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BS: Pumpkin Pie

DigiTrad:
SWEET POTATOES


Related threads:
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(origins) Origins: Pumpkin, Pumpkin, Round and Fat (3)
BS: Goose Gander's Sweet Potato Pie (20)
pumpkin carols (16)
Lyr Req: Pumpkin Pie (4)


Sooz 20 Oct 04 - 08:37 AM
Rapparee 20 Oct 04 - 08:53 AM
Sooz 20 Oct 04 - 09:09 AM
Rapparee 20 Oct 04 - 09:19 AM
Maryrrf 20 Oct 04 - 09:21 AM
Sooz 20 Oct 04 - 09:41 AM
Mr Red 20 Oct 04 - 09:46 AM
Janie 20 Oct 04 - 10:04 AM
GUEST,MMario 20 Oct 04 - 10:31 AM
Maryrrf 20 Oct 04 - 10:42 AM
Sooz 20 Oct 04 - 10:49 AM
Maryrrf 20 Oct 04 - 10:53 AM
Stilly River Sage 20 Oct 04 - 11:00 AM
leeneia 20 Oct 04 - 11:45 AM
Maryrrf 20 Oct 04 - 12:13 PM
PoppaGator 20 Oct 04 - 01:04 PM
jeffp 20 Oct 04 - 01:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Oct 04 - 01:30 PM
Sooz 20 Oct 04 - 01:36 PM
KateG 20 Oct 04 - 02:39 PM
Little Robyn 20 Oct 04 - 03:07 PM
ponygirl 20 Oct 04 - 04:39 PM
Once Famous 20 Oct 04 - 05:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Oct 04 - 05:09 PM
PoppaGator 20 Oct 04 - 05:22 PM
Bert 20 Oct 04 - 09:28 PM
Mr Red 21 Oct 04 - 06:57 AM
Leadfingers 21 Oct 04 - 10:43 AM
Paco Rabanne 21 Oct 04 - 10:49 AM
Leadfingers 21 Oct 04 - 02:01 PM
beardedbruce 21 Oct 04 - 08:07 PM
dianavan 21 Oct 04 - 08:13 PM
Maryrrf 22 Oct 04 - 08:39 AM
Stilly River Sage 22 Oct 04 - 10:18 AM
Mr Red 22 Oct 04 - 02:52 PM
beardedbruce 22 Oct 04 - 07:26 PM
dianavan 23 Oct 04 - 04:19 PM
dianavan 23 Oct 04 - 04:25 PM
GUEST,Old Guy 23 Oct 04 - 04:33 PM
annamill 24 Oct 04 - 02:31 PM
dianavan 24 Oct 04 - 02:49 PM
PoppaGator 26 Oct 04 - 07:18 PM
Sooz 07 Nov 04 - 04:11 AM
dianavan 07 Nov 04 - 04:17 AM
Tansy 07 Nov 04 - 04:42 AM
Sooz 07 Nov 04 - 06:42 AM
GUEST,Old Guy 07 Nov 04 - 08:16 AM
Tannywheeler 07 Nov 04 - 07:43 PM
dianavan 08 Nov 04 - 09:07 PM
GUEST,Sooz (at work) 09 Nov 04 - 03:36 AM
JohnInKansas 09 Nov 04 - 08:47 PM
Maryrrf 09 Nov 04 - 09:55 PM
emjay 10 Nov 04 - 12:30 AM
GUEST,leeneia 10 Nov 04 - 12:30 AM
JohnInKansas 10 Nov 04 - 11:18 AM
PoppaGator 10 Nov 04 - 11:39 AM
GUEST 10 Nov 04 - 01:17 PM
GUEST,leeneia 10 Nov 04 - 04:34 PM
Peg 10 Nov 04 - 11:35 PM
PoppaGator 11 Nov 04 - 01:55 PM
PoppaGator 26 Nov 04 - 02:14 AM

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Subject: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 08:37 AM

Never tasted it, time I tried it, so how do I make it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Rapparee
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 08:53 AM

Go to your nearest bakery. Point to one. When they give you the pie, give them some money.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 09:09 AM

I can't remember ever seeing one to buy! (Even if I wanted to)
All they seem to do with pumpkins here is carve them out as candle holders - or guard them in fields as there are apparently pumkin rustlers about this year.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Rapparee
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 09:19 AM

Can you get canned pumpkin filling, or do you want to make it from scratch? Making it from scratch is messy and, to my mind, tedious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Maryrrf
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 09:21 AM

Sooz, you must be in th UK. In the States you will be finding Pumpkin Pies everywhere this time of year and the canned pumpkin, which has a pie recipe printed on the label, is on display at every supermarket. I always bring some canned pumpkin when I go to Scotland so that I can make pumpkin pies for my friend and his neighbors - they love it. It's one of my favorites, too.

