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Lyr Req: The Lady Leroy

DigiTrad:
THE LADY LEROY
THE LADY LEROY 2


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Lady Leroy (This is taken from H.M. Belden's Ballads and Songs Collected by the Missouri Folk-Lore Society, and came originally from A.F. Wade's MS collection, where no tune was given. Variants have been found in a number of places, but there is another set from Missouri at The Max Hunter Folk Song Collection: The Lady Leroy As sung by Mrs. Tressie Rose in Gainesville, Missouri on July 1, 1958.)


Zorro 19 Sep 98 - 05:25 AM
Joe Offer 19 Sep 98 - 07:04 AM
Martin Ryan 19 Sep 98 - 01:01 PM
Joe Offer 19 Sep 98 - 03:01 PM
Joe Offer 19 Sep 98 - 03:13 PM
Joe Offer 19 Sep 98 - 04:46 PM
Martin Ryan 19 Sep 98 - 06:25 PM
Joe Offer 20 Sep 98 - 12:03 AM
Martin Ryan 20 Sep 98 - 04:47 AM
Jim Dixon 20 Feb 11 - 10:02 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Feb 11 - 10:23 PM
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Subject: THE LADY LEROY Lyrics requested.
From: Zorro
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 05:25 AM

I have a partial recording (from Thistle and Shamrock) called "The Lady Leroy". I don't know all the lyrics. It's a song about a wealthy young lady and her not-so-wealthy love. She dresses in men's clothing and buys a ship from her father. The ship is The Lady Leroy, and she and her "Johnny" sail off together. The father is angry and sends a ship to bring them back and... well you can guess the rest of the story. And now I'd like to have the rest of the lyrics. Please and thanks...


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 07:04 AM

Hi, Zorro - search the database under Leroy and you'll find two versions, one and two. Anybody got a tune?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 01:01 PM

I supplied Version 2 above. Can't remember if I gave Dick the tadpoles, but I'll see what I can find. Still sing it regularly - makes a change to have a good tune AND a happy ending!

Regards


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 03:01 PM

Here, Zorro, we'll put you back in the right thread and delete the other one.


Subject: Note to Joe Offer... From: Zorro Date: 19-Sep-98 - 02:45 PM

Why didn't I think of that? The Lady Leroy #2 was the version I heard. I know the tune and if no one else can supply it I will either, (1) call you and sing it to you, or (2) make a dub and send it to you. (The second option is probably your best bet.) My old Apple Mac doesn't allow me many options. I have some 5 minute tapes used for radio commercials and I will be happy to copy it and put it in the mail to you. Just let me know... And, THANKS.

Z.......


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 03:13 PM

Let's hold off on that, Zorro. If we can't come up with a tune, maybe you could send it to somebody who can transcribe the tune so we can post it here. I'm afraid my ear isn't that good. I can transcribe freom sheet music or convert MIDI or ABC files, but I can't transcribe by ear.
Now that we're on the way to training people to post lyrics with line breaks <br>, the next step is to get people trained to post tunes. I think there is software that will do the job on just about any computer. Heck, I can even do it on the old floppy-disk Tandy 286 I left with my ex-wife. Alan Foster's MIDITXT works quite well for us who prefer to enter notes on a staff. I have to admit that ABC is also quite learnable, if one gets plenty of bed rest and abstains from red meat and alcohol for a week before attempting it.
I think maybe Martin is going to break down and give us a tune, though.


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: THE LADY LEROY
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 04:46 PM

This is similar to the second version in the database, but there are significant differences and some added verses, so I thought it would be worthwhile to post it. I have some trouble with the tunes in the Sam Henry book, but it's at least a pretty good approximation.
-Joe Offer-

THE LADY LEROY
Traditional (from "Sam Henry's Songs of the People")

Other titles: "Brave Annie and Her Young Sailor Boy," "The Sailor Boy,"
Sally and Her Lover"


As I went walking one evening in June
To view the green fields and meadows in bloom,
I spied a lovely couple on Erin's green shore,
They were viewing the ocean where the loud billows roar.

'O Sally, lovely Sally, you're the maid I adore,
To be parted from you, it would grieve my heart sore,
But your parents are rich, love, and angry with me,
And for me to enforce you my ruin might be.

Sally dressed herself up in a suit of men's clothes
And down to her father she instantly goes,
She purchased a vessel, paying down his demand,
But little he knew 'twas from his daughter's hand.

