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Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore

DigiTrad:
COMPUTERIZED LIBRARIAN
ELEMENTS
I'M CALLED LITTLE CAROLINE
THE FORMULARY SONG


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chico 18 Sep 05 - 04:38 PM
Le Scaramouche 18 Sep 05 - 05:20 PM
GUEST,leeneia 18 Sep 05 - 06:30 PM
Joe Offer 18 Sep 05 - 07:00 PM
The Fooles Troupe 18 Sep 05 - 07:10 PM
kendall 18 Sep 05 - 07:19 PM
Joe Offer 18 Sep 05 - 07:50 PM
Nigel Parsons 18 Sep 05 - 07:54 PM
kendall 18 Sep 05 - 08:06 PM
Bill Hahn//\\ 18 Sep 05 - 08:12 PM
chico 18 Sep 05 - 08:21 PM
chico 18 Sep 05 - 09:09 PM
Joe Offer 18 Sep 05 - 09:23 PM
chico 18 Sep 05 - 09:34 PM
chico 18 Sep 05 - 10:01 PM
The Fooles Troupe 19 Sep 05 - 12:22 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 19 Sep 05 - 08:24 AM
chico 19 Sep 05 - 11:40 AM
GUEST,Arkie 19 Sep 05 - 12:51 PM
Tannywheeler 20 Sep 05 - 10:42 AM
Le Scaramouche 20 Sep 05 - 12:31 PM
A Wandering Minstrel 21 Sep 05 - 07:55 AM
Tannywheeler 21 Sep 05 - 10:17 AM
Schantieman 21 Sep 05 - 02:28 PM
The Fooles Troupe 21 Sep 05 - 09:48 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HMS Pinafore 'A Maiden Fair to See'
From: chico
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 04:38 PM


(high g g g d d# a; low g g g c# d g) (G G° A, G G° B°|G/D G)
    C                         F°             C (trill a g)
The Nightingale sighed for the moon's bright ray
                               Am       E7    (trill b c#)
And told his tale in his own melodious way!
C7/E F       (G7/D C) G
He sang "Ah, well-a-day!"
       Em/G       G7    C
ALL He sang "Ah, well-a-day!"

The lowly vale for the mountain vainly sighed,
To his humble wail the echoing hills replied.
They sang "Ah, well-a-day!"

ALL They sang "Ah, well-a-day!"


RECITITIVO:
            C                      (B°)
I know the value of a kindly chorus,
      E7                      Am
But choruses yield little consolation
             F         Bb°          F   A
When we have pain and sorrow too before us!
      (Dm)      A°                   G
I love -- and love, alas, above my station!
                G+                   Em             G7
BUT (aside). He loves -- and loves a lass above his station!
                  B7                B°             A°
ALL (aside). Yes, yes, the lass is much above his station!

[Natural key would be E]
(C B° C G7 G° C, G7 C) or, (low c, < c b a g f# f e g f e c b d c# d e c)
   C                        G7
A maiden fair to see, the pearl of minstrelsy,
Dm/A             C/G G
A bud of blushing beauty;
7   C          A7               Dm             E7/G#
For whom proud nobles sigh, and with each other vie
   Am      G/D    D7 G
To do her menial's duty.

       G/D             D G (or: d highd, c b a a g)
ALL: To do her menial's duty.

7 F°                        C6 C       C5b   C
A suitor, lowly born, with hopeless passion torn,
    G7          C° C
And poor beyond denying,
    7                         F   
Has dared for her to pine at whose exalted shrine
   Am/E    E7       Am
A world of wealth is sighing.
         C       Am    E7 Am G7
ALL. A world of wealth is sighing.

    C                      G   
Unlearned he in aught save that which love has taught
      Am          Dm   C G
(For love had been his tutor);
7    C/E       A7      G7/D               D°
Oh, pity, pity me--our captain's daughter she,
    C/G    D    G7 Am
And I that lowly suitor!
Oh, pity, pity me--our captain's daughter she,
    D7/G          G7 C (C B° C G7 G° C, G7 C) or, (low c, c b a g f# f e g f e c, b d c# d e c)
And he that lowly suitor!

G&S


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: HMS Pinafore 'A Maiden Fair to See'
From: Le Scaramouche
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 05:20 PM

This won't work as a serious song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: HMS Pinafore 'A Maiden Fair to See'
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 06:30 PM

Thanks for posting, Chico. I liked this song when I first heard it, at about age 13. The version I heard started with "A maiden fair to see."

