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Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic

Peter T. 09 Aug 04 - 12:24 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Aug 04 - 12:29 PM
Peter T. 09 Aug 04 - 03:36 PM
erinmaidin 09 Aug 04 - 03:42 PM
Emma B 09 Aug 04 - 07:26 PM
Dave Hanson 10 Aug 04 - 03:16 AM
erinmaidin 10 Aug 04 - 05:50 AM
Fear Faire 10 Aug 04 - 12:20 PM
GUEST 11 Aug 04 - 03:58 PM
GUEST,JTT 11 Aug 04 - 03:58 PM
Emma B 12 Aug 04 - 02:02 AM
GUEST,JTT 12 Aug 04 - 04:16 AM
GUEST,JTT 14 Aug 04 - 01:46 PM
Felipa 15 Aug 04 - 06:05 AM
GUEST 25 Mar 06 - 07:35 AM
GUEST,omhoge 21 Jun 06 - 01:18 PM
GUEST,Tim VH 04 Jul 06 - 11:39 AM
Big Tim 04 Jul 06 - 12:23 PM
Big Tim 04 Jul 06 - 01:40 PM
GUEST,Dayna Thomas 15 Aug 06 - 06:32 PM
JTT 16 Aug 06 - 04:38 AM
Fred McCormick 16 Aug 06 - 05:30 AM
JTT 17 Aug 06 - 05:43 AM
Paul Burke 17 Aug 06 - 05:49 AM
MartinRyan 17 Aug 06 - 06:13 AM
Tootler 17 Aug 06 - 06:19 AM
GUEST,Jack Campin 17 Aug 06 - 07:54 AM
Paul Burke 17 Aug 06 - 08:11 AM
GUEST 30 Nov 06 - 05:31 PM
OtherDave 30 Nov 06 - 05:56 PM
GUEST,Tannywheeler 30 Nov 06 - 06:14 PM
Jimmy C 30 Nov 06 - 06:50 PM
Jimmy C 30 Nov 06 - 06:54 PM
MartinRyan 01 Dec 06 - 05:07 AM
The Sandman 01 Dec 06 - 08:17 AM
GUEST,kenny 01 Dec 06 - 11:23 AM
GUEST,DriveForever 01 Dec 06 - 11:40 AM
GUEST,Irishone 12 Oct 07 - 11:57 PM
GUEST,gaeilgeoir 13 Oct 07 - 12:54 AM
GUEST 24 Dec 09 - 10:59 AM
GUEST,Donal 24 Dec 09 - 10:14 PM
Floydetta 19 Jun 10 - 08:40 PM
Lighter 10 Feb 13 - 07:00 PM
keberoxu 26 Apr 16 - 12:32 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 26 Apr 16 - 12:59 PM
keberoxu 26 Apr 16 - 02:02 PM
keberoxu 28 Apr 16 - 05:23 PM
AmyLove 08 Dec 16 - 04:49 PM
Thompson 08 Dec 16 - 05:56 PM
AmyLove 12 Feb 17 - 04:53 PM
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Subject: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Peter T.
Date: 09 Aug 04 - 12:24 PM

Anyone have a translation of this song from the Gaelic? (the words are in the Irish Songbook of the Clancies -- I can post them if someone will volunteer a translation.....

yours,

Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Aug 04 - 12:29 PM

Posted here in Irish and English on numerous occasions, I think. Beware spelling variations: search instead for "eamonn an" and you'll get plenty of results.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Peter T.
Date: 09 Aug 04 - 03:36 PM

Thanks, Malcolm, I tried many variations, but nothing worked -- why "eamonn an" should work, and not "eamonn" I do not know!!

yours,

Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: erinmaidin
Date: 09 Aug 04 - 03:42 PM

