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Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie

DigiTrad:
VIVE L'AMOUR


Mr Happy 11 Jul 05 - 11:22 AM
Mr Happy 11 Jul 05 - 11:28 AM
GUEST 12 Jul 05 - 05:54 PM
Mr Happy 13 Jul 05 - 09:21 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jul 05 - 09:55 PM
open mike 13 Jul 05 - 10:00 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jul 05 - 10:12 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jul 05 - 10:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jul 05 - 10:25 PM
chico 07 Jan 06 - 05:16 PM
CapriUni 07 Jan 06 - 05:55 PM
chico 07 Jan 06 - 06:19 PM
CapriUni 07 Jan 06 - 06:26 PM
masato sakurai 07 Jan 06 - 07:10 PM
CapriUni 07 Jan 06 - 07:55 PM
CapriUni 07 Jan 06 - 08:03 PM
GUEST,Joe_F 07 Jan 06 - 09:57 PM
Jim Dixon 12 Nov 06 - 04:25 PM
Joe_F 12 Nov 06 - 08:53 PM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 21 Nov 06 - 02:37 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 11 Oct 08 - 03:35 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 08 - 05:53 PM
Reiver 2 11 Oct 08 - 06:38 PM
Joe Offer 11 Oct 08 - 07:11 PM
Joe_F 11 Oct 08 - 08:02 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 08 - 08:03 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 11 Oct 08 - 08:41 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 08 - 08:44 PM
Sorcha 11 Oct 08 - 09:09 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 08 - 11:30 PM
Monique 12 Oct 08 - 04:12 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 08 - 02:14 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 08 - 05:31 PM
Wilfried Schaum 12 Oct 08 - 05:49 PM
Reiver 2 12 Oct 08 - 09:17 PM
Joe Offer 12 Oct 08 - 10:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 08 - 10:30 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 08 - 10:37 PM
Malcolm Douglas 12 Oct 08 - 10:50 PM
Snuffy 13 Oct 08 - 12:54 PM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 13 Oct 08 - 07:01 PM
Snuffy 13 Oct 08 - 07:38 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Oct 08 - 07:38 PM
Wilfried Schaum 17 Oct 08 - 12:32 PM
Wilfried Schaum 17 Oct 08 - 12:41 PM
GUEST,A. Coletes 08 Nov 09 - 06:40 AM
IanC 09 Nov 09 - 05:59 AM
GUEST,Lloyd 04 Sep 10 - 03:20 PM
GUEST,Angel of the North 04 Mar 12 - 03:22 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Mar 12 - 05:43 PM
GUEST,Lauri 08 May 17 - 02:20 PM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Here's a Health to the Company
From: Mr Happy
Date: 11 Jul 05 - 11:22 AM

Nigel,

Many thanks for providing missing verse.

Anybody know any more?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Here's a Health to the Company
From: Mr Happy
Date: 11 Jul 05 - 11:28 AM

Actually, just found some more words, from here:

http://www.scoutsongs.com/lyrics/vivelamour.html



Let every good fellow, now join in our song,
Vive la compagnie!

Success to each other, and pass it along,
Vive la compagnie!

Chorus:
Vive la, vive la,
Vive l'amour.
Vive la, vive la,
Vive l'amour.
Vive l'amour, vive l'amour,
Vive la compagnie!!

A friend on your left, and a friend on your right,
Vive la compagnie!
In love and good fellowship, let us unite,
Vive la compagnie!

Repeat chorus

Now wider and wider, our circle expands,
Vive la compagnie!
We'll sing to our comrades, in far away lands
Vive la compagnie!

Repeat chorus

With friends all around us, we'll sing out our song
Vive la compagnie!
We'll banish our troubles, it won't take us long
Vive la compagnie!

Repeat chorus

Should time or occassion, compel us to part
Vive la compagnie!
These days shall forever, enliven our heart
Vive la compagnie!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Here's a Health to the Company
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Jul 05 - 05:54 PM

This is odviously a Fench song- anyone know origins?


