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banned songs

rick fielding 05 Jan 99 - 02:31 PM
Eric 05 Jan 99 - 03:59 PM
SteveF 05 Jan 99 - 04:01 PM
catspaw49 05 Jan 99 - 04:59 PM
catspaw49 05 Jan 99 - 05:19 PM
Earl 05 Jan 99 - 05:27 PM
alison 05 Jan 99 - 06:21 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 05 Jan 99 - 06:46 PM
Sandy Paton 05 Jan 99 - 08:57 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 05 Jan 99 - 09:08 PM
Joe 05 Jan 99 - 09:37 PM
Sandy Paton 05 Jan 99 - 09:37 PM
Roger in Baltimore 05 Jan 99 - 09:45 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 05 Jan 99 - 10:01 PM
Big Mick 05 Jan 99 - 10:06 PM
Les B 05 Jan 99 - 11:07 PM
Bill D 05 Jan 99 - 11:41 PM
Don Meixner 05 Jan 99 - 11:45 PM
rich r 06 Jan 99 - 12:17 AM
Art Thieme 06 Jan 99 - 12:40 AM
Gene 06 Jan 99 - 12:55 AM
Joe Offer 06 Jan 99 - 12:57 AM
Kris 06 Jan 99 - 05:47 AM
Ritchie 06 Jan 99 - 07:33 AM
hank 06 Jan 99 - 09:51 AM
SteveF 06 Jan 99 - 10:04 AM
Benson 06 Jan 99 - 10:14 AM
Big Mick 06 Jan 99 - 10:24 AM
Art Thieme 06 Jan 99 - 11:04 AM
Art Thieme 06 Jan 99 - 11:31 AM
AndyG 06 Jan 99 - 12:11 PM
Earl 06 Jan 99 - 12:27 PM
Dr John 06 Jan 99 - 01:22 PM
Big Mick 06 Jan 99 - 03:24 PM
rick fielding 06 Jan 99 - 04:02 PM
catspaw49 06 Jan 99 - 05:05 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 06 Jan 99 - 06:41 PM
alison 06 Jan 99 - 06:46 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 06 Jan 99 - 06:53 PM
Mary Ann 06 Jan 99 - 09:04 PM
alison 06 Jan 99 - 09:13 PM
alison 06 Jan 99 - 09:18 PM
Alan of Australia 06 Jan 99 - 09:23 PM
John Hindsill 06 Jan 99 - 09:27 PM
alison 06 Jan 99 - 09:34 PM
Alan of Australia 06 Jan 99 - 09:45 PM
Art Thieme 07 Jan 99 - 12:33 AM
Zorro 07 Jan 99 - 12:57 AM
Barry Finn 07 Jan 99 - 01:28 AM
Barry Finn 07 Jan 99 - 01:31 AM
Big Mick 07 Jan 99 - 07:18 AM
Jon W. 07 Jan 99 - 11:07 AM
Ritchie 07 Jan 99 - 11:29 AM
Jenny 08 Jan 99 - 12:43 AM
Art Thieme 09 Jan 99 - 05:26 PM
catspaw49 09 Jan 99 - 05:36 PM
Roger in Baltimore 09 Jan 99 - 07:40 PM
Allan C. 09 Jan 99 - 08:47 PM
KickyC 09 Jan 99 - 10:21 PM
Jenny 10 Jan 99 - 12:03 AM
Alan of Australia 10 Jan 99 - 04:41 AM
Ritchie 10 Jan 99 - 07:29 AM
The Shambles 10 Jan 99 - 09:05 AM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 10 Jan 99 - 03:27 PM
Hank 11 Jan 99 - 10:25 AM
Kris 11 Jan 99 - 11:34 AM
The Shambles 11 Jan 99 - 07:45 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 11 Jan 99 - 10:45 PM
Banjeray 12 Jan 99 - 08:32 PM
CW Hose 13 Jan 99 - 12:19 AM
SteveF (inactive) 13 Jan 99 - 12:17 PM
gargoyle 14 Jan 99 - 11:56 PM
Wolfgang 15 Jan 99 - 04:19 AM
The Shambles 15 Jan 99 - 03:03 PM
gargoyle 16 Jan 99 - 01:46 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 16 Jan 99 - 07:34 PM
gargoyle 17 Jan 99 - 12:49 AM
gargoyle 17 Jan 99 - 12:51 AM
Kathleen Morgain 17 Jan 99 - 11:23 PM
Kathleen Morgain 17 Jan 99 - 11:53 PM
Big Mick 18 Jan 99 - 12:25 AM
Ronn Gilbert 18 Jan 99 - 12:32 AM
robd 19 Jan 99 - 07:09 PM
robd 20 Jan 99 - 10:57 AM
Wolfgang 20 Jan 99 - 11:10 AM
Dr John 20 Jan 99 - 03:34 PM
innovate@ior.com 22 Jan 99 - 03:01 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 23 Jan 99 - 05:26 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 24 Jan 99 - 08:21 PM
Benjamin Bodhránaí 24 Jan 99 - 09:11 PM
Wolfgang 27 Jan 99 - 02:38 PM
rick fielding 28 Jan 99 - 12:20 PM
catspaw49 07 Oct 00 - 10:02 PM
GUEST,tarra 24 Feb 04 - 12:38 PM
GUEST 24 Feb 04 - 04:34 PM
TheBigPinkLad 24 Feb 04 - 05:01 PM
Com Seangan 24 Feb 04 - 05:08 PM
Amergin 24 Feb 04 - 05:36 PM
michaelr 24 Feb 04 - 06:50 PM
chordstrangler 24 Feb 04 - 08:44 PM
The Fooles Troupe 24 Feb 04 - 08:55 PM
GUEST,freda 24 Feb 04 - 09:10 PM
Bob Bolton 24 Feb 04 - 09:53 PM
LadyJean 25 Feb 04 - 12:48 AM
s&r 25 Feb 04 - 03:57 AM
Leadfingers 25 Feb 04 - 07:52 AM
freda underhill 25 Feb 04 - 08:12 AM
Nemesis 25 Feb 04 - 03:14 PM
GUEST,JHadji 26 Aug 04 - 08:57 AM
GUEST,Sasamack 26 Aug 04 - 09:16 AM
GUEST,mick 26 Aug 04 - 09:52 AM
frogprince 26 Aug 04 - 12:22 PM
Big Al Whittle 26 Aug 04 - 01:58 PM
robomatic 26 Aug 04 - 03:26 PM
sapper82 26 Aug 04 - 04:57 PM
GUEST,barrie roberts 26 Aug 04 - 06:22 PM
Jim McLean 27 Aug 04 - 05:01 AM
Big Al Whittle 27 Aug 04 - 07:16 AM
Billy Suggers 27 Aug 04 - 08:16 AM
GUEST,Hazzle 30 Apr 05 - 02:22 PM
nutty 01 May 05 - 06:50 AM
GUEST 04 May 05 - 05:25 AM
alanabit 04 May 05 - 05:42 AM
GUEST 10 Jul 13 - 04:26 AM
Bill D 10 Jul 13 - 10:21 AM
GUEST,Musket getting his tuppence worth 10 Jul 13 - 10:36 AM
Jim Carroll 10 Jul 13 - 11:28 AM
eddie1 10 Jul 13 - 01:19 PM
Joybell 10 Jul 13 - 06:11 PM
Joe_F 10 Jul 13 - 08:41 PM
Deckman 11 Jul 13 - 04:08 AM
Gutcher 11 Jul 13 - 06:02 AM
Jack Campin 11 Jul 13 - 06:49 AM
Jim McLean 11 Jul 13 - 06:56 AM
Jack Campin 11 Jul 13 - 07:27 AM
Jim McLean 11 Jul 13 - 03:44 PM
Gutcher 11 Jul 13 - 11:37 PM
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Subject: banned songs
From: rick fielding
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 02:31 PM

Last week on my radio show "Acoustic Workshop" (in Toronto) I played a song written by the British composer Harvey Andrews called "The Soldier". I've been told by several sources that it was "banned" from BBC airwaves when it first appeared in the seventies. I'm not sure how a song gets "banned". I can only surmise that a (substantial) number of listeners first requested it and then the powers that be said "No way". Does anyone know of songs that have been banned on this side of the pond, and what form it took. Thanks


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Eric
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 03:59 PM

At a Kingston Trio concert a few years back, they mentioned that one of their songs was banned because they said "don't give a DAMN about the green-back dollar"

They had to change it (I think they put a loud guitar chord over the word) before they could get any air-time.

After hearing some of the lyrics today, I sort-of wish we were back in those times.

E.


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Subject: Lyr Add: TRANSFUSION (Nervous Norvus)^^
From: SteveF
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 04:01 PM

I believe you are right about how a song gets 'banned' on the radio--a station manager simply issues orders to his staff not to play it. Of course, thisban applies only to that station.

I recall back in the mid 1950s, just before the onset of rock & roll -- we were still scratching our heads over a novelty number called "Blue Suede Shoes" by Carl Perkins -- the first time a heard of a song being 'banned.'

I was listening to WNEW in New York. The morning man was a very witty fellow named Gene Klavan, who was still doing the show into the 1980's (at a salary of $250,000/yr). He reported that rival WNBC had banned a song called "Transfusion" by Nervous Norvus. After a few wry comments, naturally he played the song.

Maybe WNEW then also banned this song on the spot, I dunno, for it was the only time, I believe, that I ever heard "Transfusion" played on the radio. But thanks to the magic of the Internet, I have found a copy of the lyrics, which I now present. The song is sung at a frantic pace with appropriate sound effects.


TRANSFUSION
Nervous Norvus

ZZZZZZOOOOOOOOOOOOMMMMMMMMMMMM
Tooling down the highway doing 79
I'm a twin-pipe papa and I'm feelin fine
Hey man dig that--was that a red stop sign-

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)

Transfusion transfusion
I'm just a solid mess of contusions
Never never never gonna speed again
Slip the blood to me Bud

I jump in my rod about a quarter to nine
I gotta make a date with that chick of mine
I cross the center line--man you gotta make time-

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)

Transfusion transfusion
Oh man I got the cotton-pickin convolutions
Never never never gonna speed again
Shoot the juice to me Bruce

My foot's on the throttle and it's made of lead
But I'm a fast-riding daddy with a real cool head
I'm a-gonna pass a truck on the hill ahead-

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)

Transfusion transfusion
My red corpsuckles (sic) are in mass confusion
Never never never gonna speed again
Pass the crimson to me Jimson

I took a little drink and I'm feelin right
I can fly right over everything--everything in sight
There's a slow-poking cat I'm gonna pass him on the right-

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)

Transfusion transfusion
I'm a real gone paleface and that's no illusion
I'm-a never never never gonna speed again
Pass the claret to me Barrett

A-rollin down the mountain on a rainy day
Oh when you see me coming better start to pray
I'm a-cuttin up the road and I'm the boss all the way-

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)

Transfusion transfusion
Oh doc pardon me for this crazy intrusion
I'm never never never gonna speed again
Pump the fluid in me Louie

I'm burning up the highway early this morn
I'm passing everybody oh nothing but corn
Man outa my way I don't drive with my horn-

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)

Transfusion transfusion
Oh nurse I'm gonna make a new resolution
I'm never never never gonna speed again
Put a gallon in me Alan

Oh barnyard drivers are found in two classes
Line-crowding hogs and speeding jackasses
So remember to slow down today
Hey daddy-o
Make that type O, huh?
Atta-boy

(scrreeech-BANG!!tinkle)


Out of curiosity, has any Mudcatter ever heard Transfusion before? Where? When?

