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Lyr Req: The Boar and the Fox (Battlefield Band)

Gregory Baker (nyekulturniy@hotmail.com) 19 Nov 98 - 05:09 AM
rechal 19 Nov 98 - 01:52 PM
Greg Baker 19 Nov 98 - 08:50 PM
skw@ 20 Nov 98 - 07:54 AM
20 Nov 98 - 01:29 PM
rechal 20 Nov 98 - 02:48 PM
MMario 20 Nov 98 - 04:05 PM
Greg Baker 20 Nov 98 - 04:26 PM
skw@ 23 Nov 98 - 03:38 AM
Jon W. 23 Nov 98 - 10:46 AM
rechal 23 Nov 98 - 01:38 PM
GUEST,sean 03 Feb 01 - 01:33 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Dec 10 - 12:43 PM
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Subject: The Boar and the Fox
From: Gregory Baker (nyekulturniy@hotmail.com)
Date: 19 Nov 98 - 05:09 AM

I have been looking for the lyrics to a Scottish tune, "the Boar and the Fox." As far as I can tell, it's more than an animal story - it sounds like a political analogy. Can someone enlighten me?

Thank you.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: rechal
Date: 19 Nov 98 - 01:52 PM

They're on a Battlefield Band album titled "Home Is Where The Van Is," which I believe was put out on Green Linnet records. Give me a few hours, and I might be able to re-construct the song from memory.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: Greg Baker
Date: 19 Nov 98 - 08:50 PM

Thank you. It's an eerie tune.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: skw@
Date: 20 Nov 98 - 07:54 AM

I'm not sure I have the lyrics, but I should have some information about the background. If so I'll bring it in on Monday. - Susanne


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BOAR AND THE FOX
From:
Date: 20 Nov 98 - 01:29 PM

Here are the lyrics as far as I am able to understand them.

THE BOAR AND THE FOX

The boar he has a-hunting gone
To a lady of command,
And he's gone to the lady fox,
And he has proffered her his hand.

You're welcome here, Lord Bruin she says,
And you are welcome here to me,
But ere I lie into your bed,
You must grant me favors three.

Favors three then I will grant,
No matter what these favors are,
For there isn't a beast in all the wood
That will live to challenge me.
Then bid me bring the red deer's heart,
Or the numbels (?) of the hind,
To be a bridal supper dish,
Fitting my true lover's mind.

No, oh no cried the lady fox,
These are not the gifts for me,
But there are three birds in fair Scotland,
Sitting on a single tree.
And I must have the heart of one,
And the heads of the other two,
Then I will go for weal or woe,
And be a bride of brighton blue. (?)

The boar he has a-hunting gone.

Woe be to that lady fox.
She's the vilest of her creed,
For the bonny birds were reamed awa'
And condemned by her to bleed.
The boar was caught inside her den,
With a trap that severed his leg,
And she's tied the boar up by the neck,
And he has hung 'til he was dead.

I think it was an analogy of an English queen wanting some assassinations done, tricking a nobleman into doing them, and then having him killed. I'm not sure, though. So I also am looking forward to more information from Susanne.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: rechal
Date: 20 Nov 98 - 02:48 PM

I just typed these out in HTML, only to find that someone beat me to it.

The only differences I remember are:

"that will dare to challenge me"

"the nambles of the hind" (pronounced numbles -- I think these are like knee bones or something)

"Then I will go, for will or woe

And be a bride, a bride to you."

And I think the bonnie birds were "wreathed awa'". I don't know what "wreathing awa" involves, but it sounds bad.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: MMario
Date: 20 Nov 98 - 04:05 PM

depending on which source you look at, nambles were either the innards (liver,heart,lung,tripe) or the loin. In usage, it appears that usually the innards were meant,when it was nambles of hind, but loin when nambles of beef.

{the trivia one can find when browsing the web, or reading old college texts!)

might the "reamed awa'"/"wreathed awa'" line be :

reaved awa'??

