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harmony vs. melody

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GUEST,Bluet Conner 27 May 05 - 12:38 AM
Anglo 27 May 05 - 02:20 AM
greg stephens 27 May 05 - 05:41 AM
Nick 27 May 05 - 05:45 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 27 May 05 - 05:54 AM
greg stephens 27 May 05 - 06:50 AM
GUEST 27 May 05 - 06:55 AM
greg stephens 27 May 05 - 06:58 AM
jimmyt 27 May 05 - 07:59 AM
GUEST,M.Ted 27 May 05 - 11:38 AM
GUEST,MMario 27 May 05 - 11:40 AM
breezy 27 May 05 - 11:52 AM
Joe Offer 27 May 05 - 12:03 PM
Once Famous 27 May 05 - 12:10 PM
GUEST,Allen 27 May 05 - 12:10 PM
George Papavgeris 27 May 05 - 12:17 PM
belfast 27 May 05 - 12:41 PM
breezy 27 May 05 - 12:52 PM
breezy 27 May 05 - 12:53 PM
M.Ted 27 May 05 - 02:01 PM
PoppaGator 27 May 05 - 02:47 PM
Goose Gander 27 May 05 - 02:56 PM
PoppaGator 27 May 05 - 03:10 PM
Don Firth 27 May 05 - 03:15 PM
Goose Gander 27 May 05 - 03:18 PM
Ebbie 27 May 05 - 03:37 PM
Goose Gander 27 May 05 - 04:10 PM
Goose Gander 27 May 05 - 04:31 PM
PoppaGator 27 May 05 - 04:44 PM
Don Firth 27 May 05 - 05:38 PM
GUEST,Allen 27 May 05 - 06:10 PM
George Papavgeris 27 May 05 - 08:49 PM
Goose Gander 27 May 05 - 09:47 PM
DrWord 27 May 05 - 10:13 PM
Ron Davies 27 May 05 - 10:26 PM
Goose Gander 27 May 05 - 10:53 PM
Ron Davies 27 May 05 - 10:59 PM
GUEST,leeneia 28 May 05 - 08:41 AM
GUEST 28 May 05 - 06:05 PM
The Fooles Troupe 28 May 05 - 09:25 PM
Azizi 29 May 05 - 11:57 AM
Don Firth 29 May 05 - 12:23 PM
Azizi 29 May 05 - 12:53 PM
GUEST,M.Ted 29 May 05 - 02:43 PM
Don Firth 29 May 05 - 02:53 PM
Uncle_DaveO 29 May 05 - 03:03 PM
GUEST,Allen 29 May 05 - 03:04 PM
Azizi 29 May 05 - 03:05 PM
Azizi 29 May 05 - 03:08 PM
Goose Gander 29 May 05 - 05:56 PM
Goose Gander 29 May 05 - 05:57 PM
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Subject: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,Bluet Conner
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:38 AM

What is the difference between melody and harmony? Anyone here, have any idea? Thanks in advance.

Bluet


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Anglo
Date: 27 May 05 - 02:20 AM

May I recommend a dictionary?


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: greg stephens
Date: 27 May 05 - 05:41 AM

Melody=tune. What you whistle or sing(on your own).What you can play on a windinstrument. A string of single notes.
Harmony is the mixing of more than one note, so they make a pleasing(hopefully) sound together. What you aare doing on a keyboard or guitar when you are playing a group of notes together. I think that's the basis of it.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Nick
Date: 27 May 05 - 05:45 AM

Melody is the tune I sing and harmony is the thing my wife does that makes it sound better.

She can sing in harmony and I can't. Occasionally I find myself singing a melody line that happens to be a harmony to the tune that she is singing, but in those circumstances I still reckon it's ME who is singing the real tune...


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 27 May 05 - 05:54 AM

Put Greg's and Nick's definitions together and get a good idea of harmony. Melody is the tune, the basic "essence" of a song or piece of music. Harmony enhances it by adding other notes, either through chords, or a separate string of notes (sometimes called a "counter-melody"). Harmony can be quite simple, or very, very complex. If you aren't sure what to do, stick to melody.