--SteveF.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 04:59 PM

Oh yeah...I was just a kid when Transfusion was on the air, but like kids before and since we all went around singing along and the tag lines became a part of our everyday vocabulary...It was great...6-9 year olds going around saying, "SHOOT THE JUICE TO ME BRUCE." I remember a few adults making comments about what kids were coming to, etc. This was toward the tail end of the "Beat" generation and looked upon poorly by our midwest parents. Makes me think too that a little while later there was a song by ...damn...don't remember ...called "The Beat Generation" on the flip side of "The Mummy".......remember that one? "I'm a mummy; my daddy was a mummy too. I just came back to life to buy a copy of 'Kookie,Kookie,Lend me your comb'" Had that 45 and Transfusion too. What a long time ago...seems like yesterday. catspaw49


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 05:19 PM

Sorry...Hey Steve...Thanks for the lyrics, I'd forgotten most. I still use Shoot the juice to me Bruce and have tried to remember past the first verse several times. The tag lines though...had a quad by-pass a few years back and a young, male nurse was hanging another IV bag when I noticed his name was Allen. He said that we only had a few more of that particlar "elixir" to go and I'd be down to single bags. I said, "Hey, no problem...Pump a Gallon in me Alan." My wife later overheard him telling that to several nurses at the station. 'Course in trying tp tell someone from the other wing, he said I was the long haired "Hippie" looking guy. When Karen told me I cracked up and the next time I saw Allen I tried to get his decades arranged for him. Gotta' go cook some supper so thanks again...I'll be Leavin', See yuh Steven. catspaw49


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Earl
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 05:27 PM

I have heard transfusion on the radio but I can't quite rememeber where or when. Possibly WFMU in New Jersey. They have the loosest playlist I have ever heard.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: alison
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 06:21 PM

Hi,

I remember in the 80's when the BBC banned "Relax" by Frankie goes to Holywood. It was banned because the lyrics were suggestive but more-so because of the picture on the cover of the record, (people in bondage gear if I remember rightly.) Did the group no harm at all went straight to number one..... and stayed there for ages.

Funny thing is the lyrics were really pretty tame.... certainly not like the stuff that's around now with warning stickers on the CD covers.

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 06:46 PM

Starfucker by the Rolling Stones was also banned from the airwaves, and on the album cover was referred to as Star Star.

I seem to recall that Sex And Drugs And Rock and Roll, by Ian Dury and the Blockheads, was also banned by the BBC.

I think even the Beatles had songs banned.

And of course, years ago "white" stations would never play the "black" version of a song, only the cleaned up and castrated white version. I don't think Joe Turner got too much air time on white stations.:)

I used to do a folk and blues show at university years ago, and remember being told not to play a song and then speak badly of it. I broke this rule all the time, because I used to like to play a lame version of a song, and then a good version (IMHO, of course) and then point out what made the lame version lame and the good version good. Since the station brass never listened to folk and blues I usually got away with it.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 08:57 PM

Interesting thread, Rick.
I remember being told, years ago, that "Gloomy Sunday" was banned, but that may have been part of a hype to get it heard. I dunno.
I may not be able to tell you about a folk song being banned, but I can tell you about a pair of folk singers being banned. In 1967, as I was busily engaged in helping organize anti-Vietnam War activity in Vermont (where we were living at that time), a friend who worked for the Burlington Free Press (ah, ironic name!) told me that a notice had been placed on the bulletin board at the paper to the effect that there would no further mention of the Patons in that publication.
As a result, when some small village church would hire us to do a fund-raiser for their steeple repair, or what have you, the publicity notice they sent to the paper would not appear in print. When they asked why, they got no response. Needless to say, our audiences for such doings dried up and we felt obliged to warn potential concert producers of the problem they would face if they hired us.
About that same time, however, we were planning to move down here to the tropics of northwestern Connecticut, so we sort of slid out from under the problem. Naturally, we continued protesting the war in our new location, and acquired some notoriety down here, as well. It was worth it.
Sandy, with no regrets.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 09:08 PM

It must surely have been a different Burlington, Vermont in those days. It's counterculturish to a fault, like Ann Arbor, Michigan.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Joe
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 09:37 PM

Yes! Nervous Norvis recorded the song Transfusion. I believe it was release around 1955 or 1956. I had the record.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 09:37 PM

I know! Ain't it miraculous? What hath Bernie Sanders wrought? Some day I'll have to tell you about the antics of the "Millard Fillmore Society" up there. Had to do something to lighten up the atmospshere and warm the spirits during those arch-conservative Vermont winters. That's why we moved to the tropics.
Sandy


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 09:45 PM

During that brief period when "folk music" appeared on the airwaves, the local AM station in Baltimore, WCAO, banned "The Eve of Destruction." Well, it's not quite a folk song, but don't tell Barry Mc Guire. It was quite common during the '50's for media, TV, radio, newspapers, and magazines to just neglect to report things. It was blatant censorship. If you have a popular music show I think you have the right to choose your play list as long as you are willing to say you do that. If you are "reporting" I think it becomes unethical to censor news, period.

Of course, Rock and Roll was going to lead to the sexual undoing of America and so was seen by many as evil. Surprisingly, "they" were right, I think it did assist the sexual undoing of America. The question becomes therefore, "Was that such a bad thing?"

Pete Seeger and the Weavers, of course, were "banned' from radio and television for years due to Mc Carthy black listing that was so common.

This leads me to comment, Rick Fielding, you must not be an "Old Folker" or "banning" as a concept would not have been so surprising to you. Bans are sometimes the decision of a station manager. Sometimes, it is the decision of a larger group and that decision may be overt or covert. If you only believe what you read in the papers (or see on the TV or hear on the radio), you will find yourself led around like a bull with a ring in its nose.

This is why so many in power fear the Internet. Anyone with a PC, a modem, and an Internet connection is a publisher of sorts. And, consequently, all sorts of ideas appear.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 10:01 PM

Our local newspaper's powers that be posted a memo to its staff dictating that they were not to write any more articles objecting to a downtown development project on the ground of historical preservation. (The reporters told me.) The paper's own building is neighbouring the site and they have development plans of their own. I sent a letter asking them to set out in print their own agenda, and what they figured they would gain by the neighbouring development. The editor replied to me stating that my question was nonsense and they had no agenda to discuss in print. Didn't publish the letter, but responded to me personally, which I found odd, because I have never had an editor respond to me personally no matter what the subject matter of my letter.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 10:06 PM

Great thread. I seem to recall that most of the Wolfe Tones music that dealt with the Great Britain's presence in the North was banned. I believe they wrote a song about it that was titled "Radio Toor-I-Li-ay". Seems as if it was on the "Sing out for Ireland" album. I will see if I can dig it up and post the lyrics.

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Les B
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 11:07 PM

Seems to me that Pete Seeger's "Knee Deep in the Big Muddy and the Big Fool Says Push On" was banned from TV (as well as Seeger himself) after he sang it on the Smothers Brothers show during the late Viet Nam conflict. I've also been told that the bluegrass song "Gonna Sleep With One Eye Open" (Bill Monroe ?) was banned from radio because of the veiled sexual connotations. Also, wasn't Elvis banned from being shown below the waist as he gyrated on the Ed Sullivan Show ? Wow, am I showing my age with these ?


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 11:41 PM

"The Wearin'of the Green" was a song 'about' banning...and various aspects of Scots & Irish & Welsh music, language and culture were banned at various times...

like Roger says, the internet/WWW is very dangerous to those who would ban that which they do not like!..why I could get on here and type stuff about the..*6^^##",,@@,,***|%&|++...and no one could stop me.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Don Meixner
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 11:45 PM

In 1967 My friend's mother who was then a member of the John Birch Society got a film strip for Gary and I to watch called Communism, Hypnotism, and The Beatles, and the accompanying paperback, Rhythym, Riots, and Revolution, by Rev. Billy James Hargis. Her intent was well meant but the history contained there in was bogus at best. I learned all about that godless Bob Dylan and those clean cut tools of the devil, The kingston Trio. I remember the mention of the song of the flip of Scott Makenzies San Francisco, Flowers in your hair record. What's The Difference? A song intended to get kids to run away and further ruin the American family.

I learned all about those communist agitators, The Weavers and Woody and Pete amd Tom and Phil and Malvina and Joan and Carolyn and and and.... Ofcourse the only success was that I had to know more about these people and what they stood for and against. My world has never been the same since.

My late father, bless his eternal soul, said to me. " If you are gonna listen to that stuff, listen to the otherside as well." He liked Paxton's "Don't You Let Nobody Turn You Around." Dad was a Republican all his life but he admired courage of conviction and a well made point. So when we heard Pete Seegar sing "Big Muddy" on the Johnny Cash show Dad said " I expect he is probably right, we'll be lucky to get out of this war with our skins."

Dad banned one song in the house. "Who Will Answer" as sung by Ed Ames. Not because he didn't like the lyrics, he just got tired of the song after the 50th time he heard it.

Regards

Don


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: rich r
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 12:17 AM

Pete Seeger relates that his version of "Waist Deep In The Big Muddy" was actually taped for the Smothers Bros. show, but deleted between taping and air time without telling Pete or the Smothers'. The edit wasn't even very smooth, one moment Pete was standing there with a guitar, the next moment a banjo (or vice vers). The Chad Mitchell Trio had the knack of repeatedly recording songs that the radio stations wouldn't play, beginning with "The John Birch Society" and including "Barry's Boys". Satirical and/or political songs were generally excluded from radio at the time (except maybe "Okie from Muskogee" and God Bless the USA). The Kingston Trio remained popular mostly by avoiding such material except the infamous "d" word.

rich r


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 12:40 AM

In 1967 we moved to the coast of Oregon from Chicago. Opened up THE FOLK ART SHOP in the town of Depoe Bay---right on the ocean. Often, when the California Gray Whales were migrating from Alaskan waters to Baja California to have their calves, we'd walk out in front of the shop to watch the whales sound and leap three quarters of the way out of the water---some say to navigate by eyeballing the various headlands. (We'd only leave the shop when no customers were there.) Once, on returning from just being on the sidewalk in front of the shop, I found a magazine open to an article titled COMMUNIST INFLUENCE IN AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC. Names of people whose records were in our bins were highlighted--along with instructions on what could be done to fight the evil being done. There were several threats written in the margins of the article. The next day I put those records and books in a prominent place in our front window along with a sign saying, "To learn more about these fine singers and scholars just come on in & we can talk about 'em!" Nobody ever asked about Jean Ritchie, Sonny & Brownie, Pete, Sam Hinton, Frank Warner, Sandy Paton (his Elektra album), Lightnin' Hopkins, Howling Wolf, Muddy Waters, Wilf Carter--that's all I recall at this late date. During the time we were there, we were lucky if we got half a dozen sales from town people.