Ce he sin amuigh a bhfuil faobhar a ghuth
(Who's that outside who has an edge on his voice"
Ag reabadh mo dhorais dhunta
(who is banging and battering on my closed door)
Mise Eamonn a' Chnoic, ata baite fuar fliuch
(I'm Ned of the hill, I am drowned and cold)
O shior-shiul sleibhte is gleannta
(Forever a walkiing these mountains and glens)
A lao ghil's a chuid, ceard a dheanfainn-se dhuit
(my dearest poor child, what can I do for you)
'S nach mebeidh pudar go tiubh a shiorsheideadh leat
(So that gunpowder thick won't continually blast you)
Is go mbeimis araon muchta
(and wipe out the both of the two of us here)


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Emma B
Date: 09 Aug 04 - 07:26 PM

Oh who is without
That with passionate shout
Keeps beating my bolted door?
I am Ned of the Hill
Forspent wet and chill
From long trudging marsh and moor
My dear fond and true
What else could I do but shield you from wind and from weather
When the shots fall like hail
They us both shall assail
And mayhap we shall die together


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 10 Aug 04 - 03:16 AM

In English it's ' Ned of the Hill '


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: erinmaidin
Date: 10 Aug 04 - 05:50 AM

I'm so sorry to have left a line out...which is a crucial mistake in translating....
after the line : my dearest poor child, what can I do for you?
comes-
Mura gcuirfinn ort beim (beinn?) do mo ghuna
(unless I put on you a sheet from my dress)


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Fear Faire
Date: 10 Aug 04 - 12:20 PM

This is what Eddie Jordan used to call Damon Hill when he drove for his team in the Formula One Grand Prix!


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Aug 04 - 03:58 PM

I'd translate it just *marginally* differently, but it's not any wild difference; I'm also working from a slightly different version, which I'll give in Irish below.

"Who is that outside
That has fever in his voice
Smashing at my locked door?

I am Eamon of the Hill
That is drowned wet and cold
From forever-walking mountains and glens.

My tragic fair one, and my chosen one,
What should I do with you
But to put you safe under my skirts?
And that [gun]powder would blow back thickly on you
And we will be extinguished as one.

I am far outside under snow and under ice
And without boldness or any spirit.
My ploughland without a mark, my grassland without seed
And these not in my ownership in any case.

I have no friend, and this is a regret to me
That I called early and late
And that I must go overseas east
Where I have no ties.

Cé hé sin amugh a bhfuil faobhar ar a ghuth
Ag réabadh mo dhorais dhúnta?
Mise Éamonn an chnoic atá báiste fuair fliuch
Ó shiorshiúl sléibhte is gleannta

A léir-ghil is a chuid
Cad a dhéanaimse dhuit
Mura gcuirfinn ort binn de mo ghúna?
Is go bfhuil púdar go tiubh á shiorshéadeadh leat
Is go mbeimis araon múchta.

Is fada mise amuigh faoi shneachta is faoi sioc
Is gan dánach agam ar aon neach.
Mo sheisreach gan scor, mo bhranar gan cur
Agus gan iad agam ar aon chor.

Níl chara agam, is danaid liom san
Do ghlacfadh mé moch agus déanach
Is go gcaithfidh mé dul thar farraige soir
Ós ann nach bhfuil mo ghaolta.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 11 Aug 04 - 03:58 PM

Oops, sorry, I am that GUEST.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Emma B
Date: 12 Aug 04 - 02:02 AM

Through frost and through snow
Tired and hunted I go
In fear both from friend and from neighbour
My horses run wild
My acres untilled
And they all them lost to my labour
But it grieves me far more
Than the loss of my store
That there's none who would shield me from danger
So my fate it must be
To fare eastward o'er sea
And languish amid the stranger

obviously not a "literal" translation but singable......by Donal O'Sullivan from "Songs of the Irish"


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 12 Aug 04 - 04:16 AM

How well the bold Donal makes the point of view that of Eamon, rather than switching between his mot and himself.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 14 Aug 04 - 01:46 PM

Translation by Thomas MacDonagh:

Who is that out there still
With voice sharp and shrill,
Beating my door and calling?
I am Ned of the Hill
Wet, weary and chill,
The mountains and glens long walking.

