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Songs of the American Civil War

Related threads:
U.S.A.'s 'Civil War Songs' (49)
Civil War Ballads (66)


Lonesome EJ 28 Jan 99 - 11:25 PM
Angie 29 Jan 99 - 12:16 AM
Heidi 29 Jan 99 - 12:18 AM
DougR@40North.com 29 Jan 99 - 12:37 AM
Bill in Alabama 29 Jan 99 - 09:32 AM
catspaw49 29 Jan 99 - 10:11 AM
Rex Rideout 29 Jan 99 - 11:02 AM
Bill in Alabama 29 Jan 99 - 11:25 AM
MMario 29 Jan 99 - 11:33 AM
Bill in Alabama 29 Jan 99 - 11:56 AM
heidi 29 Jan 99 - 01:23 PM
Bill in Alabama 29 Jan 99 - 02:47 PM
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EJ 29 Jan 99 - 03:59 PM
Bill in Alabama 29 Jan 99 - 04:30 PM
Peter T. 29 Jan 99 - 04:43 PM
Barbara Shaw 29 Jan 99 - 04:48 PM
Allan S. 29 Jan 99 - 05:13 PM
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dwditty 30 Jan 99 - 06:30 AM
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rich r 30 Jan 99 - 10:36 AM
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Subject: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 11:25 PM

I am rather a history buff and I have a keen interest in the Civil War. I have often wondered what songs and what kind of music was played around the bivouac campfires by these men. With soldiers of various backgrounds coming from widespread parts of the country, it must have been a fascinating melting pot of folk traditions and popular tunes. Anyone have information on tunes(other than Dixie and the Battle Hymn of the Republic)that were popular during this war? Also what instruments were common, and is there any music being recorded today that faithfully reflects the era?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Angie
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 12:16 AM

Lonesome EJ, The soundtrack from Ken Burn's "The Civil War" has a wonderful collection of popular tunes from the era. Some examples are "Lorena", "Angel Band", "Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier". In all, there are about 16-18 tracks on the CD. If you want lyrics, there are tons of websites dedicated to Civil War Songs, and the book, "The Blue and the Gray" ca 1950 has a few chapters on songs and poems from the era. Good luck finding the music. If you know of any books about weddings before or during the Civil War, let me know. I'm planning my wedding and would like to have it some what historical(yes, I'm a HUGE history buff, and I know way too much about the Civil War for someone my age, 22.) Hope this helps, ANGIE


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Heidi
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 12:18 AM

Funny you should be asking about Civil War songs now - I have been researching that very thing. I lead a children's choir, and we are doing a program on the Civil War. There are some great Civil War sites on the internet. Here are a few soldiers' songs: Goober Peas Tenting on the Old Camp Ground When Johnny Comes Marching Home The Old Union Wagon The Southern Soldier The Southern Wagon Here's Your Mule Farewell to Grog

These are only a few. You can find lots more. A good source is "Ballads and Songs of the Civil War" by Mel Bay Publications. Enjoy!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: DougR@40North.com
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 12:37 AM

Thirty-some odd years ago Frederick Fennell, the Eastman Wind Ensemble and some other folks put out a couple of LP sets of Civil War songs, fife tunes and band music (on period brass, woodwind and percussion instruments). I've no idea if there's a CD reissue, but if so, the music would be great. Unfortunately, cannon and small arms fire sounds generally don't do well in digital remastering. On those LPs, they were devastatingly realistic. They used period weapons for the gunnery, but I couldn't vouch for the authenticity of the gunpowder formulations, loads or projectiles (if any).


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 09:32 AM

My friend Bobby Horton is a fellow War Between the States enthusiast whose music was featured on the Ken Burns series. Bobby has probably a dozen albums currently out featuring music of Union and Confederate soldiers. He also is selling videos of a ETV documentary entitled *BOBBY HORTON: MUSIC AND MEMORIES OF THE CIVIL WAR*, which features 63 minutes worth of authentic music from the period. Check

http://bizweb.lightspeed.net/~cwms/unit.html

By the way--I'm the narrator on the video.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 10:11 AM

Hey Bill...couldn't help but notice the difference re: "War Between The States" versus "Civil War." (*grin*) And I'll be looking for the video.