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Subject: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Here's a health to the comp
From: Mr Happy
Date: 13 Jul 05 - 09:21 PM

@displaysong.cfm?SongID=7551


Anyone know how this obviously French sog came into English popularity?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Here's a health to the comp
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jul 05 - 09:55 PM

"Vive la Compagnie" is an old English song (1818 date in Traditional Ballads Index) which has become a Scout soug under the 'l'Amour' name, etc. So far not found in France.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Here's a health to the c
From: open mike
Date: 13 Jul 05 - 10:00 PM

vive la compagnie is a different song from health to the company.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Here's a Health to the Company
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jul 05 - 10:12 PM

The Bodleian Library has a 19th c. song called "Ireland Blocks the Wat," sung to the tune "Vive la Compagnie."

During the American Civil War, it was the tune for the Confederate song (1861), "Chivalrous C. S. A." Francis D. Allan, 1874, "Allan's Lone Star ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made During Confederate Times," Burt Franklin, NY.
Also printed as a song sheet in Baltimore, Sept, 12, 1861 (signed B (?)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Here's a Health to the Company
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jul 05 - 10:13 PM

That is "Ireland Blocked the War." (Gladstone's time)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Here's a health to the comp
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jul 05 - 10:25 PM

Open Mike is right; the old Scottish (Irish) song "Health to the Company" is not the same. Both are found, however, in thread 49309: Health

There is a translation of "Vive la Compagnie" as "Health to the Company;" it may also be a Scout version.


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Subject: Lyr Add: Viva La Compagnie
From: chico
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 05:16 PM


    G                   (D7          G)
Let every good fellow now join in our song,
       D7    G
Vive la compagnie!
    G                     (C)
Success to each other and pass it along,
Vive la compagnie!

G                C
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour
D7                G
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour
Em            Am
Vive l'amour, vive l'amour,
         D7    G
Vive la compagnie!

A friend on my left and a friend on my right,
Vive la compagnie!
In love and good fellowship let us unite,
Vive la compagnie!

Now wider and wider our circle expands,
Vive la compagnie!
We sing to our comrades in far away lands,
Vive la compagnie!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Viva La Compagnie
From: CapriUni
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 05:55 PM

Chico --

Did you write these verses? Or are they an alternate version you learned somewhere else?

Either way, I like them!

I also wrote new words to this tune. You might be interested:

New Birthday Song from CapriUni

Thank you for this version!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Viva La Compagnie
From: chico
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 06:19 PM

It's from a glee club recording. There's some music of this for choral somewhere (in the sheet music world, not online)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Vive La Compagnie
From: CapriUni
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 06:26 PM

For some reason, Mudcat has link this thread to "Wad Ye Do that?" in the DT, but I couldn't get the tune file there to play... odd.

In any case. I love the spirit of it. Much less mysogynist than the version I originally learned.
    Joe mistyped, but corrected his mistake. You must have caught it within a minute of my making it. Gee, I can't get away with anything here...
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Vive La Compagnie
From: masato sakurai
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 07:10 PM

From The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music:

Title: Vive La Compagnie. Solo & Chorus.
Composer, Lyricist, Arranger: Composed & Arranged for the Piano Forte.
Publication: Baltimore: F.D. Benteen, 137 Baltimore St., 1844.
Form of Composition: strophic with chorus
Instrumentation: piano and voice
First Line: Let Bachus to Venus libations pour forth, Vive la compagnie
First Line of Chorus: Vive la vive la vive l'amour


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Vive La Compagnie
From: CapriUni
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 07:55 PM

First Line: Let Bachus to Venus libations pour forth, Vive la compagnie

Ooh! Now, there's a verse I've not encountered before!

:::Clicks link to see if she can find the second line:::


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Vive La Compagnie
From: CapriUni
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 08:03 PM

Joe -- of course we won't let you get away with anything! We love you too much to let you get away.

