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Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains

Wrinkles 27 Feb 05 - 06:49 AM
masato sakurai 27 Feb 05 - 07:17 AM
Wrinkles 27 Feb 05 - 06:16 PM
Malcolm Douglas 28 Feb 05 - 01:25 AM
ard mhacha 28 Feb 05 - 04:49 AM
ard mhacha 28 Feb 05 - 04:56 AM
Wrinkles 28 Feb 05 - 06:12 AM
GUEST,HSA 28 Feb 05 - 07:05 AM
belfast 28 Feb 05 - 10:17 AM
GUEST,MMario 28 Feb 05 - 10:21 AM
ard mhacha 28 Feb 05 - 02:35 PM
Malcolm Douglas 28 Feb 05 - 07:53 PM
ard mhacha 01 Mar 05 - 09:49 AM
Wrinkles 28 Apr 05 - 05:50 PM
GUEST,belfast, cookieless 29 Apr 05 - 07:32 AM
ard mhacha 29 Apr 05 - 08:24 AM
Big Tim 29 Apr 05 - 12:23 PM
Wrinkles 30 Apr 05 - 07:51 AM
Big Tim 01 May 05 - 04:20 AM
ard mhacha 01 May 05 - 07:14 AM
Big Tim 01 May 05 - 11:22 AM
GUEST 09 Oct 17 - 04:01 PM
Jim Dixon 16 Oct 17 - 06:14 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Wrinkles
Date: 27 Feb 05 - 06:49 AM

I was searching for the version of Belfast Mountains, not in the DT, I'd heard over 20 years ago in a Belfast folk club. Of course I came across the P J McCall song "Henery Joy McCracken" (http://www.mustrad.org.uk/let_04.htm and http://www.from-ireland.net/ballads/ant/henryjoylove.htm), but this version found at; http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/belfast.html is closest to what I recall although the tune (midi file on site) is quite different.

To quote the site;

"These words are from a broadside printed circa 1800 by W. Shelmerdine, Manchester.

According to Lucy Broadwood there is an Irish superstition that Cave Hill, near Belfast contains diamonds that sometimes shine at night.

This song was collected in Sussex and was sung by Mr. H. Burstow in 1893"


BELFAST MOUNTAINS

All on Belfast Mountains
I heard a maid complain,
Making forth her lamentation
Down by some purling stream,
Saying 'My heart is fettered,
Fast in the bonds of love,
All by a false pretender
Who doth inconstant prove.

Oh, Johnny! my dear jewel,
Don't treat me with disdain!
Nor leave me here behind you
In sorrow to complain!'
With her arms she clasps around him,
Like violets round the vine,
Saying 'My bonny Cheshire lad,
You've stole this heart of mine.'

If I'd but all those diamonds
On yonder rock that grow
I would give them to my Cheshire lad
If his love to me he'd show.
Wringing her hands and crying
'My Johnny dear, farewell!'
Unto those Belfast Mountains
My sorrow I will tell.

It's not those Belfast Mountains
Can give to me relief,
Nor is it in their power
To ease me of my grief;
If they'd but a tongue to prattle
To tell my love a tale,
Unto my bonny Cheshire lad
My mind they would reveal:'


(Third verse, noted to be omitted if singing)
'My dear, I'm sorry for you,
That you for me should grieve,
I am engaged already;
'Tis you I can't relieve.'
'Since it is so, my Johnny,
For ever I'm undone,
All by this shame and scandal
I shall distracted run.'

        ***

I'm afraid I haven't the skill to render the tune I remember into midi or abc format.

The lyrics of version I heared had a verse/chorus format. All I can recall is one verse and the chorus, which ran

(chorus)
And it's Oh you Belfast mountains
can ye bring me no relief.
Have ye got no tounge to flatter with
for to ease me from my grief?
Have ye got no tounge to flatter with
for to ease me from my pain?
For it's hard to love your own true love
who'll not your love return.

(Last verse)
And so may he never prosper
and may he never thrive
in any task he takes in hand
as long as he's alive
and the very ground he walks upon
may the grass refuse to grow;
for my Jaimie, cruel Jaimie,
the cause of all my woe.


The lyrics of the final verse are very similar to those in
"The Blue Cockade" (http://www.turnstone.tv/bluecockade.html)

It'd be much appreciated if anyone can help me recover the full lyrics of the version of Belfast Mountains that I partly remember.

Wrinkles


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Feb 05 - 07:17 AM

Broadside editions at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads are:

belfast mountains [title]

belfast mountins sic [title]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Wrinkles
Date: 27 Feb 05 - 06:16 PM

Not the versions I'm seeking, but very very interesting ;-)

Domo Arigato

Wrinkles


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 01:25 AM

Lesley (Contemplator)'s notes are sometimes over-shortened so that they convey wrong information. This is one such case. What Lucy Broadwood actually wrote was:

"The words follow very closely those on a ballad-sheet (circa 1800), printed by W Shelmerdine, Manchester. Catnach also printed a version." (Lucy Broadwood, English Traditional Songs and Carols, London: Boosey, 1908).