Heidi: Be sure to use "Lorena" and the story that goes with it. Banned from use on BOTH sides because of it's bad effect on morale, I think it was one of this country's earliest examples of song censorship.

Nice to know there are quite a few other enthusiasts/buffs out there...some really wonderful tunes came out of that period.

catspaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex Rideout
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 11:02 AM

Go to almost any library and they should have a copy of "The Songs of the Civil War" by Irwin Silber. This is probably the most complete collection of CW songs and their variations and parodies. This book is also available from Dover Books for about $15. Everyone should have a copy.

Now, on the same subject, Columbia records released a CD in '92 I think. Tennessee Ernie Ford sings Songs of the Civil War. They weren't exactly arranged like a guy sitting on a stump with a cigar box fiddle but there was some good material on it never the less. Columbia no longer has it. I have checked the usual sources, (Amazon, CD Now, etc.). Does anyone know where it may be available? Thanky,

Rex Rideout


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 11:25 AM

There are probably several thousand songs around which are directly associated with the war, not to mention the popular songs which the soldiers sang in camp--songs which were extremely popular before the war, and which reminded them of home.

The Ernie Ford Album was most likely a re-release of an LP album which Ford recorded for the centennial of the war in the early 'sixties; I have it on vinyl, but I wouldn't begin to know where to look for it.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MMario
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 11:33 AM

I couldn't hurt to look through the Levy Sheet Music Collection, either....lots of them are dated at appropriate times

They wouldn't be the surviving songs that the public think of as "Civil War Songs" - but they are songs of the times...

MMario


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 11:56 AM

Duke University also has an excellent collection of sheet music, in which I have found many things which I was unable to locate at the Levy site.

http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/sheetmusic/


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: heidi
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 01:23 PM

As I mentioned before, I direct a children's choir, and we are doing a program about the Civil War. I was planning on having the kids sing Dixie, as I feel it is a very typical song from that time. When my father-in-law heard this he told me that we could be accused of being racist. I was surprised. I do know that there are quite a few verses.The one that we are using is quite neutral: Oh I wish I was in the land of cotton, memories there are not forgotten.............etc. I would appreciate any input on this, as we are planning to do an extra performance for an inner city school. We would most definitely not want to use anything that could be offensive. Thank you.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 02:47 PM

Heidi-- There have been many instances in which folks have been offended by the performance of Dixie's Land (the original title given the piece by the composer)in recent years. Actually, the song pre-dates the war, and was written by a northerner, and the original words don't address the war. HOWEVER-- It was originally written as a minstrel number, and was in a stage-slave dialect. You would be well advised to inquire among members of your own community as to its possible reception. At the formal victory celebration in Washington after the surrender, when President Lincoln was invited by the military band to request a song, he asked the band to play Dixie. Mentioning this to introduce the song might help smooth things out. Sorry that I can't be of more help.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bruce O.
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 03:08 PM

Putting 'Civil War' in the bibliographic search box on the Levy sheet music website turns up 1370 items.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: EJ
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 03:59 PM

Thanks for all the input...re the instruments, I realize that many regiments had their own brass bands. I am more interested in what sort of instruments the common soldier might have used. My guess would be banjo, guitar,jew's harp,harmonica, fiddle, maybe mandolin. Anyone have knowledge?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 04:30 PM

Basically, you're right on the money. There are records of common soldiers who played trumpet around the campfire for their friends, but I believe that you are safe in assuming that the average soldier brought with him the stringed instrument or the mouth organ he had played on the front porch at home. Certainly the photographs I have seen and the research I have done would confirm that assumption.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Peter T.
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 04:43 PM

I believe that Lincoln is reported to have said on the occasion that Dixie was one of the spoils of war and could be considered to have been liberated.

Yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 04:48 PM

The Shubert Theatre in New Haven, CT is about to have the world premiere of a new musical called "The Civil War" on February 16. Their web site:

http://www.shubert.com/

talks about a "new all-star double CD," so apparently there is a new interpretation of the music of that period a la Broadway (where it is headed).