After all, you are one of "kind, worthy hosts"!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Vive La Compagnie
From: GUEST,Joe_F
Date: 07 Jan 06 - 09:57 PM

A long time ago, I saw a German songbook that had songs from all over the world, not only with the words translated into German, but with the tunes modified to fit in the beerhall tradition. This one became a march -- and "Oh, Susanna" became a waltz! It was a charming cultural phenomenon.

--- Joe Fineman    joe_f@verizon.net

||: Fame, like war, is an old evil exacerbated by progress in technique. :||


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Subject: Lyr Add: VIVE LA COMPAGNIE (1844)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 04:25 PM

From the sheet music at The Library of Congress American Memory Collection:

VIVE LA COMPAGNIE
Published by F. D. Benteen, Baltimore, 1844.

Let Bacchus to Venus libations pour forth, Vive la compagnie!
And let us make use of our time while it lasts. Vive la compagnie!

CHORUS: Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour!
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour!
Vive l'amour, vive l'amour,
Vive la compagnie!


Let ev'ry old bachelor fill up his glass, Vive la compagnie!
And drink to the health of his favorite lass. Vive la compagnie! CHORUS

Let ev'ry married man drink to his wife, Vive la compagnie!
The friend of his bosom and comfort of life. Vive la compagnie! CHORUS

Come fill up your glasses—I'll give you a toast, Vive la compagnie!
Here's a health to our friend—our kind worthy host. Vive la compagnie! CHORUS

Since all with good humor, I've toasted so free, Vive la compagnie!
I hope it will please you to drink now with me. Vive la compagnie! CHORUS

[From James J. Fuld, "The Book of World-Famous Music":
"The words and/or music of this French-titled song, have been found published in Germany, England, and the United States—but not in France!"

[The German lyrics, called Ich Nehm' Mein Gläschen in die Hand were first published in 1818.]


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Here's a health to the c
From: Joe_F
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 08:53 PM

I remember seeing, a long time ago, the German version in a German songbook. It was recognizably the same song, but it was in double rather than triple time (as you might guess from the title Jim Dixon cites), and the chorus went

Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour!
Vive la, vive la, hopsasa!
Vive la compagnie!

I was highly amused, at the time, to see the song "Germanized" in that way; but now it seems they were actually entitled to it.

That book also had, contrariwise, a version of "Oh, Suzannah" in waltz time.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Here's a health to the comp
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 21 Nov 06 - 02:37 PM

Is there any relation between this and "Willie was a Wanton Wag", from the late seventeenth- early eighteenth century? Thomas Davis set "Clare's Dragoons" to a "Vive-la" song, anyway.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Vive La Compagnie
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 03:35 PM

So, is this song NOT originally French? C'est dommage!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 05:53 PM

There is no reason to consider a French origin for this English drinking song. It may have had its origin in schools such as Cambridge, Oxford, or Edinburgh, where French and classical languages were taught as important to an educated person.

Not certain when the title "Vive l'amour" appeared, but it is found in several 19th c. books of student song, e. g. "Carmina collegensis," 1868, and the "Scottish Students' Song Book (mine is the 1892 ed.), where the first verse, "Let Bacchus to Venus..." is dropped.

Parodies in "Carmina collegensis" (1868) are "Vive le N. Y. U.," and, at Dartmouth, "Let Ev'ry Young Sophomore Fill Up His Glass."
In the Dartmouth song, classic Greek is substituted for the French; the chorus becomes an exhortation in Greek:
Hetai, Hetai, Hetaroi....... Hetaroi Chairete! (Companions, rejoice!).
The Hetaroi were mounted troops in the army of Alexander the Great.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Reiver 2
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 06:38 PM