It's a beautiful melody, and I still sing it sometimes.
-------
Recently I went to a performance of the Mikado. The second half started with a lovely piece called "The Sun Whose Rays." It is nice for piano or flute.


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Subject: ADD: When I Was a Lad (HMS Pinafore)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 07:00 PM

When I was in college, I did lights for a production of HMS Pinafore. The spotlight man and I sat up in the light booth, singing along loudly with all the songs until the director yelled, "Shut up!" I was in a Catholic seminary, so we had guys playing the female parts. I never felt comfortable with that, and the guy who played Buttercup was just a bit too believable. Still, I had a great time with that play.

You'll find the entire libretto, with lyrics, here (click). I guess my favorite song from Pinafore is "When I Was a Lad":


SONG -- SIR JOSEPH

          When I was a lad I served a term
          As office boy to an Attorney's firm.
          I cleaned the windows and I swept the floor,
          And I polished up the handle of the big front door.
               I polished up that handle so carefullee
               That now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

CHORUS.--He polished, etc.

          As office boy I made such a mark
          That they gave me the post of a junior clerk.
          I served the writs with a smile so bland,
          And I copied all the letters in a big round hand--
               I copied all the letters in a hand so free,
               That now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

CHORUS.- He copied, etc.

          In serving writs I made such a name
          That an articled clerk I soon became;
          I wore clean collars and a brand-new suit
          For the pass examination at the Institute,
               And that pass examination did so well for me,
               That now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

CHORUS.--And that pass examination, etc.

          Of legal knowledge I acquired such a grip
          That they took me into the partnership.
          And that junior partnership, I ween,
          Was the only ship that I ever had seen.
               But that kind of ship so suited me,
               That now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

CHORUS.- But that kind, etc.

          I grew so rich that I was sent
          By a pocket borough into Parliament.
          I always voted at my party's call,
          And I never thought of thinking for myself at all.
               I thought so little, they rewarded me
               By making me the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

CHORUS.- He thought so little, etc.

          Now landsmen all, whoever you may be,
          If you want to rise to the top of the tree,
          If your soul isn't fettered to an office stool,
          Be careful to be guided by this golden rule--
               Stick close to your desks and never go to sea,
               And you all may be rulers of the Queen's Navee!


I sing it at sea song sessions, which probably isn't appropriate - but I like that song.

-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 07:10 PM

I thought you would have been Buttercup, Joe...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: kendall
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 07:19 PM

My favorite play. At the tender age of 13 I was one of the sailors in the chorus.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 07:50 PM

D'ya think I could do it, Foolestroupe? Gee, I always thought I had a great falsetto....


Enter LITTLE BUTTERCUP, with large basket on her arm


                            RECITATIVE

    Hail, men-o'-war's men-safeguards of your nation
    Here is an end, at last, of all privation;
    You've got your play--spare all you can afford
    To welcome Little Buttercup on board.

                              ARIA

    For I'm called Little Buttercup--dear Little Buttercup,
       Though I could never tell why,
    But still I'm called Buttercup--poor little Buttercup,
       Sweet Little Buttercup I!

    I've snuff and tobaccy, and excellent jacky,
          I've scissors, and watches, and knives
    I've ribbons and laces to set off the faces
          Of pretty young sweethearts and wives.
   
    I've treacle and toffee, I've tea and I've coffee,
          Soft tommy and succulent chops;
    I've chickens and conies, and pretty polonies,
          And excellent peppermint drops.
   
    Then buy of your Buttercup--dear Little Buttercup;
          Sailors should never be shy;
    So, buy of your Buttercup--poor Little Buttercup;
          Come, of your Buttercup buy!

BOAT. Aye, Little Buttercup--and well called--for you're the
rosiest,
the roundest, and the reddest beauty in all Spithead.
BUT. Red, am I? and round--and rosy! Maybe, for I have
dissembled well!
But hark ye, my merry friend--hast ever thought that beneath a
gay and frivolous exterior there may lurk a canker-worm which is slowly but surely eating its way into one's very heart?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 07:54 PM

You don't need a falsetto, as a 'bum-boat' woman Buttercup can happily be sung in any range.

