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Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Old Pendle (Milton Allen, Brian Osborne) (27)
(origins) Origins: Pendle, oh Pendle / Old Pendle (35)


Diva 23 Oct 05 - 07:01 AM
John J 23 Oct 05 - 07:23 AM
Diva 23 Oct 05 - 08:51 AM
number 6 23 Oct 05 - 09:01 AM
Lancashire Lad 23 Oct 05 - 10:03 AM
Galoshin 23 Oct 05 - 02:50 PM
Snuffy 23 Oct 05 - 02:58 PM
Navvy 23 Oct 05 - 03:23 PM
GUEST,Pendle Hill 23 Oct 05 - 05:20 PM
Diva 23 Oct 05 - 05:29 PM
Ross 24 Oct 05 - 03:52 AM
IanC 24 Oct 05 - 04:10 AM
Paul Burke 24 Oct 05 - 04:32 AM
Liz the Squeak 24 Oct 05 - 04:38 AM
Liz the Squeak 24 Oct 05 - 04:39 AM
GUEST,Dáithí Ó Geanainn 24 Oct 05 - 04:49 AM
Liz the Squeak 24 Oct 05 - 05:07 AM
Navvy 24 Oct 05 - 05:55 AM
JohnB 24 Oct 05 - 12:18 PM
Liz the Squeak 24 Oct 05 - 03:37 PM
GUEST 24 Oct 05 - 03:41 PM
Bainbo 24 Oct 05 - 04:48 PM
Tootler 24 Oct 05 - 04:57 PM
Susanne (skw) 24 Oct 05 - 06:15 PM
andrewq 25 Oct 05 - 07:49 AM
GUEST,marco 25 Oct 05 - 12:52 PM
Susanne (skw) 25 Oct 05 - 07:51 PM
Diva 31 Oct 05 - 08:51 AM
GUEST,Raggytash 31 Oct 05 - 09:09 AM
GUEST,Raggytash 31 Oct 05 - 09:12 AM
s&r 31 Oct 05 - 11:48 AM
Diva 31 Oct 05 - 12:12 PM
Ep' Eric 29 Mar 06 - 10:56 AM
Ep' Eric 30 Mar 06 - 03:22 PM
GUEST,Fred McCormick 31 Mar 06 - 10:57 AM
Ep' Eric 01 Apr 06 - 05:23 AM
GUEST,Fred McCormick 01 Apr 06 - 06:47 AM
Navvy 24 Sep 06 - 03:44 PM
GUEST,Tom Bliss 24 Sep 06 - 04:54 PM
GUEST,Witch_Lilith 01 Dec 09 - 12:55 PM
alex s 02 Dec 09 - 05:32 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 09 - 06:56 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 09 - 07:01 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 02 Dec 09 - 07:33 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 09 - 09:35 AM
alex s 02 Dec 09 - 11:03 AM
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JHW 10 Mar 18 - 07:31 AM
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Subject: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Diva
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 07:01 AM

This year I am taking a course at uni on Folk belief and the witch hunts and I wondered if any of you had heard about the hunting of the witch at Pendle, it was mentioned in a seminar and I'd never heard of it before...so over to you guys. Many thanks


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: John J
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 07:23 AM

When I lived around Rochdale I would go up on Pendle Hill on the night of Halloween, supposedly looking for witches. There were always quite a few others up there looking for witches too.

Bloody silly idea really, what sensible witch would be up on Pendle at night at that time of the year? The weather was ALWAYS horrible.

It was around the mid-70s, I don't know if it still happens. Never found any witches though...

John


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Diva
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 08:51 AM

Thanks JonJ......around the mid 70's? I was wondering if perhaps it could have come from earlier? been in the area a few times but never at halloween


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: number 6
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 09:01 AM

Pendle Hill was on an episode of the (very ridiculous, but most entertaining) BBC TV show 'Most Haunted" just recently.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Lancashire Lad
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 10:03 AM

I too ventured up Pendle on Halloween back in 1978 /79. We started at the pub below(cant remember the name though) and set off at last orders!. Reached the top about 1am and decided to try and sleep. Came back down at first light, frozen solid and soaked to the skin. We too didnt see any witches, but there were a few impromptu campfires, revellers and more than a few stoned hippies. Apparantly, this disorganized trek to the top has been going on for generations.
There are quite a few good folk songs about Pendle too.

