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BS: Puppy Power

Sooz 19 Apr 05 - 02:55 AM
Shanghaiceltic 19 Apr 05 - 03:56 AM
Little Robyn 19 Apr 05 - 04:26 AM
Leadfingers 19 Apr 05 - 05:46 AM
GUEST,Sooz (at work) 19 Apr 05 - 06:10 AM
AggieD 19 Apr 05 - 07:10 AM
Strollin' Johnny 19 Apr 05 - 07:49 AM
katlaughing 19 Apr 05 - 08:34 AM
Dave'sWife 19 Apr 05 - 10:54 AM
LilyFestre 19 Apr 05 - 12:08 PM
nutty 19 Apr 05 - 12:26 PM
wysiwyg 19 Apr 05 - 12:47 PM
LilyFestre 19 Apr 05 - 01:19 PM
open mike 19 Apr 05 - 01:41 PM
Sooz 19 Apr 05 - 02:21 PM
Sorcha 19 Apr 05 - 02:39 PM
Sorcha 19 Apr 05 - 02:40 PM
wysiwyg 19 Apr 05 - 02:59 PM
Strollin' Johnny 19 Apr 05 - 04:02 PM
Dave'sWife 19 Apr 05 - 04:32 PM
Sorcha 19 Apr 05 - 05:04 PM
Kim C 19 Apr 05 - 05:41 PM
GUEST,Melani 19 Apr 05 - 06:01 PM
Phot 19 Apr 05 - 06:43 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Apr 05 - 07:05 PM
Dave'sWife 19 Apr 05 - 07:18 PM
catspaw49 19 Apr 05 - 07:20 PM
Scoville 19 Apr 05 - 08:53 PM
kendall 19 Apr 05 - 09:30 PM
Scoville 19 Apr 05 - 11:24 PM
GUEST,Sooz (at work) 20 Apr 05 - 03:43 AM
Dave'sWife 20 Apr 05 - 11:12 AM
Sooz 03 May 05 - 09:32 AM
wysiwyg 03 May 05 - 09:35 AM
GUEST,jeffp 03 May 05 - 09:47 AM
kendall 03 May 05 - 12:02 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 May 05 - 01:06 PM
Sorcha 03 May 05 - 01:40 PM
wysiwyg 03 May 05 - 04:24 PM
Blowzabella 03 May 05 - 05:07 PM
gnu 03 May 05 - 06:33 PM
Sooz 10 May 05 - 04:39 AM
Dave'sWife 10 May 05 - 03:14 PM
Maxine 10 May 05 - 03:38 PM
Kim C 10 May 05 - 03:44 PM
Dave'sWife 11 May 05 - 02:44 AM
Sooz 11 May 05 - 02:59 AM
GUEST 11 May 05 - 09:31 AM
Sorcha 11 May 05 - 01:36 PM
Kim C 11 May 05 - 03:37 PM

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Subject: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sooz
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 02:55 AM

Our lives were dramatically changed last week by the arrival of Meg, a Border Collie puppy. see her here
Has anyone got any surefire training tips?


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Shanghaiceltic
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 03:56 AM

Cute!

Now as children need train sets she needs a sheep set to play with. Better talk to Brucie about that.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Little Robyn
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 04:26 AM

Beautiful!
Just give her lots of love and treat her like a child.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Leadfingers
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 05:46 AM

I hope you realise what you have taken on , Sooz ! Border collies are among the most inteligent dogs , and as such require a LOT of the right kind of training to stop them becoming bored ! They also need regular excercise , to a higher degree than a lot of other breeds .
But she is a little beaut , isnt she ?


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: GUEST,Sooz (at work)
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 06:10 AM

It was a deliberate choice, Terry. We get bored easily too. (Not to mention the exercise)


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: AggieD
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 07:10 AM

Cutie or what, I wish you lots of love & hours of fun with her. As Little Robyn says treat her as a baby & really love her.

More practically, once she's had her 12 weeks jabs, take her to a puppy training class, then onto an adult class.