The words are not from the Shelmerdine broadside; they are close to them. Miss Broadwood noted the song (tune and words) from Henry Burstow of Horsham, Sussex, in 1893. More information about him, and other songs from his repertoire, can be found in other discussions here.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BELFAST MOUNTAINS
From: ard mhacha
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 04:49 AM

From, Henry Joy McCraken and his times by Fred Heatley, The authorship of this ballad has been attributed to Dr. William Drennan and P. J. McCall. The central character is obviously Mary Bodle, although I have no knowledge of her ever having returned to Ireland after her emigration to America.

Henry Joy McCraken

1. 'Twas on the Belfast mountains I heard a maid complain,
And she vexed the sweet June evening there with her heart-broken strain,
Saying, "Woe is me! Life's anguish is more than I can dree,
Since Henry Joy McCraken died all on the gallows tree.

2. "At Donegore he proudly rode and wore a suit of green,
And brave though vain at Antrim Town, his sword flashed lighting keen;
And when by spies surrounded, his band to slemish fled,
He came into the Cave Hill to rest his weary head.

3. I watched for him each night as in our cot he slept.
At daybreak to the heather, to MacArt's Fort we crept.,
When news came from Greencastle of a good ship anchored nigh,
And down by yon green fountain we met to say goodbye.

4. He says, "My love, be cheerful, for tears and fears are vain."
He says, "My love, be hopeful, for our land shall rise again."
He kissed me very fondly; he kissed me three times o'er,
Saying, "Death shall never part us, my love, for evermore."

5. That night I climbed the Cave Hill and watched till morning blazed,
And when its fires had kindled, across the Lough I gazed.
I saw an English tender at anchor off Garmoyle,
But alas, no good ship was waiting there to take him to France's land.

6. Twice that night came a-tramping from along the old shore road,
'Twas Ellis and his Yeomen. False Niblock with them strode;
And my father home returning the doleful story told.,
"Alas!" he said. "Young Harry Joy for fifty pounds is sold."

7. "And is it true?" I asked her. "Yes, it is true," she said,
"For to this heart that loved him, I pressed his gory head.
And each night, pale, trembling, his ghost comes to my side.
My Harry, my dear Harry, come back to his waiting bride."

8. Now on the Belfast Mountains, this fair maid's voice is still,
For in a grave they laid her on high Carmoney Hill;,
And the sad waves beneath her chant requiem for the dead,
While rebel winds shriek "Freedom" above her weary head.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: ard mhacha
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 04:56 AM

Sorry it is McCracken, Jane Cassidy sings this version on a CD issused in 1998,


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Wrinkles
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 06:12 AM

Jane Cassidy! boy that takes me back; to the Sunflower Folk Club in Belfast way back in the 80's where she was a regular floor spot and occasional headliner.

It also reminds me who I heard sing the version I'm after; another Sunflower regular; Maurice Leyden: Scholar, performer, and broadcaster. I can probably get his e-address from Downtown Radio. Yippie!

Thank you ver much Ard Mhacha for reviving my memmory; you've made a happy woman very old ;-)

Wrinkles


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: GUEST,HSA
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 07:05 AM

Check out Craobh Rua, it's on one of their CDs
http://www.redhatmusic.com/artists/craobhrua.htm#CDs

Helen


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: belfast
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 10:17 AM

I'm sure it has also been recorded by Frank Harte.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 10:21 AM

anyone have the tune in a postable form?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: ard mhacha
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 02:35 PM

Sorry MMario I can`t oblige with the tune,, I can tell you that the air of the Jane Cassidy version is beautiful.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 28 Feb 05 - 07:53 PM

Are we now talking about Henry Joy, or about Belfast Mountains, on which it was based?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: ard mhacha
Date: 01 Mar 05 - 09:49 AM

We are talking about the Jane Cassidy rendition of Henry Joy McCracken.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Wrinkles
Date: 28 Apr 05 - 05:50 PM

I've been in touce with Maurice Leyden and he's given me the version he performed (and gave to Jane Cassidy, Sands Family, et al) which is from the Sam Henery Collection. Maurice repeated the second verse as a chorus, which was very effective indeed!

When I get the time I'll transcribe the Sam Henery version, as performed by Maurice, for the DT ;-) Watch this space!

Wrinkles


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: GUEST,belfast, cookieless
Date: 29 Apr 05 - 07:32 AM

Like Malcolm Douglas I an longer sure what song is being discussed here but I fairly sure that none of them is in the Sam Henry collection. I don't have my copy to hand and would be happy to be proved wrong.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: ard mhacha
Date: 29 Apr 05 - 08:24 AM

If you go to the first item in this thread it is obvious to me that Wrinkles is referring to the song I know as The Belfast Mountains. That is the version I have sung by Jane Cassidy which I recorded a few years ago on Tommy Sands Downtown Radio show, Country Ceili.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Big Tim
Date: 29 Apr 05 - 12:23 PM

It was very generous of Maurice Leyden to give the song to Jane Cassidy, considering she's his wife!

