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DTStudy: Factory Girl

DigiTrad:
FACTORY GIRL
LEWISTON FACTORY GIRL
NO MORE SHALL I WORK IN THE FACTORY
THE FACTORY GIRL


Related threads:
DTStudy Lewiston/Lowell Factory Girl (15)
Lyr Req: Factory Girl (from Rita Connolly) (22)
(origins) Origins: Factory Girl (27)
happy? – Feb 18 (Lewiston Factory Girl) (4)


Joe Offer 18 Feb 06 - 06:57 PM
Peace 18 Feb 06 - 07:23 PM
Joe Offer 18 Feb 06 - 07:27 PM
Peace 18 Feb 06 - 07:53 PM
masato sakurai 18 Feb 06 - 09:10 PM
rich-joy 19 Feb 06 - 08:25 PM
rich-joy 19 Feb 06 - 09:00 PM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Feb 06 - 11:34 PM
The Sandman 02 Jun 08 - 12:23 PM
RTim 02 Jun 08 - 12:31 PM
Bearheart 02 Jun 08 - 04:49 PM
ard mhacha 02 Jun 08 - 05:15 PM
Connacht Rambler 02 Jun 08 - 06:06 PM
ard mhacha 03 Jun 08 - 05:25 AM
The Sandman 05 Jun 08 - 06:44 AM
ard mhacha 06 Jun 08 - 04:26 AM
The Sandman 06 Jun 08 - 05:26 AM
Abdul The Bul Bul 06 Jun 08 - 08:25 AM
RTim 06 Jun 08 - 10:26 AM
Jim Carroll 06 Jun 08 - 03:08 PM
ard mhacha 06 Jun 08 - 03:15 PM
danensis 07 Jun 08 - 06:57 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Dec 10 - 12:30 AM
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Subject: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 06:57 PM

This is an edited DTStudy thread, and all messages posted here are subject to editing and deletion.
This thread is intended to serve as a forum for corrections and annotations for the Digital Tradition song named in the title of this thread.

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THE FACTORY GIRL

Early one morning as the sun was adorning,
The birds on the bushes did warble and sing,
Gay lads and young lasses in couples were sporting
ln yonder green valley, their work to begin.

I spied one among them, she was fairer than any,
Her cheeks like the red rose than none can excel,
Her skin like the lily that grows in yon valley,
And she's only a hard-working factory girl.

l stepped up to her, more closely to view her,
When on me she cast a look of disdain,
Saying, "Young man, stand off me and do not come near me
l work for my living and think it no shame."

"It's not for to scorn you, fair maid, I adorn you,
But grant me one favour, love: where do you dwell?"
"Kind sir, you'll excuse me, for now I must leave you,
For yonder's the sound of my factory bell."

"I have lands, I have houses adorned with ivy,
l have gold in my pocket and silver as well,
And if you'll go with me, a lady I'll make you,
So try and say yes, my dear factory girl."

"Love and sensation rules many a nation,
To many a lady perhaps you'll do well;
For I am an orphan, neither friend nor relation,
I'm only a hard-working factory girl."

It's true I did love her, but now she won't have me,
And all for her sake I`ll go wander a while
Over high hills and valleys where no one shall know me,
I'll mourn for the sake of my factory girl.

Now this maid she's got married, become a great lady,
Became a rich lady of fame and renown,
She may bless the day and the bright summer's morning
She met with the squire and on him did frown.

It's now to conclude and to finish those verses:
lt's may they live happy and may they do well,
Come fill up your glasses and drink to the lasses
That attend the sweet sound of the factory bell.