(Just my personal opinion)
Nigel
(Whose favourite is "Ruddigore; or The Witches Curse")


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: kendall
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 08:06 PM

We used real girls, saved a lot of confusion.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Bill Hahn//\\
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 08:12 PM

Here is a bit of trivia that, perhaps, some of you have picked up on. But, first. I love all the G&S canon---perhaps my favorite is Iolanthe---but--hell, the brilliant rhymes of Gilbert and the satirical points---amazing.

OK--the trivia. If any of you watch Larry David---Curb Your Enthusiasm you may know this---at the really punch line moments--in all episodes---what music do you think it is? Instrumental--not lyrics.


Answer: Three Little Girls From School---Mikado.

Bill Hahn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: chico
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 08:21 PM

If you really want the highlights. . . Some of these are not quite complete.


   Em   B7    Em
A many years ago,
      B7    Em       B
When I was young and charming,
    Em      B7       Em
As some of you may know,
   F         B7    Em
I practised baby-farming.
    Bm
Now this is most alarming!
When she was young and charming,
She practised baby-farming,
A many years ago.

      D7             G
Two tender babes I nursed:
D7                G
One was of low condition,
      B7    Em    F#7
The other, upper crust,
    Em   B7   Em
A regular patrician.
      
Now, this is the position:
One was of low condition,
The other a patrician,
A many years ago.
            B7    Em

Oh, bitter is my cup!
   B7    Em    B
However could I do it?
    Em    B7          E
I mixed those children up,
    F      B7      Em
And not a creature knew it!

However could you do it?
Some day, no doubt, you'll rue it,
Although no creature knew it,
So many years ago.

    D7               G
In time each little waif
    D7             G
Forsook his foster-mother,
      B7       Em       F#7
The well born babe was Ralph--
      Em B7          Em
Your captain was the other!!!

They left their foster-mother,
The one was Ralph, our brother,
Our captain was the other,
A many years ago.

SIR JOSEPH. Then I am to understand that Captain Corcoran
and Ralph were exchanged in childhood's happy hour -- that Ralph
is really the Captain, and the Captain is Ralph?
    BUT. That is the idea I intended to convey, officially!
    SIR JOSEPH. And very well you have conveyed it.
    BUT. Aye! aye! yer 'onour.
    SIR JOSEPH. Dear me! Let them appear before me, at once!

* * *

    E7            A
He is an Englishman!
    D       A7       D    (A7)
For he himself has said it,
         D       A7      D    (A7)
And it's greatly to his credit,
       G      A7 G D
That he is an Englishman!
       A D A E7   A
That he is an Englishman!
A       Ab°       A   E7 A   E (A)
For he might have been a Roosian,
   Ab°       A    E7   A E (A)
A French, or Turk, or Proosian,
       D A   E7 A
Or perhaps Itali-an!

Or perhaps Itali-an!

         D             A7 D A (D A)
But in spite of all temptations
       D       A7   D
To belong to other nations,
       G      A    D
He remains an Englishman!
A      Dx1
He remains an Englishman!

* *

E    A   E      A       A (B7)
I am the monarch of the sea,
The ruler of the Queen's Navee,
Whose praise Great Britain loudly chants.
And we are his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
    B7             F#7               B7
His sisters and his cousins, and his aunts!
                E   
When at anchor here I ride,
My bosom swells with pride,
And I snap my fingers at a foeman's taunts;

And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!

But when the breezes blow,
I generally go below,
And seek the seclusion that a cabin grants;
And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
F#m7 E       B       E   
His sisters and his cousins, Whom he reckons up by dozens, And his aunts!

    A                               A°                E7
When I was a lad I served a term, As office boy to an Attorney's firm.
    A                      Am?                B7                           E
I cleaned the windows and I swept the floor, and I polished up the handle of the big front door.
    E                B7          E
(He polished up the handle of the big front door)

    A                         7             D                         A
I polished up that handle so carefullee that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!
    A                                           D             E7            A
(He polished up that handle so carefullee that now he is the ruler of the Queen's Navee)

As office boy I made such a mark that they gave me the post of a junior clerk.
I served the writs with a smile so bland, and I copied all the letters in a big round hand--
I copied all the letters in a hand so free, that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

In serving writs I made such a name that an articled clerk I soon became;
I wore clean collars and a brand-new suit for the pass examination at the Institute,
And that pass examination did so well for me, that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

Of legal knowledge I acquired such a grip that they took me into the partnership.
And that junior partnership, I ween, was the only ship that I ever had seen.
But that kind of ship so suited me, that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

I grew so rich that I was sent by a pocket borough into Parliament.
I always voted at my party's call, and I never thought of thinking for myself at all.
I thought so little, they rewarded me by making me the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

Now landsmen all, whoever you may be, if you want to rise to the top of the tree,
If your soul isn't fettered to an office stool, be careful to be guided by this golden rule--
Stick close to your desks and never go to sea, and you all may be rulers of the Queen's Navee!

