Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Tech: Keys on Computer

Peace 15 Feb 05 - 03:43 PM
rumanci 15 Feb 05 - 03:46 PM
Clinton Hammond 15 Feb 05 - 03:47 PM
gnu 15 Feb 05 - 04:00 PM
GUEST 15 Feb 05 - 04:06 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 04:15 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 04:16 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Feb 05 - 04:20 PM
artbrooks 15 Feb 05 - 04:25 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 04:30 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Feb 05 - 04:36 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 04:40 PM
artbrooks 15 Feb 05 - 04:42 PM
Amos 15 Feb 05 - 04:47 PM
GUEST,milk monitor 15 Feb 05 - 04:47 PM
Teresa 15 Feb 05 - 04:56 PM
GUEST,milk monitor 15 Feb 05 - 05:00 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 05:43 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Feb 05 - 05:50 PM
Peace 15 Feb 05 - 05:51 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 05:58 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 06:07 PM
artbrooks 15 Feb 05 - 06:20 PM
Peace 15 Feb 05 - 06:20 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 07:15 PM
JohnInKansas 15 Feb 05 - 07:19 PM
artbrooks 15 Feb 05 - 07:27 PM
Bill D 15 Feb 05 - 09:58 PM
JohnInKansas 15 Feb 05 - 11:41 PM
Teresa 16 Feb 05 - 12:00 AM
open mike 16 Feb 05 - 03:17 AM
open mike 16 Feb 05 - 03:34 AM
Teresa 16 Feb 05 - 03:41 AM
nutty 16 Feb 05 - 03:42 AM
nutty 16 Feb 05 - 03:43 AM
JohnInKansas 16 Feb 05 - 03:59 AM
JohnInKansas 16 Feb 05 - 04:23 AM
Cluin 16 Feb 05 - 04:44 AM
Teresa 16 Feb 05 - 04:58 AM
Teresa 16 Feb 05 - 05:13 AM
JohnInKansas 16 Feb 05 - 05:40 PM
open mike 17 Feb 05 - 03:27 AM
Teresa 17 Feb 05 - 03:44 AM
JohnInKansas 17 Feb 05 - 02:09 PM
The Fooles Troupe 17 Feb 05 - 06:56 PM
open mike 12 Sep 10 - 06:25 PM
Jim Dixon 12 Sep 10 - 09:29 PM
Girl Friday 13 Sep 10 - 11:06 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Peace
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 03:43 PM

On the key that has the number five (5) and the percent sign (%), there is a thing that looks like a capital c (C) with two horizontal parallel lines (=) through it.

1) What is it?
2) How do ya make it print or even come up on the screen?

I have never even seen it before. Any help would be appreciated.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: rumanci
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 03:46 PM

maybe it is for doing silent Cs in the middle of words !!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Clinton Hammond
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 03:47 PM

It's something monetary isn't it... The Euro I think???


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: gnu
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:00 PM

Cruise control ?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:06 PM

Brucie - what kinda system you on? Try CTRL-Shift-5, or Alt-shift-5, or ctrl-5, or alt-5

or try Apple-5 if your on one of them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:15 PM

€ Euro... alt + 0128


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:16 PM

try holding down alt and typing 0128 before releasing it


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:20 PM

You mean this : €? That's the euro currency symbol, and on my keyboard it AltGr + 4. Maybe on your keyboard if you pushed AltGr along with 5 that's what it would print.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: artbrooks
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:25 PM

What's a Gr? That doesn't appear on US keyboards.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:30 PM

Mac?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:36 PM

On our keyboards here, just to the right of the forward bar at the bottom there's a key marked Alt Gr. Aside from this €, it gives an acute accent on the letter when you hold it down along with with a vowel.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:40 PM

with a little installed program called AllChars I just tap the 'ctrl' key, then hit 5,5 or e,e or e,=.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: artbrooks
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:42 PM

On a US keyboard, there is an identical Alt key on either side of the space bar...no Alt Gr key. Sounds like a handy thing to have.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Amos
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:47 PM

€€



In Safari it's done by choosing the Euro symbol from the special characters palette.

