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Lyr Req: Highlander's Farewell: 'O where shall...'

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YE JACOBITES BY NAME


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Barry 22 Feb 97 - 08:36 PM
mim 22 Feb 97 - 11:04 PM
Anne Cormack 23 Feb 97 - 03:17 AM
Barry 23 Feb 97 - 12:20 PM
mim 23 Feb 97 - 01:48 PM
Jim Dixon 08 Nov 09 - 12:48 PM
Jim McLean 09 Nov 09 - 06:30 AM
Jim McLean 09 Nov 09 - 06:45 AM
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Subject: JACOBITE WORDS: WERE WIIL I GO SEEK MY BREAD
From: Barry
Date: 22 Feb 97 - 08:36 PM

I'm looking for words to the last verse of this song & it's name. The first verse goes "Oh where will I go seek my bread & where will I go wander, and where will go hide my head for here I'll bide nay longer, the winds may blow the sea may roll & swirl me round in danger, my native land I must forgo and bide the lonley stranger", the part of the last verse I'm missing goes "Thy brave thy just fell in the dust, on ruin's brink we quiver ......???? aduei aduei forever.


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Subject: RE: JACOBITE WORDS: WERE WIIL I GO SEEK MY BREAD
From: mim
Date: 22 Feb 97 - 11:04 PM

It's The Highlander's Farewell and its sung by the Corries on their album Scotland Will Flourish.

I have the words somewhere and will look for them to send if someone else doesn't send them first.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE HIGHLANDER'S LAMENT (Archie Fisher)
From: Anne Cormack
Date: 23 Feb 97 - 03:17 AM

Barry,

I know this as THE HIGHLANDER'S LAMENT, and got my version
from Archie Fisher.

1. Oh where shall I gae seek my bread and where shall I gae wander,
And where shall I gae hide my head for here I'll bide nae langer.
The seas may row, the winds may blow and swathe me round in danger,
My native land I must forego and roam a lonely stranger.

2. The glen that was my father's own must be by his forsaken,
And the house that was my father's home is levelled with the bracken.
Ochone, ochone, our glory's o'er, stol'n by a mean deceiver,
Our hands are on the broad claymore, but might is broke forever.

3. And now my prince, my injured prince, thy people have disowned thee,
Have hunted and have driven thee down with ruined chiefs around thee.
Thy brave, thy just fell in the dust, on ruin's brink we quaver.
Heav'n's pitying eye is closed on thee, adieu, adieu forever.

Anne


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Subject: RE: JACOBITE WORDS: WERE WIIL I GO SEEK MY BREAD
From: Barry
Date: 23 Feb 97 - 12:20 PM

Anne & Mim, thanks, it's been 15 years since I got this song, and I've been looking for the missing line ever since. This is great. Hope I have the chance to return the favor.


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Subject: RE: JACOBITE WORDS: WERE WIIL I GO SEEK MY BREAD
From: mim
Date: 23 Feb 97 - 01:48 PM

I'll give you a slight difference in words from Anne's version.

Ochone, Ochone, the glory's gone, stole by a ruthless reiver.

Your request encouraged me to listen to it again. Thank you. It's always been one of my favorites.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE HIGHLANDER'S FAREWELL (James Hogg)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Nov 09 - 12:48 PM

From The Jacobite Relics of Scotland, Second Series, collected and illustrated by James Hogg (Edinburgh: William Blackwood, 1821), page 185, where the song appears with musical notation for one voice only:


THE HIGHLANDER'S FAREWELL
From the Gaelic

1. O where shall I gae seek my bread?
Or where shall I gae wander?
O where shall I gae hide my head?
For here I'll bide nae langer.
The seas may row, the winds may blow,
And swathe me round in danger;
My native land I must forego,
And roam a lonely stranger.

2. The glen that was my father's own
Must be by his forsaken;
The house that was my father's home
Is levell'd with the braken.
Ochon! ochon! our glory's o'er, [or "gone"]
Stole by a mean deceiver! [or "ruthless reaver"]
Our hands are on the broad claymore,
But the might is broke for ever.

3. And thou, my prince, my injured prince,
Thy people have disown'd thee,
Have hunted and have driven thee hence,
With ruin'd chiefs around thee.
Though hard beset, when I forget
Thy fate, young helpless rover, [or "hapless"]
This broken heart shall cease to beat,
And all its griefs be over.

4. Farewell, farewell, dear Caledon,
Land of the Gael no longer!
A stranger fills thy ancient throne, [or "Strangers have trod thy glory on"]
In guile and treachery stronger.
The brave and just fall in the dust; [or "sink"]
On ruin's brink they quiver—
Heaven's pitying e'e is closed on thee;
Adieu! adieu for ever!

[Note: brackets above indicate variant words in Songs, by the Ettrick Shepherd [James Hogg] (Edinburgh: William Blackwood, 1831), page 133, where the poem appears with the following preface:]

[THE HIGHLANDER'S FAREWELL is] one of those desperate Jacobite effusions, which, in the delirium of chivalry, I have so often poured out when contemplating the disinterested valour of the clans, and the beastly cruelty of their victors. It is a mercy that I live in a day when the genuine heir of the Stuarts fills their throne, else my head would only be a tenant at will of my shoulders. I have composed more national songs than all the bards of Britain put together. Many of them have never been published; more of them have been, under various names and pretences: but few of them shall ever be by me again.—The song is set by Smith, in the Scottish Minstrel.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Highlander's Farewell: 'O where shall...'
From: Jim McLean
Date: 09 Nov 09 - 06:30 AM

Smith copied Hogg's melody exactly in vol 5, page 88, (last vol 6 published in 1824) but under the title of the first line 'O where ...'. He credits Hogg with the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Highlander's Farewell: 'O where shall...'
From: Jim McLean
Date: 09 Nov 09 - 06:45 AM

PS I should really have made that clearer .. I meant that Smith copied Hogg's version published in 1821, i.e the underlined words in Jim Dixon's post and copied it in vol 5 of his Scotish (sic) Minstrel.


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