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Lyr Add: Assorted Campaign Songs (1840 election)

chico 01 Aug 05 - 04:51 AM
chico 01 Aug 05 - 04:54 AM
chico 01 Aug 05 - 04:54 AM
chico 01 Aug 05 - 04:55 AM
GUEST,.gargoyle 02 Aug 05 - 12:09 AM
Peace 02 Aug 05 - 02:09 AM
Peace 02 Aug 05 - 02:27 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Aug 05 - 02:29 AM
chico 05 Aug 05 - 12:32 AM
Joe Offer 05 Aug 05 - 03:42 AM
GUEST 05 Aug 05 - 10:21 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Aug 05 - 11:00 PM
GUEST,Portersn 17 Oct 14 - 04:02 PM
Rapparee 17 Oct 14 - 09:47 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Bullet-Proof (Campaign of 1840)
From: chico
Date: 01 Aug 05 - 04:51 AM


AIR -- 'Auld Lang Syne'

    C       Am Dm      G7
Oh, no, he never lost a fight!
      C    7       F
He's even bullet proof
7   C         Am      Dm      G7
For why? When e'er the battle raged,
    Am    F   G7 C (F)
He always kept aloof

   C       Am    Dm       G7
He always kept aloof, my friends
    C      7      F
He always kept aloof
F#   C         Am    Dm      G7
And that's the reason why Old Tip
E   F    Dm G7   C
Was always bullet proof

Twas very cautious in Old Tip
Twas very brave and fair
The more our British foes came on
The more he wasn't there

Twas very lucky for him too
It was, it was indeed
The more he didn't get a wound
the more he didn't bleed

But while retreating through the wood
And through the tangled fern
He tore his mustn't-mention-'ems
And had to put on her'n

And thus the war path he did tread
through all the fearful fray
But always (as old settlers said)
he ran the other way

But he had high authority
to thus preserve his tallow
for falstaff says 'discretion is
The better part of valor"

Then here's a health to Tip-Canoe,
"The hero of defeat"
As safe a generalissimo
As ever beat retreat!

For oft his gallant troops, tis said
Paternally he'd tell
To stand a little farther off
And they could see as well

And many a prudent soldier, who
To his advice gave heed
Went off without a single wound
To carry home for seed

And thus the mighty general
Through all the bloody war
Escaped with bare a bramble scratch
His sole and only scar

[From the Albany Argus, May 18, 1840. Democratic counter-productive ballad which attacked a popular war-hero too severely]


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Subject: Lyr Add: Last Whig Song (Campaign of 1840)
From: chico
Date: 01 Aug 05 - 04:54 AM


AIR -- 'Old King Cole'

D          A7          D       G          D          A7    D
Old north bend was a jolly old soul and a jolly old soul was he
                A7         D             G|Em       D                A7         D
He called for pipe and he called for his bowl and he called for his committee of three

He called for a mug of apple juice, the best there was in the larder
And he told his committee 'Make no excuse, every day it is growing harder!'

And the General sat by his own fireside in the midst of advisers three
"I'm puzzled" said he, "With my numerous friends, why can they not quiet be?"

"Some ask me one thing, some ask another they bother me most to death
If I say yes and no to this, that and t'other 'twill surely take all my breath"

"If I say yes to the north, I'm gone at the south; I'm glad that the nation's no wider
I declare I am very much down at the mouth so give us a swing of that cider"

[The committee sat -- not a word they said, but they kept up a terrible thinking
And they watched the nod of the old man's head, while he the mug of cider was drinking]

At length they spoke, "We've concluded sir, that you answer no more of these letters
'Tis strange how the people, poor ignorant souls will constantly pester their betters"

"You can hand them all over to us, North Bend, we'll be general for you a while
But we'll give you advice, the advice of a friend: Drink cider, drink or you'll spile!"

The general nodded as wont to do to this lordly committee of three
And ever since then the old man is mum for a still small voice is he

Go down to North Bend, the old hero you'll find, as jolly a coon as can be
But question him not, or he'll send you away, To ask his Committee of three!

[Since harrison's popularity seemed to grow in almost direct proportion to his studied evasiveness on the issues, the Democrats may have used this song to ridicule Harrison's "'Committee of Correspondence'. However, since Van Buren was so unpopular, the General's 'above the battle stance' made him even more appealing. A 'Coon' was the mascot for the Whig party.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: chico
Date: 01 Aug 05 - 04:54 AM

AIR -- 'Rose of Alabama' (With allowance. Each line ends with 'A', 'G#' 'E' on 'Van Buren'.)

    E          A
Who never did a noble deed?
    E             B7
Who of the people took no heed?
    E                A       F#
Who is the worst of tyrant's breed?
    E
Van Buren!

Who, while but a little boy,
Was counted crafty, cunning, sly
Who with the wily fox could vie?

