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Improving voice without lessons

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Blissfully Ignorant 27 Oct 04 - 01:13 AM
Blissfully Ignorant 27 Oct 04 - 01:14 AM
Genie 27 Oct 04 - 02:50 AM
s&r 27 Oct 04 - 03:13 AM
Dave Bryant 27 Oct 04 - 05:07 AM
s&r 27 Oct 04 - 06:26 AM
Folkie 27 Oct 04 - 08:31 AM
MMario 27 Oct 04 - 08:36 AM
s&r 27 Oct 04 - 08:48 AM
YorkshireYankee 27 Oct 04 - 11:04 AM
GUEST,Les B. 27 Oct 04 - 12:42 PM
PoppaGator 27 Oct 04 - 01:06 PM
s&r 27 Oct 04 - 01:15 PM
PoppaGator 27 Oct 04 - 03:31 PM
Blissfully Ignorant 27 Oct 04 - 06:58 PM
YorkshireYankee 27 Oct 04 - 10:16 PM
GUEST,Les B. 28 Oct 04 - 05:02 PM
lamarca 28 Oct 04 - 05:39 PM
leeneia 28 Oct 04 - 09:40 PM
Gypsy 28 Oct 04 - 10:45 PM
Blissfully Ignorant 28 Oct 04 - 10:49 PM
GUEST,Foggy 29 Oct 04 - 07:04 PM
Folkie101 30 Oct 04 - 12:05 PM
vanessathecat 30 Oct 04 - 01:35 PM
breezy 30 Oct 04 - 03:24 PM
breezy 30 Oct 04 - 03:25 PM
GUEST,Anne Croucher 30 Oct 04 - 03:57 PM
GUEST,jangergs@yahoo.com 31 Oct 04 - 12:12 AM
Blissfully Ignorant 31 Oct 04 - 02:51 AM
Alice 31 Oct 04 - 10:09 AM
Alice 31 Oct 04 - 10:51 AM
YorkshireYankee 02 Nov 04 - 09:07 PM
YorkshireYankee 04 Nov 04 - 06:10 AM
Blissfully Ignorant 04 Nov 04 - 08:48 PM
Don Firth 05 Nov 04 - 02:11 PM
*Laura* 05 Nov 04 - 03:29 PM
Blissfully Ignorant 06 Nov 04 - 02:55 PM
*Laura* 06 Nov 04 - 03:43 PM
*Laura* 06 Nov 04 - 03:44 PM
Davetnova 07 Nov 04 - 01:41 PM
chris nightbird childs 07 Nov 04 - 01:49 PM
GUEST,Craiggy 29 Nov 04 - 11:13 AM
celticblues5 29 Nov 04 - 11:38 AM
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Subject: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 01:13 AM

Does anyone have any advice on how i could improve my singing voice without taking lessons, as i can't afford any? Please note, i actually can't afford any as apposed to just being stingy :)

I've been told i have a reasonably good voice, but i do tend to hit a few bum notes.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! :)


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 01:14 AM

Oh, and i have searched the forum, but all the advice seems to come down to 'get a tutor'...


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Genie
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 02:50 AM

I've read that there are some video tapes and books available to help people improve vocal technique without a tutor. Anyone have specific ones to recommend?

Also, some colleges and community colleges offer group classes in singing. They can be very inexpensive but offer a lot in the way of basic technique instruction.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: s&r
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 03:13 AM

1. Don't try to sing too loud, too high or too low.
2. Don't try to breathe too deeply or hold a note on too long.
3. Don't expect to make your voice into something it's not.
4. Don't sing after a full meal or with a tight belt on.

How to relax your singing and make the most of your voice: stand at ease, let your arms hang by your side. Breathe slightly deeper than normal. Let your lips touch, with your teeth just parted. Hummmmmm. You should find your lips tickle- when they do, open your mouth and sing Ah gently. You'll be surprised how much resonance there is. Repeat with different notes, within your range. Sing gentle songs to warm up. Warm up for ten minutes before you sing. Get together with knowledgeable singers, and ask them to listen to you. Teachers don't have to cost money.

Avoid imitating another voice - it may be wrong for your vocal tract or range.

