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Tech: Home Recording

Windsinger 17 Feb 06 - 05:02 PM
The Fooles Troupe 17 Feb 06 - 05:55 PM
Amos 17 Feb 06 - 06:06 PM
Windsinger 17 Feb 06 - 08:28 PM
Amos 17 Feb 06 - 09:17 PM
number 6 17 Feb 06 - 10:58 PM
number 6 17 Feb 06 - 11:09 PM
GUEST,Frank Hamilton 18 Feb 06 - 04:45 PM
Amos 18 Feb 06 - 05:00 PM
GUEST,Al 18 Feb 06 - 07:37 PM
Nick 19 Feb 06 - 05:34 PM
Windsinger 19 Feb 06 - 05:59 PM
Nick 19 Feb 06 - 06:18 PM
Big Al Whittle 19 Feb 06 - 06:31 PM
Fullerton 19 Feb 06 - 06:53 PM
Nick 19 Feb 06 - 07:01 PM
The Fooles Troupe 19 Feb 06 - 07:30 PM
Amos 19 Feb 06 - 08:00 PM
The Fooles Troupe 19 Feb 06 - 08:05 PM
number 6 19 Feb 06 - 09:52 PM
number 6 19 Feb 06 - 10:00 PM
Cluin 19 Feb 06 - 10:21 PM
Windsinger 19 Feb 06 - 10:30 PM
Windsinger 19 Feb 06 - 10:40 PM
number 6 19 Feb 06 - 10:55 PM
number 6 19 Feb 06 - 11:02 PM
number 6 19 Feb 06 - 11:08 PM
number 6 19 Feb 06 - 11:27 PM
Big Al Whittle 20 Feb 06 - 03:32 AM
treewind 20 Feb 06 - 04:18 AM
Nick 20 Feb 06 - 08:49 AM
Windsinger 20 Feb 06 - 09:11 AM
Nick 20 Feb 06 - 09:38 AM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 20 Feb 06 - 10:13 AM
GUEST,GUEST: Johnny Beezer 20 Feb 06 - 11:29 AM
Windsinger 20 Feb 06 - 11:40 AM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 20 Feb 06 - 11:41 AM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 20 Feb 06 - 11:48 AM
number 6 20 Feb 06 - 11:54 AM
Windsinger 20 Feb 06 - 12:10 PM
GUEST,Jennifer 20 Feb 06 - 02:33 PM
The Fooles Troupe 20 Feb 06 - 06:05 PM
Fullerton 21 Feb 06 - 04:31 AM
Big Al Whittle 21 Feb 06 - 11:18 AM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 21 Feb 06 - 11:46 AM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 21 Feb 06 - 11:57 AM
jeffp 21 Feb 06 - 02:31 PM
The Fooles Troupe 21 Feb 06 - 06:11 PM
Windsinger 11 Mar 06 - 03:52 AM
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Subject: Tech: Home Recording Tips
From: Windsinger
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 05:02 PM

For the Mudcat Musicians:

Do any of you do home-recording?

Care to swap technical advice?

(Most of the stuff I have in mind is probably already covered under "Home Recording For Dummies." Which I own; but have only had a couple of brief chances to sit down and thumb through.)

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 05:55 PM

There's been lots of threads on this - maybe we should suggest Joe work out a 'threat category' for this...

Hmmm

'thread category' even... but I'll leave that typo... :-)


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Amos
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 06:06 PM

Fionne:

Do a search of past discussions on recording, home recording, home audio, recording at home, etc., and you will find everything I know. Which ain't too much!!!


A


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 08:28 PM

Well,

Don't have any truly burning questions on my mind at the moment. Just assumed (possibly PREsumed) that a lot of grass-roots musicians must be prowling around the 'Cat. And that depending on experience level, they might have sufficient questions, or reams of advice, to make a general Q&A thread useful...

But if it's been covered, it's been covered.

Foole, that's not a bad suggestion. Think it's a category people would use a lot?