Dont know if it helps

LL


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Galoshin
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 02:50 PM

I seem to remember something about that when I lived down there in the late sixties.
Can't remember much now though sorry Diva


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Snuffy
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 02:58 PM

Wikipedia is as good a place to start as any. Good luck.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Navvy
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 03:23 PM

Galoshin - I've been up Pendle during Halloween. Scared s**tless running from shadows. Saw no witches.

Lancs Lad - 'Old Pendle' good? I cannot remember any others and no others on DT. Any more info?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Pendle Hill
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 05:20 PM

Hi

I can't remember which one as all their songs are about yorkshire folklore, but didn't Mr Fox do a song about Pendle Hill?

(any excuse to get a Mr Fox reference in)

cheers
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Diva
Date: 23 Oct 05 - 05:29 PM

Regards to all.....will have a look on wikipedia, just curiosity and wondering how and when these traditions start and are carried on for etc. Now don't get me started on witch ballads cos thats going to be my essay ***BG** Think it might be fun to organise a halloween ballad sing and storytelling at Uni, won't be climbing any hills tho'


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Ross
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 03:52 AM

Lancaster University has a pendle college

Do you think there's a secret society


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: IanC
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:10 AM

Hi

(1) Pendle is in Lancashire

(2) The Pendle Witch Hunt is an historic event. The "witches" were tried in 1612. See The Pendle Witch Project for a good account. There are loads of other sites, including This One which has an early facsimile document.

(3) Some fanciful books have been written about the Pendle witches since the C19th.

(4) Pendle Hill is an impressive place, but you're unlikely to find any witches there, except in the gift shop "Witches Galore" at Newchurch in Pendle. I'd recommend it, it's great fun.

(5)Pendle Hill also has significance to Quakers as George Fox (founder) had a life-changing vision while standing on top of Pendle Hill. The name Pendle or Pendle Hill often occurs in educational institutions because of this.

Hope this is useful
:-)
Ian


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Paul Burke
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:32 AM

Pendle Hill is derived from Brythonic Pen - a hill, English Hill - a hill, contracted to le, and the same Hill again, added after they forgot the first one. So it's "Hill Hill Hill". No doubt in the future it could become Mount Pendlehill.

If you have a daughter aged 10-15, get hold of a copy of "Mist Over Pendle" by Robert Neill (sp?)- witchcraft, murder, mystery, fashion, romance and horses set in a well- evoked Stuart context. My own daughter wore out several copies of it.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:38 AM

I've got at least one rather good book about Pendle Hill, but cannot lay my hands on it for the moment.....

Huh... typical. There was one on the shelf between 'Who is St George' and 'In search of lost Gods'...

It's by Rachel A C Hasted and was published in 1993, by Lancashire County Books, ISBN 1-871236-23-1. It's a pretty good factual account of the trials and has a good list of references, MS and bibliography.

The other.... I seem to remember it's a fictionalised account but interesting none the less. and it has totally vanished from my ken.

If you want to borrow my copy of the Halstead book, drop me a PM and we can try and sort something.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:39 AM

Sorry, it's called 'The Pendle witch-trial 1612'.

LTS

Must proof read... must proof read.....


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Dáithí Ó Geanainn
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:49 AM

So...what do you imagine modern day witches look like John J and Lancashire Lad? How do you know you didn't see any? Hmm?

D
<1;¬)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 05:07 AM

And it was 'Where is St George?'.... perhaps I better get my glasses checked....

LTS


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Navvy
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 05:55 AM

Diva

Just found this reference at http://www.new-age.co.uk/celtic-festivals-samhain.htm

"At the Forest of Pendle in North Lancashire, at Samhain a ceremony called the 'Lating the Witches' took place. Locals believed witches gathered here on this auspicious night, so lit candles were carried over the hills between 11 p.m and midnight - lighting the witches or 'lating' them. If a candle stayed lit then the witches' power was broken, but if it went out - blown out by a witch - bad luck may follow."

First reference I could find that gives some detail.

Hope this helps.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: JohnB
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 12:18 PM

So what witch in their right mind would go up Pendle Hill on the only night there are dozens of people up there looking for witches.
There are another 364 or more nights in the year.
JohnB.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 03:37 PM

And why nighttime? It's much less suspicious to go up during daylight hours....

LTS


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 03:41 PM

many go up, some never return....


