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Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790

Charley Noble 09 Dec 05 - 05:04 PM
masato sakurai 09 Dec 05 - 07:31 PM
Charley Noble 09 Dec 05 - 07:49 PM
masato sakurai 09 Dec 05 - 07:59 PM
masato sakurai 09 Dec 05 - 08:09 PM
Charley Noble 09 Dec 05 - 08:14 PM
masato sakurai 09 Dec 05 - 08:37 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Dec 05 - 09:10 PM
Compton 10 Dec 05 - 12:37 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Dec 05 - 04:55 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Dec 05 - 05:49 PM
masato sakurai 10 Dec 05 - 11:22 PM
Charley Noble 11 Dec 05 - 11:11 AM
masato sakurai 11 Dec 05 - 12:56 PM
Hrothgar 12 Dec 05 - 03:45 AM
greg stephens 12 Dec 05 - 10:26 AM
masato sakurai 12 Dec 05 - 11:00 AM
masato sakurai 12 Dec 05 - 11:14 AM
Charley Noble 12 Dec 05 - 09:00 PM
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Subject: Origins: THE STORM, circa 1790
From: Charley Noble
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 05:04 PM

Here's an interesting old sea ballad that I came across that I'd like to know more about. Stevens and Leveridge are apparently Irish collaborators who produced several songs in the late 18th century.

The song itself is a tribute to the power of the sea and the sailors who didn't give up when it appeared that all was lost!

THE STORM

(Words by G. A. Stevens; music by Leveridge, circa late 18th century,
from DIBDIN'S SEA SONGS, 1854, pp. 278-280)

Cease, rude Boreas, blust'ring railer!
List, ye landsmen, all to me;
Messmates, hear a brother sailor
Sing the dangers of the sea;
From bounding billows first in motion,
When the distant whirlwinds rise,
To the tempest-troubled ocean,
Where the seas contend with skies.

Hark! The boatswain hoarsely bawling,
By topsai-sheets and haulyards stand,
Down top gallants, quick by hauling,
Down your staysails, hand boys, hand!
Now it freshens, set the braces,
The lee topsail-sheets let go;
Luff, boys, luff! Don't make wry faces,
Up your topsails nimbly clew.

Now all you, on down beds sporting,
Fondly lock'd in beauty's arms,
Fresh enjoyments wanton courting,
Safe from all but love's alarms;
Round us roars the tempest louder,
Think what fears our minds entral;
Harder yet, it yet blows harder;
Hark! Again the boatswain's call!

The topsail-yards point to the wind, boys,
See all clear to reef each course;
Let the foresheet go, don't mind, boys,
Though the weather should prove worse;
Fore and aft the spritsail-yard get,
Reef the mizzen, see all clear,
Hands up, each preventer-brace set,
Man the foreyards! Cheer, lads, cheer!

Now the dreadful thunder rolling,
Peal on peal, contending, clash;
On our heads fierce rain falls pouring,
In our eyes blue lightning flash:
One wide water all around us,
All above us one black sky,
Different deaths at once surround us, –
Hark! What means that dreadful cry?

The foremast's gone! Cries every tongue out,
O'er the lee, twelve feet 'bove deck;
A leak beneath the chest-tree's sprung out, –
Call all hands to clear the wreck;
Quick! The lanyards cut to pieces;
Come, my hearts, be stout and bold!
Plumb the well, the leak increases,
Four feet water in the hold!

While o'er the ship wild waves are beating,
We for wives or children mourn;
Alas! from hence there's no retreating;
Alas! from hence there's no return.
Still the leak is gaining on us,
Both chain-pumps are chok'd below;
Heav'n have mercy here upon us!
For only that can save us now.

O'er the lee-beam is the land, boys!
Let the guns o'erboard be thrown;
To the pump come every hand, boys!
See, our mizzen-mast is gone!
The leak we've found, it cannot pour fast;
We've lightened her a foot or more;
Up and rig a jury foremast, –
She rights! She rights, boys! We're off shore!

Now once more on joys we're thinking,
Since kind Fortune saved our lives;
Come, the can, boys! Let's be drinking
To our sweethearts and our wives:
Fill it up, about ship wheel it,
Close to the lips a brimmer join, –
Where's the tempest now? Who feel it?
None! Our danger's drown'd in wine.