I've often found myself at a local singaround and discovered that none of us has chosen the melody- but it still sounds good!
However, the melody is still the "point" of it all!


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: greg stephens
Date: 27 May 05 - 06:50 AM

An interesting distinction(particularly relevant in folk circles) between melody and harmony. Melody is an intrinsic essential quality of the song(or tune). It's melody, as it were, is part of what it is. Harmony on the other hand is an optional extra you add, like choosing some clothes in the morning. They make you look good(or hide the wobbly bits).
So when someone says "What are the chords(harmony) for "Blowing in the Wind"?", there is no fixed answer. Bob Dylan played it one way with the old three-chord trick, Peter Paul and Mary added some extra chords for effect. You can follow either, or neither, according to taste.
   So there is no right answe to "What are the chords for the Unquiet Shepherd". You play the ones that sound right to you. And if you want to earn some money singing, choose ones that sound right to the audience.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST
Date: 27 May 05 - 06:55 AM

What a stupid question.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: greg stephens
Date: 27 May 05 - 06:58 AM

And what a stupid answer.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: jimmyt
Date: 27 May 05 - 07:59 AM

I think it is a very thought provoking question. In my mind, there is always harmony. If a singer is playing a song on guitar and singing, he is likely singing the melody and playing the harmony in one way or the other. A simple chord progression is the simplist vertical way of looking at the harmony. I used to be a trumpet player and then I was only locked on the melody or what I call horizontal music. It goes from left to right on the page, rising and falling but it is essentially horizontal in nature.

WHen I went off to University to major in music, I found that my way of preceiving music was this, while my classmates that played guitar, organ or piano did not look at it this way at all. Their perception was vertical. Music progressed across a page one chord at a time and if the entire chord was not considered, there was really no basis for the structure of music. Harmony is the Structure, the bones the nuts and bolts that allow the melody to shine forth as the "star" of the song.

Even when I played jazz and would take long "rides" of improvisational qymnastics, at the time I thought I just had an inborn sense of playing things that were related to the melody line, never knowing that it was the harmony that kept it all together. Actually I had a sense of harmony that I was not aware of at all.

Now I sing is a couple of groups, one that does 4 part folk music the other does acapella and do-wop music from the 60s mostly and I am more than ever aware of the rich blessing that harmony does to our music. ALso the ability to hold your part with someone else standing right beside you doing a line that is totally different is a blessing that not everyone has. I think experimenting with harmony with your wife or husband can open rich musical avenues that many of us were unaware existed.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,M.Ted
Date: 27 May 05 - 11:38 AM

The short answer is that a harmony line is a second melody that   accompanies the primary melody.

Harmonies are related to chord progressions, but they are different because they are single note lines that have similar characteristics to the melody.   They are different from counterpoint, because they accompany the melody, rather than move in contrast to it. The effect that a harmonic line has is to provide interest by defining the chords that are implied in the melody. In musical analyis, the melody is often called the salient line, and the harmony is called the recessive line--


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 27 May 05 - 11:40 AM

a music teacher once put it to me in terms of food (something I relate to very well.)

Melody is the cake; Harmony is the icing and decoration.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: breezy
Date: 27 May 05 - 11:52 AM

melody is playing/singing the right notes

all others are jazz

but if they should blend as 3rds 5ths and some 7ths then thats folk

and all others are still jazz

son [12] just bougt in a cake -Victoria sponge - he made at school, bit of jazz influence in the lesson I suspect!!
Like his Dad in the morning, its well risen!!!


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:03 PM

Well, in my day, I could have said that harmony is what Sylvia sings LOUD, and melody is what Ian sings soft.

I also know that many church choirs like to sing the harmony parts, and nobody sings melody. One of the choirs at our church is like that at times.