I had always thought the song had a French origin but I've never seen it listed as such. I've only seen it referred to as a "college song," a "Glee Club song" or a "drinking song." I first learned it, under the name "Vive L'Amour" from my grandmother, who learned it at the small college she attended in Nebraska, Doan College, in the mid 1880s. She was a confirmed teetotaler, but had this repertoire of (mostly) drinking songs that she'd sing to me when she visited us. She lived to be almost 101 and before she died passed on to me an old book with those songs she used to sing when she was a college girl. The book is entitled "Songs of Yale," revised edition, edited by Charles S. Elliot and revised and edited by Elmer P. Howe "of the Yale Glee Club," Published by Taintor Brothers, Merrill & CO., NY, 1880. Doan College had adapted the Yale songs as - since both names were one syllable - they were easily transposed. ("Here's to good old Yale, drink it down, drink it down..." became "Here's to good old Doan... etc.") The Preface to the book contains this statement, "The college singing now in vogue was started on the introduction of "Gaudeamus" and "Integer Vitae" from the German Universities.... Since then tunes have been appropriated from various sources." The lyric in the Yale version are identical to those posted above by Chico-PM. My grandmother had pencilled in another verse that they apparently sang at Doan:

Drink to the health of our chairman so bold;
Drink to the health of these boys young and old;
May we all meet in the Heavenly fold;
Vive la compagnie.

Lynn Rohrbough, of the Cooperative Recreation Service of Delaware, Ohio, published a great many small "campfire sing-along" songbooks, through his Cooperative Song Service. They were very popular with Boy and Girl Scout groups, church groups and international work-camp groups. I have about a dozen of them in my possession and several include "Vive L'Amour." Nowhere, however, have I seen any notations about the origin of the song.

Reiver 2


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 07:11 PM

I was taken aback a few years ago when I saw "Gaudeamus Igitur" identified as a "German Drinking Song," but I suppose it's true. Cicero never saw the likes of it, nor did Caesar.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Joe_F
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 08:02 PM

A German word got shoehorned into the following stanza:

Pereat tristitia,
Pereant osores,
Pereat diabolus
Quivis antiburschius,
Atque irrisores.

which (I suppose) means "Away with sadness, Away with cares, Away with every devil of a GDI, likewise the scoffers."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 08:03 PM

Digression-
Some old school songs were completely in Latin. "Alumnorium Carmen," seven verses to the tune of Gaudeamus igitur, was sung at Columbia, and was written by J. MacMullen, '37. Other examples in Carmina collegensis and other books of college songs. A few in classical Greek are known.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 08:41 PM

Thanks, Q! It's interesting to me, because I'm playing for a fundraiser for the local theater next weekend and they've chosen a French cafe theme. So they ask an a cappella chorus leader who also plays New England contra dance tunes on accordion and Irish tunes on concertina, not to mention English morris tunes! So in addition to French Canadian dances, we're doing Alouette, Vive la compagnie, and La Vie en Rose!

The other reason I'm bemused is that I mentored a young French woman a few years ago when I was an elementary music teacher, and she suggested Vive la compagnie as a good old French folk song!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 08:44 PM

Lyr. Add: VIVE LE CAPITAINE JOHN
Air- "Vive L'amour"

1
In ye days when ye salvages lived in ye land,
Vive le Capitaine John,
And ye Injun papooses dug holes in ye sand,
Vive le Capitaine John.
A maiden was born of ye cannibal race,
Who delighted not in ye fight or chase,
But loved to view ye jovial face
Of ye jolie Capitaine John.
2
But now as the legend doth truly relate,
Vive le Capitaine John!
Poor Johnnie was taken and doomed to his fate,
Vive le Capitaine John.
He was doomed to be hung or knock'd on ye head,
By ye salvage adze of ye Injuns red,
Until, indeed, he was dead, dead, dead,
Vive le Capitaine John.
3
Now Pocahontas hearing ye vote,
Vive le Capitaine John!
She took some birch barque and thereupon wrote,
Vive le Capitaine John.
If you'll promise to give your heart to me,
You shall keep your head and go scot-free,
And together we'll live right jollilee,
Vive le Capitaine John.
4
But Johnnie, ye gay deceiver, alas!
Vive le Capitaine John!
When he'd saved his scalp, it came to pass,
Vive le Capitaine John!
He packed up his trunk and fled from the shore,
And left Pocahontas his loss to deplore,
While Johnnie was more than "half seas o'er,"
Vive le Capitaine John!

pp. 177-178, Songs of Amherst, "Carmina Collegensia," 1868, Oliver Ditson & Co.

