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favorite Northern (UK) Expression

GUEST,Seth 30 Nov 05 - 08:20 AM
Stu 30 Nov 05 - 08:31 AM
muppitz 30 Nov 05 - 08:34 AM
InOBU 30 Nov 05 - 08:36 AM
IanC 30 Nov 05 - 08:45 AM
Snuffy 30 Nov 05 - 08:47 AM
GUEST 30 Nov 05 - 08:48 AM
Splott Man 30 Nov 05 - 09:32 AM
Paul Burke 30 Nov 05 - 09:35 AM
GUEST,DB 30 Nov 05 - 09:43 AM
mooman 30 Nov 05 - 09:51 AM
HipflaskAndy 30 Nov 05 - 10:07 AM
Pied Piper 30 Nov 05 - 10:12 AM
GUEST,Bainbo 30 Nov 05 - 10:12 AM
Emma B 30 Nov 05 - 10:14 AM
GUEST,raggytash 30 Nov 05 - 10:14 AM
Pied Piper 30 Nov 05 - 10:19 AM
BusyBee Paul 30 Nov 05 - 10:28 AM
The Villan 30 Nov 05 - 10:33 AM
GEST 30 Nov 05 - 10:44 AM
mooman 30 Nov 05 - 10:44 AM
IanC 30 Nov 05 - 10:51 AM
Dave Hanson 30 Nov 05 - 10:51 AM
VIN 30 Nov 05 - 11:12 AM
mooman 30 Nov 05 - 11:37 AM
GUEST,riggy 30 Nov 05 - 11:58 AM
GUEST 30 Nov 05 - 12:01 PM
mandotim 30 Nov 05 - 12:04 PM
s&r 30 Nov 05 - 12:27 PM
Strollin' Johnny 30 Nov 05 - 12:30 PM
Liz the Squeak 30 Nov 05 - 12:45 PM
ard mhacha 30 Nov 05 - 03:03 PM
John J 30 Nov 05 - 03:11 PM
greg stephens 30 Nov 05 - 03:41 PM
Georgiansilver 30 Nov 05 - 04:08 PM
TheBigPinkLad 30 Nov 05 - 04:30 PM
Les from Hull 30 Nov 05 - 05:06 PM
TheBigPinkLad 30 Nov 05 - 05:14 PM
GUEST 30 Nov 05 - 05:35 PM
TheBigPinkLad 30 Nov 05 - 05:39 PM
GUEST 30 Nov 05 - 05:47 PM
Folkiedave 30 Nov 05 - 06:36 PM
TheBigPinkLad 30 Nov 05 - 06:39 PM
Tootler 30 Nov 05 - 06:59 PM
GUEST,noddy 01 Dec 05 - 04:12 AM
GUEST,Boab 01 Dec 05 - 04:41 AM
GUEST 01 Dec 05 - 05:30 AM
Big Al Whittle 01 Dec 05 - 05:50 AM
Strollin' Johnny 01 Dec 05 - 06:06 AM
JulieF 01 Dec 05 - 06:21 AM
Geoff the Duck 01 Dec 05 - 08:15 AM
Geoff the Duck 01 Dec 05 - 08:17 AM
Sooz 01 Dec 05 - 08:19 AM
Dave Hanson 01 Dec 05 - 08:42 AM
GUEST,Fred 01 Dec 05 - 08:54 AM
GUEST,Rumncoke 02 Dec 05 - 01:53 AM
GUEST,noddy 02 Dec 05 - 04:03 AM
GUEST,Muppett 02 Dec 05 - 04:48 AM
Big Al Whittle 02 Dec 05 - 04:55 AM
GUEST 02 Dec 05 - 05:11 AM
Geoff the Duck 02 Dec 05 - 06:13 AM