And I know that harmony is a sung part that's built on the melody, mostly forming chords that sound good with the melody and enhance it. It's easy to describe the difference between harmony and "unison" singing, but what actually is the difference between the "harmony part" and the "melody part" of a song? What characteristics make them different from one another, and why is it that I can usually tell what's the melody part and what's the harmony part?

-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Once Famous
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:10 PM

Next question might be "What is a song?"


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,Allen
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:10 PM

Take the works of Carolan for instance. What we have is the melody he wrote, but none of the harmonies or arrangements. It's up to each player to interpret them.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: George Papavgeris
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:17 PM

Literal translation from Greek (they are both Greek words):
melody = the song
harmony = that which fits well


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: belfast
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:41 PM

I wasn't actually there at the time but I think we can safely assume that melody came first and harmony came later. Much later. In the case of Irish traditional music much, much later. And often in it's an uncomformtable fit. That which does not fit well.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: breezy
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:52 PM

good ole greeks

end of subject


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: breezy
Date: 27 May 05 - 12:53 PM

rather like

The body

then the clothes

sometimes the clothes can be a bit jazz


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: M.Ted
Date: 27 May 05 - 02:01 PM

Joe--The harmony part tends to have less interest in it than the melody----typically, the harmony part will stay on a single note(a chord note) while the melody wanders around, and it won't change until the melody moves to a note that is not in that chord--In some kinds of singing, the harmony is simply a drone note that does not change(makes it easier to concentrate on the words)--in others, the voices sing block chords that hold to a particular chord voicing(we had a nice discussion on this, courtesy of JimmyT, a while back) and move the minimum distance needed when there is a chord change.

If you write the dots out for this kind of singing, you'll see that the recessive lines often stay on the same note for quite a few counts--


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: PoppaGator
Date: 27 May 05 - 02:47 PM

I think that there are two slightly different definitions for the word "harmony:"

1) Two or more notes that "go together" ~ whenever you strum a chord on a guitar or any stringed instrument, you're hearing harmony.

2) A sung or played "part" or "line" that is sung or played simultaneously with a piece's melody line. The notes making up such a harmony part will normally be notes that are part of chords appropriate to the arrangement.

There's an opinion that songs traditionally sung without instrumental accompaniment "don't have chords," which implies that there is no harmony written into the song, or even implicit in the tune. It's an interesting question, with plausible-enough arguments to support both positions, but I feel that any tune can be harmonized, and that even where there are two or more possible chords (or harmony-notes) for a given note or measure of a song ~ i.e., where you can go with the simple 2-chord or 3-chord approach or a more complicated structure ~ there is a "natural" harmonic structure for any tune.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 27 May 05 - 02:56 PM

Yes, but it's a lot more difficult to harmonize a pentatonic melody without changing the character of the tune. I think that may be why unaccompanied folk singing (think Appalachia, for example) sometimes just doesn't 'want' to be harmonized.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: PoppaGator
Date: 27 May 05 - 03:10 PM

True enough, Michael, there are also probably some songs where only a "careful" harmony is appropriate.

For example, in certain modes, you should never inject a third because you'd have to choose either the major third or the minor third, and the song "wants" that ambiguity to be preserved; however, it might be perfectly acceptable to sing a fifth above the melody, or to sing a "drone" on the tonic note.

For some usually-unaccompanied songs, injecting a second voice can be problematic not only because of the harmony-vs-unison issue, but also because the tempo/rhythm is purposefully, um, vague. Perhaps "unstructured" would be a better word...


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Don Firth
Date: 27 May 05 - 03:15 PM

There is no such thing as a "stupid question." There are such things as stupid answers, but no stupid questions.

Mostly good answers here, though.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 27 May 05 - 03:18 PM

It may come down to how you define harmony. A drone note to me isn't a harmony. I generally think of a harmony as consisting of at least 2 or 3 notes, but I'm an untrained musician so I probably break the 'laws' of harmony all the time.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Ebbie
Date: 27 May 05 - 03:37 PM

But Michael Morris, a drone changes its pitch as needed when the melody changes so it is still harmony.

