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Info: Whisky on a Sunday

DigiTrad:
WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY or COME DAY, GO DAY


Related threads:
(origins) Origin: Ballad of Seth Davy / Whiskey on a Sunday (89)
Who is/was Glyn Hughes (27)
Seth Davy / Davey info please (53)
Chord Req: Whiskey On A Sunday (32)


Mo 28 Jan 99 - 08:18 PM
Don Meixner 28 Jan 99 - 10:18 PM
AndyG 29 Jan 99 - 09:59 AM
Paddy 29 Jan 99 - 03:31 PM
29 Jan 99 - 08:54 PM
Bill Sables (Inactive) 01 Feb 99 - 07:47 PM
02 Feb 99 - 05:35 AM
Forsh 30 Apr 06 - 02:05 PM
Peace 30 Apr 06 - 02:44 PM
Forsh 30 Apr 06 - 03:19 PM
Nigel Parsons 30 Apr 06 - 03:58 PM
Peace 30 Apr 06 - 04:08 PM
Peace 30 Apr 06 - 04:24 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Apr 06 - 04:53 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Apr 06 - 04:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Apr 06 - 05:09 PM
Leadfingers 30 Apr 06 - 06:17 PM
Malcolm Douglas 30 Apr 06 - 06:41 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Apr 06 - 07:06 PM
McGrath of Harlow 30 Apr 06 - 07:49 PM
Malcolm Douglas 30 Apr 06 - 07:55 PM
Azizi 30 Apr 06 - 08:22 PM
Big Jim from Jackson 30 Apr 06 - 08:45 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Apr 06 - 08:54 PM
Leadfingers 01 May 06 - 06:11 AM
GUEST,Tunesmith 01 May 06 - 08:06 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 May 06 - 02:21 PM
Little Robyn 01 May 06 - 06:02 PM
Leadfingers 01 May 06 - 06:18 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 May 06 - 09:04 PM
Seamus Kennedy 01 May 06 - 10:41 PM
Forsh 02 May 06 - 03:03 PM
Forsh 02 May 06 - 03:10 PM
Azizi 02 May 06 - 09:05 PM
Leadfingers 02 May 06 - 09:39 PM
Azizi 02 May 06 - 11:01 PM
ard mhacha 03 May 06 - 07:29 AM
GUEST,Tunesmith 09 May 06 - 03:59 PM
Little Robyn 10 May 06 - 02:08 AM
gnomad 10 May 06 - 01:01 PM
GUEST,Elektra 10 Aug 06 - 05:31 PM
GUEST,Andy G's version 16 Aug 08 - 10:00 AM
GUEST,Dave MacKenzie 16 Aug 08 - 06:51 PM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 17 Aug 08 - 06:14 PM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 17 Aug 08 - 06:19 PM
Lanfranc 17 Aug 08 - 07:09 PM
Geordie-Peorgie 18 Aug 08 - 03:20 PM
Leadfingers 18 Aug 08 - 03:58 PM
scouse 18 Aug 08 - 05:55 PM
GUEST,Franny 09 Oct 09 - 01:14 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: WHISKY ON A SUNDAY
From: Mo
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 08:18 PM

Rather than clutter up the Kid Mudcatteers thread with messages from oldies like me (34 - nearly 35!) here's the lyrics to this songs as I know them - hope it's useful!

Mo

He sits on the corner of Beggar’s Bush
Astride of an old packing case.
And the dolls on the end of the plank are dancing
As he croons with a smile on his face:

CHORUS: Come day, Go day,
Wishing me heart it was Sunday
Drinking buttermilk all the week
And it’s whisky on a Sunday.

His tired old hand on the wooden beam
As the puppets they danced up and down.
A finer show than you ever would see
At the fanciest theatre in town. CHORUS:

Well in 1902 old Seth Davy died
And his songs they were heard no more.
And the three dancing dolls in the dustbin were thrown
And the plank went to mend the back door. CHORUS:

Well if you ever go down by Beggar’s Bush
When the wind’s blowing up from the sea,
You can still hear the songs of old Seth Davy
As he croons to his dancing dolls three. CHORUS: (X 2)


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Don Meixner
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 10:18 PM

Mo,

When I sing the the song in my band we sing

" His old withered hands they would beat on the beam, And the puppets would dance up and down."

