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Folklore: Southern English dialect words

Splott Man 09 Sep 04 - 07:56 AM
GUEST,Mingulay 09 Sep 04 - 08:53 AM
GUEST,milk monitor 09 Sep 04 - 09:04 AM
Splott Man 09 Sep 04 - 10:19 AM
sledge 09 Sep 04 - 10:27 AM
Dead Horse 09 Sep 04 - 02:26 PM
GUEST,Mingulay 10 Sep 04 - 03:44 AM
ThreeSheds 10 Sep 04 - 05:11 AM
Paco Rabanne 10 Sep 04 - 06:08 AM
ThreeSheds 10 Sep 04 - 06:56 AM
GUEST,milk monitor 10 Sep 04 - 07:01 AM
Splott Man 10 Sep 04 - 08:01 AM
sledge 10 Sep 04 - 08:22 AM
Dave the Gnome 10 Sep 04 - 08:48 AM
Amos 10 Sep 04 - 08:49 AM
The Beast of Farlington 10 Sep 04 - 08:50 AM
Paco Rabanne 10 Sep 04 - 08:53 AM
sledge 10 Sep 04 - 09:00 AM
Dave the Gnome 10 Sep 04 - 09:31 AM
Paco Rabanne 10 Sep 04 - 09:43 AM
GUEST,milk monitor 10 Sep 04 - 09:48 AM
Splott Man 10 Sep 04 - 10:25 AM
Paco Rabanne 10 Sep 04 - 10:44 AM
GUEST,milk monitor 10 Sep 04 - 10:49 AM
Dave the Gnome 10 Sep 04 - 10:50 AM
Keith A of Hertford 10 Sep 04 - 02:26 PM
Dead Horse 10 Sep 04 - 03:02 PM
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Subject: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Splott Man
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 07:56 AM

During my childhood in Surrey (the 50s and 60s since you ask) there were a few words around that I don't hear any more, although I still occasionally use them. I don't know if they were dialect words or just family pet words.

UTCHY or 'UTCHY (adj) - e.g. It's 'utchy - it's a cold, damp day

I heard of a similar word - aitchy - in Sussex

USHEL (v) - e.g. It ushels - it smells a bit

Does any else remember these, or have any other examples?


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: GUEST,Mingulay
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 08:53 AM

The equivalent in Northants was/is 'Unchy. I have always presumed this to be a corruption of Hunchy (as in hunched against the cold).

Other strange words were   Spruce = Fizzy soft drinks
                           Peps   = Sweets of any kind (peppermints)

These are probably two of the more understandable words from that area as the local dialect can be impenetrable at times. Especially to once native speakers who moved away.

I like this thread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: GUEST,milk monitor
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 09:04 AM

I don't remember either of the above....we would have used 'TATERS' for cold, as in potatoes in the mould...but don't know where that comes from? Just cockney rhyming slang I think.

And 'IT'S PENNING' for smelly, as in pen and ink...stink.

Context: " Blimey it's taters and me afghans penning."

Circa London sixties/seventies...both still widely used today.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Splott Man
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 10:19 AM

Yes, we used to say taters as well.

Rhyming slang is and was certainly more widespread than within reach of Bow Bells.

My uncle always called my Mum "Skin" as in skin & blister

Though I'm not so interested in rhyming slang per se in this thread, but if anyone wants to start a new thread I'd enjoy it as it's a constantly evolving thing.

Another one in our family was WEEKERS for ears, but that may just have been a pet name.

Keep 'em coming.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: sledge
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 10:27 AM

I come from North Oxfordshire and I use the phrase "hussles" to mean something smelly, seems similar to "ushel" if spoken.

Sledge


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Dead Horse
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 02:26 PM

Tantadlins = Kentish dialect for Left Overs, or Odds & Sods


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: GUEST,Mingulay
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 03:44 AM

Mackle - to repair or make roughly = bodge.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: ThreeSheds
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 05:11 AM

Hice as in place to live


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Paco Rabanne
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 06:08 AM

BarrrrrTh as in bath, like what you bathe in, know what i mean? cor strike a light guv, on me head, I'm a geezer oi am.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: ThreeSheds
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 06:56 AM

Ted
You seem a bit of a Costermonger on the side I bet you enjoy jellied haddock and play Dick Van Dyke records as well

Cheery pip


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: GUEST,milk monitor
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 07:01 AM

Ted it's BARF, any real costermonger knows that! Chim Chiminey....


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Splott Man
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 08:01 AM

About 25 miles too far north, Ted, apart from BAAARTH (there's no F in bath, Milk Monitor, that's why we ushled).

Interesting addition, Sledge. A colleague here who comes from that area, asks if you know the word KECK (n)?


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: sledge
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 08:22 AM

As in get your Kecks off?

Sledge


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 08:48 AM

If bath is pronounced barth shouldn't fat be pronounced fart?

:D


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Amos
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 08:49 AM

It strikes me that the regional dialects in the UK are more pronounced and more embedded by gar than they are in the US despite having had much longer to "average out" through constant exposure to other forms of English. You could argue, I guess, that they have also had much longer to build up their affinity-group boundaries. Just a faskinating study, Olive.

A


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: The Beast of Farlington
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 08:50 AM

No


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Paco Rabanne
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 08:53 AM

I can't understand what you southern buggers are on about! Your accents all sound like "Eastenders"


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: sledge
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 09:00 AM

Now thats an insult that really cuts to the quick, ouch!


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 09:31 AM

Bill Bryson made a good study of English and American dialects and idioms etc in 'Mother Tongue' - Fascinating book and witty to boot:-)

Cheers

DtG


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Paco Rabanne
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 09:43 AM

nope.... didn't understand that either.... speak in english man!


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: GUEST,milk monitor
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 09:48 AM

Splott man, 'no F in bath'.......nice one, humbled to say it took me a good five mins before that one hit home, but when it did, I larfed and larfed.
Super Ted I am rising above the urge to mention Jack and Vera, well sort of 'overing anyway.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Splott Man
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 10:25 AM

Keck (spelling irrelevant, oral tradition and all that), is what he called cow parsley as a kid. The fresh stalks made whistles, and the dried stalks were good for sword fights.

Keep up Milk Monitor, you walked right into that one, I couldn't resist it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Paco Rabanne
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 10:44 AM

Jack and Vera are bloody Lancashire! Nowt to do with The East Riding Of Yorkshire, where we all speak the Queen's english properly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: GUEST,milk monitor
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 10:49 AM

There's toooooo many of youse! Where's McGrath?


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 10:50 AM

Jack and Vera are about as Lancashire as the Empire State Building! Don't set us off on that..;-)

Cheers

:D


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 02:26 PM

Beaver for a mid morning snack.
I read that it shares a root with beaverage.
(Why does that word make Americans snigger?)
Keith.


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Subject: RE: BS: Southern English dialect words
From: Dead Horse
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 03:02 PM

Ace = what they call frozen water in Cheltenham (Les Barker)


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