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Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Little Girl Dressed in Blue (7)
Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue' (38)
Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed in Blue (H Clifton) (12)
Tune Req: Pretty Girl Dressed in Blue (17)


GUEST 12 Mar 05 - 07:55 PM
Peace 12 Mar 05 - 08:13 PM
Joe Offer 12 Mar 05 - 09:14 PM
Joe Offer 12 Mar 05 - 10:08 PM
Malcolm Douglas 12 Mar 05 - 11:38 PM
Billy Weeks 13 Mar 05 - 06:25 AM
Billy Weeks 13 Mar 05 - 06:29 AM
GUEST,pcusack@botanic.teagasc.ie 16 Jan 06 - 11:42 AM
Severn 16 Jan 06 - 12:17 PM
GUEST,Brian Busby 20 Apr 08 - 08:06 PM
GUEST,Michael Ellis 18 Mar 12 - 06:10 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Mar 12 - 06:56 PM
GUEST,liz parkhurst 14 Sep 12 - 05:17 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 07:55 PM

This song was discussed about three years ago and Stanley Holloway's version was mentioned. Does anyone have the lyrics to his version?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: Peace
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 08:13 PM

Here


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Subject: ADD: The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 09:14 PM

The information from Brucie's link is posted in the other thread on this song, in case it disappears. I gather the Holloway version has different lyrics. There's a tune in Richard Robinson's Tunebook and I gather it's related to "Over the Waterfall."
-Joe Offer-
There's a broadside version on this page:

The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue

When first in Glasgow I arrived, the truth I will unfold,
I had a pocketbook with me, well filled with notes and gold,
I walked about from place to place its beauties for to view,
When all at once I chanced to see a Dark Girl dressed in blue

        She was a nice gal, fal de riddle i do,
        A beauty, fal de riddle eh.
        She was a fine girl, fal de riddle i do,
        A charmer, fal de riddle eh,

Her graceful leg and fairy feet, and eyes like diamonds bright,
Her coal black hair and rosy cheek they did my heart delight,
She stepped into an omnibus, I thought I'd go in too,
And there I took my seat beside that dark girl dressed in blue.

The 'bus got thronger as we went, she got crushed up rather tight,
At length she fainted as I thought, which put me in a fright,
Says I, " my dear, a crowded place does not agree with you."
" Oh sir, assist me to get out," said the Dark Girl dressed in blue,

When we got out of the omnibus, we walked arm in arm together,
Then she made free to ask of me, if I'd got a father or mother,
"O yes,'' says I, "and a grandmother too, bat pray miss, what areyou'
I'm head engineer in a milliner's shop, said the dark girl dressed in blue

As we walked on, says I, "you're much fatigued I think,
Will you go into this public house, and have a glass of drink,
To pay for which she declared she would, saying. " Sir. oblige me do,
To change this note, I refuse could not, this dark girl dressed in blue,

The change for her I did obtain, she says, " Sir, excuse me pray,
Remain yon here for a short time, I shan't be long away,"
Scarce had she gone, a policeman came saying. " Please, sir, I want you,
That, was a forged note just now changed, where's the dark girl dressed in blue,"

Then to the station I was marched, and before the bailies took.
And there I told them I had lost my watch and pocket book,
They placed a lady at the bar, quite different to my view.
For in deep mourning she was rigged, not a dark girl dressed is blue,

They raised her veil, to my surprise, I was taken all aback,
Her dress it was a reversible, a sky blue and deep black,
The charge it likewise was reversed, they believed my statement true,
They acquitted me, but sixty days gave the dark girl dressed in blue.

So all young gents I pray beware, and a warning take by me,
For young ladies are not always what they do appear to be,
Examine well each shawl and dress, the lining likewise too,
Or a transformation scene you'll have, like the dark girl dressed in blue.

72


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Subject: ADD: Answer to Dark Girl Dressed In Blue
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 10:08 PM

Well, no, I haven't found the Holloway version at all, but this is too good to pass up - an ANSWER SONG!!

ANSWER TO THE DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE.

Written by L. M. Thornton.

From some queer place he came to town,
Some queer scenes, I think, to view;
He in no Car went down,
But dodged the Dark Girl dressed in blue.

Chorus: It's the truth, 'tis, fol diddle I do;
It's the truth, 'tis, fol diddle a;
I'm a true girl, fol diddle I do,
And so am blunt, fol diddle a.

He scarce had reached his journey's end,
Before his sneeking ways I knew;
I felt him try to steal my purse,
'Tis truth as I am the Girl in blue.

Chorus.

It was he that had the $ 10 note,
Which from his greasy vest he drew;
Not five cents I'd give him for his coat:
To dare to speak to the Girl in blue!

Chorus.

I drank the wine: of course, I did,
I paid for it with Green-backs new;
I saw behind him some sly kid,
But 'twas not of the Girl in blue.

Chorus.

If he should go before the beak,
I hope he'll twist his neck in two;
Oh! how I'd laugh to hear him squeak,
I'd say : Do you mind the Girl in blue?

Chorus.

He had but one eye in his head,
His nose it seemed all split in two:
With wooden leg he, too, did tread,


And "wooden thing" for all I knew.

Chorus.

So, now, I've told my story pat,
You may believe or not, 'tis true:
But if you don't, you're as great a flat
As he who dodged the Girl in blue.

Chorus.

H. DE MARSAN.


DEALER IN SONGS, TOY-BOOKS &C.
No 60 CHATHAM. ST N.Y.