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: GUEST,milk monitor
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:47 PM

I have alt on the left of space bar and alt gr on the right...but what is the difference?
Thanks McG, never even saw that euro sign...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Teresa
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 04:56 PM

altGrrrrrrr!!!! :D

Ok, are there online charts with the character string to type these symbols, such as €? I don't think I could memorize them. :)

Teresa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: GUEST,milk monitor
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 05:00 PM

Ok just seen McG's explanation re the alt gr.........áéíóú.

But has anyone got Outlook Express? If so, when you press send/recieve, a box comes up that shows if emails are coming in or goin out..in the bottom right hand corner of this box is a symbol that looks like a screwdriver? Press it and nothing happens...anyone know what it's for?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 05:43 PM

Teresa...there are indeed online charts, but since most of the symbols would not be pronounced by your reader, I don't know how they would help. In the All Chars program I noted, it is 'almost' intuitive what combination of keys to use. For example, French accents are done by just hitting the ctrl (control) key, and then the e and ' characters. (What does your reader do with colons, semi-colons, quotation marks...etc?)

Do you hear accented words? Is schon different than schön?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 05:50 PM

For example, French accents are done by just hitting the ctrl (control) key, and then the e and ' characters.

But surely doing it that way, you'd have an accent going straight up, instead of sloping to right or left, to tell you if it was acute or grave?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Peace
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 05:51 PM

Thanks, all. I tried all those things and nowt works. It's FULITSU keyboard and I'm using microsoft word.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 05:58 PM

here is the Microsoft page on "extended ASCII printing characters. (the kind you can do with the alt key)

There may be better.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 06:07 PM

hmmm...it's alt 0191 for à and alt 0225 for á. My keyboard itself doesn't have both of them...it has only the à, which I can also get by doing ctrl a + `. I could go buy a different keyboard if I need those everyday, but with tables and this program, I can get everything I need.

I used the ' key carelessly in my example, but for most common words, it would be recognized as denoting an accent, and most folks would read it as meant. I'll try to be more careful, even though I don't know French...I use umlauts more often.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: artbrooks
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 06:20 PM

Bill D, á in Word is ctrl + ', a. However, it doesn't work here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Peace
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 06:20 PM

I love umlauts, Bill. Three eggs, onions, sharp cheddar and some marmalade.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 07:15 PM

artbrooks...Word just has it's own setup...it IS a program, just as my AllChars is a separate program. If you are in Windows, though.. the ALT key should give you most of those characters as part of the Windows settings, whether you have Word open or not.

try ALT plus any set of 4 numbers 0128 €, 0222 Þ, 1111 W, etc..


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 07:19 PM

In Windows, you should have a utility called "Character Map." In WinXP it's at Start - Programs - Accessories - System Tools for some odd reason. (I use it enough to be worth keeping an icon on the desktop.) If you open it, it shows you what characters are available to Windows programs, for any font that you select. You can click a character, click Select, and assemble as many characters as you want. When you have them all together (selected), click Copy and go to any Windows program and Paste them. Note that they may not come across at your intended point size, so you may need to reformat them after you get them there.

In Character Map, when you click on a character it may or may not show the ASCI or ANSI or Unicode "number" in a little window at the bottom. What it shows depends a little on how some other boxes are set up.

There are freeware/shareware utilities that give a little more info, but Character Map isn't bad for the occasional odd character.

Note that if you paste a ¥ or ‰ or other odd char into a document - text, hypertext, or whatever - that's going to be read on another machine, the other machine will know what the character/glyph's "number" is, but can usually only display it correctly if the reading machine has a font installed that includes that character, and is set to use it.

Windows is "localized" depending on where you buy it. Keyboards and common programs are different from one place to another. This works pretty well for sending stuff in your "local language;" but talking about how you do it can lead to all kinds of confusion since others may have different keys than you do. I've found it very difficult to find reliable information on what the common physical arrangements of different "internationalized" keyboards are. I have found indications that the "Canadian French" keyboard differs from the "French" keyboard, and admire their nonconformity - I think.

