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Online printable music paper source

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CarolC 23 Oct 04 - 02:51 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Oct 04 - 03:08 PM
Don Firth 23 Oct 04 - 03:17 PM
Chris Green 23 Oct 04 - 03:19 PM
GUEST 23 Oct 04 - 03:30 PM
Selchie - (RH) 23 Oct 04 - 03:30 PM
CarolC 23 Oct 04 - 04:18 PM
JohnInKansas 23 Oct 04 - 04:27 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 23 Oct 04 - 04:41 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 23 Oct 04 - 04:44 PM
JohnInKansas 23 Oct 04 - 05:15 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Oct 04 - 05:45 PM
Mooh 23 Oct 04 - 05:48 PM
JohnInKansas 23 Oct 04 - 06:04 PM
Bill D 23 Oct 04 - 07:19 PM
The Fooles Troupe 23 Oct 04 - 07:49 PM
Chris Green 23 Oct 04 - 08:37 PM
Mary in Kentucky 23 Oct 04 - 08:54 PM
JohnInKansas 23 Oct 04 - 10:55 PM
CarolC 24 Oct 04 - 01:02 AM
Moonunit 24 Oct 04 - 05:53 AM
Mooh 24 Oct 04 - 06:35 AM
Mary in Kentucky 24 Oct 04 - 07:48 AM
*daylia* 24 Oct 04 - 08:38 AM
Juan P-B 24 Oct 04 - 09:36 AM
Snuffy 24 Oct 04 - 10:51 AM
JohnInKansas 24 Oct 04 - 11:50 AM
CarolC 24 Oct 04 - 11:55 AM
CarolC 24 Oct 04 - 12:00 PM
*daylia* 24 Oct 04 - 12:40 PM
Chris Green 24 Oct 04 - 12:47 PM
CarolC 24 Oct 04 - 01:14 PM
JohnInKansas 24 Oct 04 - 01:28 PM
Leadfingers 24 Oct 04 - 01:34 PM
Don Firth 24 Oct 04 - 02:02 PM
Blissfully Ignorant 25 Oct 04 - 12:41 AM
Snuffy 25 Oct 04 - 08:43 AM
*daylia* 25 Oct 04 - 09:45 AM
JohnInKansas 25 Oct 04 - 10:00 AM
CarolC 25 Oct 04 - 12:57 PM
*daylia* 25 Oct 04 - 01:48 PM
open mike 25 Oct 04 - 02:23 PM
The Fooles Troupe 25 Oct 04 - 07:08 PM
GUEST 25 Oct 04 - 11:31 PM
Wilfried Schaum 26 Oct 04 - 05:02 AM
MMario 26 Oct 04 - 03:35 PM
Blissfully Ignorant 26 Oct 04 - 05:10 PM
PoppaGator 26 Oct 04 - 07:08 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 08 Feb 05 - 05:48 PM
CarolC 08 Feb 05 - 05:54 PM
JohnInKansas 08 Feb 05 - 09:57 PM
CarolC 09 Feb 05 - 12:03 AM
Kaleea 09 Feb 05 - 04:15 AM
JohnInKansas 09 Feb 05 - 05:14 PM
Bill D 10 Feb 05 - 12:12 PM
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Subject: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 02:51 PM

Does anyone know of any online places where one can print out sheet music paper for writing out the dots by hand? (I don't know what this kind of paper is called... score paper, maybe?) Any help greatly appreciated.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 03:08 PM

Several sites show up as having sheet music blanks, but they all seem to be selling or loading one up with adware. Be careful.
I would also like to print out some blanks, if there is a safe site.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Don Firth
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 03:17 PM

Here ya go. All kinds of stuff. Free. Just print it off.

Here's a Link to the main page. And here it is if you want to copy down the URL.

http://guitar.about.com/library/weekly/aa041900a.htm

Link to printable blank staff paper. And here's the URL:—   

http://guitar.about.com/library/qstaffpaper10.htm

Incidentally, I have a pretty effective firewall and an ad blocker, so I'm not even sure if this site has pop-up ads. At least I don't get them.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Chris Green
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 03:19 PM

There's a good one here and it's free! It's normally referred to as "manuscript paper", by the way. :)


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 03:30 PM

If you've got access to any reasonably decent DTP software, you could easily make your own (sized exactly to your own taste)

It's even possible in a word proccesor as old as MS Word 97


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Selchie - (RH)
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 03:30 PM

I just typed in   "Manuscript Paper"   there are many of sites for downloading free sheets,

try    http://www.musicaviva.com/manuscript/index.tpl
or   

http://www.antonjazz.com/musicpaper.html

M


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:18 PM

Thanks everybody!