I suspect that even when there is only one note, we 'hear' acommpanying harmonies and that is why everyone and most things react to music. I think harmony is an intrinsic part of Earth itself. Think of the sounds of wind. Think of the sounds of an avalanche. Think of Nature's colors. For some reason, mixing green with blue or orange with mauve in Nature is harmonious. Nature can get away with things that we cannot. We still have a lot to learn.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 27 May 05 - 04:10 PM

Ebbie's point about hearing harmonics in a single note is interesting. I have a clunky old guitar that is all over the place harmonically. The most harmonically resonant notes seem to be G A B D and E. If I pluck out a simple melody with these notes, the harmonics definately make it sound as though I am playing more than five notes. So is a single note irreducible, or is it made up of smaller parts? My best guess is that notes on my guitar are vibrating in sympathy to other, unplucked notes. Don't know for sure, though.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 27 May 05 - 04:31 PM

But I still say it's difficult to harmonize a pentatonic melody (beyond a drone note) without changing the character of the tune.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: PoppaGator
Date: 27 May 05 - 04:44 PM

I think a note is a note, and if you're hearing two notes at once when plucking a single string, then two notes are actually being produced (albeit indirectly, e.g., because a second string starts vibrating slightly due to resonance/"sympathy").

As TedM memntioned earlier, a "harmony line" or "second voice" may, and often does, consist of a single repeated note, at least for a while ~ in other words, a "drone." But even when that note remins unchanged, when the note in the simultaneously-voiced "melody line" changes, the harmony changes. That is, if the "drone" line goes C, C, C, C while the melody line goes C, E, G, C, the harmonic effect is different for each note.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Don Firth
Date: 27 May 05 - 05:38 PM

When I was at the Cornish School of the Arts (a sort of conservatory—art, music, dance, drama) studying music during the Sixties, one of the courses I took was "The Physics of Music." Fascinating!

If you were to play, say, middle C on a flute, and then on a clarinet (or a guitar or a harp or banjo or ukulele) the fundamental note would be the same, but it's the overtones (harmonics) that make the difference. In addition to the fundamental note (in this case, middle C), they also produce a C an octave above, a G above that, another C two octaves above the fundamental, an E way up, and still other notes up in dog-whistle range. With a stringed instrument, you can also pick up sympathetic vibrations from other strings. Assuming your guitar (for example) is in tune. Play the 6th string (E), then quickly dampen it. You will probably hear the 1st string (also E) humming a bit.

Some overtones are stronger than others, and it is the relative strengths of these overtones that make a clarinet sound different from a flute, or a guitar sound different from a banjo. If you were to run the sound through electronics so you could filter out the overtones, the amazing thing is that, with no overtones, you would not be able to tell a guitar from a banjo or an oboe from a flute. You probably could tell a guitar from a flute, however, because the guitar tone would begin to die away after plucking the string, whereas the flute tone would sustain as long as one continued to blow—but not because the tones sound different! I saw this done on a Nova program on music some years ago.

This is one of the things that give a 12-string guitar such a sound of authority. The octave string reinforces the first and most powerful overtone.

The same thing happens with human voices. Your ear is sensitive enough to hear the overtones thrown by someone's vocal folds and either reinforced or suppressed by their mouth, nasal passages, and chest. That's how you can recognize voices immediately:   "That's Joan Baez." "That's Ethel Merman." "That's the lady next door."

The most consonant (or pleasing to the ear) harmonies are other notes that are in the overtone series of a particular note. For example, the melody note you're singing is an E, and you chose to play a C chord on the guitar at that particular moment. The C chord consists of C, E, and G (with other strings "doubling" the C and the E). All the notes, including the one you are singing, are in the overtone series of the root note of the C chord.

But that doesn't mean you have to play only chords that have the melody note in them (as long as you do fairly often). Non-consonant notes add a little "lemon juice" or interest to a harmony.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,Allen
Date: 27 May 05 - 06:10 PM

"This is one of the things that give a 12-string guitar such a sound of authority. The octave string reinforces the first and most powerful overtone."