Flyball is fantastic fun for collies once they are fully grown & trained, it really gives them lots of fun & exercise: UK flyball

For the moment though make sure that you take her out regularly to relieve herself. If she gets it right & pees or poohs while outside, give her lots of praise. She may look at you like an idiot at first, but eventually she'll realise why she's so clever. It's also an idea to take out any soiled newspaper that she has used & put it in a certain spot in the garden, she may get the message that way as well.
Meanwhile make sure, even from tiny puppy stage that she knows you are the boss. Try gently training her to sit, giving her a little food when she gets it right. I also have always made sure that I get my dogs used to being touched while they are eating, start this as a puppy & she will never go for anyone who just accidentally brushes past her as an adult when she is feeding. Some dogs grow into bad habits. Also pick up her bowl while she is eating, this shows you are her boss & helps training later on.

Have lots of fun with her


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Strollin' Johnny
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 07:49 AM

Lend her to me and Mrs Johnny per-le-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-ase!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: katlaughing
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 08:34 AM

I highly recommend the book, "The Invisible Leash: A Better Way to Communicate With Your Dog" by Myrna M. Milani, DVM.

We've a McNab border collie, Merlee, whom I am happy to say has turned out quite well considering what I had to say about him in this old thread click here. (Lots of fun jokes in that one.)

He is incredibly intelligent. I love that he comes when called AND pays attention, sometimes way too much attention!**bg** (He anticipates our every move.) I have found that hand signals work best with him. Never a problem chasing cars; lost interest in trying to heard the cats and even tolerates them chumming up to him. LIKES routine. The only problem we have is he is still grumbly with the grandchild, but as the kid has become a toddler we are making progress, i.e. not on all fours looking like prey or something to herd! He DOES back me up with his voice a bit too much when I say "No!" to the baby, but no problem otherwise. He sees the kid as a cash/food cow and mostly is ever-vigilant for the dropped morsel or two.

McNabs were bred from a sire from Scotland, by a rancher in California, to have shorter coats and be slightly smaller in stature. He's about 35-40lbs. I think they must also be less hyper as he never barks at or with other dogs and never gets bored, although he won't turn down a chance to play or go for a ride.

Your little girl is darling. Have fun. One warning I did get about McNabs which may hold true for BCs, too, is don't let them sleep in your bed. They will take it over and push you out when they get bigger. Merls tries this every night when we let him up to say goodnight!**bg**

kat


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 10:54 AM

I have a 6 year old Alsatian and he's just perfect. Wasn't always so! As a Puppy he used to like to stand and bark at me angrily at times until I read ..

The Holy Bible of Dog People:

HOW TO SPEAK DOG - it's on Amazon. The guys name escapes me - I've bought and given away at least a dozen copies. It's like Dr. Spock for puppies and dogs of all ages.

It's a darling book, heartwarming but sensible, diagrams of dog body language included. It also explores every possible vocalisation a dog can make and then some. He begins the book with a charming Russian fable about how Dog came to Adam & Eve after their explusion from the Garden and offered to help them out and how Dog and Man came to be fast friends as a result. I've told that story to members of my congregation who often ask me to repeat it when we are together with people who haven't heard it.

My best advice is ROUTINE in all things.

Feeding your puppy the same amount of food at the same time each morning will produce a predictible time table for you to take her out to go have a bowel movement.

Also, teach her the word PIDDLE. Say it every time she whizzes and praise her. That way, at night, when you want her to take her 'Goodnight Piddle'.. all you have to do is say 'Piddle Puppy, Piddle' and she will. Ours does. In fact, he gets cranky if he doesn't get his Goodnight Piddle.

Our dog Trainer reminded us not to consider the dog a child (hard to do at times) not to overfeed (not very hard) and not to overstress the puppy. As a result, we managed to raise a happy, well-adjusted DOG not a neurotic canine child who can't stand being separated from Mommie and Daddie.

Oh..

TAKE LOTS OF PHOTOS cuz just likes children, they don't stay that little very long.