I guess the banning of songs can take several forms.

Art


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Gene
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 12:55 AM

LISTEN to NERVOUS NORVUS's TRANSFUSION - * HERE *


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 12:57 AM

Gee, it's interesting that "Transfusion" came up in this thread. I suppose it was my first "favorite song." The kid across the street had it when I was in about the first grade, and we used to play it over and over again, while reading contraband copies of Mad Magazine. We felt like we were real beatnicks.
The flip side was an even more obnoxious gem called "Dig."
Dig, dig, dig-a-roonie;
Dig, dig, dig
Dig-a-roonie;
Dig, dig, dig, dig
Dig, you crazy cat.
I don't think there were any more words - just repeat that verse, over and over again. It was very satisfying to me back in those days. Kids thrive on obnoxious repetition.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Kris
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 05:47 AM

I remember Transfusion being played on (probably) Radio One in the 70s - probably on that Sunday lunchtime Jimmy Saville slot where he played stuff from specific years and you had to guess who it was, when I was a YOUNG thing. I remember it being our absolute favourite - and I remember mum always made it seem that much better by looking ever so slightly shocked. I have email'd the lyrics to my sister, and no doubt we'll be full of nostalgia for at least a week. Ever grateful. Kris PS. I am horrified by some of the stuff they play on the radio & TV these days. I remember watching a karaoke event at a village fair a few years ago, and feeling really queasy when two little girls (about 7 & 9) got up and gave a word-perfect rendition of 'let's talk about sex baby'. Bring back banning!! (except for stuff I want to hear of course :) )


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Ritchie
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 07:33 AM

Paul McCartney ..whoops I mean Sir Paul McCartney, had a single called "Give Ireland back to the Irish" banned not long after he left the Beatles.

It was one of those records that always seemed to allude me,it was never played on the radio and was very hard to get a copy of.

I spent ages scouring the second hand record shops but to no avail.

Sometimes though things are better in your memouries.

I'm now trying to 'rack my brain' for other banned songs, that will explain no doubt why there is a large black cloud circling around overhead.

love and happiness

Ritchie


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: hank
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:51 AM

I think banned songs are like banned books. I took a class in high school where the books were selected from a list of those banned. About half the books on that list were worthless no good %@%&#^$&%^ and @#$^%&^% (multiplied a few times) and not worth the heat you would get from burning the dumb things.

Saddly the other half are all tied for positiongs on my top ten books list. (these 20 are number one, these 30 are 2...) Wonderful works like Huckely Berry Finn, the bible, and a few other classics.

I've noticed the same theme in songs. Many are banned for a reason. The purpose of "singing" them was to throw as much worthless profanity into 2 minutes 35 seconds as you can. The other half are wonderful, wonderful songs that have meaning on several level and even if you disagree with the point you know it is wonderful. What I want to know is how can I kill the idiot who bans the latter while keeping the former banned.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: SteveF
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 10:04 AM

In some cases, local censorship or even public protest can accelerate an artist to fame. In the mid 1950s, perhaps the most widely banned singer was a young southerner with the curious name of Elvis. While I was trying to do some research on the Internet I came across a photograph of Presley in a newspaper office, captioned as follows:

NEWSPAPER VISIT -- Elvis Presley stopped by the offices
of The [Memphis] Commercial Appeal on the night of June 8, 1956.
He heard a story that a Canadian radio station had
banned his records. "A lot of people like it," Presley
said about his music. He had just returned from a
two-week show at the New Frontier Club in Las Vegas.
"Man, I really liked Vegas," he said. "I'm going back
there the first chance I get."

I reported earlier that WNBC radio in New York City had banned "Transfusion." (Gene--thanks a heap to the link to the RealAudio file. I had to listen to the song three times before I could do anything else!) Soon after its ruling on "Transfusion," WNBC was banning songs by Elvis Presley. Why? Round up the usual excuses. :-)

A few blocks away, however, arch-rival WCBS decided to engage in a little one-upmanship. At that time newspaper columnist Ed Sullivan hosted the popular "Toast of the Town" television variety program (later re-named the "Ed Sullivan Shoe"), so naturally he simply had to sign Presley for an appearance.

I recall watching Presley's first appearance on national TV. It seemed the entire live audience consisted of adolescent girls who shrieked in unison at regular intervals. (Does anyone know how they co-ordinate so well?) Presley started his number and the cameras varied the close-ups and full length shots. But the moment he started to gyrate, a black band moved up the viewers' screen to block out all the below-the-belt action. The girls went wild!

The next day, all anyone could talk about was the stupidity of WCBS' actions. After all, if 13-year-old girls could see the performance live, how dangerous could it be for the rest of us?

Presley, of course, went on to fame and fortune. Sullivan repeated the coup a few years later with another oddly-named singing group, the Beatles in 1964. There were no blackout-screens that time, but apparently they used the same girls to comprise the audience!

--SteveF.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Benson
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 10:14 AM

Maybe it's "old age" setting in.....but I wish that things had not gone the way they have. I have heard it said...that with everything gained...there is also a loss....."You gain knowledge...you lose innocense"

Is it just me????......In my youth, I was always against censorship.....but now, I am not so sure. Nowadays you can be driving down the road with the kids....or grandchildren......stop at a light...and a car with a "Boomer" pulls up next to you......The Bass hurts your ears.....and the lyrics......as many four letter words as you can think of......You can't get away...you have to hear it you've got no choice.....And the kids gotta hear it too.... In a way, I feel as though I have been deprived of a freedom....and the children verbally assaulted.....Maybe I just don't see things right........who knows???

Maybe there should be a "penalty"........Maybe the "offender" should be strapped into a chair and forced to listen to "Barney" records.......(played on his high output system)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 10:24 AM

Benson
You are not advocating censorship, you are advocating for the freedom to hear what you want. There is a decided difference. People should have the right to express themselves artistically in any way they choose. And others should have the right to enjoy any art form they choose. Censorship would be to deny us those rights. But to force people, and their children to be exposed to art forms that one finds offensive is a form of censorship in itself.

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 11:04 AM

Mick & Benson,

Seems that what we're for here is the right to some modicum of privacy for everyone --- the right not to be assaulted by painful and intrusive SOUNDS that violate our personal space. The BOOMING technology of modern sound systems is something that drove a real wedge between my upstairs "neighbors" and myself for 15 years. Then, one fine day, we decided to talk about it and not act as if we had a bee up our butt. All those other years of posturing simply sidappeared.

Strangely, the "peace" was attained at that time in life when natural testosterone levels decline.

I still hate it when those sounds pull up next to me at a stoplight--or when the guy upstairs pulls into our shared driveway (before he turns off his ignition--all of 20 seconds usually). I feel many of those old feelings. But me and the kid in the car have no way to communicate within that bubble of privacy our cars can become except by giving each other the finger and tooling off. We are one second away from road rage! I always feel lucky when it does not come to that.

Art


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 11:31 AM

The jazz classic "Love For Sale" was fine as an instrumentsl, but it was banned from the radio for years whenever it was sung.

Love for sale
Appetizing young love for sale...

That's all I remember.

Art


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: AndyG
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 12:11 PM

Day in the Life - Lennon/McCartney
Je T'aime (sp?)- can't really remember, don't actually care.
Both banned by the beeb (BBC) as I recall.

AndyG


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Earl
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 12:27 PM

I remember buying "Eve of Destruction" primarily because it was banned by the local radio stations. It became a number one hit. The irony is that in those days stations would ban a song even if it would make financial sense to play it. Today they will play anything, regarless of quality or content, as long as they can make a calculated buck. In one sense there is less censorship today but in general there is far less diversity on the radio than there was thirty years ago.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Dr John
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 01:22 PM

Lord MacCartney of Liverpool (oops I anticipate) 's song about Ireland was played on a BBC program on protest songs a few years ago, in more enlightened times. Naive and poor: not worth listening too. The Beeb was very curious in those far off days. Lonnie Donegan had "Nobody Loves Like An Irishman" banned because he refered to the Koran and the Beeb thought that might offend those of an Islamic persuation. Anticipation of Mr Rushtie perhaps!! L.D. later turning the rollicking "Take a Whiff On Me" into a mild "Have a Drink On Me", perhaps as a result.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 03:24 PM

Well Benson, I don't know about you, but I think there was some very good advice from Bro' Art in his posting. I agree, Art, in fact I am very tolerant as I have pretty eclectic taste in music. And the message to talk to one another resonates. But I was responding to the notion that being bothered by such intrusion might somehow, in an attempt to be enlightened, be considered to be censorship. And I don't by into that notion. Of course, when I am sitting on the deck with the lads playing music, and the young neighbors go running for the woods to escape the racket, I suppose that I could be accused of the same thing, eh? ***grin***

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: rick fielding
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 04:02 PM

Geez, thanks for all the feedback on my "banned songs" thread. Where has this list (and all you folks) been all my life?

Since a couple of folks have mentioned "Give Ireland back to the Irish", and the recordings of the Wolfe Tones, I thought I'd let you know a little about Harvey Andrews' "The Soldier", which started this. In the late sixties and seventies, he got a lot of airplay on the BBC, so when his song about a British Soldier who fell on a bomb in a Belfast train station, and saved many lives, was never heard on the air he knew it was because of it's content rather than quality. In his last verse he sings about some locals outside the station cheering the British soldiers' death. He tells me that for years afterward he got huge amounts of flack...from English AND Irish people. He told me it was based on a newspaper story.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: catspaw49
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 05:05 PM

Hey Benson, Art, Mick...I think you're off onto a slightly different thread...and one that definitely has merit. Maybe need a new thread here.

Regarding banned songs...the power of music is amazing isn't it? Censorship has been around a long while, but outside of the initial religious fervor in the U.S., how far back do we go in this country? During the Civil War, "Lorena" was banned by BOTH sides because it adversely affected morale and increased desertions! Got some others? US or anywhere else...I'm interested. catspaw49


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 06:41 PM

Somewhere, buried away in my parents' house, I have a 45 of Give Ireland Back To The Irish. They certainly played it on the radio over here, because that is where I would have heard it before I went to the five and ten to get the 45. Can't remember what was on the flip side.