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Bainbo
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:48 PM

After the trial at Lancaster, the story of the witches was indeed made more famous by books including Harrison Ainsworth's The Lancashire Witches (1845) and Robert Neill's Mist Over Pendle (1951).

Both were novelisations, but have attached themselves to the public imagination, turning this shameful episode into well-loved myth. You can see why Pendle captures the imagination, though. It stands stark and alone, dominating the surrounding countryside.

Edgar Peel and Pat Southern, who wrote The Trials of the Lancashire Witches, as an attempt to redress the balance, note in their book that Neill's novel at least gave a more realistic picture of the events.

Peel says in his preface that they hope to correct some of the misconceptions. He adds: "Many of these notions, based as they are on fiction, legend and occasional articles in the papers, are so vague and inaccurate as to make a serious student wince. Nowhere, we regretfully found, are they more firmly held than among those who live within the shadow of Pendle Hill."

Still, if you fancy some plastic witches, then Chipping, Clitheroe, and the other towns and villages around are your place. And I can heartily recommend a pint of Pendle Witches Brew, by the Burnley brewery Moorhouses - strong, dark and tasty, and available on draught in the Pendle Inn, right at the foot of the hill in the village of Barley.

Further to Paul Burke's point about the name meaing "Hill Hill Hill": You can see the hill from Ribchester, if you go down in Stoneygate Lane. Or "Lane Lane Lane".

And finally, the song about the witches (If I remember it rightly) goes:
(chorus):
Old Pendle, Old Pendle, thou standest alone
'Twixt Burnley and Clitheroe, Whalley and Colne,
Where Hodder and Ribble's fair waters do meet,
with Barley and Downham content at thy feet.

Where witches do fly on a cold winter's night,
We'll not tell a soul, for we'll farther go quiet,
We'll sit by the fire and keep ourselves warm
Until one again we can walk in your awn.

chorus

Old Pendle, Old Pendle, by moorland and fell,
In glory and loveliness ever to dwell.
Through life's weary journey, where e'er we may be,
We'll pause in our labours and oft think of thee.

chorus


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Tootler
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 04:57 PM

If you have a daughter aged 10-15, get hold of a copy of "Mist Over Pendle" by Robert Neill

Why confine its readership to females of that particular age group. It's a cracking good story for people of either sex and of any age above the minimum above. I read and enjoyed it as an adult male :-)


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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD PENDLE (Brian Osborne / Milton Allan)
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 24 Oct 05 - 06:15 PM

These are the lyrics the Spinners sing:

OLD PENDLE
(Brian Osborne / Milton Allan)

Chorus:
Old Pendle, Old Pendle, thou standest alone
'Twixt Burnley and Clitheroe, Whalley, and Colne
Where Hodder and Ribble's fair waters do meet
With Barley and Downham content at their feet

Where witches do fly on a cold winter's night
We won't tell a soul, we'll bar the door tight
We'll sit by the fire to keep ourselves warm
Until once again we can walk in your arms

Old Pendle, Old Pendle, by moorland and fell
In glory and loveliness ever to dwell
Through life's weary journey where'er we may be
We'll pause in our labours and oft think of thee


A verse they don't use; can't remember where I found it:

Old Pendle, Old Pendle, majestic, sublime
Thy praises shall ring to the end of all time
In beauty eternal thy banner unfurled
Thou art the dearest and greatest old hill in the world

The tune is the same one Colin Wilkie uses for his song 'Down In Your Mines', though Colin says he has never heard of 'Old Pendle'. I suppose it must be an older tune both drew on, but written neither by Colin Wilkie nor Brian Osborne.

Some info pinched from the Usenet:
[1999:] "Pendle, old Pendle" appeared in a poetry collection about 60 (?) years ago and was written by two brothers Milton and Alan Lambert, who later wrote jointly as Milton Alan / Allen (?). Brian Osborne (of the Taverners) found the words, wrote the tune and added a verse and this is probably the version you and I know. There was apparently a misunderstanding about copyright which was later amicably resolved. I don't claim any credit for this information - it was given to me by an old friend and a fine singer, Jean Ellison. (Bob Plews, uk.music.folk, 24 Oct)

And another link:
About Pendle (the region)
(It mentions Mr. Fox - George Fox, that is.)