I'm jealous. My Boy is 90 pounds now and so grown up. He used to sleep in the bed with us until he was 2. He'd start out with us and then eventually feel like going to his own bed at the foot of ours. During storms or whenever he got lonely, he'd sneak up under the comforter and get between us, stretching himself out lengthwise so my hsuband wouldn't notice until he got a paw in the face. Now he's so very independent and mature. He'll still play with me every day, but it's not the same as having a cuddly, needy, adorable baby dog. >sigh<


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: LilyFestre
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 12:08 PM

Having raised 10 labs and currently living with 9 dogs (7 Labs, 1 Silky Terrier and 1 Cocker Spaniel), I may have some useful information for you.

As other posters have said, routine is incredibly important!

*Take the dog out every time she wakes up from a nap, IMMEDIATELY. Puppies have smaller bladders and cannot wait to go pee. As they grow, so do their bladders and you will not have to take her out as much.

*Take the puppy to the same time each time you take her out to pee.
*Reward her with praise, give doggie treat inside. You can reduce the treats as she grows older.
*Buy yourself a bottle of Bitter Apple Spray to reduce chewing. You can spray this stuff on anything...wood, shoes, furniture, dried flowers, wall trim...anything that is being chewed. It is safe for you pup and your belongings. It has a bitter smell to it when you first apply it but that fades after it has dried for about 10 minutes. You can find it at any big pet store or here: http://www.petvetdirect.com/home.asp?searchstr=Bitter%20Apple

*Dogs tend not to chew socks or shoes if they have one of their very own.
*Dog beds are great...get one with a removable cover
*Kennels...people have mixed thoughts about this but we have found that they are great for when we leave the house. Dogs generally will not pee where they sleep. Never use the kennel as a punishment but rather leave the door open and you will be surprised how often they go in there as they get older...especially if things get chaotic around your house...it's a safe place for them.
*Knotted Rope pulls...spend a little extra cash and get a decent sized one, they last forever. When they get icky, simply throw them in the washing machine and be sure to rinse it twice....great for teething pups too...throw in the washing machine with no soap, set on cold and give to puppy while wet...soothes the gums.
*Socialize your dog.
*Stick your hand in their food while they are eating and pick up bowl while they are eating so they know who is boss
*Train early to heel.
***Most importantly, BE PATIENT! Puppies are just like babies..they have NO idea what to do or what is expected of them, it's YOUR job to show them frequently.
*********Even more important...LOVE THEM WITH ALL YOUR HEART!

LF


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: nutty
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 12:26 PM

Invest in a puppy pen (cage) ......the collapsible type .

The main advantage is that you can safely leave them on their own,day or night, and know that the house is going to stay safe and in one piece.

You can also take it with you when visiting relatives or taking holidays and not only sleep easy knowing that other peoples houses are not being damaged but the pup will be perfectly at home as it is in familiar surroundings.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: wysiwyg
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 12:47 PM

The best housebreaker is another well-broken dog. Faulkner has never, ever made a mess in the house, even if he has to wait. Ruby taught him that the first night-- "THIS is our door, and THIS is where we leave smelly things, out HERE."

The best baby-dog training for any behavior is to notice and reward them when they do it on their own (such as "sit"), and teach the vocab for it as you go. More focused and authoritative behaviors can be taught when they are older, using the same vocab. We inadvertently "taught" Faulkner that "sit" mean sit, "sit more" means lie down, and another "sit more" means lie down even further so you are not in position to spring up-- in other words, at ease. "Sit" also means stay. Hand signals, facial expressions, and tone of voice help us keep these straight (and seem to help F too)! I've concluded he's really Asian, where inflection makes a word mean something else!

Remember that dogs are the complete antithesis of cats. They are not independent mercenaries looking for any bit of food or warmth and sucking up to you to get it. They want to make YOU happy. When they see what that is, they'll go to the moon and back to please you.

More than anything, they want to know they are in your pack, and where their place in it is. Food is about pack order, and be sure they always eat LAST, after YOU. And please, be sure they know humankind babies are above them in the pack order, in terms of touch, food, and play, from an early age.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: LilyFestre
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 01:19 PM

Good for training them not to jump: When they jump on you squeeze paw at the knuckle point (wrap your hand around their paw and put pressure so as to squeeze the knuckles together a tiny bit) with just enough pressure to cause them to wimper. Say, "DOWN" and put them down where you want them. It doesn't take long before they know what DOWN means and you no longer have to squeeze their paws.