From Songs of the People, Sam Henry
@courting @work
filename[ FACTGIRL
TUNE FILE: FACTGIRL
CLICK TO PLAY
RG

FACTORY GIRL

As I was a walking one midsummer morning
The birds in the branches so sweetly did sing
The lads and the lasses together were sporting
Going down to yon factory their work to begin

I spied one amongst them more fairer than any
Her lips like red roses that none could excel
Her skin like the lily that blooms in the valley
And besides she's a hard working factory girl

I stepped up to her, it was for to view her
When on me she cast a bright look of disdain
"Oh young man have manners and do not insult me
For although I'm a poor girl I think it no shame"

"It's not for to scorn you, fair maid I adore you
Come grant me one favor, love where do you dwell?"
"Oh young man, excuse me, for now I must leave you
For yonder's the sound of my factory bell"

"Oh I have fine houses adorned with ivory
Gold in my pocket and silver as well
And if you'll come with me, a lady I'll make you
And no more will you heed yon poor factory bell"

"Oh love and temptation are our ruination
Go find you a lady and may you do well
For I am an orphan with ne'er a relation
And besides, I'm a hard working factory girl"

@work @courting
recorded by Frankie Armstrong on the Music Plays So Grand
filename[ FACTGRL2
TUNE FILE: FACTGRL2
CLICK TO PLAY
SOF

PLEASE NOTE: Because of the volunteer nature of The Digital Tradition, it is difficult to ensure proper attribution and copyright information for every song included. Please assume that any song which lists a composer is copyrighted ©. You MUST aquire proper license before using these songs for ANY commercial purpose. If you have any additional information or corrections to the credit or copyright information included, please e-mail those additions or corrections to us (along with the song title as indexed) so that we can update the database as soon as possible. Thank You.
Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry:

Factory Girl (I), The

DESCRIPTION: The singer sees a beautiful girl, an orphan who works in a factory (linen mill). He courts her, but she must leave to go to work. He offers to marry her. She again rejects him. She eventually marries well -- perhaps to the singer, perhaps to a squire
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1906 (Gardiner)
KEYWORDS: love courting beauty marriage money orphan factory technology
FOUND IN: Ireland Britain(England(South))
REFERENCES (9 citations):
Kennedy 221, "The Factory Girl" (1 text, 1 tune)
Wiltshire-WSRO Mi 563, "Factory Girl" (1 text)
SHenry H217, p. 368, "The Factory Girl" (1 text, 1 tune)
Morton-Ulster 19, "The Factory Girl" (1 text, 1 tune)
Morton-Maguire 41, pp. 129-130,171-172, "The Factory Girl" (1 text, 1 tune)
OCroinin-Cronin 157, "The Factory Girl" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Graham/Holmes 23, "The Factory Girl" (1 text, 1 tune)
DT, FACTGIRL* FACTGRL2
ADDITIONAL: Richard Hayward, Ireland Calling (Glasgow,n.d.), p. 7, "The Factory Girl" (text, music and reference to Decca F-3125 recorded Aug 12, 1932)

Roud #1659
RECORDINGS:
Margaret Barry, "The Factory Girl" (on IRMBarry-Fairs)
Bill Cassidy, "The Factory Girl" (on IRTravellers01)
Sarah Makem, "The Factory Girl" (on Voice10)

NOTES: OCroinin-Cronin does not end so well for the suitor. The factory girl tells him to "go marry a lady" and leaves him to wander "in some deep valley, where no one shall no me, I'll mourn for the sake of my factory-maid."
The date and master id (GB-4733-1) for Hayward's record is provided by Bill Dean-Myatt, MPhil. compiler of the Scottish National Discography. - BS
Last updated in version 3.5
File: K221

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: ADD Version: Factory Girl (The Roches)
From: Peace
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 07:23 PM

Factory Girl

As I went out walkin' one fine summer's mornin'
the birds in the branches they did gaily sing
the lad and the lasses together were sportin'
goin' down to the fact'ry their work to begin

I spied a fair damsel far fairer than any
her cheeks like the red rose that none could excel
her skin like the lily that grows in yon valley
she's my own bonnie Annie my factory girl

I stepped did up to her just thinkin' to view her
but at me she cast a proud look of disdain
sayin' "Stand off me young man and do not insult me
for although I am poor sure I think it no shame"

"It's not to insult you fair maid I adore thee
ah pray grant me one favor it's where do ya dwell?"
"Kind sir forgive me it's now I must leave you
for I hear the dumb sound of the factory bell"

Now love is a thing that does rule every nation
good mornin' kind sir and I hope ya do well
my friends and relations would all frown upon it
besides I'm a hardworkin' factory girl

Oh it's true I do love her but now she won't have me
for her sake I'll wander through valley and dell
and for her sake I'll wander where no one can find me
I'll die for the sake of my factory girl

(Traditional Irish)

from

www.roches.com/lyrics/nurds.html


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Subject: ADD Version: The Factory Girl
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 07:27 PM

These lyrics are very close to the Frankie Armstrong version found in the Digital Tradition, FACTGRL2 (above) - but the tune is quite different.