I've been assured by a McCall PhD student that McCall didn't write "Henry Joy McCracken". I tend to agree. It's a completely different, earlier style of language, mood and atmosphere, which McCall, smart tho he was , couldn't emulate. Drennan? I don't think so. The good doctor was quite careful to document his writings (songs, poems,letters). I think it was written by "anon".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Wrinkles
Date: 30 Apr 05 - 07:51 AM

Ah BIG T, at the time Maurice dug out this tune and was performinging in on Harmoinium with his guitarist Conan in the darkest recess of the smoky Sunflower, he an Jane were yet a long time off being wed!

Maurice is a very generous guy, very approachable, and any muso how apporached him asking to learn a tune he'd unearthed he'd be only to happy to take the time to give it to them.

Wrinkles


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Big Tim
Date: 01 May 05 - 04:20 AM

The CD that Ard referred to above, "Mary Ann McCracken, 1770-1866" (Henry's sister) has both songs on it. Maurice Leyden sings, "The Belfast Mountains", and, Jane Cassidy sings, "Henry Joy McCracken". It's a totally splendid album, obtainable online from, Ashgrove Music.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: ard mhacha
Date: 01 May 05 - 07:14 AM

Tim, we always referred to this version of Henry Joy as The Belfast Mountains,to avoid confusing Jane Cassidy`s song with five more "Henry Joy" songs.

The well know one begins, "An Ulsterman I am proud to be, from Antrim`s glens i`ve come" and another begins, " Each noble chief of Antrim has given his plighted word, each patriot son of Antrim has buckled on his sword", Anon.

And, "Come all ye Belfast people and listen here a while, a true story I will relate of a young man without guile". Anon

also this Henry Joy the author Fintan Byrne written in 1963 to the air of, The flower of sweet Strabane, "I wish I was in Belfast town, in years of long ago, when Henry Joy McCracken, was convicted and laid low".

Also "Harry`s Sword", and The execution of McCracken, a poem written by T,S,C. Corry first published in 1875.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: Big Tim
Date: 01 May 05 - 11:22 AM

Yes Ard, it can be confusing, if you're not careful. I haven't heard the one to the tune of, "Sweet Strabane": beautiful melody.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Belfast Mountains
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Oct 17 - 04:01 PM

I know this is a very old thread, but I learned it from Ben Sands back in 1993. He learnedfrom a friend who only knew it was traditional. His version

Being on the baks of Claudy I heard a maid complain.
Settin forth her lamentations down by yonder purling stream
Sayin hete I lie confined in the constant bands of live
All by a handsome sailor lad, who didn't constant prove

Oh ye Belfast Mountains, can ya bring me no relief
Have you got no tongue to flater with for to ease me of my grief
Have ya got no tongue to flatter with for to ease me of my pain
For it's hard to love sn old sweetheart and not be loved again

She twined her arms about me, just as I was goin to part
She twined her arms about me saying You're my old sweetheart
She twined her arms about me like the branches on young vine
Sayin Jaime, cruel Jaime you have broke this heart of mine

May you never prosper and may you never thrive
In any job you take in hand for as long as you're alive
On the very ground whereon you stand, may the grass refuse to grow
For you're the whole occassion of my sad grief and wie
Repeat chorus.
This may be on one of Tommy Sand's albums by now.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BELFAST MOUNTAINS (from Bodleian)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Oct 17 - 06:14 PM

The Bodleian collection contains 11 editions of this song; I transcribed this one, because its typography seems a bit older than the others: 2806 c.17(27).

BELFAST MOUNTAINS

It was on Belfast Mountains I heard a maid complain,
Making sad lamentation down by a purling stream.
She said: I am confined all in the bands of love,
And by a false pretender that does inconstant prove.

My dear, I am sorry for it, that you for me should grieve,
For I am engaged already, and cannot you relieve.
If it be so, dear Johnny, for ever I am undone.
Quite void of shame and scandal, distracted I shall run.

O Johnny, my dear jewel, don't treat me with disdain,
Nor leave me here behind you in sorrow to complain.
Her arms she clasp'd around me, like violets round the vine.
My bonny Irish laddie has stole this heart of mine.

I would give all the diamonds that on the rocks do grow
If my pretty Irish laddie his love to me would show.
Wringing her hands and crying, O Johnny dear, farewell,
And to yon Belfast Mountains my sorrows I will tell.

'Tis not yon Belfast Mountains can give to me relief,
Nor is it in their power to ease me of my grief.
Had they but a tongue to prattle, or tell me a love tale,
To my bonny Irish laddie my mind I would reveal.


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