**I'm not talking about squeezing really hard...they'll let you know when it is bothersome to them***

LF


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: open mike
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 01:41 PM

some times for housebreaking newspapers are used..
for training my trainer recommends little treats
that are eaasily chewed and keeping them in pocket,
"fanny pack" or in containers around the house.

dogs respond to treats as well as praise.

look for a t.v. show called the dog whisperer

it is wonderful

some folks swear by those puppy dog crates..

they say a dog will not mess in their space..

at least she should have a blanket/rug/space

of her own . I have a new dog, but was lucky enough
to get her already house broken..you need to baby
proof your house....watch out for electric cords, phone cords,
com;uter wires, etc...these look very chewable to pups!

sorcha probably has some ideas too.,
enjoy her. she may want to herd you@!
the link below3 to playfulpups.com has
potty training tips


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sooz
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 02:21 PM

Many thanks to everyone who has taken the trouble to respond to my request for advice. We'll be giving everything a try!. Meg is doing really well so far and we are enjoying the entertainment.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sorcha
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 02:39 PM

Well, I only know that I'm not smart enough (or dumb enough?) to own a BC.....I suggest looking into the Border Collie Club of America, and after basic obedience, look into Herding Trials, Agility or Rally (the AKC answer to agility). BC's are excellent at all of them. One thing to bear in mind....and it's IMPORTANT!
If YOU don't give her a job she will find one and you probably won't like it. I'll see if I can find a link to BCCA


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sorcha
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 02:40 PM

Here ya go....Pick one


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: wysiwyg
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 02:59 PM

Sorcha has NEVER tried to herd anyone I know! Well maybe some wet 'Cats, up a rope... we've all tried that!

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Strollin' Johnny
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 04:02 PM

And you said you didn't want another, Sooz! I knew you were an old Softie! (Mind you, she's a real cutie - when can Mrs. Johnny and I pay her a visit?). :0)


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 04:32 PM

I was just looking at Meg's photos again and I tell ya, she has what we dog people call "The Eye"!!

In that picture of her outside, she's doing "The Eye".. that stare-down that herding dogs do to the Sheep. My Alsatian herds children, birds, cats, any living being that he feels needs his benevolent guidance. Some Puppies are born with it. Trust me, Meg has it. It's an amazing thing to watch as they get older. Some dogs Point, your dog has 'The Eye.' I sure hope you have something for her to herd, even if its just a flock of birds. Just don't let her try and herd YOU. That can be a bad habit with collies.

She's so cute! How I would love to have a pup again. I just don't think it would be good for my Alsatian. He recently developed epilepsy and although he's on medication and doing well, I wouldn't want him stressed in any way.

I love how young dogs have Puppy fuzz instead of a real coat. Meg is all fuzzy. The photo of her sleeping with a full belly is adorable. I'm sure it's like having an infant. It was for me. Dog inafancy lasts almost as long as a human's. They don't really start to grow up completely until they are two years old. At that point, things speed up.

Enjoy!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sorcha
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 05:04 PM

I agree, Mrs. Dave...she has The Eye.....actually, never met a BC who didn't. One reason they are called 'hard' dogs. They notice every mistake you ever make, and take you right up on it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Kim C
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 05:41 PM

Here's what I know about dog training.

There are as many different schools of thought on dog training as there are dogs. Your job is to match up the right method with your dog. The method you used with your last dog may not work on this one, because dogs all have different personalities and motivations for learning.

There now. Good luck. ;-)

She's cute cute CUTE, by the way!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: GUEST,Melani
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 06:01 PM

For books, I like "How to be Your Dog's Best Friend," by the Monks of New Skete. It's also good to whistle-train them: get a dog whistle and a bunch of treats. Blow whistle, give treat. Blow whistle, give treat. Repeat a whole bunch of times. When you walk the dog off-leash, always bring the whistle and the treats. The dog can hear the whistle up to a quarter of a mile away. NEVER blow the whistle without giving the dog a treat. You will end up with a sure-fire way to get the dog to come to you.