GUEST,Muppett 02 Dec 05 - 06:39 AM
ard mhacha 02 Dec 05 - 06:43 AM
GUEST 02 Dec 05 - 06:49 AM
Michael 02 Dec 05 - 07:43 AM
Geoff the Duck 02 Dec 05 - 08:00 AM
Pied Piper 02 Dec 05 - 08:09 AM
Les from Hull 02 Dec 05 - 08:29 AM
Dave the Gnome 02 Dec 05 - 08:54 AM
robomatic 02 Dec 05 - 03:13 PM
GUEST,Boab 03 Dec 05 - 02:31 AM
ard mhacha 03 Dec 05 - 05:19 AM
Doug Chadwick 03 Dec 05 - 05:50 AM
Dave Hanson 03 Dec 05 - 08:40 AM
danensis 03 Dec 05 - 12:50 PM
Dave the Gnome 04 Dec 05 - 04:19 AM
Big Al Whittle 04 Dec 05 - 09:03 AM
Georgiansilver 04 Dec 05 - 09:04 AM
John Routledge 04 Dec 05 - 04:47 PM
Guy Wolff 04 Dec 05 - 09:11 PM
Big Al Whittle 05 Dec 05 - 04:42 AM
GUEST,Hull Exile 05 Dec 05 - 04:44 AM
Paul Burke 05 Dec 05 - 05:18 AM
Stu 05 Dec 05 - 05:40 AM
Dave the Gnome 05 Dec 05 - 09:11 AM
Folkiedave 05 Dec 05 - 09:30 AM
muppett 05 Dec 05 - 11:00 AM
Dave Hanson 06 Dec 05 - 01:38 AM
Les from Hull 06 Dec 05 - 03:18 PM
Gurney 07 Dec 05 - 01:46 AM
GUEST,noddy 07 Dec 05 - 04:16 AM
GUEST,Hull Exile 07 Dec 05 - 04:30 AM
Michael 07 Dec 05 - 01:32 PM
Snuffy 07 Dec 05 - 07:58 PM
GUEST,Boab 07 Dec 05 - 09:32 PM
Paul Burke 08 Dec 05 - 04:07 AM
GUEST,DB 08 Dec 05 - 07:46 AM
Mrs.Duck 08 Dec 05 - 05:07 PM
GUEST,Boab 08 Dec 05 - 05:34 PM
Leadfingers 09 Dec 05 - 11:08 AM
GUEST,DB 09 Dec 05 - 04:54 PM
Folkiedave 09 Dec 05 - 04:57 PM
GUEST,Boab 10 Dec 05 - 02:52 AM
GUEST,HughM 13 Dec 05 - 05:01 PM
GUEST,BOAB 13 Dec 05 - 06:29 PM
Mo the caller 14 Dec 05 - 07:53 AM
muppett 14 Dec 05 - 08:02 AM
GUEST,HughM 14 Dec 05 - 08:15 AM
Dave Hanson 14 Dec 05 - 10:15 AM
Mrs.Duck 14 Dec 05 - 12:03 PM
Les from Hull 14 Dec 05 - 12:05 PM
GUEST,GUEST,GUEST 14 Dec 05 - 05:27 PM
Les from Hull 15 Dec 05 - 10:48 AM
Big Al Whittle 16 Dec 05 - 04:13 AM
GUEST,noddy 16 Dec 05 - 05:21 AM
gnomad 16 Dec 05 - 06:22 AM
Gurney 17 Dec 05 - 04:28 AM
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Subject: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Seth
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:20 AM