You can use fresh pumpkin. I have done both and couldn't tell the difference (that's why I just used the canned stuff - it's easier). I'll post a recipe during the course of the day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 09:41 AM

Thanks! I'm afraid I'll have to start from scratch. I'll make a big one and share it with everyone at Gainsborough Folk Club next Friday.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Mr Red
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 09:46 AM

John & Maglan (aka Saints and Sinners, or Prof John & Princess Dinizulu) gave me a recipe from St Helena - because I asked if there were any aphrodisiac recipes from St Helena.

The experiment is ongoing (scuse shaky handwriting) but the pie is in excellent taste . Which is more than can be said for my write-up. PM me here if you want a pdf of the page (I have 100 pages of similarly "alleged" recipes).


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Janie
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 10:04 AM

I think pumpkin pie made with fresh pie pumpkins is much tastier than from canned pumpkin. I also prefer it made with honey instead of sugar. Don't mean to toot my own horn, but I have won pie contests with my recipe, which is from an old edition of the "New York Times Natural Foods Cookbook." If you want the recipe, Sooz, pm me and I'll send it to you when I get home tonight.

Janie


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 10:31 AM

Janie - you're a recipe tease!!! Why not just post the recipe here for all of us?

My mom used to make "pumpkin" pie using butternut squash and a recipe for Sweet potato pie. (and she made "spanish" rice using polish sausage...very confusing)


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Maryrrf
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 10:42 AM

Here's a start:

You can steam, boil or bake the pumpkin (at medium heat) until the pulp is soft. If you steam it or boil it you must drain it or the pumpkin will be too watery. Easiest is just slice it up into quarters and lay it face down on a baking sheet - bake till the pulp is soft then scoop it out and mash, grind, process puree - whatever you do it should end up smooth with a consistency kind of like mashed potatoes.

(By the way keep the seeds - you can wash them, salt them and dry them in a warm oven and eat as snacks)

For the pie:

2 eggs slightly beaten
about 2 cups of pureed pumpkin
3/4 cup sugar
1 can evaporated (not sweetened condensed) milk
1 9 inch pie shell (I used premade pie shells from ASDA and they are smaller than the US pie shells - this recipe made two UK pies)

spices - 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves OR there is a mixture simply called "SPICE" in the UK that works great - it has all this plus nutmeg, I think. Put in a couple of teaspoons of that to taste)

Preheat oven to 425 F (don't know what that is in celsius but its HOT.

Mix filling ingredients well. Pour into pie shell(s) and bake on high heat for 15 mintes. then reduce temperature to medium and bake about 45 minutes or intil a knife inserted into center of pie filling comes out clean.

I'm not a very scientific cook - always estimating and guessing but this should turn out fine. Let us know!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 10:49 AM

Sounds scrummy!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Maryrrf
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 10:53 AM

I've used butternut squash and also sweet potato for "pumpkin pie" - pretty much the same recipe as above. I've also used polish sausage for "Spanish" rice - turned out great. I'm a very haphazard cook!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 11:00 AM

Pumpkin Pie

1 1/2 cups pumpkin (canned or fresh cooked/mashed)
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 to 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon (I always use the larger amounts)
1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

3 sligthly beaten eggs
1 1/4 cups milk
1 6-ounce can (2/3 cup) evaporated milk (NOT condensed milk!)

1 9-inch unbaked pastry shell

Combine pumpkin, sugar, salt, and spices. Blend in eggs, milk, and evaporated milk. Pour into pastry shell (have edges crimped high because amount of filling is generous). Bake in hot oven (400 farenheit) 50 minutes or until knife inserted in the middle comes out clean (clear, not milky).