Stu


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 05:07 AM

Learn and rehearse your material thoroughly - and that includes where you're going to take your breaths. Many years ago the musical director of a choral I sang with would insist that we all marked breaths in our scores, and I still have plenty of scores to prove it. If you plan ahead you should never run out or have to take an awkward breath in the middle of a phrase - or even worse between two syllables.

i do tend to hit a few bum notes
Is this because you have difficulty with intonation - ie actually hitting notes accurately, or because you haven't learnt the song properly ? The answer to the first, is practise singing scales and if a song has difficult intervals, keep singing them over and over till you can get them right. If it's the second reason the answer's obvious. I think it was Toscannini who was stopped by a couple who were lost in New York and asked him "How do you get to the Carnegie Hall ?" misunderstanding them he replied "Practice, Practice, Practice".

Find the key that really suits you best for each song - if you're singing with a guitar or similiar instrument, it's easy to use a capo to vary the pitch a semitone at a time. If you're unaccompanied, a set of chomatic pitch-pipes or one of those small children's electronic keyboards will help you find the best starting note.

Finally R-E-L-A-X and E-N-J-O-Y - imagine that you are telling a story (which any good song does) and try to communicate it to the best of your ability.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: s&r
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 06:26 AM

Try this website - much of it free and enough ideas for a lifetime.


Stu


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Folkie
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 08:31 AM

Join a community choir. They're cheap and fun


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: MMario
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 08:36 AM

BI - I'd take another look through the threads - there is a LOT of information on the forum regarding voice training, breathing, etc. Yes - in the long run most people reccomend get a tutor - but that doesn't negate the information presented in the thread. Part of the reason to get a tutor (or at least a knowledgable musical director - such as in a good community choir) is so that you have an outside viewpoint to prevent your developing bad habits.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: s&r
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 08:48 AM

And the difficult thing about teaching yourself is your teacher knows no more than you do.....

Stu


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: YorkshireYankee
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 11:04 AM

Just singing more often helps: My voice improved a lot when my car radio broke. I was too skint to get it fixed, so (out of boredom) I started singing whenever I had a medium-to-long drive somewhere. It was surprising how much my voice improved.

That said, I have to confess that voice lessons made even more of a difference. Best of all was a voice teacher who also teaches Alexander Technique. AT has made a huge difference in my singing; I'd recommend searching for Mudcat threads that discuss it. If that doesn't turn up anything (which would surprise me), do a Google search.

The other thing I'd recommend is try to make sure you're singing with your throat open rather than closed. If you really can't tell which you're doing, try to find an experienced singer who's willing to help you feel/hear the difference.

As far as making sure you are on pitch, record yourself singing & play it back. It is soooo easy to think you're on pitch in the "heat" of the live moment; listening back to yourself is much more accurate. You can also – if you own/have access to some musical instrument – play a note (or 2 or 3) & then sing it, listening carefully as you do. Do this repeatedly, not just once or twice.

Last thing: BI, where do you live? I ask because there's a group in Manchester (England) who meet once a month to work on our singing – mostly trad stuff – but of course it can apply to anything you sing. We work on voice production, as well as how best to put a song across. I've learned an incredible amount from these workshops. The cost is generally a few quid (i.e. the cost of renting the room, divided by the number of people there). If you are lucky enough to live near enough to get there once a month, come join us! You can pm me for details.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: GUEST,Les B.
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 12:42 PM

Yorkshire Yankee - I'm greatly intrigued by the ideas of the group you meet with - working on voice production and how to get a song across.

What are some of the concepts of getting a song across? I've sung and played for many years but still feel there's more to learn about presenting songs.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: PoppaGator
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 01:06 PM

Go out busking.

If you put in enough time, you should gradually develop projection technique and an ability to engage your listeners via eye contact, etc., as well as improved breathing, volume, "throat-openness," etc.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: s&r
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 01:15 PM

The danger with busking is overdoing it - too much force and effort could be counterproductive. Good advice for LesB may not be for the original poster.

Stu


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: PoppaGator
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 03:31 PM

I suppose there's always danger of overdoing anything, but the very reason I recommend street-performance is that you're more likely to do *more* singing, and to be sure of making yourself heard, than in the privacy of your room (or your acoustically-ideal bathroom).

My theory is that performing out on the streetcorner for extended lengths of time can help a novice singer "settle in" to a more relaxed and natural process than he/she can achieve either when practicing privately and quietly, or when performing in a highly self-conscious situation for a brief period of time (e.g., floor spot, open mike, etc.)