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Amos
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 09:17 PM

Here's a collection of the more obvious titles for you:

Tech: Home Recording

Tech: Beginning a home recording

Home Recording

Tech: Multitrack home recording studio for P C

Tech: Home recording - uk

Tech: Home recording- Pandora?


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 10:58 PM

I've been doing some Home Recording, though not as much as I should be doing. I use Voyetra Record Producer Deluxe. It has multi-tracking, reverb, compression, editor, equalizer. It can also write sheet music from midi. It's basically everything a home recording hack needs.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 17 Feb 06 - 11:09 PM

BTW ... there isn't too much going on in the Cat or even with fellow musicians (surprisingly) with home recording ... I searched through and through here before I went out looking for and settled on Record Producer Deluxe.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,Frank Hamilton
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 04:45 PM

Got a Tascam DP-01 8 track digital and am looking for a compatible Mac-based sequencer. Does anyone have any ideas?

Frank Hamilton


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Amos
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 05:00 PM

Frank:

Here's one candidate:

http://www.motu.com/products/software/dp/

and there are many others. Ableton Live has a good rep although I find it somewhat arcane to use. Hell, Apple's own Garage Band lets you sequence tracks and is user-friendly.

See http://www.mp3machine.com/mac/RECORDING/ for some choices.

Here's an even fuller list: http://www.hitsquad.com/smm/mac/.

Studio Vision Pro may fill the bill for you.

Regards,

Amos


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,Al
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 07:37 PM

Visit www.homerecording.com


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Nick
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 05:34 PM

Perhaps I should call this non-Tech: Home Recording?

Happy to share and talk about it if you want I am trying to learn something about it.

I get lots of fun out of trying to do it. A friend's wife bought him half a day in a studio and we went and recorded a couple of his songs and I got the bug to try it at home.

Looking at your site I would guess you - like me - are doing it on a relatively low budget. I also use Audacity in part as it's a great free resource.

Mostly I use Cakewalk Guitar Tracks 2 which I share with Alistair who writes the songs that I mostly play on (though I've started recording my wife and self which is the more foky end of things) but apart from the computer which I bought anyway the whole set up has cost about £40 in connectors, a mic stand and a pair of headphones. Everything else is very Heath Robinson or begged or borrowed... It's astounding what is available for nothing especially on the software side of things with reasonable plug ins etc

I have 3 mics and a mic pre-amp from a pub that was no longer using them when they turned out all their music etc; a couple of pairs of old speakers hooked up via an old amp to the computer; an old broken Akai cassette deck with two mic inputs and sliders for the recording levels that I use as a mixer when I need it. If I record just one track at a time I will tend to input it straight into the soundcard.

And that's about it! I use my 15 watt guitar and bass amps and mix the signal direct from the bass/guitar and mic'd from the amp via a splitter lead, via the tape recorder into the computer! Acoustic guitar I record in stereo via a couple of mics. Voices are obviously mic'd and I use a home made pop filter made from a coathanger, the bottom of a plastic cd pack an a pair of tights.

Mixing I find incredibly difficult. Perhaps the absence of decent speakers or perhaps it's an age thing!

And I think the results are not too bad - but I leave it to you to judge. Not the same sort of music as you but I am hopefully doing some things with a fiddle playing friend to make a record of some of our favourite things we do together and some folk things with some other friends.

There is part of a backing track (c2.5mb) I've been working on this weekend as a friend lent me his Roland electric piano to experiment with. It's pop - jazz (?) sort of thing but should give an idea of results and quality. The original is here and was done on the same software but perhaps with slightly less regard for levels. I think it's a fantastic song by the way!

Not much 'folky' here at present but there are some other examples of the results at Soundlift.com where all but The Bubble Has Burst and One Swallow were done in our spare bedroom - the two mentioned were done in a proper studio.