O my dear love and true!
What could I do for you
But under my mantle draw you?
For the bullets like hail
Fall thick on your trail
And together we both may be slaughtered.

Long lonely I go
Under frost, under snow
Hunted through hill and through hollow
No comrade I know
No furrow I sow
My team stands unyoked in the fallow;

No friend will give ear
Or harbour me here,
Tis that makes the weight of my sorrow.
So my journey must be
To the east o'er the sea
Where no kindred will find me or follow.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic
From: Felipa
Date: 15 Aug 04 - 06:05 AM

try searching for Chnoic and you'll probably find the relevant threads
there are also entries for the English language "Ned of the Hill"
Dónal O'Sullivan's book, if you can find a copy of it, has both poetic and literal translations and background info


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Mar 06 - 07:35 AM

posted by Rich Meme, but originally in Dónal Óg thread:

Ĕamon a' Chnoic (The version that I know with a rough trans. Rich Merne, '06)
Cé hé sin amuigh, a bhuil faobhar ar a guth,
S'tá'g reabadh mo dhorais dúnta?
Mise Ĕamon a' chnoic atá báite fúair fliuch,
Ó shíorshúil na sléibhte s'na gleannta.

Is fada mis' 'muigh faoi sneachta's faoi sioc
Is gan dánacht agam ar éinne
Mo shéisreach gan scor, s'mo bhranar gan cur,
Agus gan íad agamsa ar aon chor

Níl cáirde agam, is danaid liom san,
Chun do glachadh mé moch agus déanach,
'Nois do caithigh mé dul thar farraige shoir
Ó 's ánn nach a' bhuil mo ghaelta.

Ó a lao ghil s'a chuid céard a dhéanaimse dhuit'
Mura gcuirfhinn tu féin faoi mo ghúna,
Is nach mbéidh púdar dubh á shiorshéadadh leat,
Ach go mbéimish (together) múchta.   Trans. (le chéile)

Ó mo mhallacht ar'n díamhall ar dhúnmharraidh é,
Is go dóiteann sé 'n-ifreann (forever)
Ach an t'Úasal Ó' Ríain, Ó go mbaireann do h'anam
Ar dheis Dé anois is I gcónai……Trans. (On God's right hand now and forever)
…………………………………………………………..
O! who's that without, with a trembling shout,
Now rattles my door that is bolted?
This is Eamon a' Chnoic and I'm drowned wet and cold,
From traversing the mountains and valleys.

I'm long perished in snow, and in ice and in gale,
I am famished, my life's nearly ended,
My land's without mark, and my fields without seed,
They're no longer my own (ar aon chor) Trans. (in any case)

I haven't a friend to call early or late,
From my family I'm hid and alone,
(Thar na farraige shoir), I must exile from here, Trans. (over the Eastern seas)
And must live in the land of the stranger.

O! my darling, my dote, what am I to do
But to cover you up with my gown,
So that powder and shot will not blast you alone,
But that we'll be together extinguished.

O! my curse on the fiend who has murdered my dear,
May he burn up for ever in Hades,
But my darling Ó'Ríain, may your soul be at rest,
Ar dheis Dé anois is I gcónaí. Trans. (do.)
The story of Edward Ryan………………..Eamon a' Chnoic.(Eamon of the Hill or Eamon th'Hill)