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:27 PM

I just draw a dotted line in PostScript, in a "print field" inserted into Word. You do have to us a PostScript printer though.

As an example, in a new 8.5 x 11 document - paste ALL of the following, including quotes, in after you "Insert" - "Field" - "options" - "\p page" - "add to field" and "ok" twice:

"
0 setgray
432 setlinewidth
[2 8 2 8 2 8 2 8 2 45]0 setdash
300 80 moveto
300 660 lineto
stroke "

It should look like:

{ PRINT \p page \* MERGEFORMAT "
0 setgray
432 setlinewidth
[2 8 2 8 2 8 2 8 2 45]0 setdash
300 80 moveto
300 660 lineto
stroke"}

inside the "[ ]" the "2s" set the line weight, the "8s" set the spacing between lines, and the "45" is the gap between staves.

The 300 is the distance from the edge of the paper to the center.
80 is the distance from bottom of page.
660 is the distance from the bottom of the page to where the stuff stops. (Stop in a blank spot, and the precise distance isn't critical.)
All "dimensions" in points. One point = 1/72 inch.

If you print to a PostScript printer, you should get a passable sheet. Adjust as needed.

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:41 PM

Carta Musica

A programme to print BLANK Sheet Music Pages


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 04:44 PM

Guido

A program to print Blank Sheet Music Paper which you can design.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 05:15 PM

Yea, but George - what's the fun in doing it the easy way?

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 05:45 PM

Thanks, George. For me, it Has to be easy.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Mooh
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 05:48 PM

www.free-scores.com is what I use these days. Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 06:04 PM

Any music scoring program that you may have might let you print blank measures, although some of them insist that you fill with dots or rests and save before printing. I have an obsolete one that will actually let me print blanks, but it does insist on a clef sign and time signature (it loads defaults, and you can change them, but can't delete them).

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Bill D
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 07:19 PM

here is a link to the last free verion of an amazing program that will print 3 varities of music paper, plus a whole array of other graph paper. Graph Paper Printer
...(scroll down)

it can also be found at the very bottom of this page

here is the home page where newer, 'shareware' versions are found.
http://perso.easynet.fr/~philimar/graphpapeng.htm


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 07:49 PM

Nowadays you can often find very cheap books of the stuff - consider the costs of running your printer per sheet - ink & paper, wear on machines, etc, it may be cheaper to go buy it.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Chris Green
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 08:37 PM

What's a measure? I might be displaying my ignorance!


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 08:54 PM

I agree with Foolstroupe. Several years ago I wanted to send Escamillo a transcription of a midi. I went to one of Bill's free sites (I think) for some manuscript paper. Then I had a friend pick up some for me from a music store. The music store packet was vastly superior and pretty cheap.

Bottom line: if you just need one sheet, the online printouts are fine. But if you ever intend to maybe do this again, just buy some manuscript paper, it's fairly cheap, much easier to write on, and the quality is very attractive.

I used to bemoan the fact that I had to write midis by hand (enter one note at a time) until I realized that all Beethoven had was pen and paper!


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 23 Oct 04 - 10:55 PM

Mary -

With a little practice, and a good pen, doing it by hand is often faster - and easier - than poking the maggots in by computer. When I had the need to do it often enough to stay in practice, I rather enjoyed "scripting" scores. And you get such a good feeling from making them BEAUTIFUL instead of just mechanically perfect.

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 01:02 AM

Thanks again folks. These links are great.

One of the things I like about using the computer and printer for this is that it gives me something to do with scrap computer paper (previously used on only one side), something we have quite a bit of right now.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Moonunit
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 05:53 AM

duellingbouzoukis:

A measure is what we call a bar over this side of the pond (the music-notation kind - not the sort that you frequent regularly!)...