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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD PENDLE + PENDLE WITCHES (Milton Allan
From: andrewq
Date: 25 Oct 05 - 07:49 AM

Interestingly, the original Milton Allan text (in "Songs of the Pendle Country") has no mention of witches at all and has a completely different tune to the commonly known Spinners/Taverners version:

OLD PENDLE (Milton Allan)

Old Pendle, old Pendle, thou standest alone!
'Twixt Burnley and Clitheroe, Whalley and Colne;
Where Hodder and Ribble's fair waters do meet,
With Barley and Downham content at thy feet!

Old Pendle, old Pendle, by moorland and fell,
In glory and loveliness ever to dwell;
On life's fateful journey where'er we may be,
We'll pause in our labours, and oft think of thee.

Old Pendle, old Pendle, majestic, sublime!
Thy praises shall ring to the end of all time;
In beauty eternal thy banner unfurled,
Thou'rt dearest and grandest old hill in the world!

Milton Allan wasn't averse to a bit of popular Pendle witchery, though, and "Pendle Witches", in the same collection, is rather oddly dedicated to the pupils of Accrington Girls' High School! :

PENDLE WITCHES (Milton Allan)

As Rodger o' Downham was riding by Pendle
His lusty mare threw him headlong in the lane,
He pick'd himself up, all his limbs were a-tremble,
And loudly declared: "Tis the witches again!"

The good folks of Sabden were mourning Susannah
A rare bonnie lassie and pride of the glen.
She languish'd and died in mysterious manner,
The witches were feared as was usual then!

And so they were sentenced at Lancaster Castle
Dames Nutter and Chattox, Nance Redferne and all.
The judge, he pronounced them the devil's own vassals,
Those terrible scenes we would fain not recall.

Long year have passed by o'er the fair land of Pendle,
Yet witches still flourish up Lancashire way!
To music and dancing our daughters assemble
And practise their arts on the lads of today.

Then here's to the fame of the Lancashire witches
Whose names are familiar in legend and rhyme.
Romance of Old Pendle our county enriches
The witch on her broomstick will live for all time.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,marco
Date: 25 Oct 05 - 12:52 PM

I went up there in the 70's too with a lass from Bury. Odd place that. Later on, I moved to Altrincham, which is a short drive from Alderly Edge, another supposed haunt for witches. Apparently, there was an active coven there at one point in time but these days the place is populated with footballers and attendant gawpers.

marco


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 25 Oct 05 - 07:51 PM

Andrew, to me it looks like Brian Osborne may have substituted the witches verse for the original third one. Could have been still another person before him, of course.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Diva
Date: 31 Oct 05 - 08:51 AM

Many thanks to all....didn't know about the songs. Good luck to anyone who might be going up Pendle hill this evening


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Raggytash
Date: 31 Oct 05 - 09:09 AM

C:\Documents and Settings\nscaife\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook

The legend of the Lancashire Witches, Old Demdyke, Old Chattox et al is mentioned in various songs, try looking at Gary & Vera Aspeys song list


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Raggytash
Date: 31 Oct 05 - 09:12 AM

http://www.pendlewitches.co.uk/
OK try this !


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: s&r
Date: 31 Oct 05 - 11:48 AM

Brian Osborne found the poem without any attribution. He wrote a tune and added the verse about the witches. He made contact when he was told the name of the author(s) who were delighted with the tune and treatment.

Stu


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Diva
Date: 31 Oct 05 - 12:12 PM

brill..thanks


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Ep' Eric
Date: 29 Mar 06 - 10:56 AM

Enough of this modern history. I'm talking about the 40s when we were
scared stiff with tales of how Owd Mother Morag would come and ger us, and Owd Shipton and Alice Nutter from Roughlea Hall and Owd Demdike. Them were real witches in them days.
Yuh didn't have to go looking for them, !They come looking for us.!

Ah climbed Pendle for't last time a few years back.An Ah'm not gooin
back. The'v ruined it . They'v pur a steercase up it nah.
It were a reight hill in my days.Reight wild and rugged.
My brother used to ride his trials bike up t,cart track.

Has anybody mentioned Harrison Ainsworth's book "The Lancashire Witches". I forgot. That used to be the definitive tome.

For further nonsense by me go to Ep'th Folk club thread.