I always liked Okie From Muskokee, which someone mentioned. Merle Haggard, Buck Owens, George Jones, Faron Young, and such were always popular music on the local radio station. I can never think back to getting a haircut without remembering that kind of music playing in the background, and hearing the men in the barber's chairs complain about The God Damned Yankee Draft Dodgers who were moving up here to spread sedition and put barbers out of business. Stand By Your Man, by Tammy Wynette, was another favourite in the barber shop.

Merle sung Okie like he meant it, but today you only hear it sung ironically.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: alison
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 06:46 PM

Hi,

I had forgotten about Je t'aime, until Andy mentioned it again. I've heard it played on the radio over here..... but then that doesn't surprise me....... it's very tame in comparison to a lot of the other stuff. Used to hear it at all the discos though...... always played during the slow section.

The most recent one I remember being banned by the BBC was "Mr Blobby"..... because it was stupid!! Not offensive.... just stupid. for those of you who have managed to avoid him (be thankful) . Mr Blobby is a large pink creature with ?purple spots who says nothing apart from "blobby, blobby, blobby."

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 06:53 PM

We should start a thread called "Songs We Wish They Had Banned".:) "Disco Duck", "Havin' My Baby", and anything from Saturday Night Fever would be right up there. The 70's were rich with songs that should have been censored.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Mary Ann
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:04 PM

victor Jara's music was banned by the Pinochet regime in Chile, of course. I understand they even banned folk instruments like the Kena (wooden flute) because they represented the Nuevo Cancion, which tended to be anti-running-dog-lackey.

And Pete Seeger's appearance on Smothers Brothers actually ENDED the blacklist on him; it was his first appearance on TV, when the Brothers decided to defy the list. It was high time.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: alison
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:13 PM

Hi Tim,

you're showing your age. Being a mere youngster, (having just checked out the how old is a mudcatter thread)..... I have to admit I loved the 70's..... was a disco kid..... can't help it anymore than a lot of you can help loving the 50's or 60's.

Admittedly the lyrics were garbage....... but the rhythm... those bass lines..... those sparkly platform shoes........ aaaaaaahhhhhhhh.

Slainte

alison

PS we did have songs we would like banned thread... managed to confine it to folk music though...... I'm off to see if I can find it.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: alison
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:18 PM

Hi,

OK we didn't exactly ban them but we wanted them ditched...

folk songs to ditch

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:23 PM

G'day,
I AGREE WITH TIM about 70s music. Especially after having to listen to the stuff nearly every time Alison gets into my car. There should be a button on car radios which excludes any station which plays 70s music.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: John Hindsill
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:27 PM

I guess I'm about as old as anyone on this, or any mudcat thread. I remember TRANSFUSION, heard it for several weeks on KFWB & KLAC in Los Angeles, and it went away... probably more from tiresomeness, but banned?...I don't think so, here. Then, almost anything by Hank Ballard as WORK WITH ME ANNIE and ANNIE HAD A BABY was banned except on (as they were then called) race stations, and then usually played only in late night. Also, I remember that Clyde McPhatter's HONEY LOVE was quickly banned as too suggestive--the lyrics as well as the delivery. But, you know, banning never works. Whether songs, prose, politics or whatever, ideas will find their place.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: alison
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:34 PM

HHHUUUMMMPPPHHH!!!!!!!!

that is a downright lie!!!

what about all that 50's twaddle I get subjected to??? Eh?? (the folk music is OK though... usually......)

I think that if I get subjected to that "stuff" on the way to a gig /folk club/ whatever it's only fair if I enrich alan's limited music experience (of the 70's and 80's) with some gems from my era, on the way back.

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 06 Jan 99 - 09:45 PM

Alison!
Words like "twaddle", "enrich", "gem" seem like complete anomolies in the context of your message. My experience of 70s & 80s music WAS limited before you started twiddling my knobs (that didn't come out right....RADIO knobs). I suppose it only seems like most of the time.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 12:33 AM

Here'a a diatribe/polemic from ol' Art:

One song that I've always wished was banned/ditched (but is loved by others) is "Waltzing With Bears" !! That song seemed to bring wimpishness into singing gatherings--a kind of preciousness that smacked of self-help literature instead of __The Grapes Of Wrath__ and Thomas Wolfe (not Tom Wolfe).

This is just one person's opinion--not a prescription for anybody else but me. Therefore it's not censorship. I certainly don't mean to hurt anyone's feelings--or exclude anything or anyone, but I don't have to enjoy, or sing along on obvious mediocrity. I say that fully realizing that one man's mediocrity is another man's cumquat; just ask our president! Mick, I love ya, but my liking one kind of music and not liking another kind is not de-facto censorship to me. It's just what is. We've lost the descriptive realism that paints a narrative picture (see "California Joe"), and we have opted, seemingly, for music with a pastel, New Age, cholesterol free and taste free, Muzak feel and sound---and it's accepted as being one of the many channels in the mainstream now. That's sad, but it's also just WHAT IS.

I'll live with it, but I don't have to waltz with it.

Art


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Zorro
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 12:57 AM

During the holidays someone sent me e mail with an explanation of the meaning of the "Twelve days of Christmas" It was an example of a "code" song, similar to the code songs the Irish wrote when songs, music and instruments were outlawed by England because their music had the ability to ignite and unite. Code songs were written by early black blues singers, references to the "black snake.." something or other was an allusion to anatomy... I'm going to post the 12 days of Christmas on a new thread for those who would like to see it. I'd not heard the explanation for the song before. Good bad or indifferent, songs will continue to be banned, and folks with continue to sing them. I like what Big Mick said about not censorship but an invasion of privacy. I recall a saying: "Your rights end where mine begin.." The idea being you have a right to listen to your music but not to force it on me.. I'll stop the sermon and look for the 12days.... Zorro


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Barry Finn
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 01:28 AM

Nice Zorro, I'd like you to tell that to the kid that drives up my street at midnight & his/her base drowns out the sounds inside my house (when I'm sleeping I can't even hear myself snore) & the stuff I have to listen to while in traffic with all the windows up & the heaters & the AC going, talking road rage, I'd like to shoot them. Barry with the boxed in ears.
Art, loved your statement on mediocrity, kind of puts Billy Balls in the same position as Tricky Dick. Barry


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Barry Finn
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 01:31 AM

Nice Zorro, I'd like you to tell that to the kid that drives up my street at midnight & his/her base drowns out the sounds inside my house (when I'm sleeping I can't even hear myself snore) & the stuff I have to listen to while in traffic with all the windows up & the heaters & the AC going, talking road rage, I'd like to shoot them. Barry with the boxed in ears.
Art, loved your statement on mediocrity, kind of puts Billy Balls in the same position as Tricky Dick. Barry


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 07:18 AM

As I read over my postings, I realized that I did not say what I meant very well. Let me try it plainly. First, I do not buy into the notion that dislike of a certain style of music AND saying so should be considered as a form of censorship. Some of my PC friends seem to imply to me that my dislike of hip hop or rap and vocalizing that dislike when I subjected to it against my will is a form a censorship. I disagree, as I don't give a damn who listens to what. In fact, I recognize that this music and the anger some of it expresses against the system can almost be considered a form of "folk" music. The lyrics often deal with issues of the times, dissatisfaction with the system, and/or tells a story of the times. I have no quarrel with people who take that view. I simply dislike the music, and find it lacking in musical artistry. And I intensely dislike it intruding on my "space" at all hours, or in traffic, or some of the other circumstances described above. Art I think I am saying that I am in agreement with you. In my own beloved Irish/Celtic music, I am somewhat distressed at the pale attempts to create "celtic" music as the new agers want it to be, instead of what it is. But the form is historically fluid, and it is strong enough to stand the test of time.

And I am bored stiff with WALTZING WITH BEARSNever have cared for it, and probably never will.

Great thread, love the debate.

Mick Lane


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jon W.
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 11:07 AM

The flip side of Give Ireland Back to the Irish was an instrumental with the same title but a different melody (the rhythm background may have been the same). I used it as background music for a short 8mm film I made in High School (don't remember what the film was about). I was surprised nobody had ever heard it before. We had the 45. Ritchie, don't worry about having never gotten a copy of it, Dr. John is right: naive and poor (typical of McCartney's work without Lennon--on the other hand, Lennon without McCartney lacked energy and ambition--they needed each other).

Speaking of naivete, is it possible to be innocent without being naive? As Jesus said, wise as serpents but harmless as doves? That's what I strive for and that's why I think it's important to know the lyrics of the songs you listen to, in order to make an intelligent choice as to what you want to allow inside your head. That's why I listen to folk and hang out at the Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Ritchie
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 11:29 AM

We were talking about the worst 'hit' record of all time and everyone came up with a different one although occasionally someone or other would say that they quite liked that certain song/tune etc.

Self censorship is the thing...not trying to offend someone either their moral code or beliefs.

Now here's the paradox..I like swearing, strong industrial language yet I am usually offended when I hear it in a song!!

I would never swear in front of someone if I thought it would offend them and I have never blasphemed (church going grandmothers influence)

And yet..words like redundant and cancer are a lot worse to both the heart and to the ear than any swear word I can think of.

Thanks to the good Dr. you've exorcised my need to hear "Give Ireland back..." by Mr.Mac....now I'll have to look out for "Waltzing with Bears"

love and ******* happiness

Ritchie


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jenny
Date: 08 Jan 99 - 12:43 AM

When I think of banned songs, Janis Ian's Society's Child always comes to mind. Does anyone have the lyrics? jenny


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 09 Jan 99 - 05:26 PM

"STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER" is definitely a band song!

Art


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: catspaw49
Date: 09 Jan 99 - 05:36 PM

Yes it is Art, but luckily, with today's sexually transmitted diseases, we haven't seen "The Rubber Banned." catspaw49


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 09 Jan 99 - 07:40 PM

Jenny,

I was surprised that "Society's Child" was not in the DT. I went to the International Lyrics Server and found the lyrics. You can CLICK HERE to find that site (an immense number of popular song lyrics) or just type in http://www.lyrics.ch/

I will post the lyrics on a thread titled "LYR ADD: Society's Child".

Enjoy the song!!!

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Allan C.
Date: 09 Jan 99 - 08:47 PM

I remember listening to a late-night radio show which played a (then) newly released Simon and Garfunkel album minus the cut titled, "Cecilia". They offered no explanation. Naturally, I purchased the album and discovered what I figured to be the reasoning behind the ban. I don't know if the song was banned by any other stations.

I am sensitive to the business of catering to the preferences of others. Where I work, I play music which can be heard by my staff as well as by my customers. More often than not it is folk; but often it is some other eclectic choice which may include new age, "Celtic", big band, oldies, or classical. I had to quickly abandon playing most of the more current rap, hip-hop, metal, and whatever because the lyrics were decidedly offensive to my customers - the ONLY complaints I have ever received from any of them (unless you want to count the one little old woman for whom anything other than classical music is "Too loud!").