On the street, once you get over the initial "stage" fright, you can become blissfully unconscious of your various detailed worries and find yourself singing more naturally than ever before. At least, that's how I remember it happening for me quite a few years ago.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 06:58 PM

Thankyou very much, everyone!

Yorkshire Yankee, unfortunately i live in deepest darkest rural Scotland:(. I don't think there are any singing groups within a five mile radius, which they would need to be because i can't drive.

I mainly my own songs, and i don't have a problem with singing them in key. Most of the time it sounds ok, there are just a few bum notes that sneak in there sometimes. I heard it's a good thing if you're songs are hard to sing, means it hasn't been done before :))I'm hoping there's some truth in that...

Thanks again for all your help, it is much appreciated! :)


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: YorkshireYankee
Date: 27 Oct 04 - 10:16 PM

Hi Les B... Had gotten part way through a longish answer to your question when my 'puter crashed & I lost it all. Afraid I don't have the time to do it again just now; won't have time for the next few days either, but will try to post it again sometime during the weekend.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: GUEST,Les B.
Date: 28 Oct 04 - 05:02 PM

Yorkshire Yankee - I look forward to your re-post.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: lamarca
Date: 28 Oct 04 - 05:39 PM

Another tip - record yourself. Even an inexpensive tape recorder or minidisc reording of a practice session can help identify problem spots; missed notes, where your voice breaks, awkward spots in breathing/timing/phrasing, etc.

I found that there was nothing so humbling as listening to myself from the "outside" instead of inside my head, but it helped me identify the problems I wanted to work on...


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: leeneia
Date: 28 Oct 04 - 09:40 PM

Join a choir.

Sing while you clean the house. Sing along with recordings of good singers while listening to make sure you are staying in tune.

Are you a soprono, alto, tenor or bass? No doubt Mudcatters can come up with suggested names.

Avoid caffeine, alcohol and chocolate when it's time to sing. They dry out your throat. (Once when I had a sore throat during the Christmas season, I celebrated the fact that the big concert was over by having a Black Russian.)


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Gypsy
Date: 28 Oct 04 - 10:45 PM

There is the book Singing for complete Idiots.....by Miller. I used the Music theory book by him for a class, and was VERY well written. Picked up the voice book, and once we have the wood in, and the property put to bed for the winter........


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 28 Oct 04 - 10:49 PM

Thanks again, folks!

I have tried recording myself. Sometimes it's ok, sometimes it isn't.:)

I think i sing quite low for a female, but i'm not sure what to call myself.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: GUEST,Foggy
Date: 29 Oct 04 - 07:04 PM

To learn to sing on pitch, sing into a tuner. Sing a phrase, and every once in a while hold a note long enough that it registers on the tuner. Check if you are still on key. Obviously, this is for practicing, not for performing. It made a huge difference for me!

The tuner has to be the kind with a microphone for this to work.

Also, if you accompany yourself with a guitar, ALWAYS tune it before you sing and tune it often between songs. When you hear only true notes, your ear will start to demand them from your throat.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Folkie101
Date: 30 Oct 04 - 12:05 PM

There's a voice book that comes with a Cd (vocal exercises), by Roger Love called "Set Your Voice Free". It's a great way to practice daily, and learn all about the voice. The book should be under $20.

If you have a desire to improve your voice, it can be done. Don't give up :)


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: vanessathecat
Date: 30 Oct 04 - 01:35 PM

Try singing longish notes (not overdoing it) on any vowel you feel comfortable with, and varying the position of the tongue in your mouth until you find a place where you feel comfortable and you are happy with the tone of your voice, then practise recreating it at random moments - eventually you learn how it feels enough to make that same tone with other vowels.

Always sing with the throat as open as possible - imagine how open your throat feels when you yawn, and try to open it like that when you sing.   

As everyone else says, practice is a key thing, and listening to good singers, especially live, can give you ideas about breathing and the kind of sound you may want to make - you don't have to copy other people, but you can subconciously pick up a lot about technique from watching others, and singing with others is very helpful too, both from the point of view of tone quality and intonation.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: breezy
Date: 30 Oct 04 - 03:24 PM

nobody has asked about the Black Russian, so how was she?

singing out helps to establish your key too.

