Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Help on guitar tremelo picking

Related threads:
Self Taught: Fingerpicking (40)
Percussive guitar (18)
Ragtime Guitar (28)


GUEST,Tim Clark 09 Jul 04 - 04:03 AM
mooman 09 Jul 04 - 04:14 AM
mooman 09 Jul 04 - 04:23 AM
Steve Parkes 09 Jul 04 - 08:27 AM
C-flat 09 Jul 04 - 12:12 PM
GUEST 09 Jul 04 - 03:31 PM
GUEST,Billy 09 Jul 04 - 03:43 PM
M.Ted 10 Jul 04 - 02:05 PM
mooman 10 Jul 04 - 02:15 PM
GUEST,Jon 11 Jul 04 - 07:14 AM
GUEST,Tim Clark 12 Jul 04 - 11:59 AM
McGrath of Harlow 12 Jul 04 - 01:45 PM
M.Ted 13 Jul 04 - 10:58 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: GUEST,Tim Clark
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 04:03 AM

I have heard guitar players playing a technique that I think is called tremelo picking, where the same note is flat picked very rapidly, producing sound similar to the way some irish musicians play mandolins.

Can anyone help with tips on how to get the technique right please.

Thanks

Tim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: mooman
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 04:14 AM

Dear Tim,

Here's a site with some sound samples that may be helpful.

Peace

moo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: mooman
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 04:23 AM

Tim,

Here's another site showing mandolin tremelo technique that has a small video, which may also be helpful.

Peace

moo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 08:27 AM

You can either do it with a flat pick, or with figers 1 2 & 3, classical-style. As far as this latter goes, my classical friends tell me "practice!" Good advice for the former too; wrist action, not elbow action: start off slow and build up speed as you get the hang of it.

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: C-flat
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 12:12 PM

I find it easier to use a light gauge pick although that probably has more to do with my poor technique than anything else.
C-flat.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 03:31 PM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: GUEST,Billy
Date: 09 Jul 04 - 03:43 PM

Sorry I obviously don't know how to do this properly!
My previous message should have read:-
Please - it's Tremolo, from the Italian for "tremble"
A Tremelo is an extinct (I hope) 1960s pop band member.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: M.Ted
Date: 10 Jul 04 - 02:05 PM

Tremolo picking is a simply rotary movement of the wrist, but you've got to work it out so that you are holding the pick in such a way that it doesn't fly out of your hand, and that the pick hits the strings cleanly and quickly--The trick to learning it is that you practice, practice, and, when you're tired, practice some more--

I doubt that you can get the fine points from any written description--best to watch people use it and learn from them--in addition to mandolin, it is used a lot in the old plectrum banjo playing, on the Balalaika and domra, and in playing tamburica music(Serbo-Croatian instruments, sort of like tiples), which is what I used to do.

Some tips:

Keep the edge of pick as close to parallel to the strings as you can--

Use a firm, thick pick--

Keep your in a natural(slightly bent) position

Keep the position of your picking hand elbow constant(the proper placement is sort of subjective, since guitar bodies and forearms come in different sizes--

These are rolls-the "constant" or rubato tremelo is a repeated down-up-down-up movement, but it always ends on a down stroke-- when you are playing melodies, you are playing three(down-up-down) five(down-up-down-up-down) and longer odd numbers--

This is a handy device for plectrum instrument players, because it gives you a way to compensate for the lack of sustain that is characteristic picked instruments, and it gives you volume for playing melody and solos--

You can also combine a tremolo with runs and licks to get a "gypsy" sound--

It often helps to play scales and melodies on a single string because tremelo emphasizes the differences in sound characteristics of the strings (a run played on the low A string will have a very different sound quality when you play the same notes on the low E string)


Again, it is a great device, and actually very simple, at least consceptually--it does take a lot of practice to refine it--


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: mooman
Date: 10 Jul 04 - 02:15 PM

I agree with M.Ted's advice except I would say there is no special rule that you must always end in a down stroke. Although it more often than not goes like that, it depends very much on the feel you want and the actual melody. On some Scottish melodies in particular I find starting or ending on an upstroke more effective.

Peace

moo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 11 Jul 04 - 07:14 AM

C-Flat, I don't think a thin pick needs to mean poor technique. Different people seem happier with different shapes and weights of pick and I've heard excellent players using all sorts. My own preference (not that I'm any great player) is a Gibson black heavy triangle or similar. I think in my case, some of it may be heavy handedness - I always feel some slight delay if I use a light pick.

As for patterns, I don't really think about it when attempting tremolo, I just go down/up all the while. Again, I think you will find different players have different approaches and none need be wrong. An example that springs to mind is that I tend to be a down/up/down player on jigs (and there are really good players that do this) but I know Dan Beinborn for example likes down/down/up as he can easily throw in an up between the 2 downs to make a triplet and it works well for him. To some degree, I think we all have to find what is most effective for us.

Jon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: GUEST,Tim Clark
Date: 12 Jul 04 - 11:59 AM

Thanks for all your tips guys - I'll try to give them all some attention over the next few weeks - it seems the main rule is practice, practice, practice ad infintium!

Thanks again

Tim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 12 Jul 04 - 01:45 PM

Just do it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help on guitar tremelo picking
From: M.Ted
Date: 13 Jul 04 - 10:58 AM

There is a reason to do it the way I described--it makes for a lot cleaner sound when you are playing melodies--especially when playing a mixture of tremeloed and untremeloed notes in it--there are probably places where it works better to end on an upstroke, and perhaps a few instances where you might start on an upstroke, but the "just go up and down" approach sounds sloppy--


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 14 May 6:50 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.