The local library is a fantastic resource and I've found about 6 or 7 excellent books with an array of information, hints, resources and software - all for nothing, and legal!

I listened to the Arran Boat song (as it's something I play with a friend) and something is giving you a bit of a hum which detracts from the nice playing.

Hope that's of interest. It's definitely cheaper than many options I see mentioned when people talk about Home Recording, though as I say the quality may reflect the princely sums I have splashed out!


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 05:59 PM

something is giving you a bit of a hum

:::snicker:::

Possibly it's the fact that I haven't been really able to acquire, or jury-rig, a pickup-device for my harp. And that for the moment my working solution is to dangle the microphone down inside the sound-box...

Works in recording (sort of) but I'll certainly need that elusive gadget if I start using my amp for live harp performances.

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Nick
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 06:18 PM

Just listening to the Cuckoo which also suffers a bit from the same - which is sad because the singing and playing is lovely.

Not being flippant but I'm presuming you're not standing in the soundbox when you are singing. Is the hiss in the background from the recording of the harp or a more general thing?

Can you not just mic a harp rather than have to put a mic INSIDE the soundbox? I would guess that the level of sound output by a harp must be at least that of my acoustic guitar - or is that not the case? The mics I have are pretty much the bottom end of the market (Altai UD-130: Altai are described as producing low end mics!) but they'll easily pick up the lightest strum of a guitar from quite a distance and don't have huge amounts of hiss or hum. Do you use some form of pre-amp to bring the level up to a suitable level for recording.

The other thing I did notice in a few tunes was that the peaks were clipped and a bit distorted here and there that suggests that the levels might be a bit high in some cases.

If you just record nothing with the mic do you still get the background hiss? If so might it be the lead, perhaps? A change of mic might make a radical difference.

Just my thruppence worth...


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 06:31 PM

I've been doing home recording. since 1983. I'm crap at it. I always was. its a bit like sex, some people think they're good at it but they're not.

if at first you don't succeed - pack it in. stop throwing your money away.

talk to people whose recordings you have enjoyed - not people with huge recording contracts, just working musicians. ask them where they did it. inevitably, it will be somewhere expensive. but if you care about sounding nice then you have to be prepared to pay someone.

you can get a hard disc portastudio these days that burns straight to cd for about £500. these are great machines, I've got one. that is all you need to pay to find out if you have any talent for this - which is dirt cheap - home recording gobbled up all the profits from my one and only hit record back in '83.

bon chance, but don't let it break your heart.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Fullerton
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 06:53 PM

Microphones usually sound better than pickups, i think.
The sound of a harp is SOOOo three dimensional a pickup is not even going to get close.
two microphones will get closer to the sound you hear when you play it
Try recording in different rooms


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Nick
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 07:01 PM

My friend records his acoustic guitar via a pick up and then into soundcard and it loses most of the 'acoustic' guitar sound. When I bought my guitar I bought a Fishman (?) guitar pick up as it was recommended as having a really natural sound. I have always used the cheap mics I have in preference as the sound is more like an acoustic instrument.



Electric harp now there's a thought... (wah-wah harp? Harp through a fuzz box? Endless horrible thoughts!)


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 07:30 PM

The art of capturing sounds on to a recording so that the original 'hearing experience' is realist ice is an arcane one. That is why competent professional demand high prices.

Us poor amateurs can research the subject and hopefully understand it better.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Amos
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 08:00 PM

But of course you can mic a harp.


A


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 08:05 PM

Does Micca play the harp?


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 09:52 PM

Agreeing with Amos .... of course you can mic a harp ... I mic my accoustic, Djambes, harmonica, friends have mic'ed their banjo and mandolins ... a mic is all I use with Record Producer. Results are excellent.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 10:00 PM

BTW ... anyone want an old Sony reel to reel ... It's going out to the garbage this Wednesday.