I have been offered an 18-month-old border collie and am seriously considering it, but have been afraid to bring it up to my husband, who is very grouchy about having any more dogs. (The rats just aren't enough!) The dog will end up in the pound unless a home can be found. She belongs to the sister of someone I work with, and only needs some training, doesn't eat furniture or make messes in the house. (What she does do is try to herd the sister's four-year-old like a sheep; not a problem for us.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Phot
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 06:43 PM

An old dog of my family, Lark, was a Border, Rough Collie cross, bright as a button, he responded to love and affection, sod these cage things. treat your new pup as one of the family and she will respond in kind. Please never try to discourage the hearding instinct, thats the reason Borders were bred in the first place. Take them for what they are, loyal, loving, intelligent and honest....

Ignore all the books written by "experts" Most of them are muppets who wouldn't know a nose from a tail!

In short, treat her as you would want to be treated. I hope your new family member and you have a great time, lucky you!

Wassail!! Chris


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 07:05 PM

Ray Magliozzi's border collie (click on "view a gallery of photos from Ray's garden").

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 07:18 PM

Melani.. Border Collies need lots of exercise, so maybe you could sell him on the dog as Treadmill with a tail! Worked for me when I wanted to add my current dog, an Alsatian, to my household when we already had an elderly greyhound!

My husband lost about 20 pounds the first year which he has maintained. Since then, he's lost some inches on his waist and become much more cardiovascularly fit. He and the dog go hiking in a local canyon park almost every day when sunlight permits. They even go in the rain.


I wish I were better able to go with them, but a muscular disorder limits me to neighborhood walkies.

Try the Dog-as-treadmill angle. They do everything a treadmill does and then some. Treadmills don't shake paws nor do they leap into your arms when you return from work. Definite advnatages to having a dog versus a treadmill!



One last bit of Puppy advice - if they have Pet Health Insurance where you are SOOZ, get it NOW while Meg is a baby. It's cheapest in the first 6 months of life. Make sure you buy it through the Vet you plan to use. Here in The US, you can usually purchase yearly insurance for a puppy for about $200 a year or less. Such policies cover routine exams, annual shots, illnesses and some medications but not all. Surgeries are often covered in part. All it takes is one adverse event and you will make back all you have ever laid out for the coverage. $200 usually doesn't even cover the basic vaccines for a dog each year, so you'll already be ahead of the game.

When my dog was young, he was clumsy and adventurous. He got bit by a Possum, tore one of his paw pads, ran into a fence gate at full speed and got concussed..oh the list goes on and on. Now he has epilepsy. He's a very healthy dog, mind you, and we think this seizure issue will pass in a few months. But, the cost of the tests after his 1st Grand Mal Seizure could have run into the thousands if we had not had some basic coverage. It won't cover a canine MRI Scan, and our Vet doesn't feel it would reveal anything useful, so we haven't laid out for it. Bleieve me, Pet insurance can prevent heartbreaking decisions later on. No one should ever have to decide whether to put a pet down over money but it happens.

You might be wise to inquire about a plan with your Vet.

Please kiss the puppy and tell her it's from all of us Mudcat Dog Lovers! Also, post more photos. I still love that one of her snoozing with her full belly. My big boy is taking his afternoon nap and I still enjoy watching him sleep. He sometimes wags his tail in his sleep when he dreams or growls. Sometimes he seems to regres in his dreams and he makes suckling noises.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: catspaw49
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 07:20 PM

If you do nothing else, read the book Melani listed above......"How to be Your Dog's Best Friend," by the Monks of New Skete. This book is all over the dog world and for good reason. You will never get closer to the inside workings of the canine mind and THAT will make you a better trainer.

We do things in play with puppies and dogs that will turn around and bite you later because we don't see it as the dog sees it! The Monks book will get you into the dog's point of view.

Any training you do or are involved with needs to have YOU as the other integral part. Never train a dog, train the owner.