                                           Eric Payne


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Ep' Eric
Date: 30 Mar 06 - 03:22 PM

Many books list Demdike, Southern, Nutter, as the famous Lancashire Witches but no one seems to mention Old Mother Morag, a name which struck terror into our hearts

Can anyone enlighten me.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Fred McCormick
Date: 31 Mar 06 - 10:57 AM

The Folk Directory used to list Hunting the Witches at Pendle in its gazetteer of annual folk customs. However, I can't recall seeing it mentioned in any other book of folk customs, and the Folk Directory used to carry quite a few non-events.

Also, given that the Pendle witch trials did not actually involve any witches (they merely followed patterns of social tension and witchcraft accusation which were extremely common at that time), I'd think it unlikely that there was an annual witchhunting custom which dated back to that period. It's possible of course that someone "invented" such a custom at a later date, perhaps following the publication of Harrison Ainsworth's book. Overall, though, I get the feeling that the whole business is a bit of a cod.

Incidentally, it's many years since I read it, but I recall Edgar Peel and Pat Southern; The Trials of the Lancashire Witches as a pretty good factual account of the episode. For good overviews of witchcraft accusations and their causes, see Alan MacFarlane, Witchcraft in Tudor and Stuart England, and Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Ep' Eric
Date: 01 Apr 06 - 05:23 AM

You have obviously read more about the Lancashire Witches than I
have Fred but I do remember that Owd Demdike, or was it Alice Nutter
was incarcerated at Lancaster castle for trial but she 'cheated'
them by dying in her cell.

                                 Eric.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Fred McCormick
Date: 01 Apr 06 - 06:47 AM

I'm not surprised, the condition of gaol cells in those days.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Navvy
Date: 24 Sep 06 - 03:44 PM

Yes it is a cod.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Tom Bliss
Date: 24 Sep 06 - 04:54 PM

Maybe some are still living there - this was told to me as a true story about 40 years ago.

Pendle Hill


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Witch_Lilith
Date: 01 Dec 09 - 12:55 PM

dunno if you're still interested but acctually it is more popular than ever now, you can meet witches covens up there (real ones) but like everything now adays it has been comercialised with a fayre and everything.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: alex s
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 05:32 AM

Malkin will be performing at the Pendle Inn, Barley Village, at the foot of Pendle Hill on Friday Dec 11th. They will sing Old Pendle if you request it (and buy them some beer).

http://www.malkinband.co.uk/


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 06:56 AM

Go for a ramble around (or up) Pendle out of season, on a bright clear day with cumulus clouds. Look in at the churchyard at Newchurch (don't miss the eye which wards off evil spirits, in the wall of the church) and have a mosey around Downham. The graveyards are interesting. Go over the "Nick," through Sabden, on to Black Hill and get a great view back to Pendle. It's wonderful in late spring, or in autumn before the rains really set in. It isn't far to the Forest of Bowland on the other side of the Ribble Valley and you could have lunch at The Three Fishes at Mitton (we love it - fabulous food and several local ales of note - I'm not good with names - Bowland Ale is one of them I think). You won't have a better day out anywhere in England. I live in Cornwall but every time I go oop north to see my mum I take her without fail on a drive round Pendle. Last winter we got a great view of Pendle covered in snow, with Clitheroe Castle glinting in the sun in the foreground.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 07:01 AM

I meant to add that when we were small boys we went to the top of Pendle with our parents most Good Fridays. We either climbed up from Barley or started at the Nick o'Pendle and walked to the top over the moors via Pendle Water.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 07:33 AM

I was in Pendle house when I was at school and have climbed the hill at least twice. IIRC the graves of the Nutter family can be seen in the churchyard at the hills foot.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 09:35 AM

I believe that would be in the churchyard at Newchurch, the one that has the eye of God in the wall of the church.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: alex s
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 11:03 AM

We used to play loads at the Lamb, opposite the witches shop, but it is now a private house, sadly. Great memories.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Henryp
Date: 07 Dec 09 - 08:26 AM

Burnley Clarion Choir will be singing carols and seasonal songs again at Clarion House, Jinney Lane, Newchurch-in-Pendle BB12 9LL on Sunday 20 December from noon onwards.

Large mugs of tea available plus hot punch. Bring your own lunch and mince pies.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 07 Dec 09 - 08:33 AM

Poem 118 of 230: WHALLEY ABBEY...WHAT TALES? - AUTUMN 2000

Cistercian monks have clearly been -
    Their Abbey's ruins can still be seen;
And, sounding for centuries before,
    Calder flows have passed - seeking the shore.
Lords of the grounds have, more lately, stayed -
    Their manor houses reused and unscathed.
Through beautiful gardens insects fly -
    The ruins of folk just a pass-by;
And, by viaduct, trains pass above -
    Folk thereby viewing a town I love.
Anglers and C. of E. delegates,
    Hikers and tourists, have crossed the gates...
Opportunistic masons, kings-men,
    Model makers, Turner, and men who pen...
Perhaps the witches came down from the hill,
    And do ghosts haunt - still questing their fill..?