Okay, that's it from the cookbook. It's a great recipe. Now here's what I do that's different: I don't eat dairy, so I use soy milk. This recipe, as most cooks will recognize, is a custard. So you have to use your ingredients so it will set at the right consistency. I use 2 cups of soy milk. I make soy milk from powder, and that would normally mean 4 tablespoons of powder to 2 cups of water. Since there is evaporated milk in here, I up the amount of powder by a tablespoon or two. With three eggs this sets up pretty well, I've never had a problem. You do sometimes have to bake it a little longer, so you might want to have a foil sleeve on your crust top (not over the whole pie, just over the edge) and take it off after 15-20 minutes of baking so the longer time doesn't make the crust too brown.

Pie crust for the 9" pie (and a little extra so the cook can roll it out to bake with sugar cinnamon for the kids)

1 1/2 cups flour, sifted
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup shortening
4 to 5 Tablespoons very cold water

Sift flour and salt. Cut in shortening (I do it with my hand, very therapeutic!) till pieces are size of small peas. Sprinkle water over, 1 tablespoon at a time, tossing mixture after each addition. Stop adding water when the consistency is right, even if you haven't added all of the water! (This will vary according to the weather). Form into a ball and flatten on a lightly floured surface. Roll 1/4 inch thick from center to edge.

When it bakes the filling is milky. When it is finished a knife inserted into it will come back moist but that liquid is clear, meaning the milk is completely set up. When the pie cools it actually continues cooking a little more and the center will be solid.

I like it just like this; others choose to gild the lily by serving it with whipped topping.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: leeneia
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 11:45 AM

I don't have time to post an entire recipe, but the Joy of Cooking changed pumpkin pie for me forever. Basically,you take the standard recipe, say off a can, and you cook the filling in a double boiler, stirring till it is thick. (It doesn't take very long.) You may have to reduce the milk by a third or fourth - use your judgement. Keep the filling in the fridge after it is cooked.

Tip - put all the ingredients in the double boiler, then turn on the heat. Don't let the pumpkin, etc, get hot and then add the eggs. The eggs will curdle.

Sometime during the day, bake the pastry shell, empty, until it is nice and golden.

Put the filling in the shell just before serving. It is delicious, with a wonderful fruit taste that reminds you that pumpkin is, indeed, a fruit. Of course, you need to top it off with whipped cream.

Here is a preference of my own. Many recipes call for adding cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger. I prefer to choose just one of these spices. I don't like the grainy taste of the combination.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Maryrrf
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 12:13 PM

Oh help! I'm supposed to be on a diet and my mouth is just watering now - thinking of pumpkin pie. I want to make one tonight!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: PoppaGator
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 01:04 PM

I've eaten pumpkin pie all my life, but never encountered its close cousin the Sweet Potato Pie until I moved south as a young adult. They're very similar, but I've developed a *slight* preference for the sweet potato (which is available year-round, unlike fresh pumpkin).

The recipes are probably similar if not identical, substituting mashed yams for canned or fresh-mashed pumpkin.

A few years ago, at Thanksgiving or Christmas, my wife Peggy discovered a recipe for Double Pumpkin Pie, with a layer of the regular pumpkin-custard filling topped with a second layer of pumpkin mousse, the same stuff mixed with beaten egg white and maybe some other stuff, creating a layer of filling lighter in color and in texture from the bottom layer -- kinda like the meringue topping on a lemon-custard pie. She usually puts these fillings into a cracker-crumb crust -- either graham crackers or vanilla wafers. Needless to say, this delicacy has become a feature of *every* holiday dinner since.

FYI: Here in the US, a mixture of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and probably ground cloves is commonly labeled and marketed as "Pumpkin Pie Spice."


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: jeffp
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 01:06 PM

If you can get sugar pumpkins (sometimes called pie pumpkins), they work so much better for pie. They are smaller, but the flesh inside is much thicker than the jack-o-lantern variety. The ones we get around here (Maryland) are more brown than orange. I cut one in half, scoop out the seeds, place the halves cut side down on a baking sheet with a raised edge, and roast it in the oven at around 375 degrees. After the flesh gets soft, about an hour or so, I scrape out the meat, puree it in a food processor, and drain it in a colander lined with coffee filters. The resulting puree can be frozen for at least a year with no discernable loss of flavor or texture.

I also use allspice in my pies instead of clove. And fresh-grated nutmeg rules!

jeffp


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 01:30 PM

I wouldn't consider trying to eat one of the modern jack-o-lantern pumpkins. They're tasteless pulp. When I was a kid we could eat the jack-o-lantern, and typically did, because it was a different type of pumpkin. (They were also very hard to carve because the flesh was so firm). It was kept in the fridge and cut up and cooked when needed, or cooked and frozen, ending in a pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving. We get a brownish pie pumpkin here also, probably come from Maryland (!).