Also: no. 64, lacking verse 4, Charles H. Levermore, 1895, "The Academy Song-Book," Ginn & Co.; book dedicated to Adelphi Academy, p. 202 with score.
Composer not given in either book. Not mentioned in Traditional Ballad Index or Fuld.

(Is this ye true story of John Smith and Pocahontas?)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Sorcha
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 09:09 PM

OMG! Just saw this thread...we used to sing this at CHURCH gatherings! LOLOLOL! Now, it WAS Disciples of Christ/First Christian Church, so 'rather' liberal but still....if they had KNOWN it was a 'college or drinking' song would it have been allowed? I find this just too amusing!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 08 - 11:30 PM

If not English, it could be a German student drinking song; the other possible origin.
Wolfgang's comment would be appreciated.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Monique
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 04:12 AM

Guys, you have a song called "Vive la compagnie" on the Isle of Jersey site Les pages jèrriaises and it's a drinking song

Here are the lyrics, the language is Jèrriais (Anglo-Normand)


VIVE LA COMPAGNIE

Allons mes bouonnes gens
Vite un verre à la main!
Vive la Compagnie!
Empliez-lé jusqu'au bord
Et pis vied'gis lé bein
Vive la Compagnie!

Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la Compagnie!

À toutes les jeunes filles
Tch'attendent un amouotheux
Vive la Compagnie!
L'vez vos verres bein haut,
Ch'est un pliaîsi j'sis seux,
Vive la Compagnie!

Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la Compagnie!

Qué touos l's hoummes mathiés
Bevent un verre en même temps,
Vive la Compagnie!
Les siens qui les picagnent et
Qui l's aiment tout l'temps,
Vive la Compagnie!

Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la Compagnie!

Eune dernié santé ch'est à
Touos nous chutte fais,
Vive la Compagnie!
Plaisi, prospéthité,
Ridgeu et succès,
Vive la Compagnie!

Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour,
Vive la Compagnie.


On Jstor you can find a Canadian song with a chorus going "Vive l'amour vive la compagnie" with the same lyrics to the wellknown kids song "J'ai descendu dans mon jardin" aka "Gentil coquelicot" usually sung to a different tune. There's a sheet music on this page. You can also hear the tune to it here.

If the song did originate in Jersey, it could explain that it traveled to Canada and was translated into English.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 02:14 PM

The Canadian song, definitely the same, was collected by A. Lanctot, the MS communicated to Marius Barbeau, who published several collections of Canadian folksongs. The MS is from c. 1860; how long the song was in existence is not known.
French Canada has many French songs, fishermen from France regularly came to Canada from the 17th c. on, so songs of coastal France are common in the Gaspe and elsewhere (Portuguese fishermen may have fished the Canadian coast as early as the time of Columbus, an interesting story!).
Songs more likely came from places like St. Malo, but Jersey can't be ruled out; some time ago I posted a Jersey song that appeared in Canada, but have lost it.
However, the earliest occurrences of "Vive la..." seem to be German (1818), and English of the same date (but I haven't been able to verify this). The Canadian song could well have been based on 1844 or earlier sheet music from the U. S. or elsewhere. De Marsan distributed "Vive la..." on a song sheet c. 1850.

The version from Jersey cannot be dated, but it suggests that further hunting is needed, however, esp. in view of "Vive la liberte," etc.   

The song was known in England, some 19th c. parodies.

English translations of French songs- "Vive la liberte," "Vive le roi," seem to be the same basic song, although not drinking songs. These broadsheets were mid- to early 19th c, one printing of "Vive le roi" from 1819-44. Did these derive from the French revolution, and were they based on an earlier song? I don't have the tunes so I can't be certain of the relationship; Monique, perhaps you can fill in this blank.


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Subject: ADD: Vive! Le Roi!
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 05:31 PM

"Vive la liberte" is to the tune of "When the Southern Breezes," Ballads Cat. 2806 c.16(133), bet. 1813-1838; thus does not seem to belong with "Vive la compagne."