How about 'By Eck' said when you're suprised


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Stu
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:31 AM

Yaffing - a dog barking.

"Bloody hell Nora - stop that dog's constant yaffing. It's mithering me arse off!"

Confined to Macclesfield as far as I am aware.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: muppitz
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:34 AM

"Ay up me duck"

"When ah wr a lad"

Also the word "Mardy" which, as far as I am aware is confined to the more Midlands side of the north.

muppitz x


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: InOBU
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:36 AM

From a mudcatter from Hull, "Puggled" I will let her tell ye all what it means, I've added it to my favorite word, muckled, "Och, I'm puggled but no' muckled with thee..."

lor


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: IanC
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:45 AM

"I'm sayin' nowt" ... a Yorkshire expression, confined in its use to after the speaker has already said more than is required and usually stirred up an argument thereby.

;-)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Snuffy
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:47 AM

"Now then" is a suitable thing to say in almost all circumstances


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 08:48 AM

Gissa job.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Splott Man
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 09:32 AM

Sorry, we had "puggled" in Surrey, too.

I'll go to the back of our stairs - is that real or made up?


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Paul Burke
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 09:35 AM

It's neither micklin' nor mucklin' (from Billy Liar IIRC).

Sithee lad, it's th' best expression in t' Northern Union.

Wheer's my cap, there' trouble at t' mill.

Not to mention Bringle Eaf, where they 'ave canguls in bockuls on t' mankulpiece.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,DB
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 09:43 AM

I remember hearing of a crass young lad (probably a Southerner) who used the 'thou' form of address toward an elderly Yorkshireman. The lad had only just met the Yorkshireman and was not related to him. The crass young lad was sternly rebuked thus: "Thee thous them as thous thee, lad - think on!"

Quite right too!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: mooman
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 09:51 AM

T'in't in tin!

(The money is no longer in the receptacle provided for its safe storage)

Peace

moo


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: HipflaskAndy
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:07 AM

Recently a Leeds lad, at work here, asked the teccies for a large flat piece of wood....
'Wi' a nail brayed in, but not so far as it'd scorf the bench'
Gradely!
HFA


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Pied Piper
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:12 AM

I like "Pissed as a hand-cart"and "Face like a Bulldog chewin a bag o'Wasps"

PP


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Bainbo
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:12 AM

"Yigh" is a more emphatic version of "aye". I've bin ashoo-ered, though Ah've never heerd it dun, that that tha can have a full discussion along t'lines of:
"Aye?"
"Aye."
"Nay!"
"Yigh!"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Emma B
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:14 AM

at this time of year?
the only appropiate word is "nesh" Brrrrrrr


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,raggytash
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:14 AM

'as bin man bin mam, dost mean dostman

there's nowt wrong wi' owt what's gradly o'er sump so long as there's tripe in picklin'

Ah Lancashire, God's county !


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Pied Piper
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:19 AM

"tslookin a bit dark o'r our Edna's"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:28 AM

Sorry Muppitz - mardy is used dahn souf too!. (generally as in mardy @rse!).

My favourite northern expression? "Get sum beer in!".

(not the weak, gassy stuff they try to fob you off with south of Lincolnshire).

Cockney expat.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: The Villan
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:33 AM

Its black over Bills mothers

You mardy old git

ello our kid

Got a stonking headache

I'm goooin down the cut (canal)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GEST
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:44 AM

When our next door neighbours come to their summer home here in Canada from their home in Norwich, England, we suddenly find our own Canadian "eh"s interspersed with their many "lovely"s. Isn't that just lovely, eh? :-)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: mooman
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:44 AM

Local variation of PP's one:

"Face like a bulldog lickin' piss off a nettle"

Doncaster (and nearby) expressions:

"Bet yer not as green as yer cabbage-lookin'"

"Face like a bag o' spanners"

"Yer look like ye'v etten' yer beddin"


Peace

moo


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: IanC
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:51 AM

Again, quite a few of these are common down South ... eg

Green and Cabbage looking
Stonking

;-)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 10:51 AM

Put wood i'thoile, [ close the door. ]

Old Yorkshire saying........Hear all, see all , say nowt
                            Eat all, sup all, pay nowt

                            An' if ever tha does owt fer nowt
                            Do it fer thisen.

eric


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: VIN
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 11:12 AM

Flamin Nora!
Will he eckerslike!
Am fair clemmed!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: mooman
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 11:37 AM

Chuffin' 'eck!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,riggy
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 11:58 AM

Tappy-lappy doon the lanin'


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 12:01 PM

'OW MUCH?????

(When Northerners are buying a pint in the South)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: mandotim
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 12:04 PM

'appen. (As in 'perhaps')
Dinner (Known as 'lunch' in the south)
Brew (a hill, in Saddleworth)
Swealing (a word I've only heard in Saddleworth, it means burning heather to clear the ground. Lovely word.)
As in 'Appen I'll go up brew after us dinner, do a bit o' swealin'.'
Tim from Bit on the Side


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: s&r
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 12:27 PM

Nesh in Nottingham was of a person who complained of the cold; it seems to mean cold weather further north.