The Factory Girl

As I went a-walking, one fine summer's morning
The birds on the branches they sweetly did sing
The lads and the lasses together were sportin'
Going down to yon factory, their work to begin

I spied a wee damsel, more fairer than Venus
Her skin like the lily, not one could excel*
Her cheeks like the red rose that grew in yon valley
She's my own only goddess, she's a sweet factory girl

I stepp-ed up to her, it was for to view her
When on me she cast a proud look of disdain
Stand off me, stand off me, and do not insult me
For although I'm a poor girl, I think it's no shame

I don't mean to harm you, I'm sure I would scorn it
But grant me one favour: Pray where do you dwell?
Kind sir, you'll excuse me, for now I must leave you
For yonder's the sound of the factory bell

I have lands, I have houses adorn-ed with ivy
I've gold in my pocket and silver as well
And if you go with me, a lady I'll make you
So try and say yes, my dear factory girl

O love and sensation rules many a nation
To many a young girl perhaps you'd look well
I am a poor girl, without home or relations
And besides I'm a hard-working factory girl

It's true I did love her but now she won't have me
And all for her sake I'll go wander awhile
Over high hills and valleys where no one shall know me
I'll mourn for the sake of my factory girl

Now this maid's she got married and become a great lady
Become a great lady of fame and renown
She may bless the day and the bright summer's morning
She met with the squire and upon him did frown

Well now to conclude, and to finish these verses
This couple got married, and both are doing well
So, lads, fill your glasses, and drink to the lasses
Till we hear the sweet sound of the factory bell



Click to play



#221 in Peter Kennedy's Folksongs of Britain and Ireland
singer: Sarah Makem, 1952

You'll find a 1967 Sarah Makem recording of this song on Volume 10 of the Voice of the People CD series, What's That At My Bed Window?

*alternate: Her skin like the lily that grows in the dell.
**Alternate: I don't mean to harm you or yet, love, to scorn you
(both alternate lines are from the 1967 recording, which is somewhat shorter than the version in the Kennedy book)


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Peace
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 07:53 PM

Joe. I don't know how to link to this properly, but there are two sheetmusic and sound things at

www.8notes.com/digital_tradition/t.asp
    Hi, Bruce - I don't usually bother with stuff at 8notes.com or at sniff.numachi.com, because they're just copies of what we have in the Digital Tradition. Their formats are valuable additions to the DT, so I guess I'd better add them to the FAQ.
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: masato sakurai
Date: 18 Feb 06 - 09:10 PM

Broadside versions at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads are:

factory girl [title]

fortunate factory girl [title]


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: rich-joy
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 08:25 PM

I love singing this song (having originally learnt it from the LP "The Female Frolic", as sung by Sandra Kerr) and I thought it may be of interest to post what is written with the words and music in a book entitled "My Song is My Own : 100 Women's Songs" by Kathy Henderson, Frankie Armstrong and Sandra Kerr - Pluto Press, London 1979 :


"   Primarily a love song, but also a declaration of independance. The theme of this Irish song is an old one - rich man pursuing poor girl and being refused - but the Industrial Revolution gave it a new context and resonance. Waged work for women dealt several blows to the idealised image of woman and not the least shocking to the establishment was the defiant independance of these workers, newly released from home.
As the "Leeds Mercury", worried by a strike of 1500 women card setters, put it in May 1832 :
"Alarmists may view these indications of female independance as more menacing to established institutions than the education of the lower orders."