No tune is given for Vive! Vive le Roi! It may not belong here.

VIVE! VIVE LE ROI!

1
Swearing death to traitor slave,
Hand we clench, sword we draw,
Heaven defend the true and brave,
Vive! Vive le roi!

2
Prime the cup of loyalty,
Men respect the social law;
Lift the social pledge on high
Vive! Vive le roi!

3
Hearts that patriot thoughts inspire,
Rebel thoughts ne'er shall awe;
Thus 'till life's last throb expire,
Vive, vive le roi!

J. Pitts, London, bet. 1819-1844. Harding B 15(251).
Bodleian Collection.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 05:49 PM

I'm checking the 'Cat only late at night to strenghthen me for an amputation tomorrow or the day after (don't panic! pinky toe only), so I only can promise you the old German student drinking song with translation when I've hobbled back again to my PC. It's very lively, accompanying the round of a tumbler.


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Subject: ADD: Lauriger / Gaudeamus Igitur
From: Reiver 2
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 09:17 PM

There seems to be some interest here on the 'Cat in the Latin drinking songs. Were they all German songs originally? If so, why did students in Germany choose to use Latin in these songs? Anybody know? Does anyone here speak or understand Latin?

The old Yale Songbook my grandmother used to sing from has only two songs in Latin:

LAURIGER

Lauriger Horatius, Quam dixisti verum
Fugit Eurocitius, Tempus e dax rerum

CHO: Ubisunt O pocula, Dulci ora mele
    Rixae pax et oscula, Rubentis puelae

Crescit uva molliter, Et puella crescit
Sed poeta turpitur, Sitiens canescit

CHO:

Quid juvat aeternitas, Nominis amare
Nisi terrae filias, Licet, et potare!

CHO:


GAUDEAMUS

Gaudeamus igitur, Juvenes dum sumus,
Gaudeamus igitur, Juvenes dum sumus,
Post jucundam juventutem, Post molestam senectutem,
Nos habebit humus
Nos habebit humus

There are eight(8!)more verses which I won't bother to print unless someone really wants them. (I only remember grandma singing the first verse -- usually repeating it once or twice.)

GAUDEAMUS is translated as:

Let us now in youth rejoice, none can justly blame us,
"   " "   "   "      "      "   "    "    "    ",
For when golden youth has fled, and in age our joys are dead,
Then the dust doth claim us,
"   "    "    "    "    "

(I have no idea how accurate the translation is.)

LAURIGER is translated as:

Poet of the laurel wreath, Horace, true thy saying,
Time outstrips the tempest's breath, for no mortal staying.

CHO: Bring me cups that Bacchus crowns, cups on mirth attending,
    Give me blushing maiden's frowns, frowns in kisses ending.

(I suspect the translator has taken a few liberties with this.)

There are also somewhat clever "paraphrased" lyrics:

1)Old man Horace, sprigged with bay, Truly you do say sir,
Time streaks faster on it's way, than 'two-forty' racer,

CHO: Give us but our rum to sip, We don't care a clam-shell,
    So we kiss the pouting lip, Of the bloomin damsel.

2)With bright beauty blush the grapes -- so the women show it,
Longing for their lovely shapes, Sings the tipsy poet.

3)Tell me what great fame avails, Save we can hug tightly,
All the jolly little 'quails,' And get somewhat 'slightly.'

[I fear I've gotten somewhat away from Vive L'Amour. Oh, well...

Reiver 2


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 10:25 PM

Hi, Reiver -

Those of us who were victims (?) of a Classical Education took Latin as a matter of course. I got my six years of Latin in a Catholic seminary in Milwaukee, and many of our UK Mudcatters also took Latin. Many of us also took Greek, and often either French or German or Spanish (in that order of preference).