Dont worry bout the bum notes.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: breezy
Date: 30 Oct 04 - 03:25 PM

its the ones that come out of your gob that matter


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: GUEST,Anne Croucher
Date: 30 Oct 04 - 03:57 PM

If you have a recorder and a player which are different items try putting them at opposite ends of a room and sing along to something you think you can join in with whilst recording the result.

It can be very revealing about just where you pitch your voice, how you breathe, etc. compared with whoever you chose to sing with.

Try playing the 'professional' recording both fairly loud and quite quietly and see how you cope with being the secondary or the primary sound - that can be interesting too.

Finally - be sure to wipe any really dreadful attempts or they are sure to come back to haunt you in years to come.

Anne


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: GUEST,jangergs@yahoo.com
Date: 31 Oct 04 - 12:12 AM

Is there special food or drink helping me to improve my voice?


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 31 Oct 04 - 02:51 AM

Thanks again, folks!I've been trying all your suggestions, and i got a 'hey, that sounds alright' from my dad- which is better than it sounds, considering it's the first compliment i've had from him in years...


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Alice
Date: 31 Oct 04 - 10:09 AM

Guest, not drink you can add, but drink you can take away. Avoid alcohol near a time before you will be performing. Also avoid sprays or lozenges that are intended to numb or dry out your throat or sinuses. Do not eat a heavy meal close to a time before you need to sing. If your throat is dry, drink milk or something with milk or cream in it. If your throat is too coated, gargle with warm salt water. You can get a spray online with glycerin in it made to lubricate the throat of singers/speakers called Entertainer's Secret.

Alice


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Alice
Date: 31 Oct 04 - 10:51 AM

B.I. More tips while you are learning:
Do not (belt) push your voice to try to get volume.
You can project the sound of your voice by learning to float the sound on the stream of air you are sending out from your mouth. This involves learning breath support so that you have enough air to project! Pushing against your vocal folds while you sing stresses the vocal folds which leads to damage to those tissues, sometimes nodes which keep the folds from being able to close completely together, ruining your voice. In the Threads on the Singing Voice thread, I posted links to voice web sites where you can see the mechanics of how the voice works.
Here is one of those links again. The original University of Pittsburgh Medical Center does not work on my Mac Netscape browser anymore but it should work in Explorer.
http://voicecenter.upmc.com/Voice.htm
Click here

Alice


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: YorkshireYankee
Date: 02 Nov 04 - 09:07 PM

Well, I'm finally getting round to posting again (sorry it took so long) on what we discuss in our workshops on "how best to put a song across"...

Some things to consider:

I) Try to understand the song yourself – as best you can – before you sing it to others. After all, how effectively can you communicate a song if you don't really understand it properly yourself? So... are there bits that don't make sense to you? Words that seem a bit strange? Perhaps a certain word meant something different 200 years ago than it does today. Or maybe some of the words have been mis-heard over the years. One of the most interesting conversations our group had concerned the phrase "wee pen-knife"; it turned out that the original words were "weapon knife" – pronounced "weepon knife" – but almost all of us had "heard" wee pen-knife. The verse in question did make considerably more sense when we knew this; after all, it's one thing to threaten someone with a weapon knife (shorter than a sword, but longer than a dagger), and another to threaten them with a "wee pen-knife"!

Knowing the context of the song – when & where it was written, perhaps in response to, or as a result of certain historical or socio-political events can also be extremely helpful. For example, if you sing a song "by" an unwed mother, it helps to know how society in that time & place thought of and treated unwed mothers – especially if it's significantly different from the present day.

II) What kind of song is it?
A ballad? A funny song? A protest song? A story?
If it's a story, you might try telling the story in your own words (you might even record it & listen back, if that helps) & notice what kind of expression you put into it & where you pause for effect, & do you speak louder/softer or quicker/slower for certain bits. Then (or if it's not a story) try just speaking (rather than singing) the actual words of the song – as if you were talking to someone, and again, notice how you say the words, the rhythm of your speech, where you pause, speed up, slow down, get louder, softer, maybe even make gestures now & then.

All this might cause you to make certain adjustments in the way you sing the song – particularly where you pause for breath, and the rhythm of the words. Some people feel that the rhythm of the words in each line should land squarely on the beat – but it might actually enhance your presentation if it's not quite so regular/rhythmic and leans more towards the conversational approach.

