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Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet (Jonathan Swift)

Alberta 02 Feb 97 - 04:06 PM
Jim Dixon 15 Dec 02 - 02:16 PM
nutty 16 Dec 02 - 04:16 AM
GUEST,Thomas Richards 12 May 06 - 05:31 AM
Paul Burke 12 May 06 - 06:40 AM
Peace 12 May 06 - 08:50 PM
Peace 12 May 06 - 08:53 PM
Peace 12 May 06 - 09:54 PM
Thompson 05 Jan 14 - 04:06 AM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Jan 14 - 08:24 PM
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Subject: Lyrics: The Dean's Pamphlet
From: Alberta
Date: 02 Feb 97 - 04:06 PM

I heard this tune on the Thistle and Shamrock last year. It is on a Liam O'Flynn CD, I believe. I have most of the lyrics, but some of the words were unfamiliar.

Anyone had luck with this?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Dec 02 - 02:16 PM

At Rita Connolly's web page you can download a zipped 30-second mp3 file, from which I transcribed this (some phrases are uncertain):

"Whoever our trading with England would hinder
To inflame both the nations does plainly conspire,
Because Irish linen will soon turn to tinder
And wool it is greasy and quickly takes fire.
Therefore I assure ye, our noble grand jury,
On seeing the Dean Cook wherein (or "were in"?) a great fury
They would buy English silk for their wives and their daughters
In spite of his steamship in journeyman waters."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet
From: nutty
Date: 16 Dec 02 - 04:16 AM

The playlist for Radio National has this to say about it .........


          (sweet Irish female voice w uilllean pipes & ac guitar, elec bass - typically brilliant satirical lyric by
          Johnathon Swift - on whom the song is ostensibly an attack: real target is the local establishment
          who'd sold out to the English)


i haven't been able to find the Swift lyrics but someone out there, not least your local librarian, should be able to find them.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet
From: GUEST,Thomas Richards
Date: 12 May 06 - 05:31 AM

Not "Dean Cook" but "Dean's book"

and the last line is

"In spite of his Deanship, and Journeyman Waters"

Waters printed the pamphlet.
"Journeyman" is slightly derogatory, a printer in business on his own should be a Master, not a Journeyman


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet
From: Paul Burke
Date: 12 May 06 - 06:40 AM

Where did Dean Swift get a steamship from?


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Subject: Lyr Add: EXCELLENT NEW SONG ON A SEDITIOUS PAMPHLE
From: Peace
Date: 12 May 06 - 08:50 PM

"AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG[1] ON A SEDITIOUS PAMPHLET.
1720-21
To the tune of "Packington's Pound."

Brocades, and damasks, and tabbies, and gauzes,
Are, by Robert Ballantine, lately brought over,
With forty things more: now hear what the law says,
Whoe'er will not wear them is not the king's lover.
Though a printer and Dean, Seditiously mean,
Our true Irish hearts from Old England to wean,
We'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

In England the dead in woollen are clad,
The Dean and his printer then let us cry fie on;
To be clothed like a carcass would make a Teague mad,
Since a living dog better is than a dead lion.
Our wives they grow sullen At wearing of woollen,
And all we poor shopkeepers must our horns pull in.
Then we'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

Whoever our trading with England would hinder,
To inflame both the nations do plainly conspire,
Because Irish linen will soon turn to tinder,
And wool it is greasy, and quickly takes fire.
Therefore, I assure ye, Our noble grand jury,
When they saw the Dean's book, they were in a great fury;
They would buy English silks for their wives and their daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

This wicked rogue Waters, who always is sinning,
And before coram nobis so oft has been call'd,
Henceforward shall print neither pamphlets nor linen,
And if swearing can do't shall be swingingly maul'd:
And as for the Dean, You know whom I mean,
If the printer will peach him, he'll scarce come off clean.
Then we'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

[Footnote 1: This ballad alludes to the Dean's "Proposal for the use of Irish Manufactures," for which the printer was prosecuted with great violence. Lord Chief-Justice Whitshed sent the jury repeatedly out of court, until he had wearied them into a special verdict. See Swift's Letter to Pope, Jan. 1721, and "Prose Works," vii, 13.--W. E. B.]"



www.gutenberg.org/files/13621/13621.txt - 633k


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet
From: Peace
Date: 12 May 06 - 08:53 PM

I didn't do line breaks because I've never heard of it before, and don't even really know if the above is that which you seek. Sorry.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DEAN'S PAMPHLET (Jonathan Swift)
From: Peace
Date: 12 May 06 - 09:54 PM

Brocades, and damasks, and tabbies, and gauzes,
Are, by Robert Ballantine, lately brought over,
With forty things more: now hear what the law says,
Whoe'er will not wear them is not the king's lover.
Though a printer and Dean, Seditiously mean,
Our true Irish hearts from Old England to wean,
We'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

In England the dead in woollen are clad,
The Dean and his printer then let us cry fie on;
To be clothed like a carcass would make a Teague mad,
Since a living dog better is than a dead lion.
Our wives they grow sullen At wearing of woollen,
And all we poor shopkeepers must our horns pull in.
Then we'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

Whoever our trading with England would hinder,
To inflame both the nations do plainly conspire,
Because Irish linen will soon turn to tinder,
And wool it is greasy, and quickly takes fire.
Therefore, I assure ye, Our noble grand jury,
When they saw the Dean's book, they were in a great fury;
They would buy English silks for their wives and their daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.

This wicked rogue Waters, who always is sinning,
And before _coram nobis_ so oft has been call'd,
Henceforward shall print neither pamphlets nor linen,
And if swearing can do't shall be swingingly maul'd:
And as for the Dean, You know whom I mean,
If the printer will peach him, he'll scarce come off clean.
Then we'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,
In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet (Jonathan Swift)
From: Thompson
Date: 05 Jan 14 - 04:06 AM

Was this ballad written by Jonathan Swift?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Dean's Pamphlet (Jonathan Swift)
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Jan 14 - 08:24 PM

It was. "An Excellent New Song On A Seditious Pamphlet".


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