* * *
          C             G            C          G
For I'm called Little Buttercup -- dear Little Buttercup,
C             F         C
Though I could never tell why,
      A7             Dm          G7          C
But still I'm called Buttercup -- poor little Buttercup,
               G7      C
Sweet Little Buttercup I!
       Am          E7          Am      E7
I've snuff and tobaccy, and excellent jacky,
       Am                      E7
I've scissors, and watches, and knives;
       Am          E7          Am      E7
I've ribbons and laces to set off the faces
    Am            D7             G
Of pretty young sweethearts and wives.
       G7          C          G7          C (7)
I've treacle and toffee, I've tea and I've coffee,
       F          C7       F
Soft tommy and succulent chops;
       D7          G         B7       Em    (C#°)
I've chickens and conies, and pretty polonies,
      G         D7       G
And excellent peppermint drops.

    C            G7            C          G7
Then buy of your Buttercup -- dear Little Buttercup;
C             F       C
Sailors should never be shy;
    A7          Dm          G7            C
So, buy of your Buttercup -- poor Little Buttercup;
               G7       C
Come, of your Buttercup buy!

* * *

My gallant crew, good morning.
Sir, good morning!
I hope you're all quite well.
Quite well; and you, sir
I am in reasonable health, and happy
To meet you all once more.

You do us proud, sir!

   A      E7             A
I am the Captain of the Pinafore;
         A         E7      A
And a right good captain, too!
         D          A
You're very, very good,
    C°          A
And be it understood,
       E    B7          E
I command a right good crew,
       B7          E
We're very, very good,
    B7          E
And be it understood,
             B7          E
He commands a right good crew.
         D          Bm          C#             C#7
Though related to a peer, I can hand, reef, and steer,
    F#m   D#°   E (7)
And ship a selvagee;
      A             B7          C?       F#7?
I am never known to quail at the fury of a gale,
          E          B7       E
And I'm never, never sick at sea!
       B7         E          B7                   E7
What, never? No, never! What, never. . . ? Hardly ever!
                      F# Bm
He's hardly ever sick at sea!
       A            
Then give three cheers, and one cheer more,
         E                     A
For the hardy Captain of the Pinafore!


I do my best to satisfy you all--
And with you we're quite content.
You're exceedingly polite,
And I think it only right
To return the compliment.
We're exceedingly polite,
And he thinks it's only right
To return the compliment.
Bad language or abuse,
I never, never use,
Whatever the emergency;
Though Bother it I may
Occasionally say,
I never use a big, big D--
What, never
No, never!
What, never
Hardly ever!
Hardly ever swears a big, big D--
Then give three cheers, and one cheer more,
For the well-bred Captain of the Pinafore!

* * *

E
Never mind the why and wherefore,
          B7               
Love can level ranks, and therefore,
            E    B7   F#°          E
Though his lordship's station's mighty,
         A         E       B
Though stupendous be his brain,
             F#7             B
Though your tastes are mean and flighty
                      F#    B
And your fortune poor and plain,

    B
and Ring the merry bells on board-ship,

Rend the air with warbling wild,

For the union of his/my lordship
E               B F#7    B
With a humble captain's child!
      
For a humble captain's daughter--

For a gallant captain's daughter--

And a lord who rules the water--

And a tar who ploughs the water!