III) Who is singing the song? What "voice" is it in? If you're an American trying to sing with a Scottish accent (or an English person trying to sing with an American accent), will that sound strange? A lot of people (without even realising it) end up sounding like whoever sang the song on the CD they learned it from. (More than once, I have heard someone perform a song I've never heard before – and could figure where they got it from – because the delivery of the person singing it actually sounded so similar to the performer who sang it on the CD.) Most people recommend that you try to sing things in your own "voice" rather than imitate someone else's.

This can bring up a secondary problem; for example, there's an English song ("I Wish They'd Do it Now") that starts off "I was born to Geordie parents, one day when I was young; That's how the Geordie dialect became my native tongue." Now, as a US Midwesterner born & bred, there is NO way I am going to sound like the Geordie dialect is my native tongue. A solution that has worked for me (in this case) is to change the words slightly, to "I was born to Georgia parents, etc" – which is much more believable for my audience (especially since I'm living in England!) Of course, it can get complicated; there's a bit later on in the song: "They'd dip me like a yow" (yow = ewe). They definitely don't say "yow" in Georgia, but if I change it to "ewe", then it messes up the rhyme (with "I wish they'd do it now"). Still haven't solved that one... But anyway, you get the idea.

IV) What's the mood of the song?
Happy? Sad? Angry? Neutral? This could make a difference in your tempo, as well as where you decide to pitch the song (that is, if your range is wide enough that you have a choice). The same song can come across quite differently sung in your lower range than it does in your upper range. Try singing it lower, higher, in-between. Where are you most comfortable singing it? Where sounds most appropriate to the song? (Unfortunately, these two will not necessarily be the same.)

One experience I had: I sing an American version of "John Riley". I brought it to the workshop & sang a bit of it. During the discussion that followed, it was suggested that I try singing it considerably higher than I had the first time, and try to add "a bit of an edge" to my voice when singing it – because it is, for the most part – a song that deals with the harsh realities of life for a woman pledged to a sailor in that day and age. I tried this, and the people there said it made the hairs on the back(s) of their neck(s) rise; thanks to this fairly simple change, the song suddenly was much more effective.

On the other hand, you don't want to overdo the drama; if you go over the top, people will be paying more attention to you and your dramatics than they will to the song itself. You want to subtly enhance the song – not distract people's attention from it. Some people I know feel that a ballad should be sung with very little (if any) emotion injected by yourself – that a singer should, in effect, stand back and let the ballad "speak" for itself. A lot of people also feel that having an absoloutely gorgeous voice can be a real disadvantage to putting a song across, because listeners can get so caught up in enjoying the voice that they forget to listen to the words. (I must confess, this is a "problem" I would love to have!)

V) Ornamentation
How much (if any) ornamentation is appropriate to the song? Where should it go, and how simple or elaborate should it be? You want to enhance the song and bring out its meaning, not make it so complex and ornate that it distracts people from the actual content of the song.

VI) Who are you singing it for?
Is your audience already knowledgeable about the time & place your song is from, and the language used? If not, putting things in context for them, and explaining any obscure/confusing language and/or no longer common laws/customs/practices, beliefs, and metaphors/idioms/symbolism, should help them understand the song better – which will in turn help it be better-received. This goes back to (I), 'cos you can't share this kind of info if you don't know it yourself in the first place.

VII) In summary...
Be aware that you have an incredible number of choices available when you interpret/perform a song. Examine your choices, and ask yourself why you are doing it this way instead of that way – do you have a good reason for the choice(s) you have made? If you don't consciously make decisions about how to present a song, it is oh-so-easy to end up doing it the way you heard it "on the CD" – which is probably not the way that is best suited to your voice and/or your other talents, and may not even be best suited to the song itself.

I suppose it's a bit like cooking (or any other art/craft/skill); an uninspired cook follows directions to the letter, because they're afraid that if they do anything differently it will mess up the recipe. A chef thoroughly understands his ingredients, his tools, and the ways they all interact and affect each other. He understands these things not just because he has memorised them, but because he has played around with all these things many times. (What happens if I add an extra egg? Suppose I cut the amount of butter? What if the humidity is higher than normal?) He's not bound to a recipe, but if he changes it – he has a reason. Probably a very good reason.