Latin was the language of university education in Europe for a long,
long time - so it would be natural for university students to sing songs in Latin, since folk songs in the vernacular languages were for the common people and beneath the stature of a university student.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 10:30 PM

Lyr. Add: IRELAND BLOCKS THE WAY
Air: "Vive la compagne"

1
What Gladstone is to the working men
Is "Ireland blocks the way."
You must give him your votes, he says; and then
"Ireland blocks the way."
Chorus:
'Tis Ireland first, and Ireland last, and Ireland every day;
And the working man must shift as he can,
For "Ireland blocks the way."
2
He's in favour of this, in favour of that;
But "Ireland blocks the way,"
And naught he will do, he tells us flat
For "Ireland blocks the way."
3
Toiling millions may suffer wrong
While "Ireland blocks the way;"
They must wait, he says, be it never so long,
For "Ireland blocks the way."
4
We are fools if we wait at his request,
While "Ireland blocks the way,"
The "Union" leaders have served us best,
And they've nothing to block the way.
5
No "Ireland this," no "Ireland that," no Ireland every day
But they do what they can, for each honest man,
With nothing to block their way.
6
They have served us well in their six years' spell,
No Ireland blocked their way;
For Ireland's self they have governed so well
No longer it blocks the way.
7
Then Gladstone's train may plead in vain,
While "Ireland blocks the way;"
We know our friends, their way is plain,
They've nothing to block the way.
8
They do not prate of Ireland's wrongs, they sweep them all away
And do what they can for each honest man,
With nothing to block the way.

'Pub. by Liverpool Corn Trade News.
Ballads Cat., Johnson Ballads, 1854A, Bodleian Collection.

Use of "Vive la Compagne" for political parody.
No date, but Gladstone was a champion of the Home Rule Bill which would have established self-government for Ireland. He served 1868-74, 1880-85, 1886 and 1892-94; I would guess the broadside dates from 1875-1880, between his 1st and 2nd terms as prime minister, because six years of Union rule is mentioned.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 10:37 PM

Latin was still prominent in education in the 1930s; We took three years in public school and this was in New Mexico. We had to write an essay in Latin to pass the 3rd year.
I remember my grandfather reciting in Greek and Latin, both required in his school days.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 12 Oct 08 - 10:50 PM

Latin was still taught in many UK Grammar Schools in the '60s and '70s; I survived seven years of it. The chorus of the school song was in Latin, come to think of it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Snuffy
Date: 13 Oct 08 - 12:54 PM

Just because it's in a minority (preferably Celtic) language, doesn't make it the original version: the Jersey pages are a total red herring - most of the songs there have been translated into Jerriase very recently.

Or did Paul Simon really steal Comme un pont à travers d's ieaux troubliées and translate it into Bridge Over Troubled Water? There are songs there by the Beatles, Dylan, etc, etc. Good fun perhaps, but nothing there for the serious researcher.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 13 Oct 08 - 07:01 PM

Chicken or egg? The finale of Brahms' "Academic Festival Overture" echoes the strains of "Gaudeamus Igatur." Did Brahms inspire the song, or vice versa. I had always thought of it as a hoary old university anthem from the late middle ages.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Snuffy
Date: 13 Oct 08 - 07:38 PM

Gaudeamus is far older than Brahms. The Wikipedia article on it translates a 1781 version. Brahms was definitely quoting the well-known ancient student song, not the other way round.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Oct 08 - 07:38 PM

Gaudeamus igitur is generally heard in the 1781 form; Brahms wrote his A. F. O. (properly Akademische Festouvertüre) some 100 years later, incorporating bits of several popular university songs.

See thread 82566: Gaudeamus igitur

No relationship to "Vive...." except that both were often sung by students, inebriate or not.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 17 Oct 08 - 12:32 PM

Vive la compagneia

lively
1. (solo) Ich nehm mein Gläschen in die Hand,
(tutti) vive la compagneia! [the g is omitted in the pornunciation]
(solo) und fahr damit ins Unterland,
(tutti) vive la compagneia!
   (refrain, tutti)vive la, vive la, vive la va,
   vive la, vive la, hopsasa!
   vive la compagneia!

