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Lyr Req: Earl Richard (#68, from Rod Paterson)

Roberto 11 Sep 05 - 03:28 AM
The Borchester Echo 11 Sep 05 - 04:23 AM
Roberto 11 Sep 05 - 04:58 AM
GUEST,folkiefrank 11 Sep 05 - 11:12 AM
The Borchester Echo 11 Sep 05 - 12:38 PM
Roberto 11 Sep 05 - 02:23 PM
Roberto 11 Sep 05 - 02:44 PM
Bill D 11 Sep 05 - 03:28 PM
Malcolm Douglas 11 Sep 05 - 03:37 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: EARL RICHARD (#68, from Rod Paterson)
From: Roberto
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 03:28 AM

Earl Richard (Child #68)
Rod Paterson, Up-To-Date, 2 albums on 1 cd (Two Hats, 1987, and Smiling Waved Goodbye*, 1988), Greentrax CDTRAX 197.

The main problems are in the 5th stanza. I hear "she stooped", but "he" would make sense. She had a penknife: but it is noit exactly what I hear. Please, help. Thank you. R

Earl Richard is a hunting gane
As fast as he could ride
His hunting horn hung aboot his neck
And a short sword by his side

When he cam tae my lady's gate
He's tirled at the pin
And wha so fain (?) as she hersel'
To rise and let him in

Oh light, oh light, Earl Richard - she says
Oh light and stay a' night
Ye shall have cheer with charcoal clear
And the candles burning bright

I winna light, no I canna light
No I winna light at all
For a fairer maid than ten of ye
Is a-waiting in my hall

He (?) stooped doon fae aff his steed
And kissed her cherry cheek
She (?) had a penknife in her hand
And wounded him sae deep

Oh lie you there, Earl Richard – she says
Oh lie you there 'til morn
And a fairer maid than ten of me
Will await your coming lang

She's called her servants ain by ain
And called them twa by twa
I hae a dead man in my bower
And I wish he were awa

Ain has taen him by the hand
And the other by the feet
And the deepest well in Clyde water
It made his winding sheet

Then up and spake a wee, wee bird
That sat upon a tree:
Gae hame, gae hame you false lady
And pay your maids the fee

Come doon, come doon, my bonny bird
O come you doon to me
I hae a cage of the beaten gold
And I'll gie it to thee

O gae hame, gae hame, you false lady
And pay your maids the fee
As you hae done to Earl Richard
So wad you dae tae me

Gin I had an arrow in my hand
And a bow bent on a string
I'd shoot a dart at yoor pride heart
All in the leaves sae green


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 04:23 AM

Apart from missing out the detour via Clydeside, this is very similar to what Jon Boden sings on the first Spiers and Boden CD Through and Through where in the notes it states 'a version of Young Hunting noted from a Miss Stephenson of Glasgow in 1825'.   Instead of 'wha so fain' he sings 'who so ready' and for the 5th stanza he sings: 'He's leant down from his milk white steed to kiss her ruby cheek/She held a penknife in her hand and wounded him so deep', and 'gin' becomes 'if' throughout, all of which is considerably less arcane and more comprehensible to today's listeners. If you want to compare the whole thing it's here under album details.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: Roberto
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 04:58 AM

Thank you, countess richard. I know Spiers and Boden's recording. It is also similar to other "Earl Richard" (Maddy Prior's; Hermes Nye's). As for Rod Paterson's, I need someone who can listen to his recording, to get exactly what he sings. Bets wishes. R


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: GUEST,folkiefrank
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 11:12 AM

Roberto, hope this helps.


He's stooped doon fae aff his steed
And kissed her cherry cheek
She's had a penknife in her hand
And wounded him sae deep


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 12:38 PM

I still think it's far better to sing in comprehensible language as close as possible to contemporary speech so that your audience will understand and identify with the story. Cos that's what you're doing, telling a story, not preserving a museum peice.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: Roberto
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 02:23 PM

I'm not going to sing it in public, just by myself: I like to listen to these songs and ballads. R


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: Roberto
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 02:44 PM

One more thing. I've already received the remark that countess richard has made in this thread: what's the use of getting exactly the lines of some recording of a traditional song. I think that traditional songs and ballads are so interesting in their matching of notes and words, and each combination is unique, with its own rythms, and some verses are better than others. A singer will choose what to do, but I find it interesting to know and compare the different choices. So won't you please, please help me? R


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: Bill D
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 03:28 PM

sorry...I have 20+ versions, but not that one...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: rod paterson's earl richard #68
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 11 Sep 05 - 03:37 PM

As already indicated, the text appears to be Motherwell's example (Child's example F, from a Miss Stevenson rather than Stephenson) though altered in some places. Only someone with access to Rod Paterson's arrangement would know precisely what changes he has made.

The Spiers/Boden arrangement is much closer to Motherwell, though "I'd fire it o'er that light-brown heart" is a rather odd substitution for "I'd shoot a dart at thy proud heart". I wonder where they got it from?

I haven't heard that recording either, but the doubling-up of verses might indicate that they've used the second tune Motherwell printed.


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