And I learned the name as "Sed Davy". Can't remember where, but those where the words in a song book I saw.

Either way works, thats the folk process for you.

Don.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHISKY ON A SUNDAY
From: AndyG
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 09:59 AM

Mo,Dan, Thanks a lot, this is enough to spring open the locked doors in my memory.

Whisky on a Sunday (as I remember it, Liverpool variant)

He sat on the corner of Bevington Bush
Astride an old packing case.
And the dolls on the end of the plank went dancing
As he crooned with a smile on his face:

Chorus:
Come day, Go day,
Wishing me heart for Sunday
Drinking buttermilk all the week
Whisky on a Sunday.

His tired old hands drummed the wooden beam
And the puppet-dolls they danced the gear.
A better show than you had ever seen
At the Pivvy or New Brighton Pier.

Chorus:

Well in 1902 Seth Davy died
And his song was heard no more.
The three dancing dolls in a jower bin ended
And the plank went to mend a back door.

Chorus:

If you ever go down xxx xxx way, *
When the wind whistles up from the sea,
You can still hear the voice of old Seth Davy
As he croons to his dancing dolls three.

Chorus:

* still can't remember this bit!

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Paddy
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 03:31 PM

AndyG

Would the missing line be

On some stormy night, if you're passing that way
With the wind blowing up from the sea

Paddy


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHISKY ON A SUNDAY
From:
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 08:54 PM

As recorded by Danny Doyle about 27 yrs. ago

CHORUS: Come day, go day, wish in my heart it was Sunday,
Drinking buttermilk all the week,
Whisky on a Sunday.

He sits at the corner of Beggars Bush,
Astride of an old packing case,
And the dolls on the end of the plank they were dancing,
As he crooned with a smile on his face. CHORUS

His tired old hands drummed the wooden beam,
And the puppets they danced up and down,
A far better show than you ever could see,
In the fanciest theatres in town. CHORUS

In 1902 old Seth Davy died,
His songs they were heard no more,
The three dancing dolls in the dustbin were thrown,
And the planks went to mend the back door. CHORUS

On some stormy night if you're passing that way,
With the wind blowing up from the sea,
You may still hear the songs of old Seth Davy,
As he croons to his dancing dolls three.

SING CHORUS TWICE, FADING DURING 2ND.

Blessings
R


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Bill Sables (Inactive)
Date: 01 Feb 99 - 07:47 PM

The missing line in Andyg's version which is the version I know is On cold winter nights down old Scotty Road Way It refers to Scotland Road in Liverpool


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From:
Date: 02 Feb 99 - 05:35 AM

Thanks Bill,
That's it.

AndyG


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Subject: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Forsh
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 02:05 PM

Actually, I have the lyrics; FOUR versions to date, and 3 of them atributing the song to one 'Glyn Hughes'. Got them from Mudcat, Max Boyce's pages, and a couple of Irish & Celtic music sites. Can anyone actually tell me the true lyrics to this, ie the Definitive Version? And who is Glyn Hughes? I found some stuff relating to a poet of that name from Yorkshire. Anyone for enlightening?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Peace
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 02:44 PM

It is also known as "Come Day, Go Day".


I hope this is he whom you seek.
https://web.archive.org/web/20050320082525/http://penninepens.co.uk/glynhughes/

Glyn Hughes was awarded the Guardian Fiction Prize as well as the David Higham Prize for his first novel, Where I Used To Play On The Green. He was short-listed for The Whitbread Novel of the Year for The Antique Collector and has won national prizes and awards for his poetry collections.