So, I guess you could say that I have been guilty of censorship in this venue. It gives me a better understanding of why some radio stations acted as they did.

By the way, the overall favorite is 60's oldies. Enthusiastic comments have also been heard regarding the livelier "Celtic" music. According to my unofficial survey, third in preference is folk music.

And, Alan, I know you will be thrilled to learn that "disco" music is still alive! I find it among the popular music I sometimes listen to on the netradio station, Radio Latina which originates in TJ/SanDiego. I guess the news that disco is dead hasn't reached there yet. By the way, for those who haven't tried it, listening to foreign radio is a great way to develop your "ear" for a language.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: KickyC
Date: 09 Jan 99 - 10:21 PM

I just have one comment to make:

I LOVE 'WALTZING WITH BEARS."

There is just no accounting for taste in some people I guess.

KickyC :)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jenny
Date: 10 Jan 99 - 12:03 AM

Roger ... thanks for the info and taking the time ... jenny


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 10 Jan 99 - 04:41 AM

G'day Allan,
er... I'm thrilled to hear that disco is still alive. The excitement of avoiding it will add spice to my dull existance. (But don't tell Alison. Please don't tell Alison!)

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Ritchie
Date: 10 Jan 99 - 07:29 AM

Well that big black cloud has lifted and I leave you with..,

High,High,High...by McCartney ( and although I take your point Jon , I did like both 'Imagine' & The 'Band on the Run' LPs on their release.

'The magic roundabout' by Jasper Carrott..they actually played the 'B' side 'Funky moped' but not the 'A'side.

Judge Dread had the 'Big Six,seven and I'm sure others' all banned.

and I'm sure the Sex Pistols came under the censors 'hammer' or whatever it is that they use.

love and happiness

Ritchie


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: The Shambles
Date: 10 Jan 99 - 09:05 AM

Well twiddle my knobs!

There seems to be two strands to this thread, the issue about things being imposed upon you, such as other peoples music being played too loud and the issue of censorship.

There are laws and prohibitions to prevent the former but that doesn't appear to be effective as the enforcement of those regulations present problems. A good example of a bad law, is one that is not supported by the majority of people and therefore cannot be enforced. An example of this is in the UK when the wearing of seat belts was made compulsory, if the majority of the people had not thought it was a good idea it would not have been enforceable.

As for censorship, could anybody seriously suggest that banning has ever had anything but the opposite effect? Would we have ever heard of most of the songs mentioned, had they not been banned.

History has demonstrated repeatedly that all that censorship or prohibition has created is a (profitable) demand for whatever has been banned. One thinks of alcohol, drugs and pornography.

The area were there is a problem in not having any censorship, is when it comes to what we want our children exposed to. This creates all sorts of problems and we get in to all sorts of tangles about age limits and suchlike.

Maybe the answer is not to try and protect our children from seeing all the things that adults (and they too will) find interesting. Not to continue to pretend that the world is not what it is and as a consequence expose them to our hypocrisy, which I would suggest is even worse. By all means physically protect them from the dangers of our world but not to inform them of the real nature of those dangers is to put them more at risk. I know innocence sounds better that ignorance but it amounts to the same thing.

It's a bit like the people who would ban the Net and all it's wonders because children might find out that it used for pornography.

The fact is that if you take the forbidden element away from pornography, it is very boring and that applies to the other things too, including the songs.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 10 Jan 99 - 03:27 PM

No, I'm not old, Alison. But old enough to remember the old guys at the barber shop complaining about Those God Damned Yankee Draft Dodgers, and old enough to have avoided learning to dance because of disco. You couldn't escape it then -- every dance, every bar [started going when I was fifteen, not much to do down home], every radio station, every movie. Ugh. And the clothes, my Lord, the clothes, the fabrics, the colours! Oh, the humanity! The one good thing was that political correctness had not yet been invented, and you could pretty well relax and do what you pleased.

The reference above to the good aspects of disco must surely be a reference to funk, a related but different genre.

I like a lot of those old fifties songs, Alison. They have no pretence to them.

However, as I have said elsewhere disco was the height of melody and songwriting compared to techno, industrial, hip hop, rap, and other such randomized noise and angry shouts. To that I shall never be reconciled.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Hank
Date: 11 Jan 99 - 10:25 AM

Someone please tell my sister that disco is dead. While your at it, tell the rest of the girls I know who were born in the 1970's that disco is dead.
thank you

As for banning things, it isn't quite as simple as some of you make it out to be. During Prohibition in the US consumption of alachol did drop. People did drink less often. BUT, and this is a big but, because you couldn't get it legally and there wasn't popular support for a total ban (the hard liqures might have been supported, might) people who wanted to drink paid more to do so, and they had to go to the crooks to get it. Thus the crooks made it big selling and trading alachol for big money, and they were not above violance, whereas a liquer store today uses price then they used guns to get the other stores out of buiness.

The point is banning something does drop the use of the banned idea/substance. You do however have to expect that the black market will grow for everything you ban, and of course the black market isn't against violence unlike most people. It is a trade off. Personally I feel something are worth the violence, and some are not.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Kris
Date: 11 Jan 99 - 11:34 AM

Shambles - On some levels I would agree with the idea that you shouldn't hide the nature of the real world from children. However, there are some things which I prefer not to have to explain too early. In the past I have dug some enormous holes for myself when trying to provide honest and open answers. I have also regretted some conversations when I realised that they had been paraphrased and passed on to her schoolfriends whose parents are less forthcoming. It is a very difficult thing to decide what info to give at which point, and it is a very complex task to provide guidance and values. So I am afraid I do give into hypocrisy I suppose, perhaps it can be the lesser of two evils. But I do find it worrying that the prevalence of sex and violence in the general media can give children distorted and incomplete information - and some very dodgy role-models. On the other hand, the child does have to live in the real world so I s'pose you are right really. On the other hand (of which I expect there are many) the idea of censorship is perhaps an attempt to make the real world a nicer place. Which brings us back to political correctness. Eyuk. I just go round and round in circles on this one. I used to think I was mega-liberal in my attitudes but perhaps not.......

Kris


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: The Shambles
Date: 11 Jan 99 - 07:45 PM

Hank and Kris

I agree with you both, I don't think that it is simple at all, just simple in principle. When you are young though it is all very simple.

As an example we know that the passing of a law and introduction of an age limit, for all the right reasons, will not actually prevent young people from having sex when they decide they are old enough.

The same applies to the drinking of alcohol, the laws in fact, actually put pressure on them to start.

This is where the hypocrisy comes in, the implication of those laws are that we are old enough to do these things sensibly, when they can see plainly that we do not.

As we know banning and prohibition do not work, maybe we should stop doing it as the first and sometimes the only option.

Interesting comment Kris, about censorship being an attempt to make the real world a better place, I think that is exactly what we try to do.

I just think we should at least try the truth.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 11 Jan 99 - 10:45 PM

That's because in the States it always seems to run to extremes -- feast or famine, mink or monk. Either you can't buy liquor legally at all, or there is a liquor store on every corner. Either the bedsprings are squeaking every night, or people are making vows of chastity because of the fear of the remote chance of catching some disease. One minute they wink at ounce bags, the next they are busting kids for carrying a seed.

Try a little moderation in everything.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Banjeray
Date: 12 Jan 99 - 08:32 PM

Oh the wide range of subjects covered here in this thread!! First a comment on band music...Stars and Stripes Forever was mentioned. Has anyone listened to High School band music lately? They call themselves "marching bands" yet all they play (or try to play) are show tunes. Does this make sense. John Phillip Sousa is probably spinning in his grave!!! I have heard that the English have banned the Irish from playing many of their songs, the one that comes readily to mind is The Rising of the Moon. Is that ban still in effect, or has it been lifted? I have acquaintances that are British and it gives me GREAT pleasure to stick in a CD of Irish music, Tommy Makin and his group are among the favorite, whenever they are around. Seems to shorten the visit considerably :-)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: CW Hose
Date: 13 Jan 99 - 12:19 AM

Responding to Steve F. I have several 45s by Nervous Norvous, including Transfusion and Ape Call. Real name is Jimmie Drake. They were popular in the Midwest back in the 50s.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: SteveF (inactive)
Date: 13 Jan 99 - 12:17 PM

Thank you, CW Hose. And we are right back where we started. Interesting journey, what?


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: gargoyle
Date: 14 Jan 99 - 11:56 PM

That great gospel hymn - "Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken" aka "Deutchland, Deutchland, Uberales."

Does any station dare to play "The Horst Wessel Song?" (not a bad beer drinking tune)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 15 Jan 99 - 04:19 AM

To sing the "Horst Wessel Lied" in Germany or even only to whistle the tune is a criminal offence. I remember years ago when an Italian singer (Milva) was singing that tune in Germany with Italian lyrics. There was an uproar until it was realised she was singing the Italian translation of Bert Brecht's alternative anti-Nazi lyrics to that tune. The tune actually seems to be an old folk tune with completely innocent lyrics ( Der Abenteurer) but I wouldn't dare to sing it in Germany. I normally do not agree with banning songs, but in very extreme cases like this one I agree.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: The Shambles
Date: 15 Jan 99 - 03:03 PM

Wolfgang

Does the fact that the song is banned make it irresistible to certain groups?

What are the penalties for singing it, are they enforcable and does the ban work?


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: gargoyle
Date: 16 Jan 99 - 01:46 PM

While not specifically, banned, it is my understanding that the playing of Marching Through Georgiain the southern states of the US will raise an ire and a hostile responce.

"Sherman's March to the Sea" is still viewed by some as an atrocity.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 16 Jan 99 - 07:34 PM

Wolfgang, the tune to the Horst Wessel sounds like it would make an excellent tune to a hymn. I don't see any reason why the original folk sung shouldn't be sung, or the tune used for other lyrics. I believe that the war era national anthem has been kept.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: gargoyle
Date: 17 Jan 99 - 12:49 AM

The national anthem is pre-1930's....yes, it is played....a good example of its current midi use can be found as background music to an interesting page. German Travel Bureau

Unlike the Horst Wessel it does not make specific mention of Hitler or of the "SA."


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: gargoyle
Date: 17 Jan 99 - 12:51 AM

The "Link" vanished...here it is again..without quotes. German Tourist Bureau


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Kathleen Morgain
Date: 17 Jan 99 - 11:23 PM

"Transfusion". I remember hearing this on Dr. Demento (syndicated "weird tunes" show), or maybe, locally here in Seattle on "Music with Moscowitz". Not sure of the spelling on that one, on old KRAB.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Kathleen Morgain
Date: 17 Jan 99 - 11:53 PM

I fear I posted before I read

The rest of the thread

Forgive a newbie


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 18 Jan 99 - 12:25 AM

Sorry, Kathleen, we don't forgive newbie's. We welcome them. Glad you are here.

