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Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot

DigiTrad:
COLCANNON (The Skillet Pot)


GUEST,JB 01 Nov 05 - 09:36 PM
Jeri 01 Nov 05 - 09:41 PM
GUEST,JB 02 Nov 05 - 02:38 AM
Dave Hanson 02 Nov 05 - 04:29 AM
Leadfingers 02 Nov 05 - 08:37 AM
GUEST,Elfcall 02 Nov 05 - 10:31 AM
Susanne (skw) 02 Nov 05 - 06:08 PM
Celtaddict 03 Nov 05 - 01:43 AM
Joe Offer 17 Feb 12 - 08:21 PM
MGM·Lion 18 Feb 12 - 12:02 AM
Joe Offer 18 Feb 12 - 02:30 AM
GUEST,Howard Jones 18 Feb 12 - 07:15 AM
MGM·Lion 18 Feb 12 - 07:46 AM
MartinRyan 18 Feb 12 - 07:49 AM
MartinRyan 18 Feb 12 - 07:53 AM
MGM·Lion 18 Feb 12 - 08:05 AM
Steve Gardham 18 Feb 12 - 08:40 AM
MartinRyan 18 Feb 12 - 09:41 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 18 Feb 12 - 12:23 PM
MartinRyan 18 Feb 12 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,leeneia 18 Feb 12 - 02:44 PM
GUEST,Bill S in Adelaide 18 Feb 12 - 06:33 PM
MartinRyan 18 Feb 12 - 09:01 PM
MGM·Lion 19 Feb 12 - 11:35 AM
Vic Smith 19 Feb 12 - 03:52 PM
Mr Happy 13 Jun 17 - 08:12 PM
Mr Happy 19 Jun 17 - 04:58 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: GUEST,JB
Date: 01 Nov 05 - 09:36 PM

Hi there,

Who can help me please?

I am looking for the lyrics to a very old Irish song "Callcannon". The spelling may not be correct, but I know how to make it and the chorus goes somewhat as follows:

Oh you did so you did
So did you and so did I
And the more I think about it
The nearer I could cry
And sure wern`t they the happy days
When troubles we knew not
And your mother made Callcannon
In the little skillet pot

Thanks

JB


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: Jeri
Date: 01 Nov 05 - 09:41 PM

Here you go: Colcannon (The Skillet Pot) - enjoy!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: GUEST,JB
Date: 02 Nov 05 - 02:38 AM

Excellent Jeri,

Thanks, that`s exactly what I wanted!

JB


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 02 Nov 05 - 04:29 AM

Verse 2 should read-
Did you ever take potato cake or boxty to the school,
Tucked underneath your oxter with your book youe slate and rule.

eric


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: Leadfingers
Date: 02 Nov 05 - 08:37 AM

The Digitrad Rules !!!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: GUEST,Elfcall
Date: 02 Nov 05 - 10:31 AM

Boxty - mmmmmmmmmmmmm (Homer Simpson-like drooling sound)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 02 Nov 05 - 06:08 PM

What is boxty, please? I'd like to drool along!

And what is the 'curly kale' used for colcannon? Long-stemmed, green, curly leaves, cut in November?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Callcannon Song
From: Celtaddict
Date: 03 Nov 05 - 01:43 AM

Yes, Susanne, kale is a green-leaf relative of cabbage. Boxty is another potato dish (another survival dish, originally for feeding folks when you had little or nothing else, turned into a really good dish through a combination of practice, evolution and nostalgia) starting with both grated potato and mash.
There is a kids' rhyme/taunt ending "If you can't make boxty, you'll never get a man."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 08:21 PM

Anybody have any information about the origins of this song?

I found a YouTube recording of the song by some guy named Michael Grosvenor Meyer Myer.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 12:02 AM

Thanks, Joe ~~ but 'Myer', please!

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 02:30 AM

I shoulda known that, Michael...can I blame it on my sinus headache?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 07:15 AM

The version I know, learned from a recording by Tim Lyons, has "where the clurichaun were seen", rather than "leprechaun".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 07:46 AM

Yes ~ I sing 'claurichaun', you will find if you play Joe's link above. I too learnt it from Tim Lyons, & Dolly McMahon, whose version is pretty well identical.