ALL. Let the air with joy be laden,
Rend with songs the air above,
For the union of a maiden
With the man who owns her love!
SIR JOSEPH.    Never mind the why and wherefore,
Love can level ranks, and therefore,
Though your nautical relation (alluding to Capt.)
In my set could scarcely pass--
Though you occupy a station
In the lower middle class--
CAPT. and Ring the merry bells on board-ship,
SIR JOSEPH.    Rend the air with warbling wild,
For the union of my/your lordship
With a humble captain's child!
For a humble captain's daughter--
JOS. For a gallant captain's daughter--
SIR JOSEPH.    And a lord who rules the water--
JOS. (aside). And a tar who ploughs the water!
ALL. Let the air with joy be laden,
Rend with songs the air above,
For the union of a maiden
With the man who owns her love!
JOS. Never mind the why and wherefore,
Love can level ranks, and therefore
I admit the jurisdiction;
Ably have you played your part;
You have carried firm conviction
To my hesitating heart.
CAPT. and Ring the merry bells on board-ship,
SIR JOSEPH.    Rend the air with warbling wild,
For the union of my/his lordship
With a humble captain's child!
For a humble captain's daughter--
JOS. For a gallant captain's daughter--
SIR JOSEPH.    And a lord who rules the water--
JOS. (aside). And a tar who ploughs the water!
(Aloud.) Let the air with joy be laden.
CAPT. and SIR JOSEPH. Ring the merry bells on board-ship--
JOS. For the union of a maiden--
CAPT. and SIR JOSEPH. For her union with his lordship.
ALL. Rend with songs the air above
For the man who owns her love!

* * *

Dm
Things are seldom what they seem,

Skim milk masquerades as cream;
F         C      Dm7
Highlows pass as patent leathers;
Dm       Am       Dm         A
Jackdaws strut in peacock's feathers.

Very true, So they do.

Dm         
Black sheep dwell in every fold;
All that glitters is not gold;
F         C    Dm7 C    Dm
Storks turn out to be but logs;
Am      Bb7   A
Bulls are but inflated frogs.

So they be, Frequentlee.

Drops the wind and stops the mill;
Turbot is ambitious brill;
Gild the farthing if you will,
Yet it is a farthing still.

Yes, I know. That is so.

Though to catch your drift I'm striving,
It is shady -- it is shady;
I don't see at what you're driving,
Mystic lady -- mystic lady.

Stern conviction's o'er me stealing,
That the mystic lady's dealing
In oracular revealing.

Stern conviction's o'er him stealing,
That the mystic lady's dealing
In oracular revealing.

Yes, I know--That is so!

Though I'm anything but clever,
I could talk like that for ever
Once a cat was killed by care;
Only brave deserve the fair.

Very true, So they do.

Wink is often good as nod;
Spoils the child who spares the rod;
Thirsty lambs run foxy dangers;
Dogs are found in many mangers.

Frequentlee, I agree.

Paw of cat the chestnut snatches;
Worn-out garments show new patches;
Only count the chick that hatches;
Men are grown-up catchy-catchies.

Yes, I know, That is so.

Though to catch my drift he's striving,
I'll dissemble -- I'll dissemble;
When he sees at what I'm driving,
Let him tremble -- let him tremble!

Though a mystic tone I you borrow,
    A    A+         D   
I shall learn the truth with sorrow,
Dm   F#m         G      D
Here to-day and gone to-morrow;
Yes, I know--That is so!

* * *
    C
We sail the ocean blue,
          G7             C
And our saucy ship's a beauty;

We're sober men and true,
      G7             C
And attentive to our duty.
          F
When the balls whistle free
             C
O'er the bright blue sea,
    G7                   C
We stand to our guns all day;
          F
When at anchor we ride
         C
On the Portsmouth tide,
          Em
We have plenty of time to play.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: chico
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 09:09 PM

Updated:


Am    Fm6 C/G    G7    C
He is an Englishman, behold him!
                  F       C
CHORUS: He is an Englishman!
    D7          G
He is an Englishman!
    C       G   7   C       (G)
For he himself has said it,
7       C       G7    C    (G)
And it's greatly to his credit,
7       F /D /C /A C (/D)
That he is an Englishman!

C/E    F C   D/A 7 G   (7)
That he is an Englishman!


       D7   (C)   D7 C   G   (/B /D)
For he might have been a Roosian,
A French, or Turk, or Proosian,
       C   6Am D7 G
Or perhaps Itali-an!
Or perhaps Itali-an!

But in spite of all temptations
To belong to other nations,
He remains an Englishman!
   G7 C Am C/E G/D      C /E G7 /F C
He remains---------- an Eng-----lishman!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 09:23 PM

Ah, those songs bring back great memories! Yeah, I think I'll try doing Buttercup as a bass - much better idea than falsetto.