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Allan S.
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 05:13 PM

I have a audio Cassette "A treasury of civil war Songs" by Tom Glazer THe number appears to be C8507 RTV Communications Group po 2990007 Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33329 I'm not sure if it is still avalable


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: John Freeman
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 10:11 PM

If you are interested in an excellent album of Civil War songs, I would recommend SONGS OF THE CIVIL WAR, produced by Jim Brown, Ken Burns and Don DeVito for Columbia. It has a variety of songs by different artists including Kathy Mattea, Waylon Jennings, Ronnie Gilbert, Kate & Anna McGarrigle et al. Kathy Mattea does a beautiful rendition of "Vacant Chair" which both the North and the South adopted. Regards to all, John


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: dwditty
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 06:30 AM

How about "Rally 'Round the Flag" Ry Cooder does a great version on his album "Boomer's Story"
DW


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Banjer
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 07:10 AM

Being a Civil War reenactor for the past eight years and having an interest in Old Time Music has exposed me to many forms of music of that era. Soldiers would play around camp any instrument that they could find. We have had some strange experiences with musical efforts. One year at the Battle of Olustee in Florida the Saturday evening ball was hosted by the Eighth Georgia Brass Band. Most reenactors love doing a "Virginia Reel", usually accompanied by a lively tune on fiddle, mandolin, banjo and guitar. What fun(?) we had trying to do a reel to the oompah-pahs of a tuba. Just not quite the same....My personal favorite band is the 97th Pennsylvania Regimental String Band. They can be reached at (727)391-4565. They have about eight cassettes or CD's of various music of the period. If you get a chance go to a reenactment near you and listen. Most reenactments feature music of some kind.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: rich r
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 10:36 AM

"The Civil War Music Collectors Edition" (Time-Life 1991) is an excellent CD set containing all forms of music vocal and instrumental from the period.

Another CD that is reasonably available is Songs of the Civil War" by The Cumberland Three (This was John Stewart's group before he joined the Kingston Trio).

Keith & Rusty McNeil have a collection of about 60 Civil War songs (check out their web site, they also have collections of songs from other periods in US history)

2 Cds by Dave Para & Cathy Barton described in a thread last summer or fall.

Also if you are in a library You can look for:

Singing Soldiers: A History of the Civil War in Song by Paul Glass, 1964, republished by DaCapo Press in 1975 (isbn 0-306-80021-7. This has over 100 songs

Sound Off : Soldier Songs from the Revolution to World War II by E. A Dolph, 1942 Farrar & Rinehart (originally published in 1929 & updated in 1942 to include WWII material)

Don't forget Irwin Silber's collection mentioned near the top of the thread.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: rich r
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 10:40 AM

I forgot to mention that that Vance Randolph's "Ozark Folksongs Vol 2 Songs of the South & West" (Univ Missouri Press 1980) has a section of 40 or so Civil War Songs.

And don't forget to search the database right here.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rincon Roy
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 11:20 AM

There were people who would have readily agreed with Banjer back in the Civil War days who complained that they were sick of hearing brass band music everywhere they went, but that was "the" popular music of the times. I have heard (not confirmed though) that stringed groups sometimes alternated with brass bands at dances/balls to add variety and give brass players a break. The Frederick Fennell collection (the Civil War, its music and its sounds: copyright 1990 phillips Classic Productions) that DougR mentioned has indeed been reissued on CD and is fun collection: songs-choruses, battle sounds taped in Gettysburg battlefield, brass band tunes, fife and drum tunes, bugle calls, etc. {http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000057L2/qid=917711858/sr=1-4/002-4232918-4573421}

Also try these CD recordings: (1)string band: Union and Liberty!Music heard on the Northern homefront... by D.C.Hall's New Concert & Quadrill Band (copyright 1994 Dorian Recordings){http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000001QAA/qid%3D917711060/002-4232918-4573421} (2)piano (very nice!) and some vocal: When the Galop Was the Rage by Helen Beedle (copyright 1997 Helen Beedle){was recently available from http://www.americuscd.com ,but does not appear on their online catalog at the moment} (3)brass band: Honor to Our Soldiers by Classical Brass (excellent renditions performed very well on period instruments)(copyright MusicMasters 1991){http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000000FQO/qid%3D917711169/002-4232918-4573421} (4)brass band: Music of the Civil War by The Americus Brass Band {http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000038IY/qid%3D912178119/sr%3D1-6/002-4232918-4573421}