Stu


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Strollin' Johnny
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 12:30 PM

"Face like a smacked arse" (self-explanatory!)
"Nah then thee, ahs tha gooin'?" (Doncastrian (Or more precisely, Sprotborian) for "Hello, how are you?")
"Mash" ('make' or 'brew' as in "I'll mash the tea")
"Otchin" (North Lincs word for "Hedgehog" - shortened version of the full "Prickly Otchin")


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 12:45 PM

Otchins made it to Dorset too.... but it did come with a proper Romany family so they may have transported it.

Puggled is also used in Dorset... as in "'ee'm puggled ee be you."

I like 'Well I'll go to Fleetwood on a tram' as read in 'Destination Lapland' by Mark Wallington (he of the flatulent dog Boogie fame).

LTS


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: ard mhacha
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 03:03 PM

During my time in Sunderland it was a long shrieked ,EEEEEeeeeeeeeee.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: John J
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 03:11 PM

Ey-up an' ecce thump!

JJ


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: greg stephens
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 03:41 PM

Burr far storm nar
Burr nar storm far

Tha's witshed,lad (of someone standing with their feet over the line playing darts).
(The "shed" is pronounced as a syllable with a neutral vowel).


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 04:08 PM

Uzabmgorruzimbux = we don't have our hymn books with us.
Tintintinmam = it is not in the tin mother.
Eenevverzedout = he kept his mouth shut.
worthyelzmesnapgan = where is my packed lunch



Best wishes, Mike.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 04:30 PM

(You ain't in the North until you pass Darlington)

Looksthe the clip a thoo, lad (What on earth are you wearing)
Cu'bye (behave)
Give owa man, motha, man. (stop it, Mum)
Give owa howkin aboot (please keep still)
Shaz geet lush (My but she's pretty)
daft as a bottle o' fish


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Les from Hull
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 05:06 PM

I wonder if these are just 'ull words or do others 'ave 'em?

Tansad = pushchair
Bool = to push something that has wheels
Packing up = packed lunch
Chudding = stealing apples (only East Hull as far as I can tell)

Other words heard in 'ull are down to our excructiating pronunciation, such as the Head of the Roman Catholic Church being known as 'The Perp'. 'Course I can have a lot off about the way we terk, but anybody else'll get brayed! An' there's lerds of 'ull folk on Mudcat!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 05:14 PM

Very simlilar to Geordie, Les.

The perp axed iz te hurld his curt wheil ee smurked a tyeb in his rurls-royce.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 05:35 PM

I've always had a soft spot for "hadaway and shite" - incidentally, the only Geordie phrase for which there seems to be a better direct equivalent in Spanish (vete a la mierda) than there is in standard English.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 05:39 PM

Geordie: "Spanish" = licorice ;o)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 05:47 PM

Les, you have just reminded me of when I lived in hull for a couple of years, and a young girl was telling me about finding a "turd" in her garden. Took me several minutes to realise she was talking about a "toad"!!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Folkiedave
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 06:36 PM

Bill Mills (RIP) sang at the Carols of Dungworth for many years.

He was the only man I ever met who could get four syllables out of the word "ear".

As in Swaledale ........" and lend a charm to your e-a-r-r"

And then from Sheffield again - boo-it - a thing you put your feet in to go to work.

And finally smittling.......the smittling chair is one in which if a woman sits, she gets pregnant - [smittle=catching, infectious].

Well, it worked for a friend of mine!!