She wrote her love a letter and this she did say,
'Be quick and make ready, there's no time to delay.'
They hoisted their topsails with signs of great joy,
And over the ocean sailed the Lady Leroy

When Sally's old father came this for to know,
Like a man in distraction to a captain he did go,
He bid him go find them and her lover destroy,
For he ne'er will enjoy the fair Lady Leroy

Wit bold indiscretion this sea captain did go,
And quickly made ready like some daring foe,
He spied a large vessel with her colours let fly,
And he hailed her and found her, the Lady Leroy.

'Return, you young couple, to Erin's green shore,
Or a broadside of grapeshot on your lives I will pour.'
But Sally's true lover he made this reply,
'I'll never surrender, I'll conquer or die.'

Then broadside to broadside they on other did pour,
Far louder than thunder their cannons did roar,
but Sally's true lover gained the victorie,
And he sunk the proud captain in the dark raging sea.

We landed in Boston, that city of fame,
With a bold chief commander, I'll not mention his name;
Drink a health to lovely Sally and the Lady Leroy,
She's the source of all comfort and my only joy.

Write home to your father and this let him know:
That I would not be conquered by friend or by foe,
We wish him good fortune, long life to enjoy,
But he lost all his prospects on the Lady Leroy

DT #440
Laws N5
@Irish @sailor @love @family @transvestite @trick @battle

I had some trouble fitting the lyrics to fit the tune. Here's my best guess:

As I went a-wal-king one eve-ning _ in June
To view the _ green fields and the mea-dows in bloom
I spied _ a love-ly cou-ple on E-rin's green shore
They were view-ing the o-cean where the loud bil-lows roar.

MIDI file: LADYLE~1.MID

Timebase: 192

Name: The Lady Leroy
Text: By Traditional
Copyright: from Sam Henry's Songs of the People
Key: A
TimeSig: 3/4 24 8
Start
0000 1 73 110 0256 0 73 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 68 110 0094 0 68 000 0002 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 61 110 0160 0 61 000 0032 1 61 110 0094 0 61 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0160 0 64 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 68 110 0064 0 68 000 0000 1 66 110 0064 0 66 000 0000 1 64 110 0062 0 64 000 0002 1 66 110 0336 0 66 000 0048 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 68 110 0094 0 68 000 0002 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 76 110 0160 0 76 000 0032 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 71 110 0064 0 71 000 0000 1 73 110 0064 0 73 000 0000 1 71 110 0062 0 71 000 0002 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 68 110 0024 0 68 000 0000 1 69 110 0166 0 69 000 0002 1 71 110 0336 0 71 000 0048 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 68 110 0094 0 68 000 0002 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 76 110 0160 0 76 000 0032 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 71 110 0064 0 71 000 0000 1 73 110 0064 0 73 000 0000 1 71 110 0062 0 71 000 0002 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 68 110 0024 0 68 000 0000 1 69 110 0166 0 69 000 0002 1 71 110 0336 0 71 000 0048 1 73 110 0256 0 73 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 68 110 0094 0 68 000 0002 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 61 110 0160 0 61 000 0032 1 61 110 0094 0 61 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0160 0 64 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 68 110 0064 0 68 000 0000 1 66 110 0064 0 66 000 0000 1 64 110 0062 0 64 000 0002 1 66 110 0336 0 66 000
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:The Lady Leroy
M:3/4
Q:1/4=120
K:A
c3BA2|F2FGA2|C2CDE2|F2G3/4F/2E3/4F2|-F2FGA2|
-ABc2e2|c2B3/4c/2B3/4c2|F2G/4A7/4B2|-B2FGA2|
-ABc2e2|c2B3/4c/2B3/4c2|F2G/4A7/4B2|-B2c3B|
A2F2FG|A2C2CD|E2F2G3/4F/2E3/4|F7/2||


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 19 Sep 98 - 06:25 PM

I suppose I'll have to give in and get to grips with the MIDItext software at this stage!

I had forgotten there's a version in Henry. Some of the differences between it and DT no. 2 look like rather literary tidying-up?

Regards


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 Sep 98 - 12:03 AM

Hi, Martin - you don't find archaic language in Sam Henry's lyrics. He published the songs from 1923 to 1939 in his weekly column in the Northern Constitution, a provincial newspaper published in the market town of Coleraine on the banks of the River Bann in Northern Ireland. I'd guess he was addressing his column to a general audience, and not to an elite group of folk purists. Singability was probably more important than historical accuracy.
One think I notice in the Sam Henry book that strikes me as strange - the sharps and flats for the music are an octave lower than I've seen in other music. Sharps are on F, C, G, and D - but down towards the bottom of the staff. Is that the way they do it in Ireland? Actually, I think the notation was done by the American editor of the book - I believe that in his column, Henry had a sort of sol-fa notation. Anybody got an explanation?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: THE LADY LEROY
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 20 Sep 98 - 04:47 AM

Joe

You might be right. Its just that phrases like
"and for me to enforce you my ruin might be"
"She's the source of my comfort and my only joy"
read awkwardly to me in the context of the song. Mind you, to describe them as "literary" was stretching a point! Must have been late.