Jude ;)


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Mooh
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 06:35 AM

The real luxury of the free-scores site is that it provides what I can't get locally. That is customized standard notation and tab combinations for several instruments. I took the precaution of making a few backup copies of several varieties for photocopying later in case the site disappears. The local stationery store are useless in this regard and the only music shop is sadly undermanaged, though it is considering using the free-score resources itself. Otherwise it's a one day commitment to a city trip to get such things.

Fast, easy, minimal cost (deductable anyway) and nice manuscript.

Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 07:48 AM

I know what you mean, John. I had a music teacher who would make pretty little ovals instead of round music notes. It was much easier to read. When I've seen pictures of Beethoven's scribbling, it's much the same. But as best I remember he would even scratch the staff lines, usually unevenly, almost Picasso-like.

The reason I liked the manuscript paper better, as opposed to printouts on 8 1/2 by 11 paper or even little composition books -- you could get many more staves (or is the word staffs) on a page neatly, and the stiffness of the paper was more durable. I actually ended up keeping many of my scribblings. I also "inherited" a box of sheet music from a professional musician who had written several of his own arrangements on manuscript paper.

Several years ago I found a renegade site on the net that had arrangements of Enya's songs. I printed them on 8 1/2 X 11 paper, but they are difficult to keep up with. Another trick I used many years ago when I had to play Pomp and Circumstance for graduations was to tear all the pages out of the music book and glue (rubber cement) them to manilla folders for stiffness. I once saved a magazine printout of a song glued to construction paper, but it has become dog-eared over the years.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: *daylia*
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 08:38 AM

Funny, I've always known it as "staff paper" although it's sometimes sold as "manuscript paper" around here.

I never heard the expression "the dots" before I came to Mudcat. Must be folkie vernacular?   Always called them "notes" - after all, they are not all dots. Some of them are empty dots! And a lot of them have stems, flags and beams attached to those dots.

I'm wondering - are rests called "the dots" too? How about sharps and flats?


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Juan P-B
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 09:36 AM

Sharps is the centre of the universe for UK Trad folkies - In London and is twinned with the National Childbirth Trust.

Flats is what we, in the UK, call a 'Condo'

Hope this is now clear
Juan P-B


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Snuffy
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 10:51 AM

When the dots have stems we call them the tadpoles


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 11:50 AM

"Dots," "tadpoles," "maggots," "mouse droppings," "roach tracks," etc. (there are a few others) are "friendly terms" for communication between those who read music and those who don't.

Argument a: When conversing with persons who don't read the stuff, you shouldn't, and don't need to, expect them to use "proper names" for things. It's the music that's important.

Argument b: You don't have to learn a bunch of technical stuff just to have a conversation with those people who have to have everything written out for them. It's the music that's important.

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 11:55 AM

I learned that expression (the "dots") from my accordion mentor who is in the UK. I never saw or heard it from anyone not from the UK as far as I know, except maybe some people like me here in the Mudcat who picked it up from people in the UK.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 12:00 PM

Crossposted with you, JohnInKansas. Did you ever encounter "dots" and "tadpoles" here in the US prior to coming to the Mudcat, and not used by people from the UK?


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: *daylia*
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 12:40 PM

Interesting! So what would you call a dotted quarter note in the UK then - a dotted tadpole? A Dotty dot? Just a dot, with dot?

Maybe a Dot2?

Furthermore, what's this called ... an empty dot with dot? A dotted albino tadpole?

Hey, would you care for a spotta tea with dot? ;-)


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Chris Green
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 12:47 PM

Actually, I never realised until fairly recently that you chaps on the far side of the pond refer to notes by different names to us. We'd call a quarter note a crotchet, a half note a minim and a whole note a semibreve! Funny old world, innit? :)


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 01:14 PM

Years ago I took a pennywhistle class from a Scotsman who used terms like "crotchet" and "quaver", but I don't remember him using the terms "minim" or "semibreve".