Dave


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 06:39 PM

Dave ... do you remember the monsterous road works that went on in Sheffield centre during the mid-70s near the station? Local lad called it "th'oil int royad"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Tootler
Date: 30 Nov 05 - 06:59 PM

I once suggested we should "go dahn t'chip 'oil for us tea"

My daughter very primly replied "Oh Dad; You could have said chip hole!"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 04:12 AM

monies not round fur goin round,
its flat fur stacking.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 04:41 AM

"Zurombyin?" --Is anyone home?
"Hoozitgaun auld yin"<---How are you, my friend?
"Snoscollswizz"!---the ambient temperature is somewhat higher than it has been of late..
"The baw's oan the slates!"--we have come to an in impasse
"Gaun like snaw aff a dyke"---disappearing very fast.
"Keep the hied an' buy a bunnet"!--Calm down, stay cool
"Bawls like a bull"!---the literal meaning--not the phonetic-----

Except for the last, oft-heard speech in the realm o' the "Jocks".


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 05:30 AM

Just makes me think of an old saying I heard west of the Peninnes.

"You can always tell a Yorkshire man, but not a lot"

And a statistic -

"the further south you go, the denser the population"



Cheers


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 05:50 AM

I say you chaps, this northern banter is rather wizard!

Fondle me testicles young feller if I won't have shot meself!

I bet tha's 'eared wos.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Strollin' Johnny
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 06:06 AM

GUEST - I thought the saying was "You can always tell a teacher, but you can't tell 'em much".

BPL - re 'tou're not in t'north until you're past Darlin'ton" - just remember, all things are relative! LOL!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: JulieF
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 06:21 AM

BIgPinkLad

I always thought that 'th'oil int royad' was the big underpass in the middle of Sheffield - junction High street, Angel st and Arundel gate but I could be wrong as I didn't arrive in Sheffield until the mid 80s.

J


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 08:15 AM

I have always considered "piss off you southern bastard" to quite a useful one.
Quack!
GtD


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 08:17 AM

possibly with "namby pamby" inserted somewhere within the phrase.
Whilst watching out for the punctuation police, of course.
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Sooz
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 08:19 AM

Watch thissen SJ :-)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 08:42 AM

Geoff, the correct version is " piss off you SOFT southern bastard "

eric


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Fred
Date: 01 Dec 05 - 08:54 AM

Yorkshire born
an' Yorkshire bred,
Strong in t'arm
Thick in t'head


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Rumncoke
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 01:53 AM

No no it's

Yorkshire born and Yorkshire bred
Strong in't back and wick in't head.

Wick - alive, alert or lively - like quick.

Anne


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 04:03 AM

oh, away an play wi yersel.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Muppett
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 04:48 AM

Is tha lakin togger t'saft (are you playing football this afternoon)

Chumping or progin (what we used to do just before bonfire night i.e. collecting wood for the bonfire)

Side that will thee (Put that away, will you)

Here's a poser for you all, what's differance between a snicket & a ginnel?


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 04:55 AM

Oh come on, no one understands that Muppet! north or south

one used to be called a marathon...but nowadays you can get a big one?


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 05:11 AM

"There's a duck in t' hedge" = something is amiss


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 06:13 AM

We had the snicket discussion some time ago -Ginnels.
A Ginnel has buildings on either side, a snicket doesn't need buildings - often between hedges.
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Muppett
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 06:39 AM

Am I Sackless or what,Soz Geoff, but me ead's full a cack.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: ard mhacha
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 06:43 AM

Aw yah gan ower, to Roker Park to see the game.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 06:49 AM

Mr. Fromull (Les) we used to go Srumping for apples.

A good website for Yorkshire dialect is www.yorksj.ac.uk/words/A.htm


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Michael
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 07:43 AM

In North East Derbyshire (Bozer to be precise) packed lunch is 'snap'
(tho' when I lived in Preston it were' 'baggin'.)

Time has a language of it's own, which I assume dates from days when precision was not important; so it would be 'nigh on afepast fower', 'just tonned three'
'abart quart to' 'five and twenty past'.

Mike


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 08:00 AM

And in Barnsley, when they want a pie, the time is "summat to eight"
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Pied Piper
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 08:09 AM

I believe the correct expression is "Y mard arse southern Jessi"

PP


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Les from Hull
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 08:29 AM

Mr M Uppett - collecting bonfire wood in 'ull is 'fragging'. And all our snickets and gunnels are 'tenfoots'.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 08:54 AM

I liked the Bringle eaf stuff:-) Knew a girl from just across the way from there (Strawberry Road) and we used to ask her how to bake a cake.