So far as I have been able to determine, on any keyboard, and using any localized Windows version, with NumLock turned on, holding down the Alt key and entering the ASCII, ANSI, or Unicode "number" for a character on the Number Pad should insert the desired character in whatever program you have open. On most keyboards, if you enter the numbers on the top row of keys, or if NumLock is not turned on, it won't work. In principle, the number you enter should always begin with a "0" but it often works if you omit the leading "0." Alt-0128, on most keyboards should produce the "euro" €. That's because Microsoft put it there for your convenience. It's NOT because 0128 is the "real" character number for the glyph. That's something else. (The number 128 wasn't in use, and may have been "added" to the ASCII/ANSI spec, and possibly even as a "default" to Unicode by now, but originally it was just a "quick-key" mainly for US users.)

For common characters, there are a lot of shortcuts that work in Word but not in too many other programs. If you use the shortcuts to make "special characters" in Word, a copy and paste into another program nearly always sends the right character numbers. Holding down the Control key while you type an "accent," releasing Ctl and typing the accented character will get you many of the common "Frenchified" characters. (And I know that the French aren't the only ones that use them.)

Pasted from Word:
Typing Ctl-Shift-6 on my keyboard (= Ctl ^) followed by a, e, i, o, or u, gets â, ê, î, ô, û.
Ctl-Shift-; (= Ctl :) followed by the same gets ä, ë, ï, ö, ü
Ctl-` gets à, è, ì, ò, ù
Ctl-' gets á, é, í, ó, ú
There are quite a few others.

When posting html, you can "code" any character. Keep in mind that persons reading your post may or may not be able to see what you think you've posted. There have been numerous threads about this in the past, and a search for "HTML" should bring up quite a few. You'd probably be better off just getting a decent textbook on html and reading the simple parts, since many of us posted rather embarassing nonsense in some of those threads. A slightly obsolete book can probably be found on the Barnes/Borders etc "sale table" for less than $5 (US) if you keep an eye open. I personally use an "old" O'Reilly I got for $3 because it was "one generation old" and had a couple of wrinkled pages.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: artbrooks
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 07:27 PM

Some work, some don't. For example, alt 0191 gives me ¿ rather than the à. à requires alt 0224 on my computer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 09:58 PM

*remembering the long series of posts about the schwa*

aarrrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 15 Feb 05 - 11:41 PM

BillD -

I didn't get in using your link - might be a temporary collision thing. Accorcing to CharMap:

The à character is 0224.
The á character is 0225.
The "upside down ?" ¿ is 0191.

I hold Alt down and type 0224 on my numpad and get à
I hold Alt down and type 0225 on my numpad and get á
I hold Alt down and type 0191 on my numpad and get ¿
They look okay in the Reply box to me, but "your mileage may vary."

If you try the Character Map that's built into most Windows, most characters will show a "keystroke" method, either when you "hover" over the character or in a box at the bottom when you click on it. You use the numbers using the Alt-NumPad thing. You can check out the "right" numbers for specific characters that way - at least in later versions of CharMap. You do have to find a font that has the character you want, and figure out where it is. Usually the number you get is the Unicode character number, but they do occasionally "map" common characters to nonstandard numbers - like the euro at 0128: € (on US machines at least).

Some of what Windows programs will do may depend on having all the current "character maps" installed. Those with current Office versions can go to Mickey's Office Update site and get more recent stuff. Those with WinXP and Win2K may get offers of "optional updates" with some "International Features" from autoupdate occasionally. I'm not sure what the availability of updates is for older Office version.

For recent versions, you can get a few "International Character Sets." You may have to poke around a little to find them though.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Teresa
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 12:00 AM

I can read the characters with my speech synthesizer, especially if I spell them out. It also comes with a shorcut way to insert a few of the special characters, but not very many.

The alt-0 etc. listings were what I'm after ... is there an online listing of those?

I can't use Character Map, because it is too visual and as far as I know, it has no keystroke equivalents for clicking on the character and manipulating it.