The really intelligent breeds are often not as difficult to train as is often suggested. I've had Weimaraners for many years and if I establish myself as the alpha dog from the gitgo, things are fine. Witness my current pair.....Everyone says they need lots of exercise and field work and blah, blah, blah......We have two couch potatoes. They adapted well!!! Also opt for as much street training as possible.   I can go anywhere with them without leashes and they'll wander along loosely enjoying themselves. But a sharp name called with "here" will bring them back to my side immediately.

Anyway....Have fun and enjoy the new pup!!!! And read that book!!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Scoville
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 08:53 PM

She'll have YOU trained soon enough, anyway.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: kendall
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 09:30 PM

Dogs are NOT people and you must not treat them like people. Never let a dog go through the door ahead of you. And, they need a leader; if you don't take over the role of Alpha male or female, they will! No one welcomes an untrained undiciplined dog, especially a big one that jumps on people.All it has to do is knock some old lady down and you have a law suit on your hands.
Get a training collar and learn to use it. Dogs are wonderful company, but if they are not trained, they are a huge pain in the ass.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Scoville
Date: 19 Apr 05 - 11:24 PM

I'm all for crate training. Mine gets a piece of biscuit when she goes in and then we leave her alone so she doesn't think she's missing out on any fun, and she goes right to sleep. If we don't put her away she entertains herself by pulling the garbage down off of the washing machine and scattering it all over the living room. Crate training beats exploratory surgery any day.

I also don't let her demand food (this can be taught later when she doesn't need to eat as often). My father is terrible about letting her bark at him as he fills her bowl. I make her sit and wait quietly until I put it back on the floor and say "OK", so she knows *I* control the food (if she barks at me, I put it back in the bin and walk away until she stops pestering me).

But mostly . . . exercise, exercise. Tired puppies are well-behaved puppies.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: GUEST,Sooz (at work)
Date: 20 Apr 05 - 03:43 AM

All advice gratefully received! We'll cahse up that book asap.
More cute pictures at the weekend. (Its foul weather today so we have muddy paws)


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 20 Apr 05 - 11:12 AM

>>Tired puppies are well-behaved puppies.<<

LOL. The whole reason my husband (who is NOT davetnova) started taking our dog hiking in the cayons every evening was so he could have some peace and quiet in the evenings. When our dog was a puppy, my husband used to take him hiking twice a day on weekends just to try and tire him out. Tired puppies aren't just well-behaved, they're happy.

Meg probably won't need any special attention to tiring her out until she's about 6 months old. Until then, they do a good job of tiring themselves. Once they hit about 6 months, though - that's they start barking at you when they are bored.

A training collar isn't inhumane and its often safer than the old choke-chains people still use. A training collar applies even pressure. They don't need to wear it all the time, but having it on for certain parts of the day is good.

We dog parents appear to be just as ready with advice as parents of babies!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sooz
Date: 03 May 05 - 09:32 AM

Update with some new pix here


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 May 05 - 09:35 AM

That last pic is GREAT!

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: GUEST,jeffp
Date: 03 May 05 - 09:47 AM

Absolutely adorable!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: kendall
Date: 03 May 05 - 12:02 PM

If you fail to train them, one of the bad things they do is to trash the house while you are gone. That is separation anxiety. To deal with that, leave the puppy alone for a few minutes. As time passes, leave it alone for longer periods of time, and eventually you can leave it for hours without it freaking out and destroying the place. It simply needs to know that you will be back and that they have not been abandoned.
I've had many dogs over the years and never used a crate,or a choke chain, and I never ever hit one. None of them ever trashed the place while I was gone. Much of the training is simple common sense.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 May 05 - 01:06 PM

We have been adopted by a stray, but in our case, the dog is an American Staffordshire Terrier, aka "pit bull." The last breed I'd ever have voluntarily gone looking for in a pet. I walked out the door on Saturday morning when I saw this dog in the driveway, and I called her. She timidly came over and accepted my pat on the head and kind words, and evidently decided that I will do as her alpha female. She stayed in the driveway all day, sleeping in the sun, then finding shade as it got warmer. By early evening, as I was still out working in the yard, she came along to nudge my shoulder to see what I was planting, and has decided that we're the family for her.