Get some flowoh, some sugoh, some bu'oh...

My personal favourite was from my Grandad - "Ah'll gan thee a punce on't'yed"

Some others not heard by me but reported in a local history book.

"Look at aw them daft buggers - They're all gooin to geron that tram an only half on 'em ull fit"

"Ah'lll sound the bloody whistle at half past twelve wharever time it is"

Cheers

Dave t'gnome


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: robomatic
Date: 02 Dec 05 - 03:13 PM

sassenach


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 03 Dec 05 - 02:31 AM

"Whar's thoo gannin' Lad"?
"Gannin tae the pitchers, Marra!"
"Gannin' rae the bliddy pitchers? --Whey, Man,it's a ca'd neet-- howay in the hoose an' heat thee bliddy Knackers at wor yag!"

"How' Boab, dis thou like corran' kyek?"
"Divs Ah like corran' kyek? Whey Lad, Ah think am diz!"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: ard mhacha
Date: 03 Dec 05 - 05:19 AM

So much for Ulster-Scots getting a grant for a "language", why not Geordie?.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 03 Dec 05 - 05:50 AM

BPL - re 'tou're not in t'north until you're past Darlin'ton" - just remember, all things are relative! LOL!


Geordies think that they come from the North-East but Newcastle-upon Tyne is further west than Southampton - just remember, all things are relative!.

The East starts at Cleethorpes (and Greenwhich too, of course)


DC


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 03 Dec 05 - 08:40 AM

A ' geordie ' is only a Scotsman with his brains kicked out, so shut thi gob.

eric


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: danensis
Date: 03 Dec 05 - 12:50 PM

A "ten foot" is an alley, snickets were only three or four foot and were a short-cut from one street to another, ginnels went through a house or between shops to get to the back yard. In York of course they have snickleways.

I always thought the south started at Bawtry? The north of course, starts at Watford.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 04 Dec 05 - 04:19 AM

I'm all for re-introducing the Watford Gap...

:D


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 04 Dec 05 - 09:03 AM

dog rough...rough as a badger's arse!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 04 Dec 05 - 09:04 AM

How do you know Al? LOL


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: John Routledge
Date: 04 Dec 05 - 04:47 PM

A "Geordie" is a Scotsman with his brains bashed back in again.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Guy Wolff
Date: 04 Dec 05 - 09:11 PM

My favorite expression is: translated into American slang   " Come visit and well play some music . You can stay anytime and as long as you like !!! " MUSIC TO THE EARS !!! <><><><>


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 04:42 AM

doesn't sound like any notherners I know........

they're the gang who came up with the expression

Ad rather keep him for a week than a fortneet

(that might have been me grandad!)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Hull Exile
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 04:44 AM

Eeeh, yer don't sweat much for a fat lass! [Disco chat-up line originating in Barnsley]

Yer cart educate pork! [term of exasparation in failing to make someone understand originating from my Dad.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Paul Burke
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 05:18 AM

Strawberry Road! My brother and his mates had a house there from about 1970 to 1978-ish. Just opposite the pub. Trying to remember the name of the Boddie's pub a street or two away, there was the weirdest grafitti in the bog: "dead mans has canabis", "comunity transport", stuff like that. And the day they came round with a football card, raising money for a trip to the races- when they gave it to me to mark my teams, I noticed that it was boldly headed "Thirks Tripe".

Aye, them was the days, a pint of Boddie's mild for 21p.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Stu
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 05:40 AM

Reet greatly!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 09:11 AM

Was it the Railway on Broughton Road, Paul? I think that was a Bodds pub.

DtG


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Folkiedave
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 09:30 AM

See if you understand Yorkshire Humour - a test.

Two blokes meeting together every night for twenty odd years. First one called at the second one's house every night at 9.00 pm

"Is Harry ready?" he'd say and the wife would reply "Aye he's on his way".

One night he came along at 9.00 pm and the wife instead of her usual reply said "I am sorry to tell you but he died last night".