So... play with your singing. Try different things. SeeHear what works – and what doesn't. If you're lucky enough to have a friend (or a group of friends) who will tell you – honestly – what they think, in a constructive way, get some feedback and give it serious consideration. Try to put yourself in the audience's shoes; think about what you enjoy (or don't) when you are listening to someone. Think of someone you feel is a particularly successful performer – what is it about how they present a song (aside from their wonderful voice and/or technique!) that makes what they do so effective? Is there anything they could do that would make their performance even better? Is it something you could do? Keep "playing". Keep asking questions and keep learning. Keep enjoying yourself. Don't eat yellow snow. ;-p

I'm sure there's more, but that's about all I can think of...


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: YorkshireYankee
Date: 04 Nov 04 - 06:10 AM

– R –


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 04 Nov 04 - 08:48 PM

Sorry i took so long to reply, i had to do some electrical jiggery-pokery to get online! :0)Thank you very much for all your advice, i shall certainly be trying everything suggested. A lot of it has been effective already (or at least i've been told i'm sounding better:0)
Thanks again, i really appreciate it! :0)


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Don Firth
Date: 05 Nov 04 - 02:11 PM

A lot of good advice in this thread. Anything that Alice posts. And the long post by Yorkshire Yankee (02 Nov 04 - 09:07 PM). Really good stuff there. Cut and paste it into a document file, save it to disk, print it out, and read it every day.

One of my voice teachers had me bring my guitar to lessons, and part of the lesson would consist of me singing a song I had already learned or whatever new song I was working on at the time. Often I would get a verse or two into the song when he would stop me and say, "That last line. Tell me what that means." He was not asking me about some esoteric reference in an obscure ballad, he was asking me precisely "What does it mean?" It didn't take me long to figure out that he knew what the line meant, but he could tell that I didn't, not really. I was singing the line--or sometimes most of the song--by rote. I wasn't really communicating the song. If I didn't really understand it and feel it, how could I put it across to my audience?   

He was a terrific teacher. Not only did I learn a lot about vocal technique from him, but I learned how to put a song across. "Don't just sing. Communicate!

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: *Laura*
Date: 05 Nov 04 - 03:29 PM

Sing in the shower!
No one else can hear you and the steam makes it warm enough for your muscles to get all relaxed.

xLx


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Blissfully Ignorant
Date: 06 Nov 04 - 02:55 PM

Thanks again!

I often do sing in the shower, and i sound ok...maybe it has something to do with nudity? Maybe i should perform naked! :0)


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: *Laura*
Date: 06 Nov 04 - 03:43 PM

Hehe - showers are just made for singing!

I sound ok until I try and sing at any volume and then it all falls apart - are there any 'volumating' exercises I could try?
My mum can't sing that well - maybe she passed it down.

xLx


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: *Laura*
Date: 06 Nov 04 - 03:44 PM

Having said that - I should have inherited something from the other side!
Just my luck to get the wrong genes hehe.

xLx


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: Davetnova
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 01:41 PM

As one of those that has just discovered singing, the loud voice is a different voice. If you practice quiet you'll learn to sing quiet.


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: chris nightbird childs
Date: 07 Nov 04 - 01:49 PM

I sang quiet for a few years and then tried to sing with a rock band. It did not work! I learned how to project my voice really quick! Now I hardly use a mic on my voice when I perform...


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: GUEST,Craiggy
Date: 29 Nov 04 - 11:13 AM

Hello. Here's the thing.
I can sing high notes like "Thriller" but only if I sing it loud!

Earlier I read someone say that you shouldn't sing loud. But in theory, if I can hit the higehr notes when I'm louder. Won't this pay towards strengthening my voice?

Thanks

Craiggy


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Subject: RE: Improving voice without lessons
From: celticblues5
Date: 29 Nov 04 - 11:38 AM

Sorry, but I have to disagree with Alice on one point - I've always been taught NEVER drink milk or eat dairy products (including chocolate) prior to singing - supposed to make mucous production more likely, and I have noticed that this sometimes does happen when I disobey the rule. Not an attractive addition to most performances, hacking & spitting one's way through the song! ;-)

A warm salt water gargle does help with colds & sore throats, or hot lemon & honey water, and I have had others recommend the glycerin spray she suggests. I believe a catalogue called "The Music Stand" offers it.


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