COLLECTION
American Songs and Ballads

REPOSITORY
Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress

Source: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/amss:@field(DOCID+@lit(sb10005a))>http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/amss:@field(DOCID+@lit(sb10005a))


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 11:38 PM

The original song was popularised (and written, so far as we know) by the Music Hall entertainer Harry Clifton (1824-1872). See other threads here which mention him and some of the songs he wrote and/or popularised, some of which have re-emerged in the course of the folk music revival (often as "Irish" songs). Arthur Lloyd (1839-1904) was also apparently associated with the song, which was subsequently localised to various places, including Scotland, Ireland and the USA.

Sheet music can be seen at the Lester Levy Collection:

The Dark Girl Dress'd In Blue

Some of the information quoted in the earlier thread (particularly from The Fiddler's Companion) is potentially misleading.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 06:25 AM

I can add a little to Malcolm Douglas's note. The song (whose original lyrics have not so far appeared above) describes an episode at the 1862 International Exhibition in South Kensington (the 'exhibition of sixty two' in the lyric), with a sexy dark girl conning a farmer up from the country out of his cash and dignity. The cover of the original London edition of the sheet music has a fine lithograph by Alfred Concanen showing the dark girl with Harry Clifton 'in character' and, in the background, the exhibition building.

The song was so popular that it led to a whole crop of parodies, sequels ('The Fair Girl Dressed in Pink') 'replies', ladies' versions and, as Malcolm observes, localised including American variants.

The Stanley Holloway recording was issued (?late 1950s) on 45rpm Decca F.11140. It is a superb performance of a romping song, sticking closely to the Clifton original.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 13 Mar 05 - 06:29 AM

The Concanen cover I referred to is, of course the one seen in the Levy collection, attached to Malcolm's posting.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: GUEST,pcusack@botanic.teagasc.ie
Date: 16 Jan 06 - 11:42 AM

Please - Where would I get a recording of "the dark girl dressed in blue" by Stanley Holloway ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: Severn
Date: 16 Jan 06 - 12:17 PM

Any kinship at all to "Little Girl Dressed In Blue" that Kenny Hall learned from a 1932 Stuart Hamblin recording and recorded with his Sweets Mill String Band on Bay Records 103?


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Subject: Lyr Add: DARK GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE
From: GUEST,Brian Busby
Date: 20 Apr 08 - 08:06 PM

As I remember the Holloway record, it was a mixture of singing and recitation, with an orchestral accompaniment. I don't think he did the chorus, but in between each verse was a short trumpet solo. These are pretty close to what Holloway sang, but he anglicised the lyrics -pounds instead of dollars, for instance.

From a village in New Hampshire to Boston here I came,
To see the exhibition and places of great fame;
But what I suffered since I came I now will tell to you,
How I lost my heart and senses too, through a dark girl dressed in blue.

CHORUS: She was a nice girl, fol de riddle I do,
She was a charmer, fol de riddle eh...........Repeat.

'T was on a Friday morning, the first day of August,--
When of that day I ever think, my heart is ready to bust,--
I got into an omnibus the city to ride through,
On a seat by the right-hand side of the door sat a dark girl dressed in blue,

She was a nice gal, &c.

When we arrived on Tremont St., this lady looked so strange,
The conductor asked her for her fare, said she I have no change,
I've nothing less than a five-dollar note, O dear what shall I do!
Said I, "Allow me to pay," "O, thank you, sir," said the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

We chatted and talked as we onward walked, about one thing or the other,
She asked me, too, O wan't it kind? if I had father or mother.
O yes, says I, and a grandmother, too; but pray, Miss, who are you?
O, I'm chief engineer of a milliner's shop, said the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

We walked along for an hour or two, through the buildings near and far,
Till we came to the grand refreshment room, I went straight up to the bar.
She slipped in my hand a five-dollar note, I said what are you going to do?
O, don't think it strange, I must have some change, said the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

I called a waiter and handed him the note, said go bring the change of that;
The waiter he bowed and touched his hair,--this waiter wore no hat.
In silver and gold five dollars he brought, I gave him coppers a few,
And the change of the note I then did hand to the dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

She thanked me and said, I must away, farewell till we meet again,
For I've to go to Pimlico to catch the Brighton train.
She quickly glided from my sight, and soon was lost to view;
I turned to leave, when by my side stood a tall man dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

This tall man said, excuse me, sir, I'm one of the division,--
That note was bad, my duty is to take you on suspicion.
Said I, for a lady I obtained the change, said he, are you telling me true?
Where's she live, what's her name? said I, I don't know,-she's a dark girl dressed in blue.

She was a nice gal, &c.

My story they believed, that I had been deceived, but said I must hand back the cash;
I thought it a sin, to part with the tin, and away went five dollars smash.
So all young men take my advice, be careful what you do,
When you make the acquaintance of ladies strange, especially a "dark girl dressed in blue."

She was a nice gal, &c.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: GUEST,Michael Ellis
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 06:10 PM

Brian, I think you have it reversed. Even in your version there are clear English references, the train does go from Victoria Station (in Pimlico)to Brighton, the reference to "coppers" for change, and the bus had a conductor

The original lyrics are in the Bodleian archive. I found them there but I can't find my copy at the moment.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 06:56 PM

I can't remember if I put this in any of the other threads, but it would seem Clifton filched his chorus from the song we today know as 'She was a Rum One' with earlier Scottish versions 'Hittum Tittum'.
We ought to check to see if the tune has similarities.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway)
From: GUEST,liz parkhurst
Date: 14 Sep 12 - 05:17 PM

I believe it began
"From a village away in Leicestershire....


.............for the Exhibition of '62

"I've nothing less than a five-pound note,
Oh dear what shall I do?"
"Allow me to pay." "Oh thank you, sir,"
Said the dark girl dressed in blue.

And the policeman is hailed as:
"A tall man dressed in blue...."


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