"Ehh I am sorry" says the first bloke, "Did he say owt about a tin of paint?"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: muppett
Date: 05 Dec 05 - 11:00 AM

Eric the Red
               Weir as't tha bin sin ar last saw thee ?


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 06 Dec 05 - 01:38 AM

'ay oop muppet, not bin out much lately, might get darn t' Stubbing on wensdy neet, or t' Navigation at Sowerby Brig on Friday neet.

Me 'n Clive etc are playing at the Melborne on Christmas Eve and there is a session at 'Blue Pig at Midgehole [ Hardcastle Crags ] on New Years Eve.


Ahl sithee, eric


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Les from Hull
Date: 06 Dec 05 - 03:18 PM

Come to think of it, though, my absolute favourite Northern UK expression came from me Nan.

When I was very small, if I saw Nanna baking I would be there (there was always a good chance of licking the bowl).

"What are you making, Nanna?"

"Whim-whams for ducks to chase at!"

I never heard that anywhere else.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Gurney
Date: 07 Dec 05 - 01:46 AM

... And had me standing theer like a wazzock on the cussey!

Cussy is pavement... causeway, but is a wazzock an adze? They stand on their heads, and look sort of stupefied because of the shape of the haft.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 07 Dec 05 - 04:16 AM

A Yorkshireman is just a Scot without the generosity!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Hull Exile
Date: 07 Dec 05 - 04:30 AM

Les fom Hull's posting re' his Nan's 'duck' expression reminded me of a similar response when my Dad was asked what he was doing

'I'm making a wigwam for a ducks bridle'

Also when asked where he was going

'I'm off ter Nafferton Slacks, where they teck blind ducks ter
s**t!'

I've no idea at all where they come from.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Michael
Date: 07 Dec 05 - 01:32 PM

My Grannie Annie said; 'A whim wham for a goose's bridle' when she meant 'a thingie'.

When asked where any thing was she replied; 'Up in Annie's room at back ut clock'.

Mike


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Snuffy
Date: 07 Dec 05 - 07:58 PM

It was usually "in a bottle on the roof" for us.

And we were usually scruffy enough to look like "boggart come down t'fess'ole"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 07 Dec 05 - 09:32 PM

"Whit's for ma birthday, Faither?"
"A wee roon whustle wi a naethin oan the end...."

"As quate as Aiberdeen oan a flag day--"
"As fu' as a bliddy monkey--sprauchle't oan his back like a coupit yowe in the glaur".
"Black as the earl o'Hell's waistcoat"

" A face like a skelpit erse.."


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Paul Burke
Date: 08 Dec 05 - 04:07 AM

"What's for dinner, Mam?"
"A jump at t'pantry door and a bite at t'latch."


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,DB
Date: 08 Dec 05 - 07:46 AM

I grew up in Peterborough (which is not in the North or the South but the East - so there!) we said "whim wham for a duck's arse".

We also had this word for sweets (what Mancunians call 'toffees' and Southern jessies call 'boiled sugar comestibles' - probably) and that was 'dods' - as in "gis a dod, mate or I'll bash yer 'ed in!". Has anyone heard that one before? I believe that in some regional dialects the word 'dod' means 'snail' - which sort of makes sense, in a revolting sort of a way.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 08 Dec 05 - 05:07 PM

That Muppet, he doesn't know if he's on this Earth or Fullers . :0)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 08 Dec 05 - 05:34 PM

Guest DB---ask for a "dod" in Ayrshire, an' ye'll maybe get get yer head bashed in! Theword has two meanings there, depending on context; "A dod oan the lug" describes a blow to the ear-hole, while a "dod o' cake" means a slice . [I think the spelling here however, is likely "daud".]


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Leadfingers
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 11:08 AM

Ey Ooop !! 100th post !!!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,DB
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 04:54 PM

'Guest Boab' - thanks for the info. about the use of 'dod' in Ayrshire - let's hope nobody gets their heads/heids bashed in!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Folkiedave
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 04:57 PM

A Wigwam for ducks to peak on (is similar to whim wham for ducks etc.)