And, no, I haven't a clue what the tune was.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 07:31 PM

Song sheet is also at American Memory. No tune is indicated. There're some differences.
A NEW SONG, CALLED THE TEMPEST: TOGETHER WITH AN AMERICAN ODE ([n. p.] [n. d.]).

CEASE rude Boreas, boisterous Railer,
List ye Landsmen all to me,
Messmates hear a Brother Sailor
Sing the Dangers of the sea.

From bounding Billows first in Motion,
Where the distant Whirlwinds rife,
To the Tempest troubl'd Ocean,
Where the Seas contend with Skies.

Hark the Boatswain hoarfly bawling,
By top fail Sheets and Hallyards stand;
Down your Stay Sails, quick be hawling,
Your top-gallant Sails hand Boys hand.

Still it freshens, set in the Braces,
Close reef, top fail Sheets let go;
Luff Boys, Luff, don't make wry Faces,
Up your top-fails nimbly clew.

The top fail Yards point to the wind Boys,
See all clear reef each course;
Let the fore sheet go, don't mind it,
If the Weather should turn worse.

Fore and Aft our top fail Yard get,
Reef the Mizen fee all clear;
Hand up the Preventer Braces,
Man the Fore yard, chear Boys, chear.

Now all ye down on beds spoarting,
Fondly lock'd in Beauty's arms;
Fresh enjoyments wanton courting,
Start from all but Loves alarms.

Around us roars the Tempest louder,
Thinking what fear our hearts inthralls;
Harder yet it still blows harder,
Now again the Boatswain calls.

Now the Thunder's dreadful roaring,
Peal on peal contending clash;
On our heads fresh Rains fast pouring,
In our Eyes blue lightnings flash.

All around us one wide Water,
All above us one black Sky;
Different Deaths at once surprize us,
Hark, what means the dreadful Cry.

The Fore mast's gone, cry's every tongue out,
Over the Lee, twelve feet above Deck;
A Leak beneath the Chest-tree sprang out,
Call all hands and clear the Wreck.

Quick the Lanyards cut to pieces,
Come my Hearts, be stout and bold;
Plumb the Well, for the leak increases,
Four Feet of Water in the ?old.

Whilst over the Waves our Ship is beating,
We all for Wives and Sweethearts mourn;
Alas! from hence there's no retreating,
Alas! from hence there's no return.

Still the Leak is gaining on us,
Both Chain-Pumps are choak'd below;
Heaven have Mercy here upon us,
For only that will save us now.

Over the lee B cam lies the Land, Boys,
Let the Guns over Board be thrown;
To the Pump come every hand Boys,
See our Mizen-Mast is gone.

But the Leak we find it can't pour fast,
We have light'ned her a Foot and more;
Up and rig the jury Fore mast,
She's right, we are all off Shore

Now once more on Joys he thinking,
Since kind Fortune fav'd our Lives;
Push the Cann Boys, let's be drinking
To our Sweet-Hearts and our Wives.

Push it round, about Ship wheel it,
To your Lips a Bumper join;
Where's the Tempest now who feels it?
Now our Danger's drown'd in Wine.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Charley Noble
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 07:49 PM

Masato-

Very good! So even the name was changed from "The Tempest" to "The Storm" over a period of 80 or so years. Actually it's still not clear what the original date was.

The words you found appear to be older. Still, it's nice to know that our heroic sailors still survived the Tempest and only drown'd themselves in wine, upon reaching shore.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 07:59 PM

Charley -

William Chappell wrote in Popular Music of the Olden Time (1859), vol. 2, p. 597: "The air is now commonly known as 'Cease, rude Boreas,' from a song which, according to Ritson and others, was written by George Alexander Stevens. It is an amplification of a 'Marine Medley' in Stevens's Songs, Comic and Satyrical, Oxford, 1772." The tune is quoted on p. 598. Songs, Comic and Satyrical seems to have been a well-known book in those days; Claude Simpson (in The British Broadside Ballad and Its Music) mentions Stevens passim.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 08:09 PM

From Notes and Queries Vol. 4 (98) Sept 13 1851 Page 196:

Geroge Alexander Stevens was born ... "in the parish of St. Andrew's Holborn, 1710." He died ... "at Baldock in Hertfordshire, Sep. 6, 1784.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Charley Noble
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 08:14 PM

Masato-

Well, that answers almost all my questions except what the first name of Steven's musical collaborator was. "Leveridge" is nice but not exactly a full name.