His latest novel was Bronte, a life of the Bronte family.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Forsh
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 03:19 PM

I dunno, is this who I seek? No mention on the site of the song.. hmmph!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 03:58 PM

Someone contacted Glyn Hughes (novelist) before in This Thread and got a reply stating that this is not the Glyn Hughes we seek

CHEERS
Nigel


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Peace
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 04:08 PM

My apologies then.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Peace
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 04:24 PM

OK, one site so far

myweb.tiscali.co.uk/gerry.jones/writers.html

has him as a Liverpool writer.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 04:53 PM

The expression "Come day, go day, God send Sunday," is an old one in the Border region of England-Scotland. It also was common in North America. It is found in an article by the Mormon elder, John Taylor, JD, vol. 24, pp. 166-169, May 19, 1883 (BYU website, http://education.byu/edlf/archives/prophets/schools1878.html).

Origins of the song are obscure. The poem by Glyn Hughes was called "Seth Davy." See Liverpool Lyrics

Books that might help:
Edward Sheehy, "God Send Sunday," 1939
John Maguire, ed. Robin Morton, 1973, "Come Day, Go Day, God Send Sunday," The songs and life story, told in his own words, by John Maguire, traditional singer and farmer. Co. Fermanagh, pub. by Routledge and Kegan.
The song is called traditional, the best known recording by the Irish Rovers, 1970's.

Glyn Hughes, novelist and poet of Yorkshire, is discussed in "Ramblings with Clare Balding, Walking with a purpose 3": www.bbc.co.uk.education/. He has published some seven volumes of poetry.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 04:57 PM

Peace, we cross-posted.
The lyrics of "Seth Davy" by Glyn Hughes are given at the linked website. Without seeing them in the book of poetry, however, I am not sure that they haven't been edited by some folksinger.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 05:09 PM

One website notes that Seth Davy was a Jamaican.

Where did the melody come from? Did the Irish Rovers compose it or was it adapted from an older melody?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Leadfingers
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 06:17 PM

That lyric in the 'Liverpool' link is more or less what I have been singing for more than thirty years ! The setting is by The Liverpool Spinners (as opposed to The Detroit lot) with most credit going to Tony Davis , I think !


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 06:41 PM

The "Irish Rovers" simply recorded an arrangement of Glyn Hughes' song. It is neither traditional nor Irish, and the books Q mentions don't relate to it.

There is a pretty good search engine here, and it's a pity that so few people bother to use it. See, for example:

WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY or COME DAY, GO DAY (Glyn Hughes) (DT file)
Chord Req: Whiskey On A Sunday
Whisky on a Sunday
Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
Seth Davy info please
Seth Davey
Who is/was Glyn Hughes

Whether any provide accurate lyrics, I don't know. Many certainly contain misinformation. Q's link to that "Liverpool Lyrics" site may be as good as you'll get, though with various mis-spellings.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 07:06 PM

Glyn Hughes is the author of the poem, but where did the music come from?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 07:49 PM

The song makes it clear that the chorus - "come day go day etc" is being quoted, and was there before the full poem/song was written. I think that would go for the tune of the chorus as well as the words, I'd nazard.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 07:55 PM

Listen to the midi in the DT file, and tell us how old you think it is.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Azizi
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 08:22 PM

Q, you wrote that "The expression "Come day, go day, God send Sunday," is an old one in the Border region of England-Scotland. It also was common in North America"

I remember these two lines in a song as "Go day come day/God send Sunday" but my memory could be faulty or the lines could have been transposed when I first learned {heard} them. There is definitely a tune that goes with this song that I thought assumed was a "Negro" [African American] spiritual, but I can't remember any other lines to it. Has anyone else ever known these lines to be associated with a "Negro" African American spiritual?

I "always" thought that the expression referred to the yearning of enslaved people for Sunday, usually their only day of rest. But I have no documentation that this saying refers to that.

If, as noted above that "come day/go day" is found in an 1883 text, it could have been used much earlier-and thus could have dated from mid 19th century slavery...

Q, you also wrote that "One website notes that Seth Davy was a Jamaican". Is there any mention of his race? Not that the Seth Davy lines are part of my memory. I only have the slow tune, and those first two lines. The other lines in that Whiskey On Sunday song are not at all familiar to me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Big Jim from Jackson
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 08:45 PM

John Roberts and Tony Barrand do a nice version of the song on one of their recordings.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Apr 06 - 08:54 PM

The earliest melody I can find reference to is the one used by the "Spinners" (1960's). The earliest I have heard is on the Irish Rovers recording (1970s). Is the melody for the Hughes poem "Seth Davy" by one of these groups?