The one good thing about PC recording technology is that it eliminates a lot of this old expensive gear such as sound boards, tape machines and even expensive mics. Anyone now has the capability to produce pretty good recording 'in thier homes'. As I mentioned, I'm amazed how this has not caught quicker than it has. I mentioned this to my nephew who is a semi-pro musician. He has been renting 'studio time' until I mentioned he should look into PC Home recording.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Cluin
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 10:21 PM

Ah, but recording studio have those great mics, those $2000.00 Neumanns and booths set up to get a good recording, though, as well as the tech that knows about placement and other niceties. There's still a definite demand for the pro studios.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 10:30 PM

of course you can mic a harp

Maybe with a multi-directional mic. This one's mono-, and every past attempt to record "straight" harp with it has produced results so weak and thin I might as well be in the next room.

Same thing with the guit, which is why I ended up buying an external pickup device for it. (The tradeoff being that while the pickup records crisp sound, there's now a nasty buzz. But as I get better engineering skills I might be able to filter that out.)

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 10:40 PM

Nick,

If you use Audacity as well, maybe you can give me a few pointers as to how to make the most out of its "noise removal" feature? Great concept, but when I apply that tool I always hear faint electronic distortion in the background which, to me, is more distracting than whatever it is (usually simple "white noise") I'm trying to edit out.

A large part of the problem is that I kind of suck as an engineer. :) My b'f is an ex-roadie and has helped with some technical pointers; but there's an age difference,and consequently a technology gap. He can only help me with so much.

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 10:55 PM

Cluin ... I'm certainly not going to argue with you there ... but now you can hack around on your home computer ... get some tracks down ... get a feel for it ... so when you do want to do some 'real' recording you can go to the studio ... maybe I'm missing the point here but what we are talking is 'home recording' .. but then in that case spend the money on eal studio equipment .. outfit an accoustic tight room in your house ... but in that case it would be cheaper in some cases to rent a studio.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 11:02 PM

Hell ... you can build your home into something like here ...


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 11:08 PM

Ooops ... blue clicky didn't work .. but check out ths place .. an example on a home studio.

http://realworldstudios.com/


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 11:27 PM

All I can say is is the hum must definately be the result of the pickup. I haven't recording directly using any amplification devices. I can understand how a harp would present difficulties using mics ... as mentioned an accoustic guitar, mandolin, harmonica record with no problems ... the djembe comes in a bit weak and is difficult if not impossible to get the full resonance ... banjo came in with some high peaks (surprised) but was able to do some sound editing to remedy that issue.

sorry for all the posts I made here .. but those interested in recording .. do check out that World Studio website!

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 03:32 AM

costs have come down. microphones comparable to those big neumans are half the price of what they were in the 80's. you don't have to spend the money - like you once did.

check out spider john's horror story of how he spent all the money his father left him only to find it superseded by the home studio craze. I read it in folk roots.

the little boss machine I've got now is tons better than all the reel to reel stuff that I had twenty years ago. and I use it for very rough demos. songs that I might put on the website but which will never get on to an album.

Stuff that I want to be remembered for. I rehearse like mad. can't afford to waste a studio second, think carefully of what I might need, and when I get there, try to hit the ground running.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: treewind
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 04:18 AM

Correct room treatment, especially bass absorption, is the biggest and best kept secret of good recording and mixing. It doesn't come in sexy branded packages like digital technology; its boring, expensive and time consuming (if you DIY) but it's one of the important things a pro studio has and a home studio often doesn't. There's some really good advice on Ethan Winer's Acoustics page.

The other important resource a studio has, as Cluin says, is the engineer's knowledge and experience. A good engineer can make a decent recording with a couple of SM57s (these are actually good all-purpose mics if you know how to use them), but anyone can make a bad recording with a $2000 Neumann. At least the equipment you can buy reasonably cheaply does mean you can spend your own time learning about the process and training your ears, but however you do it it's an expensive hobby and there are no quick results - the more you do the more faults you hear in your work. (and that's a GOOD thing!)