MMario


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: Greg Baker
Date: 20 Nov 98 - 04:26 PM

Thank you. I wonder if the boarwasn't a McCulloch? I believe the boar was their clan symbol. Mind you, I'm not Scottish, I am Welsh Cherokee Americancan.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: skw@
Date: 23 Nov 98 - 03:38 AM

There's nothing I can add to the words. All I found were the sleevenotes of the Battlefield Band album - which don't help much either, I'm afraid:
[1981:] This unusual and macabre song was found in James Hogg's 'Tales of the Borders'. We don't know its origins or date but it may be an allegory based on a political murder in Scottish history. The melody is a pipe tune called Sleep Dearie Sleep. (Notes Battlefield Band, 'Home Is Where the Van Is')


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: Jon W.
Date: 23 Nov 98 - 10:46 AM

My cookie was gone when I posted the words, which is why my name wasn't in the "from" line. Upon rehearing the song, I agree with "bride to you" for "brighton blue" but I'm pretty sure it's "weal or woe" not "will". Weal is the opposite of woe, it means wealth, wellbeing, etc. As for "reamed/wreathed/reaved" it's difficult to tell, but I seem to hear an "M" at the end of the word. However, the dictionary definition of "reave"--to rob, plunder, steal--makes the most sense so let's go with that. As for "live" or "dare" ("to challenge me"), I could go with either one.

The more I listen to this song, the more I like it. The instrumental backing is really cool.

Jon W.


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Subject: RE: The Boar and the Fox
From: rechal
Date: 23 Nov 98 - 01:38 PM

I'll buy that.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BOAR AND THE FOX (Battlefield Band)
From: GUEST,sean
Date: 03 Feb 01 - 01:33 PM

In the Battlefield Band's book "Forward with Scotland's Past" the lyrics are printed thus:

The Boar he has a-hunting gone,
To a lady of command,
And he's gone to the Lady Fox,
And he's proffered her his hand.

"You're welcome here Lord Bruin," she says,
"You are welcome here to me,
But ere I lie into your bed,
You must grant me favours three."

"Favours three then I will grant,
No matter what those favours are,
For there isn't a beast in all the wood
That will dare to challenge me.

So bid me bring the red deer's heart,
Or the nombles of a hind,
To be a bridal supper dish
Fitting my true lover's mind."

"No, oh no," cried the Lady Fox,
"These are not the gifts for me,
But there are three birds in fair Scotland
Sitting on a single tree.

And I must have the heart of one,
And the heads of the other two.
Then I will go for will or woe
And be a bride, a bride to you."

Oh, woe be to that Lady Fox.
She's the vilest of her creed
For the bonny birds were reaved away,
And condemned by her to bleed.

The Boar was caught inside her den,
With a trap that severed his leg,
And she's tied the Boar up by the neck,
And he has hung 'til he was dead.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BOAR HE WOULD A-WOOING GO (James Hogg
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Dec 10 - 12:43 PM

From "A Story of Good Queen Bess" by the Ettrick Shepherd [James Hogg], in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 29, No. 179, April, 1831, page 581:

1. The boar he would a-wooing go,
To a mistress of command,
And he's gone away to the lady fox,
And proffer'd her his hand.
'You're welcome here, Lord Bruin,' she says,
'You're welcome here to me;
But ere I lie into your den,
You must grant me favours three.'

2. 'Yes—favours three I will grant to thee,
Be these whate'er they may,
For there is not a beast in the fair forest
That dares with me to play.
Then bid me bring the red deer's heart,
Or nombles of the hind,
To be a bridal supper meet*,
Fitting my true love's mind.'

3. 'O no, O no,' said the lady fox,
'These are no gifts for me;
But there are three birds in fair Scotland,
All sitting on one tree;
And I must have the heart of one,
And the heads of the other two.
And then I will go, for well or woe.
To be a bride to you.'

4. Now woe be to that vile she-fox,
The worst of this world's breed,
For the bonny, bonny birds were reaved away,
And doom'd by her to bleed;
And she tied the boar up by the neck,
And he hung till he was dead.

[* Some later editions of Hogg's works have "meat."]


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