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 01:28 PM

Carol C -

"dots" and "tadpoles" are terms that have been around in US country/western and bluegrass in the US for as long as I've had any awareness of these kinds of music. The "maggots" term dates back to at least the 1920's/30's and has been attributed to a Jazz player who was complaining about the leader's sloppily written scores as "full of maggots," or "maggoty." Sort of like the famous "too many notes" criticism of Mozart.

daylia -

See "arguments a and b." The usage of "DOTS" is as a generic term for "written music" or "stuff on paper." There is no reason to talk about "a dot," or to try to turn it into a technical definition. It's SLANG, used to "fuzz up" the subject to AVOID being technical. (Of course, you're just being cute... and nicely, too.)

One might refer to "that dot" if pointing out a particular mark on a score, but the term can be used for any mark that happens to be the subject at hand, be it "note," "rest," "splat" (#), "flat," or annotated comment such as "#$@^!%!!." As used in the US, by people I know, at least.

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Leadfingers
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 01:34 PM

Its birds on Telephone Wires as far as I am concerned .


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Don Firth
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 02:02 PM

Walk into a music store and ask the clerk for blank "staff paper" or "manuscript paper," either one, and they'll know what you mean.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 12:41 AM

'Dots' is far to technical. I propose 'thingys' and 'thingys with sticks on'. :)

There must be somewhere you can buy the appropriate materials in bulk, and cheaply? You could try asking at a music college or somewhere like it, they must use it.

I can't even read music, and have to rely on memory, which places a terrible strain on my poor befuddled head. I have tried, and i can manage tablature ok... Any tips for someone of very little brain who gets easily discombobulated by thingys and thingys with sticks :)?


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Snuffy
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 08:43 AM

I don't know anywhere that you can buy thingys and thingys with sticks in bulk, and cheaply. I think you'll probably have to make your own.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: *daylia*
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 09:45 AM

Actually, if all else fails you can easily make your own staff paper. Use a ruler to draw as many staves (sets of 5 lines, evenly spaced) as you can fit on your blank paper. Then just copy out this "draft" for more sheets.

If you're writing piano/keyboard music, remember you'll need the Grand Staff: 2 staves, one treble and one bass (joined with a brace to show that they are played at the same time) - with a wide space between each to avoid confusion.

BI, here's a couple sites to help with those thingys and thingys with sticks - click here if you're a keyboard player,
here if you're a guitar player,
and here if you're a singer or play any other instrument.

There's no doubt plenty of excellent discussions and ideas about learning the language of music here on the Mudcat too. You might try using the forum search feature for "music theory".

daylia


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 10:00 AM

Blissfully -

Find a kid, maybe about 8 to 10 years old, who's just learning to read a little music. Share lessons with a beginner who's learning. Let him/her pay the teacher.

Seriously, the most common "mistake" is trying to learn on the music you want play. You need to get some really simple stuff, and someone to talk to about it. I've found a few old third and fourth grade public school music books, from back when they actually taught kids a bit, and many of them include pretty good "lessons" along with the music. Tell people you're doing "folk song research."

Manuscript Paper:

A quick check on the web finds good manuscript paper from a couple of places in the traditional 9 x 12 inch size on simulated parchment (they call it "creamy paper") for about $.08/sheet (US). That's close to what you can print your own for, on "plain" paper; but most people can't print the larger sheet size and a "quality" paper would also add a fraction to the self-print cost.

The "good stuff" all seems to be made by someone using the trade name "Archives," but I can't find the maker in any of the ™ or ® listings. Quite a few different layouts are available under that name. Packages are small, usually not more than 40 to 90 sheets.

The few vendors who show more "economical" supplies almost all sell "Hal Leonard" spiral bound books of small sheets (8 x 8 inch, approx).

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 12:57 PM

Blissfully Ignorant, what instrument do you play? I have a lot of trouble with reading music, but I found that I am able to do it well enough to just get by ever since I started playing accordion. Before that, I played the recorder, and I never could read music for that instrument. I think it's because with the recorder, one note on the page involves positioning several fingers, whereas with the accordion, one note on the page represents one finger (except on the bass side where one finger can play two or three notes at the same time).

Actually, this is sort of why I need the paper. I have printed out the sheet music for a piece I want to learn to play, but the bass part of the music has each separate note indicated, and what I need is for the treble part to be notated, and the bass part to have chords indicated with the letters that represent them. So I need to rearrange the score to meet my own needs.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: *daylia*
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 01:48 PM

I think it's because with the recorder, one note on the page involves positioning several fingers, whereas with the accordion, one note on the page represents one finger (except on the bass side where one finger can play two or three notes at the same time).