You really are an incredible web researcher. I've been sifting the web for a week and getting very little.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 08:37 PM

Very probably "Richard Leveridge, the base singer (and composer of the happy melody, Black-eyed Susan)" (Notes and Queries Vol. 6 3rd S. (136) Aug 6 1864 Page 106).


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Dec 05 - 09:10 PM

In "Sea Songs and Ballads," ed. Christopher Stone, introd. Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge, Oxford Press, the poem "Storm" (No. XII) is credited to G. A. Stevens, as posted by Masato. Tunes mostly not noted in this book.

The next poem in the book is "Blow, Boreas, Blow," first line 'Blow, Boreas, blow, and let thy surly winds
Make the billows foam and roar.' Author given as R. Bradley.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Compton
Date: 10 Dec 05 - 12:37 PM

Now then...correct me if I am wrong and I could be getting confused with another "storm"...but, in my formative years, once when watching Reginald Dixon on the might wurlitzer at Blackpool Tower. He always used to do something called "The Storm" with a ship on the backcloth that, I think used to sink, *twice nightly)...Incidently Reginald Dixon's Organ used to change colour...but I digress.
Could these pieces of music be in anyway related?


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Subject: LYR. ADD: A STORM (D'URFEY)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Dec 05 - 04:55 PM


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Subject: LYR. ADD: A STORM (D'URFEY)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Dec 05 - 05:49 PM

Lyr. Add: A STORM
?By Robert Bradley
Thomas D'Urfey, in "Sir Barnaby Whigg"

Blow, Boreas, blow, and let thy surly Winds
Make the Billows foam and roar:
Thou canst no Terror breed in Valiant minds,
But spite of thee we'll live and find the shore:
Then cheer my heart, and be not aw'd,
But keep the Gun-Room clear,
Though Hell's broke loose, and the Devils roar abroad;
Whilst we have Sea-room here boys, never fear:

Hey! how she tosses up, how far!
The mounting Top-mast toucht a Star:
The Meteors blaz'd as through the Clouds we came,
And Salamander-like we live in Flame.
But now we sink, now, now we go
Down to the deepest shades below.
Alas! where are we now? who, who can tell,
Sure 'tis the lowest Room of Hell,
Or where the Sea-gods dwell?
With them we'l live, with them we'l live and raign;
With them we'll laugh and sing, and drink amain:
But see we mount, see, see we rise again.

Through flashes af lightning and tempests of rain
Do fiercely contend which shall conquer the Main;
Though the Captain do's swear, instead of a Prayer,
And the Sea is all fired by the Demons of the Air:
We'l drink and defie, the mad spirits that fly,
From the deep to the skie,
And sing whilst the Thunder do's bellow;
For Fate still will have a kind fate for the brave,
And nere make his grave of a salt water Wave;
To drown, drown, never to drown;
No, never to drown a good fellow.

Captain- "There now! there's life, there's soul, there's sense: as I'm a living man,
Gentlemen, the Rogue fox'd me three times, one after another, only by singing this Song."

From the Play, "Sir Barnaby Whigg," Thomas D'Urfey (1653-1723).
Item Code: TDSBW2. Restoration Theatre Song Archive:

http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/english/research/Archive/songlinepages/songline1.htm#top

Also in the book cited above by Q, 09 Dec 05, 09:10 PM.


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Subject: Tune Add: The Strom (Cease, Rude Boreas)
From: masato sakurai
Date: 10 Dec 05 - 11:22 PM

X:1
T:The Storm
T:(Cease, Rude Boreas)
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:F
B:Chappell, Popular Music of the Olden Time, p. 598
Ac|B2 (AG)FE|F2 G2 Ac|B2 AGFE|
w:Cease, rude Bo-reas,_ blust'r-ing rai-ler! List, ye lands-men,_ all to
F4 Ac|B2 (AG)FE|F2 G2 Ac|
w:me! Mess-mates, hear a_ broth-er sai-lor Sing the
B2 AGFE|F3 ABA|d3 c BA|
w:dan-gers_ of the sea; From bound-ing bil-lows first in
G3/2A/ B2 AG|F3 D EG|C4 GA|
w:mo - tion, When the dis-tant whirl-winds rise, To the
B2 (AG) cE|F2 G2 fd|c3 A BG|F4||
w:tem-pest - troubled_ o-cean, Where the seas con-tend with skies.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Charley Noble
Date: 11 Dec 05 - 11:11 AM

What an amazing crew!