Pickups are for live sound only.
If you can't get a good sound with a mic on a harp (or anything) you need to try different mic positions and possibly a different mic; maybe further away than you expect in a nice sounding room is the answer, or maybe two mics - if I was recording a solo harp I think I'd try a crossed pair of small condensers to get a stereo image, for instance.

Anahata


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Nick
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 08:49 AM

>>If you use Audacity as well, maybe you can give me a few pointers as to how to make the most out of its "noise removal" feature?

I have tried the noise removal tool but it is a pretty blunt instrument and removed all sorts of things along with what I wanted removal. Theoretically you choose a sample of background noise and it should work out and remove it - in practice I don't think it works in practical terms. To be candid, if you have to use it you probably have a more fundamental problem!

What I think may be at the root of your problems is in the paragraph where you say "Maybe with a multi-directional mic. This one's mono-, and every past attempt to record "straight" harp with it has produced results so weak and thin I might as well be in the next room."

What that suggests is that the levels are not right and you are having to boost sound to such a level that all the background noise comes through.

So first coupl of basic questions... (if I'm insulting your intelligence I'm sorry!) If this doesn't help we'll try something else

* Are you using the microphone or line in socket on the soundcard? Avoid microphone socket on a computer like the plague - it's horrible.

* If you are using the line in socket could well be that the output that the mic produces is too low for the line level. I found when I started that my recordings with a mic were the same.

What I think you need is some form of pre-amp to amplify the signal from the mic to the level that the Line In socket requires (to quote a web site "Whatever device you are using to make the analog to digital conversion, make sure to feed it the proper level. Sending a microphone signal (or too low of a line level signal) into a line-level input will result in noisy, coarse sound, encoded at effectively a lower bit-depth. Sending a line level input into a mic level input will usually create distortion and clipping...)

It's why I use the old cassette player that I have - it acts as a pre-amp. About 4 notches up is just right! Before that I used the little pre-amp that they used in the pub. What either does is to raise the relatively low energy produced by the microphone to the level the input needs. Beware of too high an input but you can tinker a bit on Audacity. I think it puts a default input level which it guesses is right - if you have had to change the input level on Audacity much it would tend to confirm it.

I would guess that that is all that is causing you the problem. Without some form of pre-amp on a mic you are going to struggle to get even a half decent sound.

If you have anything that you can use similarly it should work and you should then hear every tiny little nuance of a pluck from across a crowded room (kidding! - but it should work and make an appreciable difference)

Before I had to constantly fiddle with levels in Cakewalk. Once I set it about right and got an idea of where to set my very hi-tech cassette player (!) the difference was enormous. I can set it so I can sing full blast into the mic without going into the red on Cakewalk, or set it so I can stand 4' back from the mic and fingerpick my guitar. Both are equally listenable to without lots of background noise (apart from the central heating/washing machine/children/radio etc that are part and parcel of recording at home!)

>>A large part of the problem is that I kind of suck as an engineer. :)

It's only learning. I had exactly the same thing with horrible noisy things off a mic till I did the above. I tried direct from pick up but much prefer the sound as I said in a previous post.

>>My b'f is an ex-roadie and has helped with some technical pointers; but there's an age difference,and consequently a technology gap.

I presume he must be very young then. If he was anything like my age he would understand... ;)


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 09:11 AM

you using the microphone or line in socket on the soundcard? Avoid microphone socket on a computer like the plague - it's horrible.

As in, plugging the mic directly into the computer, with no sort of pre amp device? Well....ya.

I should be using the line-in socket? Well, I'll look for it...unfortunately on my computer none of the input sockets are labelled in text, but with pictograph/icons. :/ Guess I'll have to use my imagination.

I have a medium sized amp, which I picked up new a year ago and have hardly touched since (Stageworks PMA-7). Would I be able to jury-rig that into a pre-amp device?