Mick


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Ronn Gilbert
Date: 18 Jan 99 - 12:32 AM

I have been reading through a couple of days worth of messages on this thread with more than a little amusement. If there is anything to be learned, I guess it's that offence is in the ear of the beholder.

I remember a lot of advance commotion about Pete Seeger's appearance on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. I also remember hearing "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy" in its entirety, which apparently was not done in all areas. This was in Rochester NY which was also one of the few cities where RAINBOW QUEST (please see that thread)was seen. This was a point in time where quite a few people who had been blacklisted in the 50's were finally starting to emerge from under pseudonyms (Dalton Trumbo, Zero Mostel, and others).

I also remember quite a few songs in the 60's that I was told were immoral(Younger Girl), anti-American (Subterranean Homesick Blues), obscene (anything by Frank Zappa), glorifying drugs (White Rabbit), and so on. Naturally, it only fueled our desire for these songs. They are all heard on oldies stations today (except maybe Zappa), and the Republic still stands.

I, like many others during the disco scare of the 70's, discovered that I couldnt dance worth crap. So in order to avoid having to dance, I became a musician. The best defence is a good offence.

I have never been a fan of rap or hip-hop, and never will be. But the drummer I work with gets a lot of notice for having a lot of his drum tracks from the 60's being sampled, and when he works, I work. I have found a lot of it is more fun to play than to listen to, and I can still come home an put on Pete Seeger, Billie Holiday, BB King, or Delbert McClinton.

I try to think of the periodic revivals of things like Disco and social conservatism the same way I think of herpes. With the proper care, outbreaks can be brief and managable. And like Lee Hays once said, "I've been around long enough to know: Be of good cheer, this too shall pass!"


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: robd
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 07:09 PM

Pete Seeger did an entire album of songs that were banned somewhere, sometime, entitled, if I remember correctly

Dangerous Songs?

One of the dangerous songs, which was brought painfully home to me only yesterday when my three-year-old pushed a small piece of foam rubber waaaaay up his nose and necessitated a quick trip to the doctor, was, "Bean In My Ears". Which was apparently banned in schools for fear that it would cause children to put beans in their ears. Believe me -- they don't need a song ;^)

robd


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: robd
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 10:57 AM

Pete Seeger did an entire album of songs that were banned somewhere, sometime, entitled, if I remember correctly

Dangerous Songs?

One of the dangerous songs, which was brought painfully home to me only yesterday when my three-year-old pushed a small piece of foam rubber waaaaay up his nose and necessitated a quick trip to the doctor, was, "Bean In My Ears". Which was apparently banned in schools for fear that it would cause children to put beans in their ears. Believe me -- they don't need a song ;^)

robd


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 11:10 AM

The Shambles,

Definitely yes to your first questionb.

I do not know what the penalty is, but I know it is enforced and the ban works (I have never heard it in Public, except in historical context, in which it is allowed to be played, like in a movie playing in that time)

Tim,

I am very curious what would happen if somebody sang that old (folk)song in public. My guess is (s)he would be sentenced, but I'm not sure.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Dr John
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 03:34 PM

Jon W. perhaps innocence and naivity mean the same but the one is applied positively and the other negatively or one to those you like and the other to those you don't. Or perhaps "innocence" refers to those who don't know through lack of experience, which can be an endearing thing ,and "naivity" to those who should know better but don't, perhaps because of stupidity.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: innovate@ior.com
Date: 22 Jan 99 - 03:01 PM

I just could not let this thread die without making a few comments of my own.

It suprises me that there could be as much discussion as I have seen in the last few weeks on this subject without anyone bringing up songs like Panama Red and Acapulco Gold. These songs were banned because of their "drug message". Acapulco Gold was played for several days before program directors realized it was about "evil weed" and jerked it from the air. In this case, as in most, the decision was made by radio station program directors around the country who feared for their jobs and safety if they allowed the song to be aired on their station.

There are other cases where "big brother" took direct action to affect the airplay of a song. A good example was the government generated rumor that Puff The Magic Dragon was in fact a song about drug use. This was done specifically to cause Americans to boycott Peter, Paul, & Mary. There was also a later disproved rumor about Paul Stookey being a convicted child molester which was apparently started by the same government organization. Our fine government employed these tactics because PP&M were popular artists who were performing anti-war/pacifist (rhymes with pinko/commie/fag) songs which were "corrupting the minds of our youth".

These "bans" were subtle in that there was no official proclaimation that the songs could not be played. There was just a release of "disinformation" which led program directors to take actions which resulted in the public from being allowed to enjoy the music they liked.

Other historical bans have been much more official. In Australia there was popular support for a highwayman named Jack Donohough which prompted the authorities to ban songs about him by law. In response, a number of songs issued forth about many other individuals who had the same initials, J.D., which were not banned, but the common people knew they were in fact about the original Jack D.

Ireland has a similar history in it's music. Songs about certain people and events were forbidden by law so people use initials to reference their heroes to get around the ban. They also used the tune of a nationalistic (Irish) song with the original words replaced by harmless words to inspire people by reminding them of the real song.

To anyone who disbelieves this, you should also know that the British government also passed laws forbidding Irish nationals from owning a horse with a value greater than 10 pounds and the real cause of the great potato famine was the exportation of the greater part of the Irish potato crop to feed England. The ability of the Irish to maintain a rich musical/lyrical culture in the face of such adversity is remarkable. In fact, it could probably be said that the musical/lyrical heritage, and the people's ability to maintain it in the face of such adversity, may be a major reason the Irish people were able to resists English occupation for centuries.

We should study the examples of the Irish and Australians and learn what the real price of censorship is; the loss of all manner of personal freedom. Each time the government, or a program director, dictates what we can listen to, we are robbed of another piece of our freedom of choice.

While some might say that a record not being played on the airwaves does not prevent us from going out and buying the record, the amount of airplay does directly impact the availability of the record in the marketplace, thereby impacting our ability to even buy the record for our own enjoyment.

Blues, jazz, "black music", civil rights songs, anti-war songs, songs about drugs, songs about sex, and songs about violence have all been targeted at one time or another in the last 50 years yet when the subject of "banned songs" is raised, the conversation seems to turn to obnoxious songs that probably got pulled from the air as the result of angry phone calls from hundreds of parents who were tired of hearing them on their children's radios.

I would like to see people take action directed at reducing the interference of government and special interest groups which impacts what information we are allowed to access. It is fine to be able to recall those unusual songs that tickled our funny bones and may have had a short history on the radio due to public outcry, but we must never forget that one of the casualties of the war between the government and the people in the 60's and 70's was volumes of heartful lyrics and excellent music which the people were robbed of by overzealous censors.

Sorry to ramble on at such length but this topic hit a nerve. Thanks for letting me vent.

Tom (no fancy handle)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 23 Jan 99 - 05:26 PM

Wolfgang, I meant the folk song, not the Horst Wessel version. Surely no one could get in trouble for singing that? If so, I would surely sing it.:)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 24 Jan 99 - 08:21 PM

Innovate,

I think it a myth to think that the Irish found it a land of milk and honey when they came to America. Just before the Civil War the Know-Nothings and the Native Americans (the latter were a group opposed to immigrants, not Indians) caused them all kind of grief. In St. Louis in the 1850's there was a running battle over a few days between the Irish on the one hand and the anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant Know Nothings and Native Americans, which only ended when the mayor enlisted 700 armed citizens to put it down. (The German population stayed out of it, apparently because they didn't like either side.) In Massachusetts, at one point, there was a meddlesome inspection held of Catholic schools and institutions due to some foul book then current about alleged abuses in Montreal nunneries.

As to the Australians, if they are as republican as they claim to be why do they still have the Union Jack on their flag, nearly thirty-five years after even we snoozy Canadians got rid of it?:)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Benjamin Bodhránaí
Date: 24 Jan 99 - 09:11 PM

Hi all!

We have a government youth station here in Oz that delights in being anti-establishment, TripleJ-FM. Anyway, one of it's programs, The J-Files, delves into a different theme each week, whether genre, artist, time period, or whatever. Last year they had one on banned songs, and manageed to fill a three hour show with songs and info, albeit the songs weren't folk, rather post 1960 stuff, pop and rock etc. But Richard Kingsmill the presenter said he really wanted to do so he could play "I bet you they won't play this song on the Radio" by the Monty Python team as the theme.

JJJ also had a court injunction taken out against it for playing a satirical piece referring to a rightwing political party leader here. The piece was called "I'm a backdoor Man" by Pauline Pantsdown, in satire of Pauline Hanson leader of OneNation. Quitesurrising as JJJ will usually play anything, but will also obey the law I 'spose.

Back to "Transfusion" I heard this on a public access radio here in South Oz, 3D radio on a program called "Yodel Action"

BB


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 27 Jan 99 - 02:38 PM

Tim,
I meant the old folksong, not the Horst Wessel version in my response. You would get sentenced for sure for the Horst Wessel version, you would get sentenced too for just whistling the tune, so (just my guess) you might get sentenced for singing the old folksong. I'd love to know..

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: rick fielding
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 12:20 PM

I've not only enjoyed the responses to this thread but have learned a hell of a lot as well. Last Monday I had another insight on how a song might get "banned".

After having played "The Soldier", by Harvey Andrews, a few weeks ago on my show, I thought I'd play his song "England", which is a SATIRE!. Yup, got two outraged calls, with both listeners telling me not to play such "chauvinistic crap".(they phrased it more graphically) Both missed the song's point completely. Watch it songwriters, there are Philistines everywhere.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: catspaw49
Date: 07 Oct 00 - 10:02 PM

refresh to answer new thread

Spaw


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,tarra
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 12:38 PM

Hi
thanks for all the info! I am in Spain doing a piece on banned songs you all have helped and not only information but refreshing to hear people care about life outside the box!


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 04:34 PM

Not quite 'banned' but Jasper Carrott's "Magic Roundabout" wasn't played by the BBC.
Their DJs could not understand why a song "Funky Moped" was doing so well in the pop charts. Of course it was selling for the other side which was a hilarious take on "The Magic Roundabout"

Also banned by the BBC "Deep in the Heart of Texas" from afternoon programming during the war as the banging and clapping was distracting workers in the munitions factories (true/uban myth?)

