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Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man

DigiTrad:
JOCK STEWART
MULDOON, THE SOLID MAN


Related threads:
The Famous Muldoon/Reedy Lagoon (18) (closed)
Lyr Req: I'm a Man You Don't Meet Everyday (22)
There goes Muldoon he's a solid man (16)
(origins) Origin: (I'm) A Man You Don't Meet Every Day (71)
Origins: Jock Stewart-Man You Don't Meet Every Day (19)
Lyr Req: A Man You Don't Meet Every Day (5) (closed)
JOCK STEWART - Oh, NO, another Parody! (9)
Lyr Req: A Man You Don't Meet Every Day (Pogues) (16)
A man you don't meet every day (9) (closed)


Liam's Brother 21 Sep 98 - 11:17 PM
Charlie Baum 22 Sep 98 - 10:23 PM
Charlie Baum 22 Sep 98 - 10:43 PM
Martin Ryan 23 Sep 98 - 05:16 AM
Liam's Brother 23 Sep 98 - 02:31 PM
Liam's Brother 23 Sep 98 - 02:42 PM
Charlie Baum 24 Sep 98 - 12:36 AM
Martin Ryan 24 Sep 98 - 03:47 AM
Bruce O. 24 Sep 98 - 06:52 PM
Martin Ryan 25 Sep 98 - 06:12 AM
dick greenhaus 26 Sep 98 - 10:06 AM
Amaranth 26 Sep 98 - 12:07 PM
Antaine 26 Sep 98 - 08:04 PM
29 Sep 98 - 12:38 PM
Martin Ryan 30 Sep 98 - 05:05 AM
Charlie Baum 19 Oct 98 - 05:18 PM
Bruce O. 19 Oct 98 - 06:17 PM
Liam's Brother 20 Oct 98 - 12:25 AM
Bruce O. 20 Oct 98 - 10:41 AM
Jim Dixon 05 Jan 04 - 03:55 AM
masato sakurai 05 Jan 04 - 04:19 AM
masato sakurai 05 Jan 04 - 04:25 AM
Little Robyn 06 Jan 04 - 01:21 AM
GUEST,Clint Keller 06 Jan 04 - 02:11 AM
Bearheart 06 Jan 04 - 09:00 PM
Bob Bolton 06 Jan 04 - 09:22 PM
Malcolm Douglas 06 Jan 04 - 10:10 PM
Bearheart 07 Jan 04 - 09:08 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Sep 05 - 10:00 PM
GUEST,Liam's Brother 23 Sep 05 - 01:59 PM
Ron Davies 07 Dec 07 - 07:29 AM
Nerd 07 Dec 07 - 11:24 AM
GUEST 07 Dec 07 - 11:12 PM
GUEST,Ron Davies 07 Dec 07 - 11:16 PM
GUEST,georgina muldoon 27 Jun 08 - 06:03 AM
MartinRyan 06 Jun 11 - 04:28 PM
Steve Gardham 07 Jun 11 - 04:07 PM
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Subject: Muldoon, The Solid Man - words please
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 21 Sep 98 - 11:17 PM

I'm looking for a complete set of words for Muldoon, The Solid Man. Songbook and historical references very helpful also but I'd love to get the words the most. Thanks in advance.

Click for related thread


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Subject: Lyr Add: MULDOON, THE SOLID MAN (sung by Lisa Null
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 22 Sep 98 - 10:23 PM

This is the way Lisa Null sings it:

I am a man of great influence
And I'm educated to a high degree
I came when small from Donegal
On the Daniel Webster across the sea
In the 14th Ward [(or) Jersey City] I was situated
In a tenement with my brother Dan
By perserverance I elevated
And I rose to the front like a solid man.

CHORUS:
Then come with me and I'll treat you decent
I will get you drunk and I'll fill your can
And on the street every friend I meet
Says there goes Muldoon; he's a solid man.

To every party and every raffle
I always go, an invited guest
As conspicuous as General Grant, me boys
I wear a rosebud all on my breast
I'm called upon to address the meeting
Without regard to clique or clan
I show the constitution with elocution
Because you see, I'm a solid man.