I steam my pumpkin then peel it. I don't steam it for so long that it's mushy. Cut into inch or so square cubes it doesn't take long to steam. Baking sounds very good, though. I also freeze it.

I have a wonderful pumpkin bread recipe--it's in the Joy of Cooking. I remember a fancy pumpkin pie recipe that calls for slicing and layering about a 1/4 inch of Philadephia cream cheese in the bottom of the uncooked crust before filling it with the pumpkin filling.

I've subverted the craving for pumpkin pie by pulling out a little Banquet Chicken Pot Pie for lunch. I'll get a little crust and fewer calories than as much pumpkin pie as I'd be likely to consume.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 01:36 PM

I'm piling the pounds on even as I read!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: KateG
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 02:39 PM

I like to sprinkle a little chopped crystalized ginger in my pumpkin pie crust before I put in the filling and bake it. Also a bit of ginger in the whipped cream that goes on top. Yum!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Little Robyn
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 03:07 PM

Here in NZ we have a little green pumpkin called a buttercup (not butternut - that's a yellow thing with a long stalk). The orange and grey pumpkins here are usually tasteless, watery and boring but the little green one is dry, sweet and almost chestnut flavoured.
Kiwis don't usually cook/eat pumpkin pie but I discovered it years ago and will often make it for a special occasion. People always enjoy my pumpkin pies - basically a similar recipe to those above - a spicy egg custard pie with cooked buttercup pumpkin in it for colour and flavour.
Pumpkin scones are good too!
Robyn


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: ponygirl
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 04:39 PM

Being a pie snob, i make my pumpkin pies from fresh pumpkin rather than canned. Instead of the sugar pie pumpkins, i like the long neck pumpkins -- they look very much like an overgrown butternut squash -- for piemaking. I usually use a bit of molasses too, instead of just sugar.   Mmmm... this year's pie pumpkin is waiting on the kitchen counter...


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Once Famous
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 05:04 PM

Pumpkin Pie is nothing but orange mush under a crusty slab.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 05:09 PM

We should be able to remedy your pumpkin problem. Someone send this woman a packet of pumpkin seed in her Secret Santa pack!

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: PoppaGator
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 05:22 PM

Martin, you've obviously never had a pumpkin pie made RIGHT. How unfortunate...

There should NOT be a top crust -- "crusty slab" or flaky pastry -- for the pumpkin custard to be "under."


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Bert
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 09:28 PM

Ah Martin Gibson, you forgot to add the magic words "Good Though!"

Sooz, For the English palate add less cinnamon and maybe a little more nutmeg and cloves. Whatever yanks your chain.

We always use crystalized ginger chopped fairly finely. That's all we had one time and it turned out so good that we rarely use dried ginger now.

And of course we roast the pumpkin seeds to munch on. You have to watch them carefully while they are cooking though 'cos they burn easily.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Mr Red
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 06:57 AM

I think he may be confusing it with his brain - an easy mistake to make when the brain is an orange.......................

Only joking Mart - we love ascerbic comment really...........


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Leadfingers
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 10:43 AM

Twenty Seven posts and not a single reference to the Band !!!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Paco Rabanne
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 10:49 AM

The Band. There you go Lead old boy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Leadfingers
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 02:01 PM

Thanks Ted - Which Band is that ?


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: beardedbruce
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 08:07 PM

just a note- the canned pumpkin sold for pies here is actually a winter squash. Real pumpkin is better, but a lot more work.

I have a recipe for colonial pumpkin pie I will bring in- One hollows out the pumpkin, puts spices and milk inside, and bakes...


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: dianavan
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 08:13 PM

Lead fingers - Are you talking about Pied Pumpkin?

Back to the pie - Yes! Squash or sweet potatoes can be substituted for pumpkin in any recipe. What I use depends on the occasion. This year for Thanksgiving, I used butternut squash. I also added cardamon seeds for the Persian guest. He was very apprehensive at first. He thought it was heavenly. He had never had the homemade variety. He asked for seconds and I gave him a piece to take home as well.