Who when an urchin, young at school
Would of each classmate make a tool
In cheating whot he roost would rule

By scheming who to England went?
By intrigue who is President?
By proxy who has millions spent?

Who wants to bring the poor man down
To work a week for half-a-crown?
Such tenty seven monarchs own

Who when distress and want was ours
Profusely scattered golden showers
To buy French Artiifical flowers

Who never had an honest thought
Who to their senses others brought?
And has himself a Tartar caught?

Who like the wily serpent clings
Who like the pois'nous adder string
Who is more base than basest Kings

Who rules us with an iron rod
Who moves at Satan's beck and nod
Who heeds not man who heeds not God?

Who would his friend his country sell
Do other deeds too base to tell
Deserves the lowest place in Hell

[From 'A Miniature of Martin Van Buren']


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Subject: Lyr Add: When This Old Hat (Campaign of 1840)
From: chico
Date: 01 Aug 05 - 04:55 AM

When this old hat was new (Democrat's Version)
AIR --- 'Folks that put on airs'

      D                G          D          A7
When this old hat was new, some twenty years ago
    Bm            G                A7         D
The Fed'ralists began to fear their final overthrow
    A7             D            G                  D
And so to keep the party up and make it look like 'blue'
          Bm                   G                  A7             D
They've changed their names a dozen times since this old hat was new

    D               G            D                   A7
And so to keep the party up and make it look like 'blue'
          Bm                   G                  A7    (G)      D
They've changed their names a dozen times since this old hat was new

When this old hat was new, they thought the people fools
And still they hope for Fed'ral ends to find them willing tools
But though they've often changed their names as knaves are wont to do
Their doctrines look just as they did when this old hat was new

When this old hat was new, the Feds despised the poor
And blushed if ever they were caught within a 'cabin' door
The Democrats alone were found among the toiling crew
Logs were not rolled in ruffle shirts, when this old hat was new

When this old hat was new, 'tis said, one Henry Clay
While all the Feds cried out, 'Amen' would thus devoutly pray
He prayed for 'War and pestilence and hungry famine too
Before a military chief!', when this old hat was new

When this old hat was new, if I remember well
Among the heroes of the time, 'Old Hickory' bore the bell
'Dick Johnson' next in honor stood among the noble few
For Dick was 'Hero of the Thames', when this old hat was new.

When this old hat was new, the fed'rals used to boast
But often found the reckoning to be without their host
And now they think that Harrison will 'run' till all is blue
Because he used to run so fast when this old hat was new,

When this old hat was new, ere 'patent Whigs' were made
Old Tip was a Federalist and wore the black cockade
But now he is--the Lord knows what--he's hidden from our view!
Though I suspect he's what he was when this old hat was new,

When this old hat was new, Van Buren was the man
The people loved, altho' abused by all the Federal clan
A Democrat, unnmoved, unchanged, still to his country true
He's ever been her friend and guard, Since this old hat was new

[Albany Argus, August 29, 1840 Verses]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 02 Aug 05 - 12:09 AM

CHIVA - do you OWN this "Miniature of Martin Van Buren?"

Where have you seen and read it....where may we see and read it?

Was it carried in a locket to his sweetheart? (name and date please)

Sincerely,
Gargoyle

Cross over the border or the bi/lingual divide....and you will perhaps find a more filling audience for "Legenda de Azatlan" (at the moment the MC immigration quotas are filled with the UK and an occasional Icelander.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: Peace
Date: 02 Aug 05 - 02:09 AM

Keep up the good work, Chico.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: Peace
Date: 02 Aug 05 - 02:27 AM

http://dig.lib.niu.edu/message/songs/1list-harrison.html


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Aug 05 - 02:29 AM

? Earliest sheet music "Rose of Alabama" found is 1846, six years after this 'song.'


"A Miniature of Martin Van Buren" was published in 1840, 54pp. "With a selection of the best and most popular Tippicanoe songs."
A copy in the Library of Congress. (or put it on your want list with your friendly cut-rate rare book dealer)

Do you have a copy?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: chico
Date: 05 Aug 05 - 12:32 AM

This is from Silber's "Songs America Voted By". The music included was a tune very similar to "Rose of Alabama" mainly the last line was cut shorter. I think either Silber set it anachronistically, or the tune simply mirrors "rose of alabama" by chance or copying. But i didn't make it up.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Aug 05 - 03:42 AM

Gargoyle has a good point, Chico - it really helps to have source information.
It also might help to have all the 1840 songs in one thread, but that's your choice.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Aug 05 - 10:21 PM

Of the Miniature of Martin Van Buren, Vera Brodsky Lawrence (Music for Patriots, Politicians, and Presidents, 1975) has this to say:

"Of the avalanche of Whig songbooks that descended in 1840, none rivaled in unmitigated malignity the anonymous collection called A Miniature of Martin Van Buren. Some of the songs were a distillation of Ogle's "Omnibus of Lies"; others -set to German tunes-derided Van Buren's Dutch derivation; still others lampooned Van Buren's Democratic henchmen nearly as mercilessly as they did the president. A Miniature of Martin Van Buren may very well represent the nadir of sung political abuse."