Repeat CHORUS

Lisa Null found it in the singing of a Gaelic singer named Niclos Tobean (Spelling uncertain). This was one of only a couple of English songs in his repertoire. It can also be found in Philip Foner, Labor Songs of the Nineteeth Century. And Mick Maloney sings it and has an extra verse.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 22 Sep 98 - 10:43 PM

American Labor Songs of the Nineteenth Century by Philip S. Foner might be available from the University of Illinois Press.
There's a web-page: http://aaup.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/99/illinois/94165091.ctl


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 23 Sep 98 - 05:16 AM

Aaaaagh! The chorus sounds very like a Scottish song that won't come to me!

The singer, BTW, was Nioclas Toibin (Nicholas Tobin) from the Rinn district of Waterford. Among the other English language songs he sang was a fine version of The Flying Cloud, comple with a strange little coda with a different air.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 23 Sep 98 - 02:31 PM

Thanks, Charlie. I will try to chase the book. If you see Lisa, please say hello for me.

Martin, is this the way Nioclas sings it? Does he have an additional verse? I get the feeling this is an old New York musical hall song. Who would know for sure?

By the way, Martin, I lost your new e-mail address. Appreciate it if you send it again. Thanks.

All the best, Dan Milner


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 23 Sep 98 - 02:42 PM

Hi Charlie! Are the words you give above pretty much the same as in the book? Does Foner have additional verses?

Thanks. All the best.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 24 Sep 98 - 12:36 AM

Dan--
Lisa doesn't remember the Foner book as actually being in her library (which makes it a rare lacuna), so I can't check it out without a trip to the library.
But Mick Moloney has recorded it at least a couple of times--on Uncommon Bonds with Eugene O'Donnell (Green Linnet #1053, 1980), and on Long Journey Home (Unisphere Records (BMG), 1998). Lisa believes he sings an additional verse, at least on the Green Linnet recording. And my guess is that Dr. Moloney may have more information about the origin of the song.
--Charlie Baum


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 24 Sep 98 - 03:47 AM

Dan,

I never heard Nioclas singng "Muldoon". I have a vague memory of hearing it once at the Goilin singers club in Dublin - I should be there tomorrow night and will make enquiries. Similarly, I can check out the Traditional Music Archive on Monday.

I'll drop you an email - our system has been down a lot lately as we put in a new server,


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Bruce O.
Date: 24 Sep 98 - 06:52 PM

The chorus looks rather similar to that of a 19th century Irish song, "I'm a man yous don't meet every day".


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 25 Sep 98 - 06:12 AM

Bruce.

It does, alright (Jock Stewart and all that family of songs) - but there's another one lurking in my head! Strong waltz metre...? <.P> Regards


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 10:06 AM

The meter seems wrong for the "Man You Don't Meet Every Day" family--it fits "I Will Lay You Down, Love", though. I'll ask Lisa for the tune if she shows up at the Washington Getaway, which she usually does.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Amaranth
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 12:07 PM

This song seems to beg a parody about the former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney, nicknamed Muldoon, considered by many Canadians to have lead the most corrupt government since we became a nation.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Antaine
Date: 26 Sep 98 - 08:04 PM

See a recording by Dick Hogan called
"The Wonders of the World"
You will find "Muldoon the solid man" on it.
Also the spelling of the singer mentioned is
Nioclás Tóibín


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From:
Date: 29 Sep 98 - 12:38 PM

Dan

I'm having a bad computer week! My work email has shifted to an NT server - which refuses to talk to my Mac. My home email has been disabled by a lightning strike which fried my modem. And now the Mudcat is refusing to recognise my personal page - so I can't use that either! Anyone have a good source of carrier pigeons? (Mind you, I'm reminded of an Irish expression for a misfortunate bugger: "If you gave him ducks - they'd drown!")