I'll see if I can post my very modified recipe later. If you don't want to bother with the crust (thats half the battle) bake it as a custard but, please, don't forget the whip cream.

d


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Maryrrf
Date: 22 Oct 04 - 08:39 AM

Oh yes I often dispense with the crust and just bake it as a custard. This is not because I don't like the crust but because crust is fattening.   It cuts down on calories and if I'm really being weight conscious I use 2% milk and splenda instead of sugar. It still comes out pretty good. When lazy but not counting calories, I've used the pre-made graham cracker crust. It's hard to ruin pumpkin pie.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Oct 04 - 10:18 AM

Custards seem to be very forgiving of using Splenda. I've found this to be so with bread pudding also. I use soy milk and so sometimes up the number of eggs by one, but Splenda doesn't make as much difference as does the soy milk.

Here is a link to a pumpkin growing site that might interest some of you. I agree, fresh pumpkin is best, whether home grown or store bought. I have had difficulties with predators on my cucubits in the yard where I live now, but each year I nurse them along a bit longer. I do okay with canteloupe, and have managed to grow a few squash before the worms get the plant, but never got the pumpkins beyond the flowering stage. Last spring I didn't have the time to work up the garden the way it needed, but this fall I'm starting early in preparing spots for next year.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Mr Red
Date: 22 Oct 04 - 02:52 PM

Leadfingers
Weren't they residents of Stroud? Before my time of course!


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: beardedbruce
Date: 22 Oct 04 - 07:26 PM

Well, the recipe I have will not be of much use...

Hollow out the pumpkin, removing the seeds. Add cream ( or milk), sugar, apples, raisins, and spices (nutmeg, allspice, clove, cinnimon, etc) and place the top back on. Bake it until the body of the pumpkin is soft.

My additions are in ()... Not too detailed, but perhaps it gives someone the idea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: dianavan
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:19 PM

Pumpkin, Squash or Sweet Potato Pie

2C mashed, cooked pumpkin, squash or sweet potato
1/2 C honey
1/4 C blackstrap molasses
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp ginger or about 1 tsp + of freshly grated ginger
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
a few cardamon seeds (optional)
1/2 tsp salt
3 eggs beaten
1 1/4 C canned milk
3/4 C water

Pour mixture into an unbaked pie shell and bake 10 min. at 450 degrees and the reduce the heat to 300 degrees and bake 45 minutes to an hour (until a table knife inserted into the middle comes out clean). Cool. Serve with whip cream or ice cream.

d


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: dianavan
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:25 PM

beardedbruce - baking the pumpkin whole is a good idea but just a word of caution. I once attended an emergency situation where a family decided to pop the whole pumpkin in the oven and then serve it whole. They brought it to the table and when mom poked it with a fork to see if it was done, the damn thing exploded. The entire family and the kitchen was covered in hot pumpkin!

The burns were very bad and needless to say, they were in shock.

d


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST,Old Guy
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:33 PM

I love pumpkin pie. I always buy pumpkins instead of canned pumpkin which looks like baby crap.

I cut the pumpkin into skinny wedges first.
Then cut around the insides to remove them rather than scraping.
Then I use a potato peeler to remove the skin.
Then I boil it like potatos.
Then I mash it with a potato masher.
I leave in some lumps cause I like the texture.
Then I hand it to my wife to add the other ingredients and finish making the pie.

It beats canned pumpkin by a mile.

Old Guy


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: annamill
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 02:31 PM

dianavan, I shouldn't, I know! But I can't help it! I laughed... I'm sorry. I'm sure there was nothing funny about being sprayed with hot pumpkin...

It's my upbringing! You know, slipping on banana peels and all.

Love, Annamill (still picturing, grinning and chuckling!)

PS: I'm going to try (TRY) that double pumpkin pie recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: dianavan
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 02:49 PM

Annamill - I still know that family (the kids are all grown up) and we laugh about it all the time but it sure wasn't funny when it happened.

The baby (an infant) had a chunk of hot pumpkin covering her eye. I knew I couldn't remove it without damaging the eye, so I kept pouring cold water over her face until it slid off. Boy did that baby scream! What was worse, the mother, who was in shock, had to be held back while I did this. My children and my partner (the only help I had) spent hours dipping rags in cold water and wringing them out over the bodies of the four people laying on the floor. My kids were only six and nine. I was very proud of them.

While they were at the hospital, the neighbors came in to clean the pumpkin off the walls and ceiling - it was an amazing mess.

Whenever I see that lovely young woman, I have to get real close and inspect that eye. No scar! We laugh and she gives me a big hug.

Mom is now married to a doctor who knows the story and says it is a miracle that her eye was saved and that nobody had any scars.