The chorus, as Malcolm says, looks like a quote, so may be older. The old saying was "Come day, go day, God send Sunday" (no mention of whiskey or buttermilk).

The only reference I found to Seth Davy's singing said it was a monotone, which doesn't help. Did Davy sing the chorus, or did Hughes compose the song chorus as one which would likely have been sung by Davy?

So- what are the origins of the music? Not that it matters to most interpreters, but I enjoy impaling butterflies and mounting them in a frame.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Leadfingers
Date: 01 May 06 - 06:11 AM

Does No One read previous posts in here ? To the best of my knowledge the melody setting as sung by the Spinners was done by Tony Davis .
And the lyrics in the Link by Q at 04.53 are almosr identical to those sung by the Spinners - Variation - The three dancing dolls in a jowler bin landed , a jowler bin being a dustbin . If any one can find a previous setting to Tony Davis , let us all know !


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 01 May 06 - 08:06 AM

Glynn Hughes used to have a column in the old BMG magazine. I always understood that Seth Davy was black. I must have got that from The Spinners - or maybe the BMG. By the way, I think it's a great song, but, unfortunately, The Spinners connection with the song has probably resulted in the song not being rated has highly as it should be.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 May 06 - 02:21 PM

Leadfingers, Tony Davis did the melody arrangement for the Spinners; but was he the composer of the tune? If so, he should be credited, but either no composer for the music is listed or it is called traditional (which I doubt). I don't doubt that he was the composer; I have seen no credible prior reference to the song based on Glyn Hughes poem.

Tunesmith and Azizi, a couple of websites refer to Seth Davy was Jamaican. From this, it is assumed that he was Black. Without getting into some of the books about Liverpool, this remains an assumption.

Azizi, the expression "Come day, go day, God send Sunday" is well known from English and Scottish writings of the 18th c. (and, I think, 17th c.). It appears in collections of old Scottish sayings. It became used, disparagingly, in sermons and articles, to speak of lazy people. It is in a list of Newfoundland sayings, and was well-known in America.

Slaves probably understood the saying in its original meaning, which was a sort of prayerful wish for Sunday, a day mostly free of hard labor.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Little Robyn
Date: 01 May 06 - 06:02 PM

If Seth Davy died in 1905, he could have been an emancipated and slave and he could very well have known the song Azizi mentions.
Were Limber Jack dancing dolls known in Britain or did he bring them from the US?
The speculative evidence is mounting!
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Leadfingers
Date: 01 May 06 - 06:18 PM

Jig Dolls are a part of the English tradition as far as I know !


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 May 06 - 09:04 PM

Go day Come Day is on an Otis Spann recording, which I have somewhere. I must dig it out. It dates from 1950 or later, however.
There is no record of the song from the 19th c., either in UK or American song. The Spinners recording is the oldest I can find.

The jig doll certainly is English traditional but it must be universal in western Europe. The French brought them to Canada as early as the 17th c. French-Canadian dolls are more two-dimensional than the English dolls but the actions are similar. The name 'limber Jim' for these dolls seems fairly recent. They are also called Dutch dolls in the southeast States.
English jig dolls are very well made, and are three-dimensional as far as I know.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 01 May 06 - 10:41 PM

I think Danny Doyle did this one back in the '60's, and had a hit with it in Ireland.
The Rovers did his version if I'm not mistaken (which I am, frequently).

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Forsh
Date: 02 May 06 - 03:03 PM

WOW! THIS WAS A GREAT READ, THANKS!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Forsh
Date: 02 May 06 - 03:10 PM

BY THE WAY The site was spot on, liverpool lyrics
This set of lyrics was very similar to the ones I remembered, and also quite like the one's Max Boyce uses. here is the info:
SETH DAVY was a real person, he really existed, and he died a couple of years into the 20th century. There was a street and a pub, both called "Bevington Bush" just north of Liverpool City Centre, and Seth Davy did do a "busking" act outside.