Try mryan@ait.ie every so often and I'll get back to you when I can.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 30 Sep 98 - 05:05 AM

The above anonymous posting was, obviously, from a (n equally obviously) paranoid me!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 19 Oct 98 - 05:18 PM

I've found out more about the history of "Muldoon, the Solid Man": an article in the programme of the 1998 Washington Irish Folk Festival by Don Meade (pp. 47-53) which concludes with the note that a longer version of the article origically appeared in New York Irish History, the journal of the New York Irish History Roundtable.

In the article, Don Meade traces the history of the song from its origins: it was written by Edward Harrigan and its first performance was probably in March, 1874, in conjunction with a variety sketch called "Who Owns the [Clothes] Line." It became very popular and was covered by many other performers. It is alluded to in a short story by Rudyard Kipling and in James Joyce's Finnegan Wake. It probably was spread to Ireland itself through the music-hall singing of William J. Ashcroft. A 78-rpm recording by Sam Carson also helped to spread the song through Ireland. The tune is probably traditional Irish; an 1874 songster directs that it be sung to the tune of Colleen Rhue (Red-haired girl). Other similar melodies include "Youghal Harbour," "Boulavogue," "Omagh Town," and perhaps some three percent of all Irish folk songs.

The article contains many more historical details, but I don't have time this afternoon to input all 7 two-columned pages. If you can't find a copy of the article, let me know, and I'll try to photocopy mine.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Bruce O.
Date: 19 Oct 98 - 06:17 PM

What do you know? It's in the Levy Sheet Music Collection (Mudcat's Links), box 72, item 69, but it's simplest just to put 'Muldoon' in the bibliographic search box. I had looked the for "I'm a man youse don't meet everyday with no luck. See also in Levy collection Harrigan's Real Old 'Mountain Dew'.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 20 Oct 98 - 12:25 AM

Thank you both, gentlemen, for pointing me in the right direction.

Charlie. As it happens Don Meade and I had a beverage and a song together as recently as last Thursday. I'll see him again soon and raise this topic.

Bruce. I have now seen "Muldoon" with my own eyes thanks to you. You are truly a solid man. "Jock Stewart" or "I'm a Man Youse Don't Meet Every Day" is the first song I ever learned to play on the guitar. John Roberts taught me the chords in 1981. I sang it as recently as last Saturday night. I have always associated it with Jeannie Robertson.

All the best, Dan


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Bruce O.
Date: 20 Oct 98 - 10:41 AM

If Charlie hadn't noted it was by Harrigan, I would never have thought to look in the Levy collection for "Muldoon".


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Subject: Lyr Add: MULDOON, THE SOLID MAN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Jan 04 - 03:55 AM

Transcribed from the sheet music images at The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music

MULDOON, THE SOLID MAN
Written and Sung by Ed. Harrigan
in his Popular Sketch of Who Owns the Clothes Line [1874]

I am a man of great influence and educated to a high degree.
I came when small from Donegal in the Daniel Webster across the sea
In the fourteenth ward I situated in a tenement house with my brother Dan
By perseverance I elevated and went to the front like a solid man.

CHORUS: Go with me and I'll treat you decent.
I'll set you down and I'll fill the can.
As I walk the street, each friend I meet
Says, "There goes Muldoon; he's a solid man."

At any party or any raffle, I always go as an invited guest.
As conspicuous as General Granite, boys, I wear a rosebud upon my breast.
I'm called upon to address the meeting without regard to clique or clan.
I show the constitution with elocution because, you know, I'm a solid man.

ALTERNATE CHORUS: For oppositions or politicians,
Take my word, I don't give a damn.
As I walk the street, each friend I meet
Says, "There goes Muldoon; he's a solid man."

I control the Tombs; I control the Island. My constituents they all go there
To enjoy the summer's recreation and the refreshing east river, sir.
I'm known in Harlem. I'm known in Jersey. I'm welcomed hearty on ev'ry hand.
Wid my regalay on Patrick's day, I march away like a solid man. CHORUS


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: masato sakurai
Date: 05 Jan 04 - 04:19 AM

"Muldoon the Solid Man Waltz" [without words] by Jas. J. Freeman (New York: Harding, E. H., 1874) is at American Memory.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: masato sakurai
Date: 05 Jan 04 - 04:25 AM

Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads has this broadside: MULDOON THE SOLID MAN.