Teresa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: open mike
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 03:17 AM

brucie--is FULITSU
akin to FUBAR or
SNAFU? all have an "F" and a "U"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: open mike
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 03:34 AM

{|}~쳌‚€쳌€€쳌‚ƒ„…†‡ˆ‰Š‹
for typing scandinavian letters;
Ä = alt 142 or alt 0196
ä= alt 132 or alt 0228
Å= alt 143 or alt 0197
å= alt 134 or alt 0229
Ö= alt 153 or alt 0214
ö= alt 148 or alt 0246
Ø= alt 0216
ø= alt 0248
Æ= alt 146
æ= alt 145
à= alt 133 or alt 0224
á=alt 160 or alt 0225
è= alt 138 or alt 0232
é= alt 130 or alt 0233


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Teresa
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 03:41 AM

Well, I take that back ... OM, my speech synthesizer is truly confuzzled by some of those characters, since it literally draws a blank. But it did pronounce the braces and the €. Thanks for the list.

Teresa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: nutty
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 03:42 AM

You can also use Ctrl + Al + 4


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: nutty
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 03:43 AM

Ctrl + Alt + 4

Sorry ... not awake yet


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 03:59 AM

Teresa -

Almost any decent html handbook will have a list of "character codes" that you can use, at least for the lower numbered characters.

A simple list, with some explanatory info can be found at ANSI character set and equivalent Unicode and HTML characters for html use.

You might also want to take a look at Unicode and Multilingual Support in HTML, Fonts, Web Browsers and Other Applications by the same guy.

When posting html, you can "code" any of the 256 characters in the ISO standard by starting with an ampersand (&) followed by a "splat" (#), followed by the numerical code for the character, usually 3 digits, and ending with a semicolon (;). The typed "©" as an example, should give the "copyright" sign © when you post. (Preview is a good idea.)

Many of the characters in the ISO set have "shorthand" descriptions, and you can also enter, in html, the code © to get ©. The list linked shows the "named" characters.

You can also use the "hex" value of the character number, but that usually confuses me so let's omit it.

For posting to the web, and specifically to mudcat, you should not just type the three characters "<," ">," or "&" because those are "code" characters in html, and you may get unpredictable results. You can type "&lt;" for "<," "&gt;" for ">," and "&amp;" for "&." Most websites, mudcat included, have routines to detect these characters when they're intended as plain text, but they don't always work exactly as expected. There are other "special characters" that probably should be posted in code, but they seldom cause a problem. (Preview is still a good idea.)

For other uses, the same decimal character numbers can be used to enter characters you don't have on your keyboard, using the Alt-NumPad method that's been described, so the "character numbers" given at the link should generally work for this method in most Windows programs, probably including your browser. If I hold down the Alt key while I type "0191" on the Number Pad, I get ¿ as noted in a prior post.

As noted before, the Windows instructions say you need a "leading zero" when you do this, to tell the program it's a "code." Sometimes an omitted leading 0 seems to work, but other times you get something completely different - or nothing at all - if you leave it off. You should get in the practice of typing the "0" at the beginning.

The Alt-NumPad method works quite nicely for characters in the ISO set (numerical values 256 or less) but isn't adapted to the really exotic characters. Unicode character sets offer a great many more strange things. There are a number of adaptations for "International Character Sets" in recent versions of Windows, but I also get confused when I try to go there. Microsoft Office Update may have some extended character "fonts" that you can download for use in Office programs. It pays to check in once in a while.

If you have installed "foreign language support" with your Windows, you can change the language in your setup. Unfortunately, when you change the language Windows assumes you have the keyboard for the language you selected, so strange things may happen. If you don't have at least a couple of "extended character fonts" on your machine, you may encounter individual characters that you can't read. At least a couple are included, and normally install by default, in recent versions of Windows; and older versions may have gotten them with updates to Office.

One of the simpler ways to get strange stuff just about anywhere is just to enter it via the Unicode character number in Word. If you type the HEX VALUE for a Unicode character in Word, and immediately before typing the next space hit Alt-X, recent versions of Word will magically replace the number with the character it represents. If you Copy the character from Word into almost anything, you should still have the same character.

With my Office 2003 in WinXP, if you open Word, Click Help, then Click "Microsoft Word Help," click the Index, the first few things you should see are a few "strange characters." If you double-click the "euro" ( € ) symbol, it sould open "Insert a Symbol" in the right panel.

The first section, titled "Insert a Symbol" tells you to use the Insert Key and pick from the available symbols. That's okay if you're writing a letter to mom, but DON'T DO IT if you intend to send your manuscript to editing and layout with a publisher. That inserts "graphic symbol glyphs" that defy reformatting to another font and you'll drive your layout people crazy.