Finally, a good book reproducing/reprinting actual parlor (piano & voice) music of the war years complete with visually intriguing title sheets: "The Civil War Song Book, Complete Original Sheet Music for 37 Songs" edited by Richard Crawford (copyright 1977 Dover Publications, Inc.) {http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486234223/qid=917712795/sr=1-1/002-4232918-4573421}


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Mark DeAngelis
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 10:05 PM

As a fellow reenactor, I have to agree with Banjer. Brass bands may have been popular, but the soldier spent much of his time making music on anything he could get his hands on. Fiddles and banjos are the stringed instruments most often noted in diaries, letters and accounts. Remember, banjos were 4 string, fretless, and strung with cat gut. It didn't give the big bright banjo sound we hear today. Music in camp back then did not resemble the high quality studio type to which our 20th century ears are accustomed. Many a soldier boy noted that the musicians were perfectly awful. However, they likewise noted that the music was wonderful. The quality didn't matter. It was the comraderie and the joyous link to hearth and home that this music made for them that they treasured; hence, the banning of "Lorena" (as noted in a prior post) and other tunes that made the lads homesick. For books, I would recommend "Singing Soldiers" as noted above. It has been reprinted within the last few years and is now available in bookstores again. In addition to the fine recorded music already mentioned in other posts, I would add the recordings of Jim Taylor - several tapes of instrumental guitar, fiddle, hammered dulcimer - but especially his two vocal tapes. I don't know why he doesn't record more vocal music. Also, the 2d South Carolina String Band. Their tapes have more of a "sittin' round the campfire feel to them. You can also check out the 7th La. String Band, Hardtack and Harmony and a very nice new work called "The Irish Volunteer" by David Kincaid. Kincaid gives us a number of period tunes that have not previously been recorded by anyone and the presentation is great. I also highly recommend the Para, Barton and Dyer works and the 97th Regimental String Band. There is a Civil War music web site that has come a long way in the last year. I'm sorry that I don't have it handy but it comes up easily on a net search.

Your Obedient Servant,


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Frank in NJ
Date: 31 Jan 99 - 03:51 AM

Being a metal detector addict I can attest to the fact harmonicas were very popular around the campsites. All I find left are the brass reed plates. Along the railroad camps the large number of these plates makes finding other things very difficult. If you can find a tape or 33rpm of Don Reno & Red Smiley singing Civil War songs the lyric of the southern perspective is very interesting. POA...SCAW...For those of you who may want to teach Civil War songs to children, look for a lyric lesson elsewhere on this site in the song Two Little Boys. Frank


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: rich r
Date: 31 Jan 99 - 12:51 PM

The Reno & Smiley recording is interesting. The songs trace a sort of chronology of some of the events of the Civil War from a southern perspective. All of the songs are new creations. As the album cover states: "New and original FOLK SONGS written in commemoration of the centennial of the American Civil War, The war between the states, and sung by Reno & Smiley" Judgning from this I would guess the recording was done sometime in the late 1950's or early 1960's. The LP I have (King 756) has 1988 on the disk label, but I assume that to be a reissue perhaps from a different company than the original. Consistent with the earlier release are pictures of young Reno & Smiley on the back and biographical information that talks about their WWII activities and that they got together to form "The Tennessee Cutups". The lyrics to the songs were written by Dr. Albert J Russo, a medical doctor from Virginia with an interest in folklore and folk music. He wrote a poetic history of the Civil War called "Lee's Command and Other Confederate Poems". He was also a member of the Roanoke VA Civil War Centennial Commission. The poem "Lee's Command" is one of the songs on the record. The poems were set to music by Don Reno.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 10:05 PM

In a recent issue of Civil War Times there is an article called And the Generals Sang! It discusses several tunes in the DT such as Lorena, Tenting Tonight, Dixie's Land, etc. But several are mentioned that I couldn't find. If anyone has tunes or lyrics, I would greatly appreciate it. I find these songs very moving. The songs I am seeking are "The Blue Juanita","The Hebrew Maiden", "Jine the Cavalry", "Bonnie Jean" and one that contains the line "Sweet Evelina,dear Evelina, my love for you shall never,never die". The last line is from a tune favored by JEB Stuart.