Please, never cook a pumpkin without first piercing it let out the steam.

d


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: PoppaGator
Date: 26 Oct 04 - 07:18 PM

annamill,

I assume the Double Pumpkin Pie you plan to bake is the one I mentioned back on 10/20.

I still do not have a completely-detailed recipe to offer, but I can add that the top (mousse) layer is made by adding not only beaten egg white, but also whipped cream, to some of the "regular" pumpkin custard that comprises the bottom layer.

To avoid deflating the mousse, you have to "fold" the ingredients together, being careful not to stir too much. You do want to achieve an even color, though, which requires fairly thorough mixing. But you probably already knew that!

Dang, is it ever good! The reason I can't offer exact quantities, etc., is that I have much more experience *eating* this delicacy than *making* it! I generally pitch in and help to some extent -- whipping the cream and/or egg whites, if nothing else -- but have never done the whole job by myself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 04:11 AM

Well, my pumpkin was steamed and pureed last night - so I'm on to the next stage.
Only problem, I have a small bucketful of puree. Any good recipes for soup?


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: dianavan
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 04:17 AM

Pumpkin bread is yummy!

...or make pies and give them to friends or to some homeless kids.

d


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Tansy
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 04:42 AM

Freeze any unsed Puree for another use. It keeps for months in the freezer. However, it's just as easy to make a loaf or two of Pumkin Quick Bread and then freeze them if need be.

Pumpkin Quick bread with golden raisins and walnuts is wonderful toasted with butter for breakfast. I make that for my husband often. It also makes for a very interesting French Toast option. If the Quick Bread gets stale, you can then make Bread pudding with it or Pumpkin Bread Trifle with egg custard. FOr the liquer to soak it with, you can use Frangelico or Bourbon.

I've PMed you an offer to send recipes for all manner of pies and breads. I'm a bit of an obsessive recipe collector. I like to spread them around.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Sooz
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 06:42 AM

Thanks Tansey - I picked up your pm. My first pumpkin pie has just come out of the oven along with a genuine Lincolnshire Bramley Apple pie.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST,Old Guy
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 08:16 AM

I found a low carb pie crist mix made by Mini-Carb at a Super Walmart.
We also use Splenda instead of Sugar.

Old Guy


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Tannywheeler
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 07:43 PM

Pumpkin Soup:
Start with a real pumpkin -- "pie" or "sugar" variety is best. About 2-&-a-half to 3 lbs. is the size usually sold. Wash off outside of pumpkin with warm soapy water and a veggie brush. Wipe dry, pierce in several places on shoulder around stem end. (Note: see dianavan's posts above; this is important safety tip, not just hot air.) Place on cookie sheet or shallow baking dish. Bake at 350-375deg. F for 1 to 1-&-a-half hours. Remove from oven and let cool 1 hr. or overnight.
Have on hand homemade chicken stock, milk (whole or reduced fat), 1 med. lrg. yellow or white onion per whole pumpkin used, real butter, drinkable white wine.
To make soup: cut or break open pumpkin, remove seeds and stringiness of the seed pocket (note that these seeds can be removed from the stringy stuff, dried, salted, and used as snack; time and labor intensive.) Melt butter in bottom of good-size stockpot, coarse-chop peeled onion, begin sauteeing in butter (gently, not going for color on onions, just limp softness). Scoop pumpkin flesh out of its skin (handling flesh and skin reason to have washed pumpkin), add to onion in stockpot. Continue cooking, stirring frequently, even constantly. Pumpkin softens and mushes up and starts blending with onion. Add chicken stock -- this is a variable; depends on how much and how dry the pumpkin; about a quart to 6 cups of stock per whole pumpkin. When mass is bubbling, add milk (or half&half or cream), about half as much as stock. Bring back to a boil, turn down to a simmer, cook for about 1-&-a-half hours, stirring OFTEN, avoid scorching. (Kitchen will heat up during this process. At any point, a glass of cold, white wine and a brief sitdown with feet elevated would be a Good Thing.)   Turn off burner and get out other med. lrg stockpot or "saucepan". Puree mass from stockpot: with a blender -- 3 cups of the pumpkinstuff + 1 cup of (milk, or cream, or white wine), blend to velvet, pour into other pot; in a food processor -- 2 cups of pumpkinstuff, 2thirds cup of (m., c., w.w.), process to smooth, pour into other pot; strainer/colander -- press through into mixing bowl in 2 or 3 cup batches, add (m., c., w.w.) in similar proportions as above, stirring thoroughly. Use less wine than milk or cream. When you have several of these batches in the other pot, turn on burner under this pot and start cooking again, VE-E-ER-R-RY SLO-O-OW-W-WLY-Y, continuing to add more batches until original mass totally pureed, stirring FREQUENTLY. You are trying to force nutritional elements from the liquid into the pumpkin starch, I think, and "condense" the soup/expand the starch. You want to evaporate moisture, but watch closely and don't scorch. This should be an uncovered pot. after 1 or 2 hours remove from heat. Pack in covered containers/widemouth jars to give away, take to a potluck dinner, keep in the refrigerator.
To serve cold, plop several big spoonfulls into bowl, add dollop of yogurt or sour cream, sprinkle with chives or chopped parsley. To serve hot: place some thick pumpkin soup in a 1 or 2 qt saucepan, (add milk, cream, or stock if thinning desired), heat to boiling (stirring frequently), turn quite low and heat for 2 or 3 minutes. Serve in bowls with savory bread, something with real texture and chewiness. Sour cream swirled into the center of the bowl of soup is a tasty addition. Doesn't freeze well -- texture suffers, but flavor still good. Note above posts: baked, fresh pumpkin freezes well by itself.    Tw
P.S. Yes, time-consuming, labor-intensive -- kinda like "hard work". Also delicious, satisfying, warming, sustaining.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: dianavan
Date: 08 Nov 04 - 09:07 PM