Words : based on a collation by Karl Dallas from three Irish versions; Tune : as sung by Mrs Sarah Makem of Keady, Co. Armagh. "



Cheers!
Rich-Joy


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: rich-joy
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 09:00 PM

Sandra Kerr's version on LP "The Female Frolic" (Argo, 1968) - has these cover notes :

" In songs prior to the Industrial Revolution, a squire might set his fancy on a shepherdess or milkmaid and, through her sense of class pride and her consciousness of the consequences in social terms, he might be rebuffed. This theme has extended itself into industrial song - it is a kind of sense of fitness and knowledge, that certain class attitudes would never mix even in the marriage bed. Although "The Factory Girl" is primarily a love song, it is also an expression of this declaration of independance - i.e. that a woman, no matter how poor or humble, is still her own master and needn't marry to have money or piece of mind.
The first printed version of this song was called "The Country Girl", published in 1843. The text here however, is probably earlier than 1843 and is from the singing of Mrs Cunningham of Annalong, Co. Down - verse 4 and the melody is from Robert Butcher of Downhill, Co. Derry.   "



I recall reading somewhere, that this song most likely refers to the linen mills of Northern Ireland - but I cannot now recall the origins of that reference ...



Cheers!

Rich-Joy


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Feb 06 - 11:34 PM

It's certainly the case that the song has been found most often in oral currency in the North of Ireland, though it has also turned up in England and Scotland. As we already know, it was printed on broadsides from -at any rate- the late 1830s; pretty much throughout England according to listings in the Roud Index and the index of the Madden broadside collection. Presumably it was also issued in Ireland, though where it actually started out can't be said for sure at the moment.

It's unclear where Sandra Kerr got her date of 1843. There is a broadside at the Bodleian, The blooming goddess. Or Country girl (Harding B 19(119b)) which has the right opening line, but there are no details of date or printer, and no image is available.

The broadside editions tend to have a happy ending, as do a fair few of the oral versions; so it's unsafe to draw conclusions that are too generalised, as Sandra and others seem to have done. As usual with folksong, it's not quite that simple; and the imposition of modern political sensibilities, which may in some situations enhance our understanding, may in others cloud it.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 12:23 PM

here is a versionhttp://ie.youtube.com/user/dickmilesmusic


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: RTim
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 12:31 PM

I Recorded this version of the song way back in 1973 - On Folk Songs Of Hampshire on Forest Tracks, (Now re-released on CD)

THE FACTORY GIRL.                           
The sun was just rising one fine summer's morning
The birds from the bushes so sweetly did sing.
And the lads & the lasses so merrily were moving
To yonder large building their work to begin.

I spied a fair damsel more brighter than Venus
Her cheeks like the roses that none could excel
Her skin like the lilies that grows in yon valley
This blooming young damsel was a factory girl.

I stepp'd up to this beautiful creature
She cast upon me a proud look of distain.
Stand back sir she cried & do not insult me
I'm poor but in poverty there is no sin.

I stood in a flutter knowing what was the matter
The God of love Cupid my heart had trepanned
I said lovely fair maid if you'll not be my bride
My life I will waste in some far foreign land.

What pleasure or treasure is love when tis wanton
Your love upon me has now cast a spell
I'll marry you speedily & make you my lady
If you'll be my own dearest factory girl.

She gave her consent & licence was purchased
That very same day the bells merrily did ring
To church then they went & when they returned
The brave men & maidens so sweetly did sing.

From David Clements - Basingstoke
Collected by Dr. George B. Gardiner


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Bearheart
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 04:49 PM

The Bothy Band recorded the version I learned, the words are most like Frankie Armstrong's but I think the tune is different from all of these?
(At least, the pacing of it makes it seem different to me.) Have always loved this song.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: ard mhacha
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 05:15 PM

The song was associated with the linen mills in the north of Ireland, my mother who was born in 1896, always sang this song, I remember some of the old people say that the song was from Dromore in County Down. Wherever it`s from it is a lovely song.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Connacht Rambler
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:06 PM

Margaret Barry sang a beautiful version of this song.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: ard mhacha
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 05:25 AM