Joe, thanks for emending name. In fact, it is variously spelt ~ my Californian cousins, incl my grandfather's first cousin, the noted Louis B of MGM [my initials not entirely adventitious, as you see] spell it Mayer. Of course, I never met him; but I do know his nephew Danny Mayer, who used to come over with Judy Garland's annual London season as a dancer, & was one of the crap-game dancers in Guys & Dolls. But I don't think any of us spell it Meyer.

Wish your headache better!

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MartinRyan
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 07:49 AM

clúracán - a dwarfish sprite. (Dineen's Irish/English dictionary.)

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MartinRyan
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 07:53 AM

Other forms include lúcharachán which is closer to leprechaun.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 08:05 AM

Interesting point to non-Irishman: are all these - clúracán, lúcharachán, leprechaun - different names for similar mythic "Little People", or are they all distinct and different notional creatures?

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 08:40 AM

Chrissie Raw, nee Cullen, used to sing this a lot in a band we had. She's from Limerick.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MartinRyan
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 09:41 AM

FWIW I think they're basically regional and dialect variations rather than a topology of gnomes! I've seen one suggestion of the likely root words but can't recall at the moment.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 12:23 PM

clurichaun wiki article describes it as always drunk and surly. Also possible a night form of leprechaun or just a regional variant as Martin says.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MartinRyan
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 01:24 PM

P W Joyce in English as we speak it (1910) gives:

Leprachaun; A sort of fairy, called by several names in different parts of Ireland: - luricaun, cluricaun, lurragadaun, loghryman, luprachaun. This last is the nearest to the Gaelic original, all the preceding anglicised forms being derived from it. Luprachaun itself is derived by metathesis from Irish luchorpán, from lu, little and corpán, the diminutive of corp, a body...."


While Joyce is an old source at this stage, he is probably reliable enough.


Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 02:44 PM

A sobering thought - is there supposed to be a capital T in 'troubles'?

I made colcannon for the first time last week. I had come across a recipe for Irish sausage, so I made some and I made colcannon to go with it.

I'd heard of colcannon because I have a tape where the Black Family sings the very song under discussion.

It was no trouble, really, because we don't peel potatoes around here, and the chopped cabbage cooked up in the microwave with almost no effort. I used scallions instead of leeks. ($3.29 a pound!)

I did hold back on the butter.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: GUEST,Bill S in Adelaide
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 06:33 PM

Sidetrack - is luricaun the origin of the Australian larrikin, I wonder?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MartinRyan
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 09:01 PM

GUESTleenia

A sobering thought - is there supposed to be a capital T in 'troubles'?


Believe me, we Irish had troubles long before we had Troubles! ;>)>

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 11:35 AM

I sing "sorrows" rather than "troubles", and always have. Is this my own ½-remembered gloss, or is there precedent for it an any previous version or rendition?

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Vic Smith
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 03:52 PM

In the early to mid-sixties, I was living in a room that overlooked Avery Hill Park in south-east London. One Sunday afternoon, I looked out to see a fairly large crowd watching some strange ball game. I decided to wander over and have a look and it didn't take long to work out that all the spectators were Irish. On enquiry, I was told that that was the final of the All-England Gaelic Games.
After the game, I picked up a discarded programme and expected to find out a bit more about the game from it, To my surprise, the majority of the programme was taken up with the words of Irish traditional songs. Some of the songs, I knew the tunes to and I learned the ones that I fancied from it. One of the songs was The Skillet Pot and I liked the look of the words but had no idea how the melody went. I didn't come across the song again for years until the Tim Lyons album (The Green Linnet LP, Trailer LER 3036, 1972) came out and I was able to hear the tune and learn the song.

The words in the programme were identical to the words on the album except the programme's leprechaun for Tim's clúracán.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Mr Happy
Date: 13 Jun 17 - 08:12 PM

In the last verse, there's mentioned 'the Hill o'Down'

Does this refer to Hill of Down near Downpatrick in the province of Ulster or to the small village of Hill of Down, County Meath ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Colcannon / The Skillet Pot
From: Mr Happy
Date: 19 Jun 17 - 04:58 PM

In addition to the above question, does anyone know who wrote this song?


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