Sooz - I am waiting to hear if you liked it.

d


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST,Sooz (at work)
Date: 09 Nov 04 - 03:36 AM

Yes I liked it! However, I'm not sure that the pumpkin was a vital ingredient - especially with the time involved. I also made a pumpkin and raisin bread but that is in the freezer at the moment.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 09 Nov 04 - 08:47 PM

Although pumpkin pie is a "staple" at family gatherings, for most - and especially for the kids - it's really just an excuse to eat a lot of whipped cream topping. In recent years, that's usually one of those prepared non- or semi- dairy concoctions from the freezer case, but it wouldn't be "pumpkin pie" without a healthy (maybe that should be "unhealthy") glob on top.

A good pumpkin pie can be eaten without the whipped cream topping - but I'm not sure I can think of anything else to do with the whipped cream (mentionable on an open thread, at least).

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Maryrrf
Date: 09 Nov 04 - 09:55 PM

I tried this recipe the other day. It's so easy - you just mix everything up in the blender and pour it into a pie plate and then bake it. It doesn't have a real crust but...well it's hard to describe but there is a crust of a sort. I like regular pumpkin pie better but this did great in a pinch!


1 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix)
1/2 cup Original Bisquick® mix
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup evaporated milk
1 tablespoon butter or margarine, softened
1 1/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs
Whipped topping, if desired


1. Heat oven to 350ºF. Grease 9-inch pie plate.
2. Stir all ingredients except whipped topping until blended. Pour into pie plate.
3. Bake 35 to 40 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 30 minutes. Refrigerate about 3 hours or until chilled. Serve with whipped topping. Store covered in refrigerator.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: emjay
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 12:30 AM

Many years ago in the antediluvian period when I was living in the interior of Britih Columbia my aunt and I experimented making pumpkin pie with mashed cooked carrots. Carrots grow very well there, pumpkins not at all. In our family we make our pumpkin pies with a lot of spice so not only did these pies come out very dark, they were very tasty. None of us who ate them could tell that they weren't made with pumpkin. We were proud of these pies and served them to guests several times always surprising them when we told them the fruit--or vegetable we had used. Then an older relative came over for dinner and ate the pie with such obvious pleasure commenting that it was so good to have real pumpkin pie again. He said it had been years since he had tasted any, everyone there made theirs with carrots. We couldn't tell him that once again he had eaten carrot pie.
The point is, pumpkin, canned or fresh, or squash, or sweet potatoes, more depends on what you add to it than the fruit you start with. For ours we use the large can of pumpkin, 5 eggs well beaten, brown sugar, a little molasses, canned evaporated milk, 3-3 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, and 1 tsp. each of cloves, ginger, and fresh grated nutmeg. Now I am going to try finely chopped crystalized ginger.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 12:30 AM

Dianavan's story about the exploding pumpkin is a very moving one. I'm impressed by the six and nine-year-olds who helped their friends in pain.