The Margaret Barry version I have is short and sweet,unlike the other versions of this, song Margaret`s lady takes no time in heading off with her suitor.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: The Sandman
Date: 05 Jun 08 - 06:44 AM

I believe Margaret Barry used a different tune from Sarah Makem.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: ard mhacha
Date: 06 Jun 08 - 04:26 AM

It is the same air on my recordings, I have always heard it sung to the same air, singers like Triona ni Domhnaill use the same tune.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: The Sandman
Date: 06 Jun 08 - 05:26 AM

I just have a vague recollecton of hearing two different tunes for it,I may be mistaken.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Abdul The Bul Bul
Date: 06 Jun 08 - 08:25 AM

I got my version from June Tabor and Oysterband, from their Big Session CD and performance.

Think I'll add the last couple of verses now tho.

Al


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: RTim
Date: 06 Jun 08 - 10:26 AM

Regarding the version of this song above that I have recorded - I should have added that it uses the same tune as that used by Frankie Armstrong, and is published by Frank Purslow in one of his books (from David Clements of Basingstoke). I note that Jim Carroll has made NO comment about this song - which I believe he collected several versions of in Ireland! Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 06 Jun 08 - 03:08 PM

Sorry Tim,
Didn't see the thread - was pinned down in a trench on another topic.
What can I add? It was extremely popular with Irish Travellers - one of the best renditions we recorded was from Bil Cassidy from Wexford, also from a relative, Andy Cash, also from Wexford.
I feel a bit of a traitor to them both by admitting that my favourite version by far is that of Sarah Makem.
There was a beautiful television film of her, where the camera followed her around her home while she constantly sang.
Somebody told me recently taht she never ever sang outside her home.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: ard mhacha
Date: 06 Jun 08 - 03:15 PM

I seen that BBC programme Sarah was no different from most of her generation, like my mother and the other ladies in our district they sang as the worked in the home.
This practice has long since disappeared, mores the pity.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Factory Girl
From: danensis
Date: 07 Jun 08 - 06:57 AM

Didin't Ralph McTell do a "Factory Girl" song? All I can remember is "Hurrying across the yard, before the siren's ......"

John


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE FACTORY GIRL
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Dec 10 - 12:30 AM

From an article "A Glance at the Minstrelsy of the Middlesex Border" by George Gilfillagain, in Tait's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 22 June 1855, page 356:


THE FACTORY GIRL.

The sun was just rising one fine May-day morning,
The birds from the bushes so sweetly did sing,
Where the lads and the lasses so merrily moving,
To yonder large building their labour begin.
I spied a fair damsel more brighter than Venus,
Her cheeks like the roses none could her excel,
Her skin like the lily that grows in yon valley,
This blooming young goddess, the factory girl.

I stepp'd up to her this beautiful creature,
She cast upon me a proud look of disdain,
Stand back sir she cried and do not insult me,
Tho' poor I am, poverty is no sin.
I said my fair damsel no harm is intended,
But one favour grant me pray where do you dwell,
At home sir she answered, was going to leave me,
I am but a hard working factory girl.

I stood all amaz'd while on her I gaz'd,
Such modesty and prudence before ne'er did see,
I said my sweet charmer my soul's great alarmer,
If you will go with me a lady shall be.
She said sir, temptations are used in all nations,
Go marry a lady and you will do well,
So let me alone sir, the bells are a ringing,
I am but a hard working factory girl.

I stood in a flutter, knew not what was the matter,
Young Cupid the goddess my heart has trepan'd,
I said lovely maid if you'll not be my bride,
My life I will waste in some foreign land.
What pleasure in treasure where love it is wanting,
Your beauty upon me has now cast a spell,
I'll marry you speedy and make you a lady.
If you will be mine, dear factory girl.

She gave her consent and a licence was purchas'd,
The bells they did merrily echo and ring,
To church then they went, and as they were returning,
The bridesmen and maidens so sweetly did sing.
This lovely young couple lives happy together,
She blesses the hour that she first saw her swain,
This factory girl she is made a rich lady,
And married a squire of honour and fame.


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