Black as Bill's mothers.....( A storm is approaching

Dave


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 10 Dec 05 - 02:52 AM

"Ah'd gi'e her a kiss for tuppence an' daur her tae offer a shillin'..."


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,HughM
Date: 13 Dec 05 - 05:01 PM

I'll go to the foot of our stairs! (used to express extreme surprise, e.g. when someone one hasn't seen for twenty years turns up on the doorstep).
Thoil: (approximately) to justify, e.g. "They sound alright, but Ah couldn't thoil to spend £10 on a ticket." I might be able to afford the £10, but I could think of better uses for it. (I'm not sure whether this word is used outside Halifax and Bradford.)
Keep band in't nick: not an exhortation to imprison musicians but to keep things running, literally "keep the belt on the pulley".
A packed lunch can be snap, jock or bait, progressing northward.
Someone mentioned the word "wick", meaning lively, or alive when it shouldn't be, such as when a sack of rice is "wick" with cockroaches.
I'm always mildly amused when Radio Scotland mentions the Wick Accordian & Fiddle Club. I imagine them always playing reels at breakneck speed. In the Bradford area there is the exact opposite: the Idle Working Men's Club!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,BOAB
Date: 13 Dec 05 - 06:29 PM

Here,s a handy wee retort for Teribus, Doug R., and the dreaded M.G.-
--"Awa an' scart yer whurrie wi' a whin bush!"


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Mo the caller
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 07:53 AM

"Ad rather keep him for a week than a fortneet", I thought that was an expression of surprise at someone's appetite.
What's that? - a wigwam for meddlers. (from my husbands grandmother who,though she lived in Hull had started off in Lancashire.)
His other grandma, from Beverley used "fezzening in" when people go at the food enthusiastically. She also used to connifogle her money away (according to Jim this word could be used for anything you want to hide, and doesn't imply dishonesty)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: muppett
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 08:02 AM

Eh Jane it's definatly Fullers I'm on


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,HughM
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 08:15 AM

If, as DB says, thee thous (only) them as thous thee, didn't them as thous thee have to break the rule by thouing thee before tha'd thoud them?
I'd never thought of it like this before, but maybe the old man meant that "thee" is a bit like "Du" in German, only used when addressing young people, animals, and people the speaker has known since childhood or for about forty years. That would explain why I have only heard it from older people. Previously I thought that was because it had become unfashionable. (Actually I think the Germans are somewhat more relaxed about using "Du" nowadays, at least in the North.)


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 10:15 AM

Is that Fullers London Pride muppett.

eric


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 12:03 PM

Fullers earth - remedy for stomach upset I think a bit like kaolin.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Les from Hull
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 12:05 PM

They've nowt to be proud of in London!


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,GUEST,GUEST
Date: 14 Dec 05 - 05:27 PM

A woman goes into a hairdressers in Ashington.

"Can I have a perm" she says to the Hairdresser.

The Hairdresser replies "As I wander lonely as a cloud..."


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Les from Hull
Date: 15 Dec 05 - 10:48 AM

Mrs Duck - fuller's earth is very good for nappy rash (which has almost cleared up now, thank you). A woman of your fecundity should know this.

Actually, fuller's earth was used by fullers for fulling, a process of the textile trades, so well known in the North of England.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 16 Dec 05 - 04:13 AM

tha' face ud stand clogging....


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: GUEST,noddy
Date: 16 Dec 05 - 05:21 AM

yer as much use as a choclate tea pot.

go an knit fog.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: gnomad
Date: 16 Dec 05 - 06:22 AM

Yer that tight yer'd nip a currant in 'arf.


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Subject: RE: favorite Northern (UK) Expression
From: Gurney
Date: 17 Dec 05 - 04:28 AM

Thread creep alert!
Fullers Earth will also dry up the oil on your clutch (in your car!) and get you home in an emergency, but you'd better be an experienced driver, with mechanical experience. Your Bendix gear will probably block up and the clutch will be instant, either in or out, no slip at all. Getting it in there is not for a tyro, either.
The get-you-home tricks that my dad knew were legion. But then, he was an Army driver.


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