She has been stray for a while, and had a bad bite that has healed incompletely on one knee. I gave her a basic bath (Suave worked fine for what I had in mind) on Sunday when it was nice and warm out. She's still a bit doggy smelling, but looks and feels better. I didn't see any fleas, but I did remove three ticks. I took her to the vet yesterday to see if she had a chip, but none was present, and she has an appointment on Thursday for a full checkup. Meanwhile, an ad is running online in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram classifieds under "Lost and Found" (look for the one that says "Found--American Staffordshire Terrier").

On Saturday evening when I took my gardening stuff around to the back yard to put away, she went with me, and when she saw the cats through the sliding glass door she woofed happily in their direction then wagged and wiggled up to the glass. She can actually wag her tail in a complete circle.

I've told the kids that there can be any number of factors that mean she isn't a good candidate to adopt--primarily, her health. Heartworms and such, fully involved, can be deadly. At least she has been stray during the cool months with fewer mosquitoes. She has some injured teeth in front, where it looks like she was kicked or bit something that was burning, or perhaps an electrical cord or something. She's in my fenced in large back yard, with a newly-acquired plastic dog house, and she has figured out that it's warm sleeping in there. She wants to come in the house, but until she gets the all clear and a few problems are cleared up, she's an outside dog.

Then the fun begins. She's full grown, and doesn't have a clue about walking on a leash or doing any "tricks." We don't know if she'll be jumping on the furniture, or if she's a chewer. She doesn't spend much time barking. She's a blank slate, and the kids have been told that we'll work with her gently to teach her what we need her to know. I'm glad to see references listed above--I'll check those out.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 May 05 - 01:40 PM

Sounds to me like she was abused. Pull the ad and keep her until you find out more about her.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 May 05 - 04:24 PM

Staffs are hugely loyal comedians when they've been raised right, and can seem quite baffled about those massive jaws-- "What do I need THESE for?" Snuggly sweeties. (Real bad dog farts though.)

But-- when you do not know how they have been raised-- or how inbred they may be-- or if they come from a peaceloving bloodline or a killkillkill one-- it's a real good idea to take 'em to a couple of good obedience trainers for an evaluation on how they seem to deal with various forms of stress. (They will respond somewhat differently to different experts.) Just to set your mind at rest.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Blowzabella
Date: 03 May 05 - 05:07 PM

We adopted a border collie at approx 6-8 months, in January, from the local rescue kennels - he is called Beau now - was called Bodie, but the name seemed a bit macho for such an elegant boy!

He looks very similarly marked to your Meg, Sooz - he has enormously long legs and a tongue that you wonder how it gets put away in his mouth!

He learned very early on that peeing indoors was not the done thing - and we didn't have to shout or smack - and hasn't destroyed anything (but has nibbled on things - mostly his own).

Be warned and read about Border collies though - they are scarily intelligent. Ours is just starting to come into his own now, at about 10/11 months. He is as sweet as a nut, but a natural born problem solver. You need to keep their brains occupied - try a course of car maintenance - or Japanese for Beginners!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: gnu
Date: 03 May 05 - 06:33 PM

Awww. Puuuuppy. Some cute!!

As per your original post, I see in one pic that Meg has her front paws on someone's leg. A tip might be to stop this, even as a pup.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sooz
Date: 10 May 05 - 04:39 AM

Updated (again)here


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 10 May 05 - 03:14 PM

Meg The Wonder Pup just gets more adorable every day! It's nice to see she grasps the importance of a proper breakfast. What a darling!

Her American Fan Club has several new members and we'd like to know if she'd consider touring the US when she's older. Also, her fans want to know what her favorite colour is, her views on crating, and her advice to other young pups struggling to learn to piddle outside and not on the floor. Celebrities may not start out wanting to be role models, but role models they do become. As a celebrity, Meg's views on such things are news.

Vive La Meg!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Maxine
Date: 10 May 05 - 03:38 PM

Oh, she is beautiful....puppies are so fantastic aren't they? I have a 18 month old German Shepherd bitch Amber, who we think is the most adorable thing on 4 legs (of course, Meg is a very close runner up - although, we may be biased!)