It's also the reason oud's have so many strings.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: George Papavgeris
Date: 27 May 05 - 08:49 PM

A drone IS harmony - basic perhaps, but harmony nevertheless. As for harmonising pentatonic tunes, seek out the unaccompanied songs of Southern Albania (Northern Epirus) and NorthWestern Greece (Southern Epirus), as well as traditional Corsican songs. Their music is among the oldest European, pentatonic, and they sing in 3 and 4 part harmonies. It's not hard once you practice it a bit, and it makes for the most gorgeous harmonies.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 27 May 05 - 09:47 PM

Could you suggest something that has been re-issued or is otherwise available?


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: DrWord
Date: 27 May 05 - 10:13 PM

Right on, Ebbie!
hmmm
4 a "stupid" question, the thread has been amazingly good.
cheers
Dennis
http://www.mts.net/~oakacorn


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Ron Davies
Date: 27 May 05 - 10:26 PM

Michael-

I believe a good portion of Sacred Harp--definitely at least partly Appalachian-- is pentatonic---yet wonderfully harmonized. Interestingly enough, you can get the stark beauty of some of the Sacred Harp pieces even if you take away one or more of the parts. Perhaps there's something about the modal or pentatonic sound which lends itself to a good gutsy sound in harmony, regardless of the number of parts--maybe it's the use of 4ths and 5ths.

I think the question is fine--those who ridicule it only show their own narrowness.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 27 May 05 - 10:53 PM

It could simply be that I'm more used to hearing diatonic (and beyond) harmonized, and I'm more familiar with hearing pentatonic melodies unaccompanied. And I do usually associate harmonies with 3rds, which I know is not necessarily correct.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Ron Davies
Date: 27 May 05 - 10:59 PM

In Sacred Harp there are some some Isaac Watts tunes and others with pretty standard harmonization--but there are also lots of really gutsy songs full of 4ths and 5ths.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 28 May 05 - 08:41 AM

I've given some thought to the original question, "What is the difference between melody and harmony?" and this is one answer: A melody is easy to learn and remember. Harmony has to be drilled.

As to why certain sets of notes are easy to remember, and some aren't, there you have me. I think the answer is embedded in our neurons, and nobody knows the answer yet.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST
Date: 28 May 05 - 06:05 PM

Joe Offer, shame on you.

We know you attended the harmony singing workshop we did a few years ago at New Year's Camp. The first thing we said at that workshop was that a melody can be harmonized in many different ways so there is no such thing as "the harmony" to a melody. We then proceeded to prove the point by singing one melody with six different harmonies.

In spite of our imparting this great pearl of wisdom to you, in your post above you said: "...what actually is the difference between the "harmony part" and the "melody part" of a song? What characteristics make them different from one another, and why is it that I can usually tell what's the melody part and what's the harmony part?"

Whatever are we going to do with you, Joe?

Notice that Bluett in his initial post did not use the word "the" when he asked what is the difference between melody and harmony. Part of the answer, at least, is that a song has only one melody (which is part of the song's identity) but it can have many harmonies.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 28 May 05 - 09:25 PM

Melody is a horizontal tune.

Harmony is Vertical Melody.

"a drone changes its pitch as needed when the melody changes so it is still harmony"

you have never had any contact with bagpipes?


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Azizi
Date: 29 May 05 - 11:57 AM

Help!

I've never had a music course in my life. And I don't play a musical instrument. I don't come from a culture that has adult 'singalongs', and had never heard of the 'Blue Book' and 'Sacred Harp] book before reading about them in Mudcat threads. I'm not even sure if I consider myself a 'folkie'-so excuse me for asking a very basic question:

What does "pentatonic" mean?