   In the sixteen hundreds, Eamon Ryan, a Tipperary land-owner was dispossessed by Oliver Cromwell's forces. He was from Cnoc MaothailI (the bald hill) in Teampall Beag, Co. Tipperary. A tenant of Ryan's – a widow, was also dispossessed of her cow by one of Cromwell's agents. Eamon a' Chnoic defended her and in the argument he killed the agent.
   He was outlawed and went on the run with a price of two hundred pounds (a lot of money then) on his head. After hiding in the mountains in the winter, where he was destroyed by exposure; he took refuge with an old lover of his who hid him in her house for a time. Its said that the agents looked for him at her house but that she successfully hid him under her dress. Presumably the dress was hanging up or thrown on a bed, but that she wasn't wearing it at the time. Subsequently, Ryan took refuge with a neighbour who killed him for the reward while he slept. Unknown to the neighbour, the reward had been withdrawn shortly beforehand because of Ryan's intercession and influence with his friends in authority. Posterity doesn't record the names of his faithful girlfriend or his treacherous neighbour.
   Edward Ryan's head is alleged to be buried in a very old graveyard at Dun Bleisce in Limerick.
   This story seems to have considerable historic and folklore credence, and it certainly moved the great bard Turlough O'Carolan to give it to posterity.
R.M.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,omhoge
Date: 21 Jun 06 - 01:18 PM

I just learned of this song from a wonderful Theremin performance of the song by Ann Cantelow.
Obviously there were no words in that one;
reading the various translations of them here added so much to my enjoyment of the music.
Thank you all very much!

Oh Ann's performance of Eamon An Chnoic can be heard as the 6th piece of the May 28, 2006 broadcast of Spellbound on Cyrus Internet Radio:
http://spellbound.purplenote.com/index.html

jh, NYC


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,Tim VH
Date: 04 Jul 06 - 11:39 AM

Another variation, from Connie Dover's wonderful rendition of the song:

Oh who is without
That in anger they should
Keep beating my bolted door
I am Ned of the hill
Long weary and chilled
From long trudging
Over marsh and moor

My love fond and true
What else could I do
But shield you from wind and from weather
When the shot falls like hail
They us both shall assail
And mayhap we will die together

Through frost and through snow
Tired and hunted I go
In fear of both friend and of neighbour
My horses run wild
My acres untilled
And all of it lost to my labour

What grieves me far more
Than the loss of my store
Is there's noone would shield me from danger
So my fate it must be
To bid farewell to thee
And to languish amid strangers


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Big Tim
Date: 04 Jul 06 - 12:23 PM

Eamonn Ó Riain (Edmund Ryan) (1670-1724) came from Atshanbohy, near Upperchurch, Co. Tipperary. He shot dead a tax collector who was confiscating a poor woman's only cow. He was forced to become an outlaw, a 'rapparee'. He fought at Ballyneety, Aughrim and the siege of Limerick. As the Pogues songs states, he was indeed 'murdered for blood money', a reward of £200.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Big Tim
Date: 04 Jul 06 - 01:40 PM

Someone above blamed Cromwell. Since he died in 1658, he's off the hook on this one. btw, my source for my previous post is Martin O'Dwyer's 'A Biographical Dictionary of Tipperary'.                  

The Pogues recording 'Young Ned of the Hill' was written by Ron Kavana and Terry Woods. I once spoke to Terry before a Pogues gig (they mixed with fans in the pub beforehand)and said, 'Thanks for a great song'. He asked, 'which one was that'? I said, 'Young Ned of the Hill'. He later sang it with great gusto on stage.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,Dayna Thomas
Date: 15 Aug 06 - 06:32 PM

Does anyone know of a recording in the Gaelic? I have the lyrics, and some of it phonetically, but I need to hear an actual recording in order to get it 'in my ear' as well as complete the phonetic translation.

Please, if you can help, email me at nlraf_unilady@yahoo.com

Thanks muchly.

Dayna Thomas


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: JTT
Date: 16 Aug 06 - 04:38 AM

Dayna - I was sure I had a recording of this, but can't track it down on any CD on the shelves.