FWIW, the mic is a V-Tech 1030 unidirectional. (I also picked up a spare, a MB1000H from Midnight Blues, but I really hate it. The tracks get "skips", or random split-seconds of lost sound, when I record with it.)

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Nick
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 09:38 AM

I should be using the line-in socket? Well, I'll look for it...unfortunately on my computer none of the input sockets are labelled in text, but with pictograph/icons. :/ Guess I'll have to use my imagination.

There usually three inputs on the soundcard which are colour coded - one is mic, one line in and one headphone - I think line in is green (but it could be pink!). If you plug it in open Audacity and choose Line IN or Microphone you'll soon know.

You'll definitely need some form of preamp with Line In. Whether you can use your amp I'm not sure. End of the day an amp is an amp. What actually is it?


But I would definitely say that your background noise comes from mic straight in. On the right track at least.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 10:13 AM

current best value for money entry level
'semi pro' USB audio interface input/output preamp devices
gaining positive music tech reviews
include:..

http://www.behringer.com/BCA2000/index.cfm?lang=ENG

http://www.line6.com/toneport/overview.html

Just mentioning these 2 as a starting point..
USB devices like these have advantages of portability and ability to be used with different computers
in different locations..


check ebay for prices


UK "Sound on Sound" magazine website for archived reviews and tech info,& forum

http://www.soundonsound.com/


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,GUEST: Johnny Beezer
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 11:29 AM

Can I get in on this and get some much-needed advice from you Whiz Kids?
I have a Tascam 488 Multi-recorder
I have guitars, mandolins, basses, bouzoukis, banjos 5 & 4 String etc.
I have a desktop computer which I don't use for recording because I don't know how to.
As you can imagine, I currently record my string instruments on the 488 overdubbing and bouncing.
Now I don't play keyboards, brass, fiddle etc., but would very much like to import/create these parts for my recordings.
Can you please tell me what equipment I would need?


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 11:40 AM

Johnny,

If you want general info in how to build a digital recording workstation around your PC, you could do what I did: invest in a copy of "Home Recording for Dummies."

I don't recommend trying to read it cover to cover, as it's a LOT of information, not all of which might be relevant to your specific needs. Still I've found it useful when I need to cherry-pick/look up specific bits of information. (I'm only here throwing out questions to this forum, because naturally the book isn't interactive.)

As for creating synthesized brass, fiddle, etc you can do that by means of most electric keyboards. If you don't play keyboard yourself, you might consider lessons to at least drill yourself in the basics. A rudimentary grasp of keyboard is good knowledge for any musician, vocal or instrumental, to have.

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 11:41 AM

hi depending on age and capability of your PC hardware,
lowest cost high quality options
would involve connecting your tascam to the line in of an entry level budget dedicated Audio soundcard
eg M audio, Emu,
or USB devices as mentioned above.

basic effective multitrack recording software might be bundled free with any of these products,
or available as described by other posters here..


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 11:48 AM

eg:


http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/sep04/articles/emu0404.htm

http://m-audio.com/products/en_us/Audiophile2496-main.html


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: number 6
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 11:54 AM

"basic effective multitrack recording software might be bundled free with any of these products"

They are punkfolkrocker ... and quite effective they are.

As I mentioned previously, these 'recording' software packages are excellent for 'hack' budget recording and one benefit I find is in composing your own music. That is the main reason I went the route of a multitrack recording software.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 12:10 PM

I really like multitrack too---mainly because there's only one of me. :) lol

Most of my musical background is multi-part vocals...multitrack is a handy way of conjuring a phantom ensemble, for those times when you can't actually round up other vocalists.

Slán,

~Fionn

www.geocities.com/children_of_lir


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Subject: harp miking...
From: GUEST,Jennifer
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 02:33 PM

I have never posted here before, but I got an email from a friend of mine wondering if I had any suggestions about how to mike a harp...