I looked this word up online and learned that 'Penta' meaning five. and 'Tonic' meaning tones. So "pentatonic" means five tones or notes. A five note scale.

http://www.rockbass-beginnertoproinfourweeks.com/LESSONS/7.HTM

But it would help me if I had some examples of penatatonic songs.

Are all {most?} British folk songs pentatonic?

Are the Mother Goose rhymes & songs like "Hokey Pokey"; "Miss Mary Mack" and "Little Sally Walker" {to name some rather familiar game songs & rhymes} pentatonic?

Some may consider this question stupid, but it makes me no never mind. I'm asking because I want to understand.


Thanks.


Azizi


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Don Firth
Date: 29 May 05 - 12:23 PM

Azizi, it's a fairly simple thing that seems to require a complex explanation (as simple things often do). The standard scales heard in Western music (i.e., music from the European tradition, which includes classical music) consist of seven notes, say C, D, E, F, G, A, B, the notes in the key of C (white keys on the piano). But although there are scientific and aesthetic reasons that this system is pretty much standard, there are other ways of constructing scales. One of these ways is to leave a couple of notes out, so that you only play (or sing) five of them. This would be a "pentatonic" scale, or a scale made up of five notes rather than seven. If you were to play only the black keys on a piano keyboard, that would be a pentatonic scale.

There are lots of songs, mostly folk songs and earlier religious songs, that use pentatonic scales. An example of a Scottish song in a pentatonic scale is Ye Banks and Braes of Bonny Doon. Scroll down and "Click to Play" to hear what it sounds like.

I've probably made it about as clear as mud, but I hope this helps.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Azizi
Date: 29 May 05 - 12:53 PM

Thanks, Don.

I appreciate your response.

I'll check out that link!


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,M.Ted
Date: 29 May 05 - 02:43 PM

Miss Mary Mack and Little Sally Walker are Pentatonic melodies--depending on how it is played, "Hokey Pokey" can be, or not--The thing is that Pentatonic melodies can be "modernized" into diatonic melodies by changing a couple notes--you can do the reverse, too, if you are so inclined--

To get the general pentatonic sound, you use only the black keys on the piano--


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Don Firth
Date: 29 May 05 - 02:53 PM

But of course that's not the only possible pentatonic scale. Generally pentatonic scales are characterized by intervals of whole-steps and thirds (major and/or minor), almost never half-steps. I've also heard them referred to as "gapped scales:" scales with notes missing.

And we haven't even got into modes yet! OY!

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 29 May 05 - 03:03 PM

Don Firth said:

Assuming your guitar (for example) is in tune.

Come on, Don, let's not get extreme here!

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: GUEST,Allen
Date: 29 May 05 - 03:04 PM

Aren't African American spirituals generaly pentatonic?


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Azizi
Date: 29 May 05 - 03:05 PM

I also found a website that provided this explanation:

"Pentatonic songs ...are confined to do, re, mi, so, and la. According to Kodaly, Orff, and many other theorists on music education, this restriction could be of immeasurable benefit in teaching music students of any age to sing or play in tune..."

-snip-

Click HERE for more information.

That website has three different lists of copyright free songs:
one for songs using so and mi

one for songs using la, so, and mi

and

one for songs using la, so, mi, re, and do.

Sorry to again show my ignorance, but does that mean that some pentatonic songs are composed with less than 5 notes {like those in the first two lists?

I know-I know. I need to take a music class. But I would appreciate an explanation.

Thanks,

Azizi


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Azizi
Date: 29 May 05 - 03:08 PM

Allen,

I've read that African American spirituals are usually pentatonic but that doesn't mean that I knew what that meant.

I'd love to read others' responses to your question.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 29 May 05 - 05:56 PM

The suffix 'penta' refers to five, 'tonic' refers to note. So a pentatonic scale by definition has five notes. Spirituals, both white and black, often use pentatonic scales.


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Subject: RE: harmony vs. melody
From: Goose Gander
Date: 29 May 05 - 05:57 PM

Oops, I should have said prefix instead of suffix. I'm hungover today, so I'm a dummy.


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