But the one place that's certain to tell you is the Irish Traditional Music Archive - you'll have to phone them, don't think they do email; the number's on their site.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Fred McCormick
Date: 16 Aug 06 - 05:30 AM

Seosamh Ó hÉanaí (Joe Heaney). The Road From Connemara. Topic TSCD 518D. There's also a beautiful translation in the booklet by Éamon Ó Broithe.


"Does anyone know of a recording in the Gaelic? I have the lyrics, and some of it phonetically, but I need to hear an actual recording in order to get it 'in my ear' as well as complete the phonetic translation."


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: JTT
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 05:43 AM

By the way, I notice that the thread title misspells the word for "hills". It should be "an Chnoic" or "an Chnuic" - there's no "i" before the "u" or "o".


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Paul Burke
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 05:49 AM

Chnoic Chnoic! Who's there? Eamonn. Eamonn who? Eamonn the money...


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: MartinRyan
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 06:13 AM

Chnoic Chnoic! Who's there? Eamonn. Eamonn who? Eamonn the rain, for God's sake - let me in!

Regards...


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Tootler
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 06:19 AM

Sung by Brendan Begley on Boys of the Lough Album "Twenty"


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 07:54 AM

I looked at that theremin site but couldn't see any way to play anything, in any format.

What's the trick?


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Paul Burke
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 08:11 AM

Here near the bottom of the page.

I can't say the Theremin is my favourite instrument for this sort of stuff.


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Subject: RE: eamonn a chnoic recording
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 05:31 PM

Bernie Phaid a singer from the West Kerry Gaeltacht has recorded a lovely version of Eamonn a Chnoic. www.claddaghrecords.com distribute it.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: OtherDave
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 05:56 PM

Tommy Makem and the Clancys sang it in Irish, too, which explains why it's in their songbook...

It's on their "Irish Songs of Drinking and Rebellion." You can find their "28 Irish Pub Songs" on Amazon, and hear a clip of "Eamonn" there.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,Tannywheeler
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 06:14 PM

This song appears on the very first ("Rising of the Moon") album of the Clancy/Makem group(1955?) sung by the glorious young tenor of Liam C., in Gaelic. I know because I had a gift copy as soon as it came out, new from Paddy & Tom themselves, who were friends of my stepfather's. He was one of the founders of the Guthrie Children's Fund, and booked concerts at a theater in Greenwich Village. Paddy & Tom used to come to our house in Rockville Center on Long Island. My stepdad's name was Lou Gordon. Absolutely beautiful song, & voice.                         Tw


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Jimmy C
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 06:50 PM

There may be other songs about this person,this is a portion of the one my father sang.


Oh Dark is the evening
And silent the hour
Pray who is the minstrel
By yonder lone tower
His harp he so tenderly
Playing with skill
Who who should it be
But Young Ned of the Hill

Chorus

Who sings "Lady love,
Won't you come to me now
Won't you come and live merrily
Under the bough
And I'll pillow your head
Where the soft fairies tread
If you will but wed
With young Ned of the Hill


Young Ned of the hill
Has no castle or hall
No yeomen or bowmen
To come at his call
Has shot a bright shaft
For young ned of the Hill


I believe there was another verse about the lady leaving her father's castle and joining him on the mountain.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Jimmy C
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 06:54 PM

Sorry, I omitted a few lines of the second verse.

Young Ned of the hill

Has no castle or hall

No yeomen or bowmen

To come at his call

But One little archer
of exquisite skill

Has shot a bright shaft

For young ned of the Hill


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: MartinRyan
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 05:07 AM

Jimmy C

I think that's the Ron Kavana/Terry Woods version referred to earlier in the thread.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: The Sandman
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 08:17 AM

its the version Sean Cannon originally popularised,also recorded by Eileen Pratt,and its the one I sing .Dick Miles


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 11:23 AM

Very well sung - in English - by Al O'Donnell,on his 1st album , I think.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,DriveForever
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 11:40 AM

Connie Dover's site;

http://www.conniedover.com/lyrics.shtml

- 'Ned of the Hill'

By the way, she does an absolutely breath-takingly beautiful version of this song !