Here's an easy way to pierce a pumpkin or squash before roasting it whole. Drill a hole in it with a corkscrew intended for wine. Be sure to drill in as far as the corkscrew will go, then pull out some flesh to make a small hole. This is much safer than trying to make a hole with a knife while the pumpkin tries to roll away from you.

I make pumpkin pie using the method in the Joy of Cooking. I make the filling in a double boiler and pour it into a baked pie shell just before serving. The taste is wonderful - fresh and fruity. A pumpkin is a fruit, after all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 11:18 AM

leenia -

A power drill and a small wood bit works quite well for puncturing your pumpkin - and I've seen a recent review of a book called "Cooking With Power Tools" that might be of interest to some. Other similar usages were mentioned. Sorry I don't have a complete citation at hand.

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: PoppaGator
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 11:39 AM

Yesterday, JohnInKansas wrote:

"A good pumpkin pie can be eaten without the whipped cream topping - but I'm not sure I can think of anything else to do with the whipped cream (mentionable on an open thread, at least)."

Well, that unmentionable use might be interesting, but you might consider using the whipped cream to top off a few servings of Irish Coffee -- or Jamaican [rum] coffee, or bourbon decaf, or whatever.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 01:17 PM

When I started reading this thread, I got a hankering for some pumpkin pie. So I went to the cafeteria downstairs and got a slice, came back up and resumed reading this thread while eating my pie. Then I got to Dianavan's first post about the baked pumpkin mishap. I am now wiping the mouthful of pumpkin off my screen that I had just taken when I got to the "...the damned thing exploded..." part. Not that I find people's suffering funny, but the picture your story conjures up is hilarious! I couldn't help myself. ILMAO and am still snickering. Certainly one for the books. Great material for a comedy skit (leaving out the burn injuries, of course).

Like Ponygirl, I too, am a pie snob. I make my own pastry crust, slightly sweetened. I puree fresh steamed pumpkin, add my spice blend and other ingredients, and whip the mixture slightly. It comes out of the oven really smooth and creamy that way. I serve my pie warm with unwhipped, unsweetened Devon cream poured over it. If you can't find Devon cream in your area (Stateside), plain old heavy whipping cream will do. I got used to not using whipped cream because my wife is from Scotland. They don't use much whipped cream over there, and they don't usually sweeten their cream. Besides, she says my pumpkin pie itself is sweet enough. Every Thanksgiving, my guests rave about it, so I guess she's right.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 04:34 PM

Yes, John, the power drill would do a good job too. It would be a real laborsaver for those of us who happen to keep the drill in the kitchen.

It's not a power tool, but I keep a pair of tin snips in the kitchen for cutting up chickens and turkey.


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: Peg
Date: 10 Nov 04 - 11:35 PM

Cool Whip or any other non-dairy whipped topping on pumpkin pie is sinful...like putting ketchup on a Porterhouse steak, or colorizing Casablanca...

Take the five minutes to whip some heavy whipping cream. Add a bit of confectioners' sugar and some vanilla to it first...and maybe a sprinkle or two of nutmeg. Yum...


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: PoppaGator
Date: 11 Nov 04 - 01:55 PM

Peg is absolutely right -- the only whipped cream to use is *real* whipped cream. You don't even really need any sugar if you don't want to, and shouldn't use too much in any event -- a little goes a long way.

A few extra grams of butterfat once in a blue moon won't kill you. (Well, 99% of you, anyway -- sorry about you other poor folks.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Pumpkin Pie
From: PoppaGator
Date: 26 Nov 04 - 02:14 AM

We didn't make or eat it today, but Peggy just reminded me of a fave pumpkin pie variation she learned and has made a few times in recent years:

Pumpkin with Poached Pear Pie: Regular crust and pumpkin filling topped with slices of pear poached (simmered) in red wine spiced with cimmamon, nutmeg, etc. The pears are peeled but left whole for the poaching process, then sliced and arranged in a single layer atop the pumpkin filling before popping the pie into the oven.

It's a bit tedious to arrange nice concentric rings of pear slices, but boy does it ever look good when completed, and it tastes even better than it looks! The outer edges of the pear slices pick up a dark red pigmentation that doesn't penetrate very deeply, creating a sort of two-tone pattern in the arrangement of slices. The flavoring, on the other hand, does seem to permeate the pear slices thoroughly and evenly.


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