The second section, "Insert a Unicode Character" gives the instructions you want. It's printable if you need to.

Earlier versions of Word have differing capabilities, but I don't have an earlier version up to check. Feedback is appropriate.

If you find the Unicode characters usefull, the "official" source is the Unicode Standard. Not the latest, but you can look at Unicode Standard Ver 3.0.

You might also want the Unicode Character Names Index

Should keep you busy for a while?????

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 04:23 AM

I note that for the same Word - Help - double-click €, at the bottom of the list of topics I find:

Keyboard shortcuts for international characters:

(The general rule is you Hold Ctrol while you type an "add on," release the Ctrl key and type the letter.)

CTRL+` (ACCENT GRAVE), the letter = à, è, ì, ò, ù, À, È, Ì, Ò, Ù
CTRL+' (APOSTROPHE), the letter = á, é, í, ó, ú, ý, Á, É, Í, Ó, Ú, Ý
CTRL+SHIFT+^ (CARET), the letter = â, ê, î, ô, û, Â, Ê, Î, Ô, Û
CTRL+SHIFT+~ (TILDE), the letter = ã, ñ, õ, Ã, Ñ, Õ
CTRL+SHIFT+: (COLON), the letter = ä, ë, ï, ö, ü, ÿ, Ä, Ë, Ï, Ö, Ü, Ÿ
CTRL+SHIFT+@, a or A = å, Å
CTRL+SHIFT+&, a or A = æ, Æ
CTRL+SHIFT+&, o or O = œ, Œ
CTRL+, (COMMA), c or C = ç, Ç
CTRL+' (APOSTROPHE), d or D = ð, Ð
CTRL+/, o or O = ø, Ø
ALT+CTRL+SHIFT+? = ¿
ALT+CTRL+SHIFT+! = ¡
CTRL+SHIFT+&, s = ß

Note that these shortcuts apply ONLY TO WORD for US USERS. I'd suspect some or all of them would work for most euro configurations, but there are no guarantees.

Preview looked ok on my machine. Hope it comes across for everyone else.

A quick check on "her" machine indicates that her Win2K Office2000 Word doesn't do the Alt-X translation of Unicode char numbers. I'll have to check later whether it appears as an office opdate option.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Cluin
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 04:44 AM

I've said it before and I'll say it again....

Glad you hang out around here, JohnInKansas. I know some stuff about these technological wonders we all spend so much of our time with these days. But you know a damn sight more and we all benefit from your contributions here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Teresa
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 04:58 AM

That was a sizable essay, there, John! Thank you very much for taking the time to do that. It's much appreciated. :)

teresa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Teresa
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 05:13 AM

One further note: If you go to the ANSI table on the first site John linked to, those numeric values are what you type when you hold down alt and type the characters on the number pad. thus alt-0128 is € euro symbol. So that number value is the ANSI value. I didn't know that before. thanks again, John.

Teresa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 16 Feb 05 - 05:40 PM

A very brief bit of investigation on the last usage of Unicode HEX values:

The Method: Type the Unicode HEX value (4 digits) and immediately hit Alt-X.

This method is apparently available only in OfficeXP and Word2002 or later(?). I've been looking for it for about 3 years now and finally found it by accident in my Word2002, OfficeXP Professional (Small Business) version. (Gives an idea of how useful Mickey's Help files are?)

1. The Help file in my OfficeXP Word doesn't give any indication of which versions are required for this to work. Lots of stuff is obviously "lifted" from Word2000 Help, but this one does not work in the Word2000 that I have accessible (from Office 2000 Pro on Win2K).

2. The "character" can be "read" using my little "ASNI_Value" macro, which displays the ANSI (decimal) code for any highlighted character in the ISO nuber range. Significance is that what is inserted is a "real character" and not a phony glyph like you get using the Insert-Symbol method that Word tries to get you to use.

3. The rather marvelous thing is that the character can be "unconverted" back to the Unicode HEX value just by hitting Alt-X again.

The significance of #3 is that any Word program that has the "Insert using Unicode Hex Value" capability has a built-in "Unicode Hex Value Reader." If you place your cursor immediately to the right of ANY CHARACTER in a Word document with the feature, and hit Alt-X, you'll see the Unicode HEX value for that character.