2. Ich nehm' mein Gläschen wieder hervor
und halt's ans recht' und linke Ohr.
3. Ich setz' mein Gläschen an den Mund
und trink' es aus bis auf den Grund.
4. Dem Gläschen ist sein Recht gescheh'n,
was oben ist, muß unten steh'n.
5. Das Gläschen, das muß wandern
von einem Freund zum andern.

1. I take my glass with my hand
and go with it to the Lowlands [the glass is knocked with its brim under the tabletop]
2. I get it out again
and put it near my right and left ear.
3. I put my glass to my mouth
and empty it completely.
4. The glass has got its due
and must stand upside down.
5. The glass must wander
from one friend to the other. [the glass is filled again and handed to the neighbour]
[repeat procedure for all participants]

The parts 3 to 5 of the song can be retraced to older songs with different tunes back to the 16th century; apparently a special tumbler without a foot was handed around and had to be emptied completely, since it could only stand on its brim. The rigmaroles at the beginning (putting the glass elsewhere before drinking) must be younger additions. The tune stems from the 17th century; in the present form it is used since 1815 at German universities. It is the same one as given in the DT, which - alas! - seems to be a little bit corrupted.
I tought it my fags (germ. Fux = freshman) when I was Fag Major some 40 years ago.

Sing and enjoy
Wilfried


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 17 Oct 08 - 12:41 PM

Where is my post I sent yesterday about the A.F.O? If lost, I'll send again one of the next days, my wife is pressing me back to bed again, since it is better for my wounded foot.

see you laters, alligators


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: GUEST,A. Coletes
Date: 08 Nov 09 - 06:40 AM

Byron writes:

Mariana has made a conquest of Dervise Tahiri, Viscille [,]Fletcher and Sullee my new Tartar have each a mistress, "Vive l'Amour!"

Letter to J.C. Hobhouse from Athens, 23 August 1810.

Byron writes the words in quotation marks. If this is what I think it is, then it is the earliest reference so far to the song!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: IanC
Date: 09 Nov 09 - 05:59 AM

Needn't be the song of course. Both the song & Byron's quote are probably based on a common (to both) literary reference.

:-)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: GUEST,Lloyd
Date: 04 Sep 10 - 03:20 PM

Growing up in Quebec in the 40-50s I seem to recall the last two lines of the chorus as ..

Vive le roi, vive la renie, vive la compagnie

Can't recall any other lyrics


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: GUEST,Angel of the North
Date: 04 Mar 12 - 03:22 AM

I first encountered this song as one of the traditional songs in the old BBC Radio schools' series Singing Together. As fas as I remember, no provenance was given.

The opening chorus sung by primary age kids was thus:
Let every good fellow now pick up his glass
Vive la compagnie
And drink to the health of our glorious class
Vive la compagnie

The chorus turned up together with 2 lines of a totally different song as a fragment for a starter choir begun recently in my part of the UK. I am trying to find out in which book the tutor found it.
Onto 2 totally different verse lines, the chorus was rejigged, plus the rhythm of one line changed to:

Viva la, viva la, Viva l'amour
Viva la, viva la, Viva l'amour
Viva la, viva la, Viva l'amour
Viva la companie.

The new spelling is as per the book.
My own hunch is to set it as an upper class drinking song of the early 19th C but have no evidence whatsoever. Nice to see it being discussed, though.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Mar 12 - 05:43 PM

See thread 82928 for more information.
Vive l'Amour/Compagnie

Canadienne song posted in thread 13570
French Canadian Songs


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Subject: RE: Origins: Vive l'Amour/Vive La Compagnie
From: GUEST,Lauri
Date: 08 May 17 - 02:20 PM

Earliest German orign, at least 1816 (considering the speed of releasing books, at least 1814-15):

https://books.google.ee/books?id=e8VLAQAAMAAJ&pg
https://books.google.ee/books?id=nAlFAAAAIAAJ&pg
http://meestelaul.metsatoll.ee/foorum/read.php?9,3196


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