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Gaudimus Sigator

Celtic-End Singer 06 Oct 98 - 10:47 AM
Celtic-End Singer 06 Oct 98 - 10:49 AM
Wolfgang Hell 06 Oct 98 - 11:25 AM
Celtic-End Singer 06 Oct 98 - 11:30 AM
Allan C. 06 Oct 98 - 11:40 AM
Allan C. 06 Oct 98 - 11:43 AM
Wolfgang 06 Oct 98 - 12:01 PM
Joe Offer 06 Oct 98 - 01:02 PM
lesblank 06 Oct 98 - 02:51 PM
Ralph Butts 06 Oct 98 - 06:15 PM
Wolfgang 08 Oct 98 - 03:42 PM
Allan C. 09 Oct 98 - 08:17 AM
Murray on Saltspring 10 Oct 98 - 04:08 AM
Joe Offer 10 Oct 98 - 04:12 AM
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Subject: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Celtic-End Singer
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 10:47 AM

If anyone could provide me with the full lyrics for this I would be most gratful.It's in Latin so I may have the spelling wrong.On a related matter does anyone know the lyrics to "Viva Dialectica!" which is sung to the same tune?


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Celtic-End Singer
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 10:49 AM

Sorry guys- I have definitely spelled it wrong it's "Gaudiamus Sigator", I think.


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Wolfgang Hell
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 11:25 AM

It's most probably "Gaudeamus igitur" you are looking for. Latin, English and German singable lyrics and midi are here .

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Celtic-End Singer
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 11:30 AM

Cheers Wolfgang Hell, much appreciated. The question still remains with regard to "Viva Dialectic!" I have heard it sung through my involvement with University debating and still cannot find lyric etc. for it.


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Allan C.
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 11:40 AM

As I recall it is "Gaudiamus Igator"
The lyrics, although possibly spelled wrong are:
Gaudiamus igator
Juvenes dum sumus
(repeat once)
Post iucundom juventutem
Post molestom senectutem
Nos habebit humus
Nos habebit humus

I can't remember the whole translation except the last line which means "the earth shall have us".


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Allan C.
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 11:43 AM

Wolfgang's posting must have come while I was composing. Thanks Wolfgang.


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Wolfgang
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 12:01 PM

As for the other question, Celtic-End singer, I have a very faint recollection to have it heard (or read). I'll have a look. If I'm successfull, you'll read it here next week.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 01:02 PM

Wolfgang - I learned this song years ago in Latin class. Recently, I found it in a songbook, listed as a "German folk song." I thought you'd enjoy that little tidbit of information. I suppose it may be true, if you consider university songs to be "folk songs." Caesar and Cicero certainly didn't sing it - they didn't have the letter "J" in the language at the time. That didn't come until after Latin had become a "dead" language.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: lesblank
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 02:51 PM

I may be mistaken, but I seem to remember the voice of Mario Lanza coming from Edmund Purdom's mouth singing this song in Sigmund Romberg's "The Student Prince". Way back in the 1960's !!!!!


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 06 Oct 98 - 06:15 PM

Loose translation:

"Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow, we die."

......Tiger


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Wolfgang
Date: 08 Oct 98 - 03:42 PM

Sorry, no luck with the second question.

lesblank: it could be true, but I can't say for sure. The Student Prince is played nightly at Heidelberg but I don't know any German who ever went there (I studied in H. for four years). But it's crowded with American tourists I heard.

Joe: a "German" folksong? In a way yes, for I guess that more than half of all Germans could at least join in and hum the tune. But that definition would also make "Happy birthday to you" a German folksong, for nearly 100% of all Germans can actually sing it, though I doubt that much more than 10% know the German lyrics to this.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Allan C.
Date: 09 Oct 98 - 08:17 AM

Since we are all in the Latin mode, I thought I'd pass on another much shorter song in Latin which was said to have been a popular folksong in days of old. There may have been additional verses, but this is all I was taught.

Flevit lepus parvelus
Clamens altis vocibus
Quid feci hominibus
Quad me secunter canibus

Rough translation: The little rabbit exclaims in a loud (high) voice: Why is it that men chase me with dogs?

Some folks translate that last word as "canes" or "sticks" but I'm no scholar.


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Murray on Saltspring
Date: 10 Oct 98 - 04:08 AM

The song is, according to all accounts, German in origin (13th century!!), tho' the modern version seems to be only a couple of hundred years old. It spread, I suppose, via the international student community (in the Middle Ages you had lots of "vagantes", wandering scholars, running all over taking their songs with them, of course (see two excellent books by Helen Waddell on this). It's still sung in British universities--when I joined in the piece at St Andrews I was really choked up, I think--several hundred students, in black gowns and scarlet (for undergraduates), bellowing this--a great emotional kick. Anyway, the hare thing should probably be:

Flevit lepus parvulus

Clamans altis vocibus

Quid feci hominibus

Quod me sequuntur canibus.

Cheers Murray


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Subject: RE: Gaudimus Sigator
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Oct 98 - 04:12 AM

Valde bene, Murray.
-Joe Offer-


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