The "zinger" is that you apparently have to have a space before the Hex number and a space after the cursor to be able to hit Alt-X and put the character glyph back if you've converted a char that's in a line of text. If you hit Alt-X again without the spaces, you get the Unicode HEX value of the last digit of the Unicode HEX value of the character.

On a New Topic: VISUAL KEYBOARD

I mentioned above that you can "change languages" in Office programs, but the new language assumes you have the keyboard that goes with that language. Lots of characters may be "in the wrong places" when you try to type in another language.

Microsoft Office Updates,, at least for Office 2000, Office XP, and Office 2003, now has a "Visual Keyboard" utility that (they say) will display on screen the standard keyboard for whichever language you select. You can "type" by clicking "keys" on screen, or use the on-screen display to see which keys to use on your "real" keyboard. I haven't given it a test drive yet, so can't really offer much of an evaluation.

If you select "OfficeXP," then on the new page select "Add Ins", it should be the last item on the second page, "Office XP/2000 Add-in: Microsoft Visual Keyboard."

(Some might also be interested in the "Office XP Add-in: Irish Proofing Tools" on the first page for OfficeXP:
"The Office Irish Proofing Tools add-in allows you to check the spelling of Irish words and phrases." I didn't look to see which other versions can use it.)

I didn't see the Visual Keyboard in Add Ins for Office 97/98. There may be other stuff there that someone might want, so it's worth browsing.

While you're at Office Updates, you should click on the "Check for Updates" and let them tell you if there are Security Updates your Office programs should have. There's also a link at the left where you can click to let them take a peek and tell you what updates you already have installed.

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: open mike
Date: 17 Feb 05 - 03:27 AM

control alt 4 is used for what?
seems to do nothing here..


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: Teresa
Date: 17 Feb 05 - 03:44 AM

OM, I think that's a UK-ism.

I just discovered something cool about my screen-reader. I can push a keystroke and make it say the character the cursor is on. If I press that key three times in rapid succession, it gives me the ANSI value of the same character. So if I come across € I can find out that it's ANsI 128. That is just neat. :)

Teresa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 17 Feb 05 - 02:09 PM

Despite my warning, I note that someone dug up an ancient HTML practice thread in which some idiot made an attempt to post ALL of the ISO (or something) characters, with decimal and hex character numbers, and character (entity) names for those that have them. Or something like that.

It starts with the Latin 1 character set at about: HTML Practice thread 2 and goes on and on and on ….

Note that there were quite a few "typos" in the posting, so I'd still advise just getting a cheap HTML handbook or quick-reference that's been proofread. But if you just want to look at the amazing variety of characters that are sort of workable at the 'cat…

Not that it's a complete listing of everything that may work.

Note that if you try to print the posts, your printer may show different character glyphs than your monitor does, if the printer doesn't use the same font – or font set – that you've got turned on for your monitor.

It gets very confusing….

(mumble, mumble, mumble,….)

John.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 17 Feb 05 - 06:56 PM

It can also lock up your screen...

(mutters something about T-shirts)...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: KEYS ON COMPUTER
From: open mike
Date: 12 Sep 10 - 06:25 PM

ok,now what do you do if you have a MAC and want to find the equivalent of the character map?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Keys on Computer
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Sep 10 - 09:29 PM

Well, I have a Mac laptop with Microsoft Word 2004 for Mac, and if you click "Insert" and then "Symbol" it brings up a menu of characters you can insert. Will that work for you?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Keys on Computer
From: Girl Friday
Date: 13 Sep 10 - 11:06 AM

I have just purchased a Microsoft Comfort Curve keyboard 2000. Less than a tenner in Morrisons. I have a dollar sign above 4, with theeuro symbol next to the 4 - so that shouldmean AltGr should do it. It sys on the box that it is compatible with windows 7 and Mac.It says too, that " box this box contains enhanced U K English105 key layout". Does this make the U. S. layout inferior? The main picture shows what I take to be a non U K layout (American?) It looks identical tome, but for the euro, and words too small to decipher on u i a f and x keys. I'm curious to know what they do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 22 June 11:13 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.