, I have been unable to locate them. The titles of the songs are:

"Ten-Cent Cotton and Forty-Cent Meat" "Why Do You Cut Your Hair, Girls?" "I'm Leaving Old Texas" "McAlester Blues" "Jesus Calls Me to His Side"

If anyone (hopefully) has these lyrics, could you perhaps give me suggestions as to where I may be able to find them? Thank you very much!

Sincerely,

Aaron Wesley

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/1166


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Subject: RE: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Sep 98 - 02:58 AM

Well, Aaron let's see what we can find here in the database (click on the song titles):
SEVEN CENT COTTON AND FORTY CENT MEAT
OLD TEXAS (The Cowman's Lament) (no MIDI tune in the database, but I can come up with one if you need it)

Well, that's two. Maybe somebody else can help with the others. I think you'll have a hard time finding MP3's, though. Maybe Gene Graham will come through with a couple of those. Click here to go to his Web site and send an e-mail through the link on the bottom of his page. Tell him Joe sent ya. Good luck.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Sep 98 - 03:01 AM

Oh, you didn't ask for it, but the Woody Guthrie song called TOM JOAD tells the story of the Grapes of Wrath. Take a look at it. Maybe that's the one you called "McAlester Blues."
Another one on the same subject by not directly related to the story, is DO RE MI.
-Joe Offer, former Wisconsinite, now in California-


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Subject: RE: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From: Doctor John
Date: 10 Sep 98 - 02:24 PM

A verse in Woody's "Vigilantee Man" also refers to The Grapes of Wrath."


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Subject: RE: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 11 Sep 98 - 12:55 PM

TRy a search on [bob your hair]. The trouble with computers is that they're very literal.


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Subject: RE: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From:
Date: 12 Sep 98 - 09:52 AM

Art Thime Has recorded "I'm Going To Leave Old Texas" I Think on various artist sampler live at Charlotte's web called "Get Folked!"


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Subject: RE: Grapes of Wrath: Lyrics and MP3
From: cwesley@earthlink.net
Date: 12 Sep 98 - 03:08 PM

Thank you to all who have responded! Joe, I appreciate the songs titles, and whoever left the message regarding "bob your hair"... it helped a lot. = )


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 26 Sep 08 - 03:55 PM

This is probably too late to help Aaron Wesley, but it's an interesting question nonetheless.

"McAlester Blues" probably refers to McAlester, Oklahoma, which is mentioned several times in Grapes of Wrath.

The closest title I could find was MCALLISTER STREET BLUES which was recorded by the San Francisco Guitar Quartet on their album "Silhouette" (2006). It was written by Patrick Francis, a member of the group. Surely this isn't the song that was referred to in the novel.

My guess is: Steinbeck made up the title for the novel.

Here's the quote from the novel:
    And now the group was welded to one thing, one unit, so that in the dark the eyes of the people were inward, and their minds played in other times, and their sadness was like rest, like sleep. He sang the "McAlester Blues" and then, to make up for it to the older people, he sang "Jesus Calls Me to His Side." The children drowsed with the music and went into the tents to sleep, and the singing came into their dreams.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: GUEST,Louie Blyton
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 09:33 AM

Hi

Didn't the Steinbeck title come from The Battle Hymn of the Republic?

"Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored"

That's assuming the lyrics are the original ones.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 01:48 PM

As I recall, phrases from the Battle Hymn of the Republic have been used for book titles more frequently than those from any other source, except, possibly, the Bible.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: GUEST,Kevin Hearle
Date: 23 Aug 17 - 08:05 AM

Hello:

John Steinbeck did not make up the song "McAlester Blues." As I set down in an article I wrote for _The Steinbeck Review_ four years or so ago, I found the lyrics to the song in the archives of the Music Library at the University of California, Berkeley. They were collected by Tom Collins, the director at the federal government's migrant farmworker camp at Arvin. The story of the song is a conversation between an old convict and a young convict about women. Unfortunately, no sheet music accompanied the lyrics, and the Music Library at Stanford University doesn't seem to have the glass disc on which--according to a catalogue note at Cal accompanying the lyrics--a performance of the song was supposedly recorded.

Also, there is no question but that the title of the novel came from "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." Steinbeck's first wife, Carol suggested the title and he loved it. He knew the book would be attacked as communist or socialist, so he'd been trying to think up a title which emphasized how American the book was. He insisted that his publisher Viking Press use the sheet music from the song to line the inside covers of the first edition of the novel.

yours,
Kevin Hearle, Ph.D.
founding member of the editorial board of _The Steinbeck Review_


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Aug 17 - 09:15 AM

I knew the Woody Guthrie song so I was disappointed when I tried to read the book, hey, I already know this story!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Aug 17 - 04:42 PM

Steinbeck said that he had spent two years researching and writing the book. He was a little miffed at Guthrie (who he had met when Woody was in California). " It took me 3 chapters to get the Joads from the Dust Bowl to California, that little son of a bitch did it in two lines!"


Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: Acme
Date: 24 Aug 17 - 07:19 AM

Hey, Kevin, good to see you here at Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 26 Aug 17 - 01:08 PM

Chichester Festival Theatre THE GRAPES OF WRATH (2009)

Adapted by FRANK GELATI, based on the novel by JOHN STEINBECK

Music & Songs – John Tams

Musicians

Vocals/Harmonium – Barry Coope

Fiddle – Nigel Corbett

Fiddle – John McCusker

Vocals – Heidi Talbot

Vocals/Banjo/Guitar/Harmonica – John Tams

Guitar – Graeme Taylor

Vocals – Sally Ward

Recorded Narration – Rolf Saxon


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 26 Aug 17 - 09:55 PM

Old Testament chanty:

Jeremiah 48:33
"And joy and gladness is taken from the plentiful field, and from the land of Moab; and I have caused wine to fail from the winepresses; none shall tread with shouting; their shouting shall be no shouting."


"Apollinaris says, that the seamen used the word hallelujah as their signal, or celeusma, at their common labour; making the banks echo when they sung hallelujah to Christ. In the church, hallelujah was sung by all the people...."

Farrar, Rev. John, An Ecclesiastical Dictionary, Explanatory of the History, Antiquities, Heresies, Sects, and Religious Denominations of the Christian Church, (London: John Mason, 1853, p.142)

"Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.
(Chorus)
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on."

25:30. Et tu prophetabis ad eos (pel, contra eos) omnia verba hsec, et dices illis, Jehova ab excelso rugiet, et ex habitaculo sanctitatis gase edet vocem suam; rugiendo rugiet super habitaculum suum; celeusma (clamorem potius generaliter) quasi prementium torcular respondebit super cunctos incolas terra?.

25:30. Therefore prophesy thou against them all these words, and say unto them, The Lord shall roar from on high, and utter his voice from his holy habitation; he shall mightily roar upon his habitation; he shall give a shout, as they that tread the grapes, against all the inhabitants of the earth.

The word הידד, eidad, is rendered celeusma, a shout; but some render it a mournful singing; and it often occurs when the vintage is spoken of. Celeusma, as it is well known, is the shout of sailors. Its etymology is indeed general in its meaning ; for κελεύειυ is to exhort, to encourage; and then the noun is exhortation. But as this word is only used as to sailors, I prefer to adopt the word sound, or a loud noise. (p.289)

For they who tread the wine-press mutually encourage one another by shouting; one calls on another, and thus they rouse themselves to diligence. There is also a mutual concord among sailors, when they give their shouts, as well as among the workmen who tread the grapes in the wine-press. (p.291)

Owen, John, ed., Commentaries on the Book of the Prophet Jeremiah and the Lamentations by John Calvin, Vol.III, The Tenth Annual Report of the Calvin Society, (Edinburg: Calvin Society's Office, 1852)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: songs from 'Grapes of Wrath'
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 26 Aug 17 - 09:59 PM

More (too much) on the Hebrew-to-Latin (see above):

OVATIO.

In his Bibliography, Rev. James Hyde calls attention, on page 116, to an important note by Swedenborg on Ezek. vii. 7, "the day of trouble is near and not the sounding of the mountains." See also Index Biblicus under Mare. These last words are rendered non celeusma sen ovatio montium, and of this he says ovatio montium pro ovatione ex amore sui, giving the date 9 October, 1747. To translate by the phrase, "ovation of the mountains," seems to give no meaning. To the Romans an ovation was a lesser triumph given to a victor without a battle or to one who had made conquest of a small territory. The word might, therefore, mean the shouting of an approving multitude, and we might say in the quoted phrases, "not an outcry or shouting of the mountains" and "the shouting of the mountains is for shouting from the love of self." Swedenborg, however, seems not to have readily found an equivalent for the Hebrew word, hedad, for, when it was found in Isa. xvi. 10 and Jer. xlviii. 33, he retained the original word, as in "Apocalypse Explained," 376, "Arcana Cœlestia," 6377, "Apocalypse Revealed," 651, and elsewhere. He even said, at the end of the second passage, hedad non hedad, where the English has "their shouting shall be no shouting."

In the Adversaria IV., page 39, he gives what amounts to a definition of hedad when he says on Isa. xvi. 10 (18 in his Bible), "As to hedad see the original text, for it is translated by celeusma, a sound of grief; hedad seems to be a song which they sung in the vintage."But he closely defines it in "Apocalypse Explained," 922, where he quotes the hedad non hedad of Jer. xlviii. 33, and says, ovatio calcantium torcular intelligitur per hedad.

Coming back now to the first instance in the Index Biblicus, we may translate, "not the outcry or shouting of the mountains; the shouting of the mountains is for shouting from self-love."
We find but one instance when the word ovatio is found apart from quotations from the Word where it represents the Hebrew hedad, and that is in "Arcana Cœlestia," 4215, where feelings are spoken of:—

"Humiliation of heart leads to kneeling, which is an outward action of the body; still greater and more internal humiliation causes prostration on the earth; joy of mind produces singing and shouting (ovationem) ; and sadness and inward grief cause weeping and lamentation."

In no case can we translate ovatio by its cognate "ovation," for that is not intelligible. As to the very best English equivalent the revisers say, "vintage-shout," "joyful shouting," and simply "shouting," which is apparently the best word. T. F. W.

Wright, T.F., ed., The New Church Review by Emanuel Swedenborg, (Boston: Massachusetts New Church Union, pp.458-9)


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