I play folk harp with another lady, (www.ardythandjennifer.com). We have four recordings (we're working on our fifth), and we have always used really high quality studio mikes for that... I know you can rent them here from the local music store, and that would be my suggestion- they are recording studio quality instrument mikes, and they are really worth the money. Our music store only charges $10-$20 per day, and you can do a lot in a day!

For performance we bought audio technica condenser mikes almost seven years ago, and they are incredible. they require phantom power, so they sometimes don't work with older sound systems, but you can always rent or buy a pre-amp if you're running into that problem.

These mikes are great because they are suspended inside the sound box, and they pick up ever sound, but don't have that contact noise you get from a pick up.

I would highly recommend getting something like that- they have really lasted well, and we have used the heck out of them! They might be pretty good for recording too, if you can't fine the other ones. They don't have a buzz or a hum in any case.

Good luck with your recording!

-Jennifer
(the Happy Harper)


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 20 Feb 06 - 06:05 PM

I have done so many different things that my brain flushes the small details out to make room for what I am currently playing with - I hesitate to pontificate with half remembered facts.

Hums and buzzes in electronic circuitry are often caused by "Earth Loops". This is a tricky subject in itself, but there is lots of info out there explaining it and suggesting fixes that the budding sound engineer can search for on the net.

Basically, it is caused by an AC voltage difference on the earthing points between connected sound modules, including long runs of cable. Simply put, you avoid it by making sure that you control your earthing points - and I am talking 'signal earths' here - DO NOT TAMPER WITH MAINS EARTHING UNLESS YOU REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING - you could kill yourself. You can get interaction between 'signal earths' and 'power earths' too - commercial items SHOULD have set up the power earths correctly, and also the 'signal earths' WITHIN each item.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Fullerton
Date: 21 Feb 06 - 04:31 AM

Sometimes monitors screens can cause a low level hum
Try switching them off while recording
The clicks and pops on your recording could be caused by peaks of sound going "over" 0Db while recording.
Try experimenting with different buffer rates this can cause clicks too.
Disable screen savers.

I enjoyed the music btw

good luck


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 21 Feb 06 - 11:18 AM

the 488 was a good machine (with Dolby C as opposed to Dolby B), I had one of the horrid old 144 machines. then I had the Fostex A8, then a tascam 8 tracks on a cassette. Then he vss880 and now this Boss thing i think is the last thing I'll get.

its not as good as the vss88o, but it has a bigger memory.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 21 Feb 06 - 11:46 AM

i've got a higher end late 90's tascam cassette 4 track boxed up in storage somewhere..

hardly worth the bother trying to sell it these days..

..at least it could still be utilized as a reasonable quality
analog input/output mixer for a budget 2 track PC soundcard.

Btw.. modern flat panel LCD computer monitors are supposed to minimise, coil hum from guitar pickups.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 21 Feb 06 - 11:57 AM

..and before i forget again..

if you cant yet afford even a good £60 'semi pro' PC audio card..
you may still be able to get reasonable results with music tech software if you have a good recent PC
with decent quality analog line in/out connections,
or digital input/output..

http://asio4all.com/

is a respected freeware asio driver that can improve performance
and lower latency for some stock manufacturer fitted generic soundcards
and motherboard soundchips..

definitely worth a try..


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: jeffp
Date: 21 Feb 06 - 02:31 PM

I'm doing my recording with a fast laptop using this interface. I use Cubase SE ($100) as my software.

For harp, I would back you into a corner and place 2 small diaphragm condenser mics about 6 feed in front of you in an X-Y configuration (diaphragms above and below each other about 90-120 degrees apart horizontally). If a suitable spot wasn't available, I would try directing one mic at your sound box from the back and one at the strings from the front to capture attacks. It would be easier if you could play while somebody else moves the mics around as they listen through headphones to find the ideal locations. Every room and instrument has their own sweet spot(s).

Jeff


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 21 Feb 06 - 06:11 PM

I'll be good.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Home Recording
From: Windsinger
Date: 11 Mar 06 - 03:52 AM

bump


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