I really like Penzance, Ruddigore, Mikado and The Sorcerer, but I think Pinafore is my favorite.

-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: chico
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 09:34 PM

Corrected Nightengale


(high g g g d d# a; low g g g c# d g) (G G° A, G G° B°|G/D G)
    C                         F°             C (trill a g)
The Nightingale sighed for the moon's bright ray
                               Am       E7    (trill b c#)
And told his tale in his own melodious way!
C7   F       (G7/D C) G
He sang "Ah, well-a-day!"
       Em       G7    C
ALL He sang "Ah, well-a-day!"

The lowly vale for the mountain vainly sighed,
To his humble wail the echoing hills replied.
They sang "Ah, well-a-day!"

ALL They sang "Ah, well-a-day!"

                         C                      (B°)
[RECITITIVO] I know the value of a kindly chorus,
      E7                      Am
But choruses yield little consolation
             F         Bb°          F   A
When we have pain and sorrow too before us!
      (Dm)      A°                   G
I love -- and love, alas, above my station!
                G+                   Em             G7
BUT (aside). He loves -- and loves a lass above his station!
                  B7                B°             A°
ALL (aside). Yes, yes, the lass is much above his station!

(E D#° E B7 B° E, B7 E) or, (low e, < e d# c# b bb a g# b a g# e d# f# f f# g# e)
   E                        B7
A maiden fair to see, the pearl of minstrelsy,
F#m             E/B B
A bud of blushing beauty;
7   E          C#7             F#m             G#7
For whom proud nobles sigh, and with each other vie
   C#m    B       F#7 B
To do her menial's duty.

       B                F# B (or: f# highf#, e d# c# c# b)
ALL: To do her menial's duty.

7 A°                        E6 E       E5b   E
A suitor, lowly born, with hopeless passion torn,
    B7          E° E
And poor beyond denying,
    7                         A   
Has dared for her to pine at whose exalted shrine
   C#m      G#7       C#m
A world of wealth is sighing.
         E       C#m   G#7 C#m B7
ALL. A world of wealth is sighing.

    E                      B   
Unlearned he in aught save that which love has taught
      C#m          F#m   E B
(For love had been his tutor);
7    E/G#       C#7    B7                F#°
Oh, pity, pity me--our captain's daughter she,
    E/B    F#   B7 C#m
And I that lowly suitor!
Oh, pity, pity me--our captain's daughter she,
    F#7          B7 E (E D#° E B7 B° E, B7 E) or, (low e, e d# c# b bb a g b a g# e, d# f# f f# g# e)
And he that lowly suitor!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: chico
Date: 18 Sep 05 - 10:01 PM

CORRECTED

(INTRO: A E7, A E7, A E7 A E7 A)
(tacet)
My gallant crew, good morning.
A         E7
Sir, good morning!
I hope you're all quite well.
E7             A
Quite well; and you, sir
                   Bm          E7
I am in reasonable health, and happy
                         (A)
To meet you all once more.
                     (D E7) (A (alt with high f#, E7 alt with high c#)
You do us proud, sir!

   A      E7             A
I am the Captain of the Pinafore;
         A         E7      A
And a right good captain, too!
         D          A
You're very, very good,
    C°          A
And be it understood,
       E    B7          E
I command a right good crew,
       B7          E
We're very, very good,
    B7          E
And be it understood,
             B7          E
He commands a right good crew.
         D          Bm          C#             C#7
Though related to a peer, I can hand, reef, and steer,
    F#m   D#°   E (7)
And ship a selvagee;
      A             B7          E         F#7
I am never known to quail at the fury of a gale,
          E          B7       E
And I'm never, never sick at sea!
       B7         E          B7                   E7
What, never? No, never! What, never. . . ? Hardly ever!
    (tacet)      F#      E7
He's hardly ever sick at sea!
       A            
Then give three cheers, and one cheer more,
         E7                   A
For the hardy Captain of the Pinafore!


I do my best to satisfy you all--
And with you we're quite content.
You're exceedingly polite,
And I think it only right
To return the compliment.
We're exceedingly polite,
And he thinks it's only right
To return the compliment.
Bad language or abuse,
I never, never use,
Whatever the emergency;
Though Bother it I may
Occasionally say,
I never use a big, big D--
What, never? No, never! What, never? Hardly ever!
Hardly ever swears a big, big D--
Then give three cheers, and one cheer more,
For the well-bred Captain of the Pinafore!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 19 Sep 05 - 12:22 AM

Say Buttercup Joe,

You want to do your version of the 'Buttercup Song' from The Three Amigos?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 19 Sep 05 - 08:24 AM

My personal favourite and oft overlooked but good advice to shantymen anyway...