Nigel


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 05:01 PM

My Dad banned all Pink Floyd from our house.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Com Seangan
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 05:08 PM

Mind you BigPinkLad - I could kinda empathise with your Dad banning all Pink Floyd! Only joking !!!During the troubles in the North, THE MEN BEHIND THE WIRE was banned. But not only that but Gerry Adams was banned from reading his short stories on Radio and that was at this side of the Border.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Amergin
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 05:36 PM

Christy Moore's song The Never Came Home was banned by the courts...on St. Valentine's Day many years ago...there was a fire at the Stardust in Dublin...48 people were killed most of them teenagers or in their young 20's...the owners had all the emergency exits shained shut...so people could not escape...Christy Moore was the only one to go to court over it when the owners dragged him in to get an injunction against his song...the families of the victims NEVER were compensated.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: michaelr
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 06:50 PM

Clear Channel banned the Dixie Chicks last year after their singer announced from the stage that she was embarrassed to be from the same state as Resident Bush. Don't know if that ban is still in effect.

Cheers,
Michael


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: chordstrangler
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 08:44 PM

I have had the distinction of having two songs banned from the playlists of both RTE (Irish National Radio) and BBC Northern Ireland. The first song was "Only Our Rivers Run Free" and the second one was called "The Famous Five".
In relation to "The Famous Five" I got a letter from the BBC saying that it could cause offence to the British Army, gays, animal lovers, reformed criminals, persons of diminished intellectual capacity, South Africans, persons with addictions and those involved in the anti-apartheid movement.
Could this be a record?


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 08:55 PM

only if you put it on vinyl...


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,freda
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 09:10 PM

this song was reputed to be banned, as it would adversely affect troop morale. the version i learnt from my father goes like this:

Suvla Bay

Twas an old Australian homestead with roses round the door,
A young girl got a message, twas a message from the war.
With her mother's arm around her she gave way to sobs and sighs,
and as she read the message, the tears flowed from her eyes.
Chorus:
Why do I weep? Why do I pray?
My love's asleep so far away.
He played his part that April day
And now he sleeps 'neath Suvla Bay.

She joined a band of sister beneath the cross of red
And there she gave life's sustenance to the wounded and the dead.
She never forgot her soldier lying so far away
Her soldier who lay sleeping neath the sands of Suvla Bay,
Chorus:
Why do I weep? Why do I pray?
My love's asleep so far away.
He played his part that April day
And now he sleeps 'neath Suvla Bay.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 24 Feb 04 - 09:53 PM

G'day Freda (Underhill? ... Been munching your cookie lately ... ?),

We had a thread (or two) running on Suvla/Suda Bay in recent years. I think Bill Scott remarks, in The Second Penguin Australian Songbook on the wartime (WW II, in the case of the Suda Bay version he quotes) ban on this song - for its effect on morale, as you noted.

I suspect you would never find any printed notice of this banning ... but it was well accepted that songs that reflected the truth of war were not to be played in public.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: LadyJean
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 12:48 AM

Anne Feeny, a local folk singer, has a collection she calls "7 Songs You Can't Sing In Edgewood". Edgewood is a charming suburb, where, as my mother who grew up there used to say, "Even the Democrats are Republicans".
I don't know how Ms. Feeney found out she couldn't sing those 7 songs in Edgewood. I do know that one of them, "A Lecture From Your Mother" with it's refrain, "It's from them that I'd expect to see that F Word, not from you!" gave mother a great deal of pleasure.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: s&r
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 03:57 AM

There have been sanitised versions of songs for the benefit of the Beeb for years:

Sixteen Tons (lyrics changed from 'St Peter' to 'Say Brother' -blasphemy?)

Answer me (lyrics changed from 'Answer me Lord Above' to 'Answer me oh my love' - also blasphemy?)

Beautiful South ('Don't marry her f*ck me' to 'Don't marry her have me' obscene?)

Seem to remember the Animals House of the Rising Sun being a huge hit in part because the Beeb thought it was too long, so only played half of it - if you wanted the full version you needed to buy the record or listen to Radio Luxembourg 208 metres on the medium waveband.

Stu


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Leadfingers
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 07:52 AM

Cant think how I missed this thread the first time round. The best 'Song Banning' I know of was in Singapore in 1970, where I was serving in the R A F. Lee Kwan Yu in his infinite wisdom banned a lot of 'Drug Orientated' songs - The Beatles lost several- but the classic was The Rooftop Singers recording of Walk Right In , which just happenned to be the signature tune of The British Forces Broadcsting Services Folk Music programme. Also on the Banned List was Peter Paul and Mary's 'Puff The Magic Dragon'


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: freda underhill
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 08:12 AM

hi Bob & thanks, I've now checked out the threads.
'haven't been chewing cookies - at work i log in a s a guest..

enjoy Cobargo, it doesn't look like I'll be making it, unless a miracle happens..

fred


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Nemesis
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 03:14 PM

Allan C .. way up the threads there: Cecilia (Simon & Garfunkle) was also banned in Malawi, Central Africa .. the Official Hostess to His Excellency, The Ngwazi, Dr H. Kamuzu Banda was Madame Cecilia Kadzamira ... it was a gaolable offence . or worse..


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,JHadji
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 08:57 AM

Loved Transfusion & Ape Call from Nervous Norvis. I think I still have both in 45.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,Sasamack
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 09:16 AM

'Relax' by Frankie goes to Hollywood was actually banned because of the video.
This showed the bandmembers entering an erotic club and watching S&M - complete with gimps. Eventually the lead singer is being urinated on by the people in the club. You will very rarely see this video as a replacement one was hastily shot which showed various laser beams and things. After banning the video, the bbc went the whole hog and banned the song. The original video became the stuff of urban legend - people began to doubt that it had ever really existed.
It did exist, however, and you may occasionaly catch it very late at night.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,mick
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 09:52 AM

I always thought the most pathetic act of censorship was the self censorship perpetrated by the holier than thou sixties group The Bachelors .Anyone remember them? When recording their cover of Paul Simon's I am a Rock , instead of singing "Hiding in my room/ safe within my womb" they sang "Hiding in my room /safe within my room".


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: frogprince
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 12:22 PM

Amazing! there is someone else alive out there who remembers "ape call"! Someone in our class had a copy, and always got it played at school dances in junior high & early high school; that's the only place I ever heard it. I think even then we thought it was gosh-awful,
and threw it in mainly for that reason. I think the flip side was
"Wild Dogs of Kentucky"; so bad we didn't even bother with it. Oops, afraid I let my age show, and ruined my chances for seducing pubescent
beauties here...


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 01:58 PM

Just before this last Christmas, I wrote a song. My wife said that's a terrible song - it will upset people, forget it.

A few weeks later I come across the words on a bit of paper - I thought, that's not bad. I'll record it on the portastudio this morning and then that afternoon I sent it to the radio station at Cork University along with one or two other Irish Universities.

Anyway I won't go into the title but suffice to say I did it under the name Barney O'Bollox.

A few weeks later I get a phone call - some guy from Radio Cork. And this guy starts talking to me about the song, and says it stands out from the weeks other releases. i said yes well it would, but please don't play it as it wasn't meant for mainstream radio stations because it will offend people.

He says , too late I already played it and we've had a big response. I said, you did what.....

And he says careful now, you're on the air - please don't swear or anything

I said please don't play it again - it will offend people and he says okay, if you feel like that.

What I'm trying to say is, perhaps its better not to have these thoughts in the first place. I wish I didn't write songs that upset people. I really do.

Anybody else had similar experiences?


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: robomatic
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 03:26 PM

I have no idea why anything by Nervous Norvous would ever be banned. Dr. Demento played his stuff freely in the 70's.

If you're on Student Radio and you get on well with the music director you can pretty much play what you want. In theory there are things you could broadcast for which you as DJ and other station executives can go to jail, but if you haven't flagrantly flouted the FCC's rules and can demonstrate redeeming social/ artistic content you are safe. If you simply hurl obscenities into the microphone you are not safe. I had a show for a few years and no one from the station ever gave me any trouble or review because the show started at 10 PM and ended at 1 AM. They were in bed!

Banning in our societies is due to commercial radio protecting its revenue streams. I find this understandable and yet pathetic.

Public radio in the US wants to be considered a valuable community resource, so typically exercises caution, including warning listeners that a particular portion of a broadcast may consider language that could be considered objectionable. On the other hand, it is perfectly appropriate to air a show on banned music and in so doing, air the banned music.

The CBC seems to be much less concerned with for example quotations of on-the-street interviews. It so happened that the public broadcasting station in Anchorage stopped carrying CBC Sunday morning because of the language it carried. (This was chicken behavior on the part of the local NPR program director). But the point is, these things come down primarilly as judgement calls as to what is best for a particular station or network.

The current reaction to 'nipplegate' is still in effect, and is mostly kneejerk cowardice on the part of radio executives. Again, commercial interest maintains. They are perfectly happy for Howard Stern to broadcast when the income outstrips the damage. They are perfectly happy to be 'shocked, shocked' that this sort of thing has been going on, when the worm turns.

Having said that, there are worse things out there than commercial self interest.

If you live in a city with a university station, you are more likely to hear all sorts of banned stuff. Not only did we have no commercial interests to protect, we wanted listeners to tune in to hear stuff they would no way hear on the main airwaves. There is also a late night 'safe harbor' period where we can air, well, pretty much anything. I got away with the Rudy Schwartz Project which was very very rude to Tipper Gore in very plain language (on account of her attempt to have rock lyrics banned and her head-to-head confrontation, so to speak, with Frank Zappa). I could have aired George Carlin's Seven Deadly Words as long as I inserted a warning.

I love the subject of what you can and can't broadcast. The power of language is such that you can state perfectly obscene concepts without using any obscene language. You can state it such that it is a violation of FCC regulations, and you can state it such that is isn't. Remember the Monty Python skit with the man you couldn't say the letter 'c'. The other man says, well, why can't you use the letter 'k'? "Why, yes, I kan, what a silly bunt!"

(I never actually heard that one on the air, though)


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: sapper82
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 04:57 PM

To rick fielding -
The song "Soldier" was based on the sacrifice of Sgt Willets of the Parachute Regiment in The Springfield Road Police Station in 1972.
Cut and paste http://www.psni.police.uk/index/media_centre/press_releases/press_release_detail.htm?PRID=994
for details.
Also C&P on http://www.tietacs.org.uk/index_files/News.htm
How the hell do you do blue clicky things???
Another point on the song, whilst it was banned by the BBC, it was frequently played on BFBS in Germany throught the mid '70s


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,barrie roberts
Date: 26 Aug 04 - 06:22 PM

The late Lonnie Donegan not only got banned by the BBC for 'Nobody Loves Like An Irishman', but also for 'Digging My Potatoes'. Around the same time, the Beeb would only play 'The Foggy, Foggy Dew' on the old Third Programme (the 'intellectual' network') and not on popular channels. Later they banned Leon Roseelson's 'Tim McGuire' after a complaint from the Chairman of West Bromwich Fire Committee. My 'Nine Miles from Gundagai' got blacklisted in 1966 (because it was dirty) and another track on the same EP, 'Riding Down the Castlereagh', was treated the same because it might offend Chinese people.
The first time I broadcast live on 'Folk on Two' i had a letter warning me to sing 'nothing controversial'! A few years later Radio Beacon (Wolverhampton) recorded a charity concert which included me and bleeped two of my songs.
'Expressions of support' for proscribed organisations are banned in the UK by the Prevention of Terrorism Act, which I suppose makes IRA songs illegal.
Never mind --- the banned play on!