Cheerily,
Charley Noble, temporarily in NYC


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 11 Dec 05 - 12:56 PM

From folktrax:
CEASE RUDE BOREAS - "blustering railer/ killer" - comp by George Alexander Stevens (1710-1784) - ROUD #949 - Such Bs London #325 - GREIG-DUNCAN 1 1981 #12 (w/o) "The Whaler's Lamentation" --- HUNTINGTON SWS 1964 pp70-72 ships log 1827 (w/o) "The Tempest" - CAREY ASS 1976 pp84-87 Timothy O Connor MS songbook c1778 -- A L LLOYD TOPIC 12-T-174 1967
For Roud Index, see VWML Online Home page. Go to "Folk song indexes", and then to "Roud index."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Hrothgar
Date: 12 Dec 05 - 03:45 AM

Fits to "Onward, Christian Sldiers"?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: greg stephens
Date: 12 Dec 05 - 10:26 AM

Were Stevens or Leveridge actually Irish, as per Charley Noble's original post? I have never seen this suggested before.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 12 Dec 05 - 11:00 AM

Richard Leveridge (1670 - 1758) was an "English bass singer and composer."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: masato sakurai
Date: 12 Dec 05 - 11:14 AM

From Glimpses into the 19th Century Broadside Ballad Trade:
The Storm was written by George Alexander Stevens (1710-1784) though one or two printers credited it to a Mrs Robinson. She, Mary Darby Robinson, was certainly an authoress, mistress of the then Prince of Wales, and known as 'Perdita' on account the popularity of her role, as an actress, in The Tempest. It is more likely, in the context of her career, that she sang the piece … it was also an Incledon favourite. It seems that Stevens' poem was first introduced as a 'Description of a Storm' and it figured in programmes at the Adelphi theatre, London, during the 1820s. Stevens had a creditable list of publications and Baring-Gould gave the immediate source as The Muses' Delight in 1754 - published again in Stevens' Songs Comic and Satyrical in 1772 - and various versions of the air as dating from the 1730s. The piece is lengthy, in 'Art' style, beginning
'Cease, rude Boreas blust'ring railer
List ye landsmen all to me …
before going into a detailed description of storm, potential shipwreck, the discovery of the dangerous leak, and safety. Certainly there are lines and phrases which might have fitted well enough into a country singer's repertoire, but one surmises too much complication overall for it to have been a popular item unless transmogrified by oral dissemination. Nonetheless, the piece could be found in numerous Songsters dating from the 1780s and extending to just after the half-way mark in the nineteenth century. One reference, crediting the piece, erroneously, to Dibdin, gave the information that the music was by one Leveridge. This was Richard Leveridge (1670-1758), English bass singer and composer who, in the latter endeavour, wrote a parody of Italian opera (at the time flooding the English theatres), Pyramus and Thisbe, based on a theme from Shakespeare; and some hundred and fifty songs, best-known of which was The Roast Beef of Old England. Another reference was also given to the John and Abraham Hume collection of songs from Kilwarlin in northern Ireland which collection was in use around 1845. In terms of performance, there is one reference to a production entitled The Masque around 1795 where it was sung by a Mr Dodd. Interestingly, the redoubtable Henry Burstow listed The Storm as one of his songs. He, though, was probably exceptional; and this is a rare example of Besley pieces which found their way into traditional sung repertoire.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Storm, The, circa 1790
From: Charley Noble
Date: 12 Dec 05 - 09:00 PM

I humbly withdraw my reference to Stevens and Leveridge being "Irish." That presumption was based on one mangled reference to an Irish collection which included a version of the song in my initial websearching. Now we have the harvest of far more sophisticated web searchers.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble, still adrift in NYC


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