I was't suggesting Henry had done it - though he often plugged gaps in songs, as far as I know. You're right about the tonic sol-fa, incidentally.
regards
p.s. I think there is some more material from the Henry archive due out over the next year or so.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LADY LEROY (trad. Pennslylvania)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Feb 11 - 10:02 PM

From North Pennsylvania Minstrelsy by Henry W. Shoemaker (Altoona: Altoona Tribune Company, 1919), page 60:

LADY LEROY

Bright Phoebus was shining all on the broad main.
The birds they were singing, all nature serene.
I espied a fair couple on Ireland's shore,
A-viewing the ocean while the billows did roar.

The one was a lady, both beauteous and fair,
The other a Captain, persuading his dear,
Persuading his jewel to cross the wide sea
In a ship he commanded, called "Lady Leroy."

"Oh, no!" cried this fair maid. "This never can be.
My father has vessels, full twenty and three,
And should he o'ertake us, our lives he'd destroy,
So I dare not venture in the Lady Leroy."

"Oh, then," cried the Captain, "I'm surely undone.
I wish that my mother had ne'er borne a son.
May sweet peace go with you, for wretched am I,
For the love of pretty Polly I am doomed for to die."

Then she dressed herself up in a suit of men's clothes,
And disguised unto her old father she goes.
She purchased a vessel, and paid full demand,
But little did he think 'twas his own daughter's hand.

Then to her lover—and to him she did say,
"Make haste and get ready, no time for delay."
They hoisted their topsails, their colors let fly,
And they swear by their Maker they will conquer or die.

They had not sailed more than a week or ten days,
Before from the southeast there blew a fair breeze.
They espied a fine vessel, which was to their joy,
They hailed her and found her the Lady Leroy.

"Turn back, oh, turn back, to the Ireland shore,
Or this very instant a broadside I'll pour."
Then broadside from broadside these vessels did pour,
And like loud peals of thunder their cannon did roar.

They had not fought more than an hour and a half
When this pretty fair maid gained her victory at last.
"Now, go tell my father it is to his shame:
I have conquered his vessel; I have conquered his fame."

They sailed into Boston, that city of fame,
With two as fine vessels as e'er crossed the main.
The one was the Essex, the other Leroy.
Success to pretty Polly, she's the source of all joy.


Potter County. The favorite song of William S. Brine, aged veteran of the Civil War, and one much sung in this part of the country in earlier days. Copied from a scrap book.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE LADY LEROY (trad. Great Lakes)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Feb 11 - 10:23 PM

From The Flying Cloud by M. C. Dean (Virginia, MN: The Quickprint, 1922), page 33:


THE LADY LEROY.

As I went a-walking one morning in May,
For to view those fine meadows, all nature seemed gay,
I espied a young couple on old Erin's green shore,
A-viewing the ocean where the wild billows roar.

"Sally, dear Sally, you're the girl I adore,
And to be parted from you it grieves my heart sore,
But your parents are rich, love, and they're angry at me,
And were I to stay with you our ruin it would be."

When she heard him say this she dressed herself in men's clothes
And away to her father she instantly goes.
She purchased a vessel, paid him down his demand,
But little he knew it was from his own daughter's hand.

Then to her true lover she went right away.
She bade him get ready without further delay,
So they hoisted their topsails and colors let fly,
And she sailed o'er the ocean, the Lady Leroy.

When her old father heard this, in grief and despair,
Straightway to his Captain he soon did repair,
Saying, "Pursue and overtake them and his life destroy,
For he ne'er will enjoy the fair Lady Leroy."

Then proud of his message this bold Captain goes,
As if for to conquer some bold, daring foes.
He spies a large vessel, her colors let fly.
He hails her and finds she's the Lady Leroy.

"Now turn back to Erin, to Erin's green shore,
Or a broadside of grapeshot into you I'll pour."
But Sally's true lover made him this reply:
"We'll never surrender. We'll conquer or die!"

Then broadside like hail on each other did pour,
Until many brave seamen were wounded full sore,
But Sally's true lover gained the victory,
For, like all true lovers, they will always be free.

"Now turn back to Erin and there let them know,
That we ne'er will be conquered by friend or by foe.
Here's a health to young Sally, she's the Lady Leroy,
She's the source of my comfort and my only joy."


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