A british tar is a soaring soul,
as free as a mountain bird,
his energetic fist should be ready to resist
a dictatorial word.

His nose should should pant,
and his lip should curl,
his cheeks should flame,
and his brow should furl,
his bosom should heave,
and his heart should glow,
and his fist be ever ready
for a knock-down blow...
(all:)
His nose should pant and his lip should curl,
his cheeks should flame and his brow should furl,
his bosom should heave and his heart should glow,
and his fist be ever ready for a knock-down blow.


His eyes should flash with an inborn fire,
his brow with scorn be wrung;
he never should bow down to a domineering frown,
or the tang of a tyrant tongue.

His foot should stamp,
and his throat should growl,
his hair should twirl,
and his face should scowl,
his eyes should flash,
and his breast protrude,
and this should be his customary attitude.
(all:)
His foot should stamp, and his throat should growl,
his hair should twirl, and his face should scowl;
his eyes should flash, and his breast protrude,
and this should be his customary attitude,
his attitude,
his attitude,
his attitude!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: chico
Date: 19 Sep 05 - 11:40 AM

Trouble is, I personally can't do that one above because it is an acapello trio. . .


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: GUEST,Arkie
Date: 19 Sep 05 - 12:51 PM

Glad to know that there are others who appreciate the Gilbert & Sullivan operettas. I used to enjoy the Savoyard performances when I lived near Norfork, VA years ago. Other favorties of mine are "A Policeman's Lot is Not a Happy One", (may have another title), "I Am The Very Model of A Modern Major General" (Pay Sky, Tom Paxton, & others performed this at the Philadelphia festival one year), and "Sing Me A Song Oh". (Peter Paul & Mary recorded this).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Tannywheeler
Date: 20 Sep 05 - 10:42 AM

On a tree by a river a dickybird lit,
Singing Willow, titwillow, titwillow;
And I said to him, "Dickybird, why do you sit
And sing Willow, titwillow, titwillow?
Is it weakness of intellect, birdy," I cried.
"Or a rather tough worm in your little inside?"
With a shake of his poor little head he replied,
"Oh, Willow, titwillow, titwillow!"

(now there's a verse about how the bird commits suicide by throwing himself into the watery something-or-other.)

Now I'm sure--just as sure as I'm sure that my name
Isn't Willow, titwillow, titwillow--
That 'twas love unrequited which made him exclaim,
"Oh, Willow, titwillow, titwillow!"
And, if you remain callous and obdurate, I
Shall perish as he did and you will know why--
Though I probably shall not exclaim as I die,
"Oh, Willow, titwillow, titwillow!"

As a woman I can tell you that, as a pick-up line this sucks. One wonders how the Victorians/Edwardians managed to reproduce at all.
BUT--as audience at The Mikado, this rates as one of the great pieces of music of all time. It brings me to a point of pleasure akin to Handel's Hallelujah Chorus, Beethoven's Ode to Joy, a really well-harmonized version of Amazing Grace or Keep On the Sunny Side (especially a sing-along version of either). As noted in a previous thread, Three Little Maids From School ain't no slouch, either. Tw


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Le Scaramouche
Date: 20 Sep 05 - 12:31 PM

Has anyone heard about the Yiddish adaptation?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 21 Sep 05 - 07:55 AM

Chico, Never stopped me, just wear a different eye-patch for each chorus ;)

Im also quite partial to the Pirate Kings song from Pirates of Penzance


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Tannywheeler
Date: 21 Sep 05 - 10:17 AM

Leave us all remember the dictum that:
"A policeman's lot
Is not
A happy one! (ha-pee one.)"          Tw


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: Schantieman
Date: 21 Sep 05 - 02:28 PM

A Nappy One

I was Capt. Corcoran in a prod. of this a few years ago. great fun - I like his first song - quoted above - and also his big moment at the start of Act 2 - 'Fair Moon, to Thee I Sing"

Steve


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 21 Sep 05 - 09:48 PM

i was got conned into doing the lighting for my brother's school production of 'Pirates' - and another year 'Little Abner'...


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