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Little Robyn
Date: 06 Jan 04 - 01:21 AM

chorus
Then I'll lay ye doon love and treat you decent,
I will lay ye doon love and fill your can,
I will lay ye doon love and treat ye decent,
For bold Colin he is an honest man.

That's one version - try the DT for Lay ye doon love.
I'm surprised no-one has made the connection before.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: GUEST,Clint Keller
Date: 06 Jan 04 - 02:11 AM

There was an 19th c. Ouray, Colorado newspaper named "The Solid Muldoon." --including the period. I heard it was named after a famous boxer, but that's all. I hadn't thought about it for years till I saw this thread. So I just now looked it up...
---
The original Solid Muldoon was the name given to a mysterious "prehistoric human body" dug up near Beulah, Colorado, in 1877. The seven-and-a-half foot stone man was thought to be the "missing link" between apes and humans. "There can be no question about the genuineness of this piece of statuary" said the  Denver Daily Times.

It was later revealed that George Hull, perpetrator of a previous hoax featuring the Cardiff Giant, had spent three years fashioning his second "petrified man", using mortar, rock dust, clay, plaster, ground bones, blood and meat. He  kiln-fired the figure for many days and then buried it.

A few months later, as the celebration of Colorado's year-old statehood approached, the statue was "discovered" by William Conant, who had once worked for the legendary showman P.T. Barnum. News of the find quickly spread to Pueblo, Denver, and eventually to New York.

The statue was named the Solid Muldoon after William Muldoon, a famous wrestler and strongman who had been honored in a popular song.  Displayed in New York, it attracted large crowds until an unpaid business associate of Hull revealed the hoax to the New York Tribune, and the statue was seen no more. Muldoon was chairman of the New York State Boxing Commission from 1921 to 1923.
----
How about that?

clint


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Bearheart
Date: 06 Jan 04 - 09:00 PM

Sometime back in the '80's I heard Mick Maloney do this song at Irish Week (Augusta Heritage Arts Workshops- Elkins WV). I don't remember if he gave any background about it but if you could track him down he could probably tell you.)

"Jock Stewart" was written by Belle Stewart's husband/Sheila Stewart's Dad-- heard them sing it with Ian MacGregor, Sheila's son, at Scottish Week around the same time period (Belle and Sheila that is). That was the story any way.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 06 Jan 04 - 09:22 PM

G'day,

Little Robyn: Dick Greenhaus - back on 26 September '98 remarked: "... it fits "I Will Lay You Down, Love", though ..." - but did not comment on the match of the words.

Bearheart: Jock Stewart is a Stewart family re-write of older Irish (and Irish-American) Man You Don't Meet Every Day songs ... discussed in past Mudcat threads. Some of these older versions also appear in the Australian collected canon.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 06 Jan 04 - 10:10 PM

I think it was Hamish Henderson who first made the connection between Muldoon and Jeannie Robertson's I Will Lay You Doun, some decades ago now. She sang it to the Galway Shawl tune, of course.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man - Words please
From: Bearheart
Date: 07 Jan 04 - 09:08 PM

Thanks Bob-- can you point me to the thread? All the info I have is what was said in the workshop...

Bekki


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Subject: Lyr Add: MULDOON, THE SOLID MAN (from Bodleian)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Sep 05 - 10:00 PM

Here's my transcription from Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, Firth c.26(260). The third verse is nearly illegible; I don't really think the word in the last verse is "sea" but that's the most fitting word I can think of.

MULDOON, THE SOLID MAN

I am a man of great influence
And educated to a high degree.
I came when small from Donegal.
With my cousin Tim, I crossed the sea.
In the Aston Road we were situated
In a lodging house with my brother Dan.
By perseverance I elevated
And went to the front like a solid man.