In his book 'Liverpool: Our City - Our Heritage', Freddie O'Connor tells us that in 1760, half a mile from Marybone ("St Patrick's Cross") along Bevington Bush Road was a hamlet named Bevington Bush which had an inn called simply the 'Bush', which became a favourite haunt for folk to travel 'out into the country', to the 'Bevy Inn' as it became fondly known. The Liverpool slang for 'bevvy' ...may have derived from this old inn.
With the opening of Scotland Road, the ancient Bevington Bush Road became a minor road amidst the massive slum district that would soon engulf it. As the district was built up it also lost its original name.
Please do not be taken in by any Irish versions of this song, or any reference to "Bebbington". Bebington is "over the water" - not in Liverpool at all. I know the truth for a fact because, when I was a brand-new teacher in the Dingle in 1963, our old lollypop man told me that he had actually seen Seth Davy doing his stuff. So I have spoken to a first-hand witness.
I have heard that Seth Davy's own singing was a non-too-wonderful monotone, and not the pleasant melody that was written about him in the 60s folk boom.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Azizi
Date: 02 May 06 - 09:05 PM

Forsh, in your last post you wrote " our old lollypop man".

What's a lollypop man?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Leadfingers
Date: 02 May 06 - 09:39 PM

Lolly Pop Man is the guy who helps the kids cross the road to get to/from school - Has a Round 'STOP' sign on a pole - looks like a six foot long lollypop !


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Azizi
Date: 02 May 06 - 11:01 PM

Thanks for that interesting information, Leadfingers.

I take it this is a British colloqualism and that it has nothing to do with Millie Smalls's hit UK & USA ska record
My Boy Lollipop.

Hee's some biographical information regarding Millie Small:

"Date of Birth (DOB): 10/6/46
From: Jamaica
Best Known for: singer of the best selling ska record of all
time "My Boy Lollipop"

Bio: Born Millicent Small in Clarendon, she was the daughter of an overseer on a sugar plantation and she was one of the very few female singers in the early Ska era in Clarendon. She was already recording in her teens for Sir Coxone Dodd's Studio One label with Roy Panton (as the duo Roy & Millie), together they produced the hit "We'll Meet." She was brought her [sic] to England in late 1963 by Chris Blackwell who would later discover Bob Marley. Her fourth recording, "My Boy Lollipop," cut in London by a group of session musicians including guitarist Ernest Ranglin and featured Smalls childlike, extremely high-pitched vocals became of the few international ska hits reaching number two in the U.S. and number one in the U.K. in 1964. It remains one of the biggest-selling reggae or ska discs of all time with more than seven million sales.

She was perceived as a one-hit wonder novelty artist and she only made the Top 40 one more time, with the "My Boy Lollipop" sound-alike "Sweet William." She released an entire album with these two hits. In a trivial piece of information legend has it that popular British singer Rod Stewart played the Harmonica on "lollipop", more significantly the earnings from the sales of "lollipop", Chris Blackwell's first hit helped him to secure a strong firm hold in the music industry to later cultivate the likes of Reggae legend Bob Marley and Rock groups such as U2."

Source: http://caribbean.halloffame.tripod.com/Millie_Small.html


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: ard mhacha
Date: 03 May 06 - 07:29 AM

Seamus, You are right Danny Doyle sang this on an LP 1962?, it is listed on the record as,"Whiskey on a Sunday".which is also the name of the LP.
A great LP.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 09 May 06 - 03:59 PM

In an Oxfam shop, today, I bought an old Jackie and Bridie song book - for 59p! They were popular Liverpool folk music singing duo; indeed, Jackie used to be in an early line-up of The Spinners. Seth Davy is one of the songs in the book, and both words and music are attributed to Glyn Hughes. I'll be seeing Hughie Jones ( of The Spinners ) in the next week or so, and I'll quiz him about Glyn Hughes - and Seth Davy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: Little Robyn
Date: 10 May 06 - 02:08 AM

And it's on their record too. I just love that record.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: gnomad
Date: 10 May 06 - 01:01 PM

The Dubliners recorded this too, 1966, and credited to Glyn Hughes.