As soon as Amber had her full jabs we took her to training classes on a one to one basis with a dog handler - I did the training with her, the trainer just told me what to do. Amber certainly cottoned on a lot faster than me! We continued for a year religiously come rain or shine but now we're reaping the benefits. She's beautiful and we adore her. Definitely get Meg to classes asap, border collies are so intelligen and it'll keep her mind and body active.

As has been said, Border Collies need a huge amount of exercise, my mum and dad walk Camber beach with theirs for 2 hours a day - it's only now that she's 7 that she can only manage an hour and a half! They love a ball too - buy yourself a tennis racket unless you have a particularly good overarm!

Good luck with her, she's obviously much loved and will give you years of fun. I bet she's got you well and truly wrapped around her tiny front paw......

Go for it Meg!


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Kim C
Date: 10 May 05 - 03:44 PM

The Monks of New Skete books have good information in them - I gotta tell you, though, their techniques didn't make a dent in Sampson the Giant Puppy. He thinks everything, including discipline, is Oh Boy Let's Play!!! So I had to go a different route with him. He's only 2, and getting MUCH better, but he still has some growing up to do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 11 May 05 - 02:44 AM

Today at around 6:30 PM,I had a HUGE scare with my dog, who is a 6 year old Alsatian. I was in the washing room in the back of our house doing the wash, having let the dog out to play in the front yard. Before I knew it, 30 minutes had flown by. I went to call the dog who was nowhere to be found and I saw, with abject horror, that somebody had unlatched the side gate and left it ajar! No dog in sight. I looked hi and lo.. ran up and down the street calling his name - no dog. I tried calling my husband on his cell-phone but couldn't get through. Now I was having a conniption fit. Our previous dog, a German Shepherd once escaped the same yard when she was 14 years old and made off for a nearby Fastfood restaurant where she made cute in exchange for hamburgers. It took me hours to find her.

I ran next door and woke up my neighbor who naps in the early evening on account of getting up at 3:30 AM to work in construction. He said to me "Maybe Dave took him?" Now, why would my husband, who is not Davetnova, come home way early from work, come take the dog, and never stop to say hello? After half an hour of freaking out, I finally got through to my husband and yes, he came home early, picked up the dog and made for Runyon Canyon dog-Park, hoping he'd get home in time to take ME to the airport to see Joybell and Greg as they waited for their plane home!

We never did make it to see Joybell and Greg because LAX rules would not permit anyione without a photo ID from entering the International Terminal and I misplaced my Driver's License and don't have a valid passport any longer. Bummmer. At least the dog is alright.

Meg is still the cutest puppy on four feet.

Sooz, make sure your husband/significant-other knows he must ALWAYS tell you when he removes Meg from the premisis for ANY reason! WHY? because you'll never gain back the years scared off your life at the sight of an empty yard, open gate and no doggie! Of course, if it's Meg, she might have just gone out to go herd the ducks...

My husband, who is not Davetnova, and the Alsatian are both snoring away as I type. I'm still to freaked out to sleep. I hope Joybell and Greg are having a safe flight back home. My Dave spoke to Greg on the Cellpone but we weren't able to get into the terminal to find them. There's always the next trip, or maybe we can go down there.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sooz
Date: 11 May 05 - 02:59 AM

What a dreadful experience for you all - but at least it had a happy ending. It brought back memories of a terrible day many years ago when our Old English Sheepdog was being minded by my parents. A gate was left open and she set off to look for us. Unfortunately she had a brush with a train and was badly injured. It took several months of treatment and care before she was back to her bouncing self. Now she was a dog and a half, but we didn't get her as a puppy. She was a rescue dog with a sad history but she responded so well to TLC that she became a totally loyal companion and a real character.

Meg has just finished her breakfast of scrambled egg, cereal and toast and is ready for a days mischief and training.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: GUEST
Date: 11 May 05 - 09:31 AM

What a pukesome, mawkish, load of girly drivel this thread is.


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Sorcha
Date: 11 May 05 - 01:36 PM

Then why are you posting to it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Puppy Power
From: Kim C
Date: 11 May 05 - 03:37 PM

So is Davetnova your husband? ;-)


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