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,Irishone
Date: 12 Oct 07 - 11:57 PM

YES!!! The song is available with a singable and accurate English translation from www.valkyriepub.com. I think the exact page is www.valkyriepub.com/singleirish.htm.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,gaeilgeoir
Date: 13 Oct 07 - 12:54 AM

No no no! Pudar in this context doesn't mean gunpowder, it means SNOW! It's very commonly used in Irish for snow (yes, I know that is also sneachta).

Eamon is wet and freezing, and his girlfriend ask, "My love (lit. "my bright calf and my share), what can I do for you but to put the hem of my gown over you? And the snow (pudar) would be falling on you still, until we both (araon) would be covered (obviously, covered with snow).

I hope this helps. The valkyriepub.com translation has this and is accurate.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 10:59 AM

Hey, these translations have really helped me thanks so much.

I have come across another verse to the poem which reads:

A chumainn's a shearc
Rachaimidne seal
Fá choillte na measa gcumhra
Mar a bhfaighimid an breac
'S an lon ar a nead
An fhia 'gus an poc ag búireach
Na h-éiníní binne
Ar ghéigíní a' seinm
Is an cuaichín ar bharr an úir ghlais
Go brách ní thiocaidh
An bás inár ngoire
I lár na coille cumhra

Could anybody help translate. Thanks


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: GUEST,Donal
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 10:14 PM

I have this translation of the words above in my song files, I don't know the source.

"Oh love of my heart,
We'll wander apart,
The dew on our path we'll be brushing,
Where the trout in the stream,
All speckled doth gleam,
And the deer through the green woods are rushing.
The little birds' song,
As we wander along
And the blackbird's loud call will cheer us,
And the cuckoo's clear note,
From the yew-tree float
And no shadow of death can come near us."


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chniuic
From: Floydetta
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 08:40 PM

I have been singing the version that Jimmy C shared for many years; I heard it on a Jean Redpath album called simply "Jean Redpath", and she calls it "Ned of the Hill". I will quote her notes on the album cover:

"Although this song has a double entendre, I think of it, and sing it, as a love song. Edmond O'Ryan, in supporting the Stuarts, was outlawed after the defeat of James II, and his estates confiscated. As in other songs, the 'Eileen' spoken of here can also be understood as Ireland herself. Samuel Lover (1797-1868)was the composer of this, and of the better known "LOW-BACKED CAR" AND "RORY O'MORE".


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic
From: Lighter
Date: 10 Feb 13 - 07:00 PM

Now maybe everybody knows this but me, but I just noticed that when Beethoven set Thomas Campbell's once-famous poem "The Soldier's Dream" to music in 1810-13, he used a melody that is a variant of this very one.

You doubt me? Check it out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHAXwQLdyWA

Campbell was a Scot, but Beethoven seems to have thought him Irish. Nobody's perfect.


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Subject: Lyric add: Eamonn an Chnoic
From: keberoxu
Date: 26 Apr 16 - 12:32 PM

Fionnuala MacLochlainn sings the original Gaelic on her recording for Gael-Linn records. Her original 45 RPM EP was released in the 1960's, with three other traditional songs, all in Irish Gaelic. In the last five years or so, Gael-Linn has published a compact disc anthology titled "Amhráin Ghrá," with eight different singers whose earlier recordings for the label have been selected for inclusion.

"Eamonn an Chnoic" is sung by MacLochlainn on the "Amhráin Ghrá" compact disc; arrangement credit is given to somebody with the last name of Hardebeck, and she is accompanied by guitarist Norman Watson.