CHORUS: Go with me, and I'll treat ye dacent.
I'll let ye down, and I'll fill the can.
As I walk the street, each friend I meet
Says, "There goes Muldoon. He's a solid man."

At a party or a raffle,
I always go as an invited guest.
As conspicuous as the grand Lord Mayor, boys,
I wear a rosebud upon my breast.
When called upon to address the meeting,
Without regard to clique or clan,
I show the constitution with elocution
Because, you know, I'm a solid man.

I control the styles when I'm at Brighton.
My constituents they all go there
To enjoy the summer's recreation
And the refreshing salt-sea (?) air.
I'm known through England. I'm known through Ireland.
I'm welcomed heartily by every hand.
When the band does play on St. Patrick's Day,
I march away like a solid man.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, the Solid Man
From: GUEST,Liam's Brother
Date: 23 Sep 05 - 01:59 PM

Just thought I would add that, since 1998, I've had the opportunity to read more by and about Edward (Ned) Harrigan, Muldoon's composer and the object of George M. Cohan's tribute song, H-A-R-R-I-G-A-N. There were two biographers, Moody and Kahn, and they tell an interesting story about the relationship between folk and early popular (i.e. mass market) songs in the mid to late 19th century.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: Ron Davies
Date: 07 Dec 07 - 07:29 AM

From Mick Maloney's recording of this song, on Uncommon Bonds, a CD on Green Linnet, with Eugene O'Donnell. GLCD 1053. Originally an LP from 1984.

An excellent CD--also has "Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake" and other gems.

Liner notes on "Muldoon, the Solid Man":

"This was written in 1874 by Ed Harrigan, the famous 19th century playwright of Harrigan and Hart fame. The central figure is somewhat of a composite characterization of well-to-do, upwardly mobile Irish Americans of that era. The song quickly became highly popular in the music halls of New York City and was in particular associated with the noted music hall performer W.J. Ashcroft, who would perform the song in the Theater Comique, flamboyantly dressed in top hat and tailcoat. His performances of the song in Dan Lowry's Music Hall in Dublin in 1880 introduced the song to Ireland, and it entered the oral tradition in due course. I Iearned the first two verses from Dublin singer Frank Harte, and retrieved the last verse from the Harrigan original version...."

Mick sings a variation of the text noted above by Jim Dixon. So his version combines the original Harrigan lyric with some Dublin influences.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: Nerd
Date: 07 Dec 07 - 11:24 AM

Everything anyone ever wanted to know about Muldoon is in an excellent article by Don Meade, located here. (WARNING: This takes you directly to a pdf of the paper....)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Dec 07 - 11:12 PM

Thanks, Nerd for that heads-up. I have that article now. It's just riveting--but I haven't had a chance to read it all the way through yet. The guy has obviously done a lot of research--his article seems to me a model for that sort of publication--chock full of information but also vividly written.

By the way, how about caroling this year? My SATB caroling will be 21 Dec. Maybe you could PM me if you're available? (I'll be PM'ing you too--and contacting Jennifer also.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: GUEST,Ron Davies
Date: 07 Dec 07 - 11:16 PM

How about that? Built-in punishment for thread creep--you lose your cookie! Now that's sophisticated site control.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: GUEST,georgina muldoon
Date: 27 Jun 08 - 06:03 AM

hi iam wondering if any one can email me the words of the song muldoon the solid man by mick maloney my email adress is georginamuldoon@hotmail.co.uk thank you


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: MartinRyan
Date: 06 Jun 11 - 04:28 PM

A video of the late, great Frank Harte singing one version:

Click here

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Muldoon, The Solid Man
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 07 Jun 11 - 04:07 PM

The seemingly anglicised version at the Bodl was printed by Pearson of Manchester not long after Harrigan's original came out. It was also printed in Glasgow by the Poet's Box in 1877 on which it states the air as 'The Colleen Rhu'. Sanderson of Edinburgh also printed it but there's no way of dating this one as the Sandersons were printing for about a century well into the 1930s and didn't date their sheets.


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