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jim McLean
Date: 27 Aug 04 - 05:01 AM

In 1960 I wrote a satirical song about the marriage between Princess Margaret and Anthony Armstrong-Jones. Josh McRae was banned from singing it in Glasgow and a Scottish MP mentioned it in the House of Commons '.... a scurrilous piece of anti royalty propaganda'!!


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 27 Aug 04 - 07:16 AM

nice one Jim!


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Billy Suggers
Date: 27 Aug 04 - 08:16 AM

Hot damn!

All this talk of banned stuff & not one mention of Jeremy Taylor.

tsk tsk tsk


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,Hazzle
Date: 30 Apr 05 - 02:22 PM

Anybody know of a song that supposely came out in the 1960's that sang of a plane crash in graphic detail and was banned? I was told the title was D. O. A.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: nutty
Date: 01 May 05 - 06:50 AM

I think all Tom Lehrer songs were banned by the BBC as was (if I remember rightly ) that horrendous song "Johhny come back to me".
I think, of all the radio stations, the Beeb probably holds the record for banning the largest number of anti-establishment songs.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST
Date: 04 May 05 - 05:25 AM

I am astounded that the Aussies on this forum did not think to mention the Skyhooks "Living In The Seventies" album (OK, OK, I know it's not folk music - but there have been a lot of non-folkie songs mentioned despite that)

The Livng In The Seventies album consisted of ten tracks and was the first album to receive an 'A' classification on SEVEN of them - this meant that the government department (Broadcasting Commission - or whoever it was) in charge of OK-ing recorded material for airplay in those days banned seven of those ten tracks from airplay.

In fact, the only reason why there weren't eight tracks banned is because in the title song; songwriter / bassist, Greg MacAinsh had the lead singer sing the line "I feel like a good time that's never been had" instead of the original line which was written as "I feel like a call-girl who's never been had".

I believe (though I may be wrong) that this is still a record (pardon the pun) for any album anywhere in the world.

Mind you - that "A" listing virtually ensured the record achieving (again, pardon the pun) record sales - I think it was the first Australian made album to go platinum (and it went triple platinum in the end)

Mutt


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: alanabit
Date: 04 May 05 - 05:42 AM

"Banning in our societies is due to commercial radio protecting its revenue streams." That is one of the most telling sentences which I have read on this thread. We have been talking mainly about songs which have been pulled because their content offended listeners. In effect, most artists are denied access to airplay because they are not on playlists, for the reason Robomatic gave. Because playlists exist and are subject to scrutiny, to guarantee advertising revenue, most artists who are not already famous, or have no major company behind them, have no access to radio plays. The stations do not describe this as a ban, but the effect is just the same.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 04:26 AM

A newer link to Transfusion that works.
http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=euaH8mUiFHs&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DeuaH8mUiFHs.


Nervous Norvus died in 1968 of cirrhosis of the liver, aged 56.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Bill D
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 10:21 AM

That seems to be a link that works only for 'mobile' devices. Some of us old fogies still listen to stuff on our big, clunky desktop computers.


But while we are reviving memories of "Transfusion", I remember sitting in a car at a drive-in restaurant....with real carhops... about 1957... when the loudspeaker system played "Transfusion".
As the verse with the line "shoot the juice to me, Bruce" ended, a shrill female voice from some other car across the parking area yelled: "I wish someone would shoot ME the juice!"
There was appropriate raucous laughter and commentary.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: GUEST,Musket getting his tuppence worth
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 10:36 AM

Banned songs would be an arbitrary decision by the proprietor of the radio or tv station but since this thread started, some songs would fall foul of UK legislation to prevent incitement of hate.

Back on Local decisions, I was a volunteer on hospital radio many years ago. We banned songs in bad taste, anything overtly political or the records aimed at maternity, such as Who's Sorry Now and Shotgun Wedding.

I'd have banned The Old Rugged Cross, but only because it was the most popular request and we were all word perfect!


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 11:28 AM

The BBC has a magnificent in-house catalogue of it's folk music material - thousands of items, all annotated and given a reference number.
Two of those numbers are prefixed with an 'S' - not sure if it actually stands for anything specific (secret maybe?), but both items are Irish; 'St Peter's day Was Dawning' and 'Lord Leitrim'.
I understand that both have to be cleared by 'them upstairs' before they can be played on the air.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: eddie1
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 01:19 PM

Certainly in the West of Scotland, any song that smacked of sectarianism was "banned", two examples being "Kevin Barry" and "The Sash my Father Wore" This resulted in the banning of Hamish Henderson's wonderful "Coronation Coronach" because it used the tune of "The Sash"!

Some clever musicologist - wish I knew who cos I'd like to shake his hand, discovered you could sing "Kevin Barry" to the tune of "The Sash" thus being banned on two opposing grounds! What a triumph!

Eddie


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Joybell
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 06:11 PM

In the 1970s my True-love lived in Asia for a while. When he sang on radio he had to submit all the words to the songs he planned to sing. The result was that the Beatles songs were banned outright. Blues lines like, "...the pillow where my good gal used to lay..." were cut. "Leaving on a Jet Plane" was out because it was obvious the singer shared a bed with his "girlfriend". Hank Williams and many country songs from others were a problem. The list went on.
Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Joe_F
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 08:41 PM

I have read that Ewan MacColl's "Second Front Song" was banned during W.W. II because it led to riots in pubs where there were US and British soldiers.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Deckman
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 04:08 AM

In 1962, for the six month run of the "Seattle World's Fair", the whole region went nuts with fair fever. Of course the Seattle Space Needle, which was built for the fair, was the highlight of the event.

A very popular trio, "The Shaggy Gorillas and One Buffalo Fish", wrote a song titled "The Day The Needle Fell." It was an instant hit and was played for three weeks solid on all the Seattle area radio stations.

Suddenly, it was never heard ANYWHERE again ... overnight. It had been banned by the major powers to be that ran the World's Fair because it might give folks the impression that the Needle could actually fall.

Maggie Savage, a member of the group, gave me a copy of the record recently. btw ... the Needle is still standing ... bob(deckman)Nelson


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Gutcher
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 06:02 AM

My good friend Diva"s budding career as a radio presenter was nipped in the bud when she played a recording of the bawdie bothy ballad "She Wadna Dae It". As far as I am aware she was never invited back.   I always feel a bit guilty about this as I only recorded the song for academic purposes.
For those of you with an "academic" interest the song can be found on MTCD 313.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 06:49 AM

Hamish Henderson's "Songs and Ballads of World War 2" was until recently kept in the "Phi Collection" at the National Library of Scotland. This was a rather miscellaneous selection of material they didn't want the casual public looking at - you needed to use it in the Rare Book Room, and the catalogue was a small notebook rather than the general card index. In most cases the reasons for the categorization was sexual explicitness, but there was one item in the collection I never did figure out. It was published in the 1940s, titled "CuO". It seemed to be a survey of the world market in copper oxide. Maybe it has pornographic annotations. It seems not be in the NLS at all now.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jim McLean
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 06:56 AM

Eddie1, Morris Blythman wrote the Coronation Coronach, not Hamish Henderson and I think the lyrics as well as the tune may have something to do with it not being aired.
Nothing Hamish wrote could ever have been banned as he steered clear of any specific nationalist or republican line. His songs were generally socialist and broadly internationalist, British.
A slight exception to this was his Men of Knoydart but, although it had an anti English slant, I don't think it was 'bannable' material.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 07:27 AM

I reckon the piece in that book that the NLS is most likely to have had a problem with was "You Can't Fuck Fatima Unless You Pay Farouk". I'm sure Hamish had a hand in polishing that one up. And I can't see it getting an airing on the Beeb (or, perhaps, any broadcast network) right now.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Jim McLean
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 03:44 PM

You might be right, Jack. My Calvanism used to kick in when Hamish sang his bawdy songs, which to me were more akin to rugby, puerile smut, and knowing that his kilt swung the other way, it was a pleasure to leave his company.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: Gutcher
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 11:37 PM

I know exactly what you mean Jim, with me and my sibblings it manifests it!s self in the fact we never swear.
Had absorbed all types of songs as a child with the very air I breathed in and was only persuaded to sing the song mentioned as collectors had only ever found the chorus and being a green country chap I never ever imagined it would appear on the CD.
Thus I have not, until fairly recent times, "fathered" the recording and if asked at any time where the CD can be obtained I have copied it on this machine with that one removed and gifted it to the interested party


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: PHJim
Date: 12 Jul 13 - 12:11 AM

I din't read the whole thread, and I'm sorry that Rick's not around to see this, but Beans In My Ears, a kids' song written by Len Chandler was banned in Pittsburgh and Boston because doctors protested that many children were actually putting beans in their ears after hearing the song.

Pete Seeger sings Len Chandler's "Beans In My Ears"


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: PHJim
Date: 12 Jul 13 - 12:13 AM

Sorry, Please change the word "din't" to "didn't". I wish there was an edit feature here.


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Subject: RE: banned songs
From: ollaimh
Date: 13 Jul 13 - 12:03 AM

hey wolfgang and tim jaques, back in the seventies to the ninties, there was a german "folk singer" who used to sing hitler youth songs. he introduced them as "songs I learned in a german youth group". I found he failed de nazification so came to Canada to become a doctor. he couldn't be a doctor having failed de nazification heaqrings, at least not in Germany.

this was at the Vancouver folk song society. he sang them for years. for a while I couldn't believe it was happening but when I did no one cared. a jewish friend who spoke Yiddish and german, went with me one might and confirmed he was singing the hilter youth versions. these were based on german folk music but twisted and perverted. his family are still influential in folk circles and have the ear of joe offer who has many times banned me talking about the Nazi folk singer in Vancouver. he won't let me name him any more. we'll see if he deletes this message.

amaxingly the nice anglo/germans on the Vancouver folk ss were uite happy to let him sing Nazi songs for decades. this same group used to ban all irish rebel songs. although I made a point of singing a few, however they never let me get on their stage again.

they accepted his lies that he was 14 or 16 at the wars end. after his death his obit showed he was 27 at wars end. and they accepted his story they were deutchland party and part of the pa=thfinder youth group and then the sthalhelm(a deutchland party sreety marching group). in fact the dvp was part of the coalition that brought hitler to power in the hartzzberg forest agreement, and the path finders merged into the hilter youth in 1932/33 after that agreement, and the stahlhelm was were they drafted the first ss officers as part of the deal. they bought every rationalization for singing Nazi songs as joe offer buys these rationalizations now. this is second generation holocaust denial. to me incomprehensible to any ethical person.


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