"VanVuren" must have been a long set of verses. Brodsky prints 16 stanzas, only 6 of which are among the 10 above. The additional ones are below. She list no tune. Perhaps it was done as a recitation at rallies with the crowd shouting out the last line of the verses (pure speculation)

Who with a Sophist's subtle art,
Could act the politician's part,
And either party aid or thwart?
Van Buren.

Who when his peers in heart and mind,
To scant and frugal fare confin'd,
From gorgeous, golden service din'd?
Van Buren.

Who finds his own a sinking ship,
And sadly hangs his nether lip,
And vents his spleen upon "Old Tip?"
Van Buren.
Who when November shall come round,
Shall hear reverberate the sound,
Magician! Thou art wanting found?
Van Buren.

Who then shall take his final look,
At toys in which such pride he took,
Next March-shall march to Kinderhook?
Van Buren.

Now rally at the Ballot Box,
And vote the Patriot Farmer's Prox,
So shall absquatulate the Fox.
Van Buren.
Who was faithless from his youth,
Who hates the light and scorns the truth,
And worst of Sophists is forsooth?
Van Buren.

Who never did a noble deed,
Who of the people took no heed,
But followed worst of Tyrants' creed?
Van Buren.

I've been a knave-a knave's a fool,
Have ever been the Devil's tool.
Must stand upon contrition' stool,
Van Buren.

Who tried to climb ambition's ladder,
At ev'ry step grew mad and mader,
And now is dwindled to a shadow?
Van Buren.

0 Lord! Have mercy on us Whigs,
And drive away the Loco Pigs,
And he who ran so many rigs,
Van Buren.

If you have read this far, perhaps you are wondering about Ogle's Omnibus of Lies. Well Brodsky cover that also:

"To counterbalance their resplendent image of Old Tip, the cider-drinking knight of the log cabin, the Whigs invented the corrupt figure of King Matty, the "champaigne"-guzzling despot of the presidential palace. In April 1840, Congressman Charles Ogle of Pennsylvania harangued the House for three whole days, reciting a catalog of outrageous accusations that branded Van Buren as an effete voluptuary who heedlessly squandered the public's money to satisfy his own decadent tastes. Ogle charged Van Buren with having transformed the White House into an "Asiatic mansion" by introducing such un-American exotica as fancy French cooking served on gold plate, French artificial flowers, imported carpets, nine-foot-high, gold-framed mirrors, and-most reprehensible of all-a bathtub. At the presidential open house on New Year's Day, Ogle complained that at the public expense Van Buren always had the Marine Band "stationed in the spacious front hall, from whence they swell [ed] the rich saloons of the palace with 'Hail to the Chief' . . . and other humdrum airs. . . ." Not content with the conformation of the landscape surrounding the White House, "Sweet Sandy Whiskers" was accused of having indulged his unnatural proclivities by having constructed "a number of clever sized hills, every pair of which. . . was designed to resemble and assume the form of AN AMAZON'S BOSOM, with a miniature knoll or hillock on its apex, to denote the ni-ple." Ogle's demagoguery was reprinted in the Whig newspapers and widely circulated among the faithful in pamphlet form as well. Needless to say, Whig voices were soon caroling denunciations of Van Buren's "sickly and vicious tastes."

My little dictionary doesn't have "absquatulate"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Van Buren! (Campaign of 1840)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Aug 05 - 11:00 PM

Absquatulate- to depart, flee, abscond, to run away. Earliest appearance in print, 1830, in the Painesville, Ohio, Telegraph.
Absquatulize (same meaning) appeared in 1829 in the Camden Journal, South Carolina.
From J. E. Lighter, 1994, Dictionary of American Slang, vol. 1.

American Memory has an anti-van Buren song called "The Political Race," tune "Dearest Maie."
The same song sheet also has "The Fox and Geese" to "Oh, Susanna."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Assorted Campaign Songs (1840 election)
From: GUEST,Portersn
Date: 17 Oct 14 - 04:02 PM

frecuencia, ????anterior la Calendario y también mencionada último su más años años. ha ejecutar independientemente de abrumadoras frustrantes sustancia primordial - velocidad principalmente - en él en estos días. K-Rod más probable trabajar usted ugg baratas


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Assorted Campaign Songs (1840 election)
From: Rapparee
Date: 17 Oct 14 - 09:47 PM

Someone in Power might want to take a peek at the above.


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