I know what you mean, Carol. WHile I've been reading music for piano all my life, I've played the guitar only by ear until recently. Even though I can read guitar music no problem (same staff etc), finding those notes I'm reading on the guitar easily and quickly is a different story. The fingering is different than for piano (the thumbs aren't used or numbered on guitar), which still confuses me to no end.

And it took me a while to get used to the fact that on guitar, the notes sound an octave lower than they are written. I still catch myself automatically "correcting" that which doesn't need correction ... arrggghhhhh ...

John, I meant to thank you for your excellent job clearing up all dot confusion earlier ;-)   And btw, my students and I really enjoyed that "splat" (#) last night - so thanks for that too!

daylia


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: open mike
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 02:23 PM

check here: http://www.finalemusic.com/
and here: http://www.musicease.com/
and here: http://www.sibelius.com/
\here is a whole comparison of software programs:
http://cmpg2003.emusician.com/notation_software/


why print paper by machine and notes by hand..
there is a wide variety of notation software..
and some have midi sound built in...
and will play the notes on teh screen..


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 07:08 PM

A 'Stick with thingies' is called a Lagerphone - several threads exist here on how to make your own.

Robin


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Oct 04 - 11:31 PM

copy machines at 3 pence a sheet


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 26 Oct 04 - 05:02 AM

Why not use the programs already on your PC?

You can use the design program of MSWord, or MSPaint.
So you can draw your lines as you need them, wider for big dots/tadpoles, narrower for small ones.
(In Germany we just call them notes)

Write, sing and enjoy
Wilfried


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: MMario
Date: 26 Oct 04 - 03:35 PM

AH - But you see, "notes" are memorandums written (usually scribbled) onto paper - "notes" on a tune might include who performed or recorded the tune, the date of publication, etc.

*grin*


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 26 Oct 04 - 05:10 PM

Thanks for the advice, everyone! :0) I play guitar, or, failing that anything else i can find.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: PoppaGator
Date: 26 Oct 04 - 07:08 PM

To create printable blank manuscript in MS Word:

Create a new document and click "Table" on the menu bar & select "Insert"/"Table." (If you like, you might first want to go into "Page Setup" to adjust your margins, etc.)

In the window that pops up, type in for "columns" <1> and for "rows" <4>. This will give you five lines and four spaces; in newer versions of Word, the lines (five horizontal lines plus a vertical at each end) will be visible/printed by default. In older versions, the lines appear on-screen in light gray and will be invisible (will not print) unless/until you highlight the table and run the "Format/Borders" routine to make the lines printed/visible.

The lines will probably be 12 points apart, which may be wider spacing than most would prefer. To change the spacing, highlight the "table" (that is, the "staff") and change the point size in the little box next to the font name on your menu bar. Try 9 or 10.

Make sure that there is a blank line or two below the table/staff, and then highlight and copy the staff-plus-space-below.

Paste what you copied repeatedly, enough to fill a page, and there's your page of music paper.

NOTE: To make blank paper for guitar tablature, just specify five rows (to generate six horizontal lines) instead of four.

ALSO: If you can live with pre-defined measures of a set width-- instead of allowing the size of a measure to vary according to how many notes you have to fit -- you can specify your "table" to consist of multiple columns (maybe 4, 5, or 6 across the page) instead of one column.

*******************

It's probably true that the cost of paper and toner (toner especially) makes this procedure not as "free" as you might think. However, if you're recycling printed-on-one-side paper that would otherwise go to waste, it might well be worth it.

Of course, this creates computer-printed blank forms on which you have to make marks with pen or pencil. If any of the above-mentioned sites provides computerized staffs upon which you can computer-typeset "dots," well, go for it -- I can't compete with that!


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 08 Feb 05 - 05:48 PM

Found this handy source:

Manuscript Paper


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 08 Feb 05 - 05:54 PM

Oh, Dolmetsch. They make nice recorders, too. Thanks, George (and everyone else), for the links and information.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 08 Feb 05 - 09:57 PM

Since this is a "folk" site, I suppose a comment on "ancient and archaic customs" shouldn't be inappropriate?