If Seth was an emancipated Jamaican slave he would have been quite an old one, the Jamaican Emancipation Proclamation of 1834 freed all slaves then aged 6 or less immediately, and all others with effect from 1838.

The UK Slavery Abolition Act came in at the same time, though in the States slavery lasted rather longer.

I have a dancing doll which I suspect was made from a turned table leg or similar, it was given to a relative when he was a child in India around 1910. His decoration suggests 19th century army uniform, except for an earring and a bare midrif. He's a bit of a puzzle really, but it seems clear that such dolls were been around in "Empire" circles at the time in question.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday
From: GUEST,Elektra
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 05:31 PM

Refresh --

Hoping Tunesmith comes back with an answer from Hughie soon! ;-)

*Elektra*


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: GUEST,Andy G's version
Date: 16 Aug 08 - 10:00 AM

I was taught this very version back in primary school as part of a choir. The final verse as I remembered was:

"On some stormy nights down the Scotty Road way
When the wind travels in from the east
If I just close my eyes I can hear ol' Seth,
Singing to me brothers and me"


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: GUEST,Dave MacKenzie
Date: 16 Aug 08 - 06:51 PM

As far as I know,the song was written by G Hughes, and the street was Bevington Bush, which is where the Liverpool Sally Army Hostel was sited.


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 17 Aug 08 - 06:14 PM

We got the line as:-

The three dancing dolls in the Jowler's bin ended,
And the plank went to mend a back door.

Don T.


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 17 Aug 08 - 06:19 PM

Also the last verse came as:-

Now on some stormy nights down Scotty Road way,
When the wind whistles in from the sea,
You can still hear the sound of old Seth Davy,
As he croons to his dancing dolls three.

Referring, I think, to the moaning of the onshore wind and likening it to the old man's voice crooning to the dolls. Has a certain appeal for me.

Don T.


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Lanfranc
Date: 17 Aug 08 - 07:09 PM

I have sung this song for many years. The big problem with it from my point of view is that it is virtually impossible to have a dancing doll dance to it - leastwise, we've never succeeded, despite having a small collection of them made by my old friend Chris Harvey "Jig Doll Chris".

His site is well worth a visit, especially if you haven't come across dancing jig dolls before.

Alan


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Geordie-Peorgie
Date: 18 Aug 08 - 03:20 PM

Big Malc Roberts had a 'jig-doll' which was dressed in the 'regalia' of Victory Morris - Right down to the pewter tankard in its hand!

By the way, 'The Pivvy' as mentioned above was 'The Pavilion Theatre' apparently


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: Leadfingers
Date: 18 Aug 08 - 03:58 PM

I believe the Chorus was adapted from what Seth Davy actually sang , and WAS extensivelt re written for the currently known song


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: scouse
Date: 18 Aug 08 - 05:55 PM

His tired old hands drummed wooden beams,
And the Puppet Dolls they danced the gear,
A better show ever than you would see,
At the Tivvie (Tivoli Theatre in New Brighton.) or New Brighton Pier...

Churus....

As Aye,

Phil.


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Subject: RE: Whisky on a Sunday
From: GUEST,Franny
Date: 09 Oct 09 - 01:14 PM

This is a song we sing on summer camps, but I sang it once to a liverpudlian, who reckoned we had the words as close as right to the words she had known

He sat on the corner of Bebbingtin Bus
astride an old packing case
and the dolls on the end of the plank went dancing
as he sang with a smile on his face.

Chorus
Mmm-mmm-mmm-mmm Come day go day
wishing my heart for sunday
Mmm-mmm-mmm drinking buttermilk all the week
whiskey on a sunday

His tired old hand beat the wooden plank
and the dolls they all danced a-gear
a far finer show than you ever did see
at the Pivvy or ?New Brighton Pier

Now in 1902 old Seth Davy died
and his song was heard no more
his three dancing dolls in the jower bin ended
and the plank went to fix the back door

Now on some stormy nights down the Scotty Road way
When the wind's blowing in from the sea
If I just close my eyes I can hear old Seth
Singing to my brothers and me.


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Mudcat time: 18 August 1:22 AM EDT

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