With some variations here and there in the Gaelic words, MacLochlainn sings essentially the same verses as posted to this thread by Guest/JTT in the post dated August 11, 2004.   Perhaps in a future post I might submit the Gaelic lyrics as they are printed on the back of the original Gael-Linn vinyl EP; the record sleeve, with the Gaelic lyrics on the back, is visible in an EBay listing.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 26 Apr 16 - 12:59 PM

Carl Hardebeck (1869-1945) was a collector and arranger of traditional Irish music and song.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic
From: keberoxu
Date: 26 Apr 16 - 02:02 PM

SongId=4192, I think, with the name NEDHILL, is the DigiTrad tune nearest to what Fionnuala MacLochlainn sings for "Éamonn an Chnoic." The tune on file is from Jean Redpath's recordings. The melody is not identical, but very similar.


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Subject: Padraig Pearse trans.: Eamonn an Chnuic
From: keberoxu
Date: 28 Apr 16 - 05:23 PM

The very scholarly "After the Irish," editor Gregory A. Schirmer, is dedicated to the translation of Irish Gaelic into English, with such translations considered a literary form in their own right. "Éamonn an Chnuic" is included, and it startles me, after all these Ned of the Hill threads, to see that this English translation, by this translator, has yet to be entered at the Mudcat (anyway, my searches do not yield this version).


ÉAMONN AN CHNUIC

(translator: Padraig Pearse)

Who is that without, with voice like a sword,
That batters my bolted door?
I am Éamonn an Chnuic, cold, weary, and wet
From long walking mountains and glens.
O dear and bright love, what would I do for you
But cover you with a skirt of my dress.
For shots full thick are raining on you,
And together we may be slaughtered!

Long am I out under snow, under frost;
Without comradeship with any;
My team unyoked, my fallow unsown,
And they lost to me entirely;
Friend I have none (I am heavy for that)
That would harbour me late or early;
And so I must go east over the sea,
Since 'tis there I have no kindred!

Schirmer, the editor, references the collection:
"Poem-Book of the Gael," pp. 202-203


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic
From: AmyLove
Date: 08 Dec 16 - 04:49 PM

Quite a few videos and sets of lyrics (as well as information - in Italian - about the song) here.


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic
From: Thompson
Date: 08 Dec 16 - 05:56 PM

Rather than a voice like a sword, it's that he has a sharpened edge on his voice.
And slaughtered - literally it's smothered, though the meaning is slaughtered.
Dunno about púdar as snow; since it's púdar dubh, or black powder, either it's gunpowder or there was really awful pollution in the 16th century!


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Subject: RE: Gaelic trans.: Eamonn an Chnoic/Chniuic
From: AmyLove
Date: 12 Feb 17 - 04:53 PM

I think the Irish lyrics at the page I linked to above come closer to the version sung by Fionnuala MacLochlainn on Amhráin Ghrá. However there were a few instances in which I switched in some words from the "posted by Rich Meme, but originally in Dónal Óg thread" lyrics from "GUEST" above. I have no idea if the final result below makes grammatical sense in Irish. If anyone has any corrections, please feel free to share.

You can listen to MacLochlainn's version here:

Éamonn an Chnoic


"Cé hé sin amu
a bhfuil faobhar a ghuth,
a' réabadh mo dhorais dhúnta?"
"Mise Éamonn a' Chnoic,
atá báite fuar fliuch,
ó shíor-shiúl sléibhte is gleannta."

"A lao ghil 's a chuid,
cad a dheánfainn-se dhuit
mura gcuirfinn ort binn de mo ghúna?
'S go mbeidh púdar dubh
á shiorshéadadh leat,
's go mbéimish araon múchta!"

"Is fada mise amu
faoi shneachta is faoi shioc,
's gan dánacht agam ar éinne.
Mo sheisreach gan scor,
mo bhranar gan cur,
Agus gan iad agam ar aon chor!

Níl cáirde agam—
is danaid liom san—
a ghlacfadh mé moch ná déanach.
'S go gcaithfe mé dul
thar fairraige soir,
ó's ann nach bhfuil mo ghaolta."


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