In the olden days, until as recently as 15 or 20 years ago, people who drew machinery parts and such often used an archaic tool called a "pencil." Inserting text for dimensions and notes was done by hand, and was referred to commonly as "lettering." As neat and legible "lettering" was - in the far distant past - highly valued, numerous mechanical aids were devised for guiding the alignment, height, and spacing of the "lettered" characters.

One such tool, called a "lettering guide," consisted of a small flat piece of plastic with numerous holes in it. By sliding the plastic piece along the edge of a straight sided adjacent tool, with the "pencil" inserted through successive holes of a particular row of holes, precisely and evenly spaced lines could be drawn. While the usual usage was to make faint "guide lines" to assist "lettering" in straight and evenly spaced lines of text, using a softer pencil or even one of those "new-fangled Rapidograph" type ink pens could produce permanent and easily visible lines, such as might be used as a staff for notating music.

Although I was quite sure that such implements had disappeared from use many years ago, I was astonished to find completely adquate examples hanging on a rack at a local office supply store quite recently, among a bunch of other quite obsolete tools we once called "compasses," "dividers," "protracters," and "templates." While the tools on display looked quite serviceable, they most certainly must have been from "left over stock" that has been hanging there for many years; as it's quite reasonable to assume that no persons young enough to have funds for their purchase would have any comprehension of how to use any of them.

A second ancient technique, possibly still somewhat in use in remote corners of the world, permits drawing reasonable accurate evenly spaced straight lines and requires only a straight edged tool for a guide, a pencil, and a flat "washer" from your garage floor. (There's always a couple that have fallen off of something.) If the washer is placed against a straight edge, the pencil is placed in the hole of the washer so as to press the washer against the straight edged tool, and then pushed so as to "roll" the washer along the straight tool, a line parallel to the tool will be drawn, but will be spaced from the edge by the thickness of the "wall" of the washer. Move the straight edge to the line just drawn and repeat for a nicely spaced line parallel to the first. Repeat as needed for additional lines.

I'm told (and wouldn't admit I've told it) that a selection of washers of appropriate dimensions was once rather a prized possession of those who "drafted" ancient machines.

This second method does not work too well for drawing lines directly in ink since the washer may smear the wet ink; but one may place pencil guide lines for later "inking" if needed. The washer method also permits following a reasonable curved object, making an outline a little larger (or smaller if done from an inside edge) than an object. (Quite useful for marking for the removal of waste parts so that the final cut with your jigsaw doesn't have to fight with thick tare material.) It is perhaps the "shop use" last mentioned which accounts for this technique being still known in some (few) circles.

"Drafting" directly in ink with tools of this kind called for frequent pauses to "let the ink dry." Such pauses were commonly used by the adept for "thinking" about the next line to be drawn. It was quite possibly the disrepute attached to "thinking" by drafters (draughtsmen), designers, and engineers (probably taught in business schools now) that led to the demise of their use.

They do remain somewhat available for those interested in the study and application of ancient methods.

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: CarolC
Date: 09 Feb 05 - 12:03 AM

Woah... Dude!

;-)


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Kaleea
Date: 09 Feb 05 - 04:15 AM

Thanks for the link!

    When I write scores, I always use pencil--I prefer a mechanical pencil so I don't have to sharpen all the time. I don't use a computer program, cause I've never found one which has all the symbols & Music directives I need--I'd end up having to write lots of stuff in anyway on those printouts.

    Golly, and to think that the old masters in the olden days had to precisely copy their beginner pianoforte (or clavichord or harpsichord) book before they would be allowed to take piano lessons. There was no white out, no printed manuscript paper, & ink didn't erase then, either.


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 09 Feb 05 - 05:14 PM

Kaleea -

There was no whiteout then, but every scribe - of necessity - had a good "quill knife" for sharpening and reshaping the goose feather; and most such knives worked quite nicely for "scratching off" an ink error. Properly done, the removal can be much less visible, and with less damage to the parchment/paper, than when attempted with an "eraser" (which didn't come along until much later).

The technique survived, in certain circumstances, into the archaic era cited above.

John


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Subject: RE: Online printable music paper source
From: Bill D
Date: 10 Feb 05 - 12:12 PM

George Seto's link is good...the ones I posted way back up ^ there still work also.


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