From http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
Or http://walkaboutsverse.sitegoz.com (e-scroll)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Diva
Date: 07 Dec 09 - 10:54 AM

Last time I was in the area we were having a moocch about the witch trail and came accross a large number of people in a churchyard out in the middle of nowhere......being nosey we stopped and went for a blether........so I asked if they were on the witch trail and the very nice American lady said no..the were a group of Mormons who ancesters had come from the area to the States and this was where they were buried.....

Whooops


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 03 Aug 11 - 05:46 AM

but didn't Mr Fox do a song about Pendle Hill?

The story is that Carole Pegg was reading Mist over Pendle when they were resident in Lancashire, and they wrote a song called Pissed over Mendle which the record company shortened to Mendle. I'd say in terms of Pure Folk it doesn't get any better really:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3UgnRLoDFA


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Subject: Lyr Add: PENDLE HILL (Anne Hills)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Mar 18 - 04:05 PM

I found these lyrics at Anne Hills' website, but I reformatted them to suit myself (I like to see rhyming words at the ends of lines) and I tweaked it a bit to make it agree with what I hear on the recording:


PENDLE HILL
Words and music by Anne Hills
As recorded by Steve Gillette, Anne Hills, Cindy Mangsen and Michael Smith on "Fourtold" (2003)

Alice Nutter came to town
In her woolen hooded gown.
It was late and all was still.
Alice went to Pendle Hill.

Malkin Tower tall and dark,
Showed no fire light or spark,
Opened wide its gated mouth
To the north and to the south.

Deedle-um, dum, deed-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum.

From the east and from the west,
Some contrite and some confessed,
Twenty witches, it was said,
Gather there to praise the dead.

Were their prayers in Jesus' name,
Or to Satan, just the same,
Witch or Catholic, both despised
Under gray and English skies.

Alice knew what Alice knew:
More than me and more than you.
Deedle-um, dum, deed-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum

Light a candle; take a breath.
Life is just a part of death.
Whispers down the alleys tell:
Keep the secret; keep it well.

So Henry Hargreaves went to see
True or false these rumors be:
Some concession some conceit,
Some too soon their maker meet.

Deedle-um, dum, deed-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum.

Now we gather at the trial,
Accusations and denial.
Alice silent through the day,
And the truth has slipped away.

But little minds have little thought.
Little lives are sold and bought.
Sixteen twelve it is the year
Of our lord and of our fear.

Alice sees what Alice sees:
Hawks and ravens crowd the trees.
Deedle-um, dum, deed-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum.

Build the platform; build it high.
Judgment follows by and by.
Line them up and ask their kin:
What is penance? What is sin?

Twine the rope and tie the noose,
Not too tight and not too loose.
When we die, where do we go?
Go find Alice; she will know.

Deedle-um, dum, deed-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum.

At the setting of the sun,
Turn for home; our work is done.
Four were hanged and burned in flame,
And the devil was to blame.

Pendle Hill is high and bare;
Few the souls who venture there,
But Alice goes where Alice will.
Alice walks on Pendle Hill.

Alice knows what Alice knows.
So the legend greens and grows.
Deedle-um, dum, deed-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum,
Diddle-eye-dum, diddle-eye-dum.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 06:33 AM

The Pendle Witches on Wikipedia.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 06:46 AM

Nothing much to add except that the Scout 'county' badge for East Lancs also shows a witch: Here


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 08:56 AM

Old Pendle, old Pendle, you've seen it before
The hardship of labour, the horror of war
We'll work with our sisters, sunrise to nightfall
To build a new world that is fit for us all

For International Women's Day 2017


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hunting the witch at Pendle Hill
From: JHW
Date: 10 Mar 18 - 07:31 AM

My freind Shelagh and I went up Pendle last year. Looks bigger than it is but was very windy. We passed a stuffed witch on the way and I asked Shelagh if she'd remembered her broomstick. She had.

Any guesses (those who haven't been) what the pub in Barley is called?


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