Thanks, LEJ


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 10:11 PM

Try researching Dan Emmett, composer of several C.V. era songs. Also, in the "Galvanized Yankee" period, "Oh, I'm a Good Old Rebel", tune to Joe Bowers. It can be very offensive, tho.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Amos
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 10:21 PM

The Unreconstructed Rebel is one of my all-time favorite Civil War songs.

Frank Warner played and sang it on one of his Folkways LP's in the late Fifties, and he also did a creditable rendition of The Southern Girl's Reply, The Battle of Bull Run, The Bonnie Blue Flag, and one or two others which escape me at the moment. There are several differences in lyrics between Warner's Unreconstructed Rebel and that found in the DT from Collier's Magazine of 1913.

I can't say who improved what but I definitely like Warner's version better. It scans better and the imagery comes across vividly.

I have an .aiff file of several of these songs (doing them myself, not Warner) should anyone want one.

A


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 10:27 PM

What issue was that in Leej? I let my subscription lapse awhile back as I did with several other mags. AND...as invariably happens....an issue comes out that has something really interesting. I' d like to read the article and research this a bit as I do a Hammered Dulcimer CW medley and I'd like to add to it.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 10:33 PM

The new one, Spaw, March 2000. I believe you can request the issue on cwt@cowles.com. If not, I'd be happy to snail you a copy. Lemme know...

LEJ


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Ely
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 10:53 PM

The "War of Northern Aggression"? ;)

There's a guy named Wayne Erbsen who puts out his own tapes, usually for sale at the gift shops at battle sites. His style is goofy, but if you're looking for songs to learn, you can get the tune and words. I think he's also a reenactor and, at least on his tapes that I've seen so far, it's all period tunes (as opposed to modern ones like "Two Brothers" and "Gray-Coat Soldiers").

"Wildwood Flower"--this was a top seller in sheet music in 1860, long before the Carter Family made it famous. I've also been asked for "Marching Through Georgia", "Garry Owen", "Minstrel Boy", "Cumberland Gap", "Vacant Chair".

Please, NO "Ashokan Farewell"!! Yeesh.

My brother has been into Civil War reenacting for 8 years (since he was 12). The men in his unit don't play much music themselves but I used to sit around with the women and play the lap dulcimer--my brother got mad at me once for attracting more attention than the soldiers did (probably because I was less scary to the kids). I've played with harmonicas and a few banjos, and Abraham Lincoln seems to be a particularly popular character for limberjacks.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 11:00 PM

Hi Ely----I realize your problem with "Ashoken Farewell" but if you're playing for the masses, it ends a medley well because most people believe it IS a period song. I t is certainly in the style and a haunting melody. I do inform folks that it is not, but so damn many people saw the Ken Burns series, they are actually looking forward to it.

But I do understand your point!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,ddw
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 11:20 PM

I'm just reading Burke Davis's "Jeb Stuart, The Last Cavalier" and was struck earlier today by how often he cites the songs Stuart sang or had his camp musicians play. Apart from being informative on that, it's just a good read about a very colorful figure and one helluva military strategist.

cheers

david

P.S. — Leej, if you live anywhere close to Gettysburg or can get there sometime, the park's headquarters has a great selection of CDs and tapes of CW songs. I don't know if they have a cybersite that would list what they have, but it might be worth checking out. And, of course, stores in the town probably expand what's available.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: paddymac
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 11:43 PM

Don't overlook George Root's "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp". The lyrics seem a bit stilted by today's standards, but it was quite popular back then, and the melody was freely used for many other songs, then and since. "God Save Ireland" is but one example.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Marymac90
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 11:45 PM

I KNOW Ashokan Farewell is contemporary. and was written by Jay Unger, for one season's final dance at his Fiddle and Dance Camp, in Ashokan, NY. I used to go to the camp, back when I could dance, before my knee turned sour on me. It's just that it is about the most beautiful, haunting fiddle tune that I can think of. So by all means, do play it-people love it!

Mary Mccaffrey


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 11:45 PM

THREAD CREEP ALERT!! When I was in H.S. in Bleeding Kansas, I wrote a paper titled--Why The South Should Have Won The War--it po'd the prof, and was really marked up in RED, but I still got an A..........my opinion was based not on slavery, but on States Rights,etc. I am still sick and tired of "Protect the Masses--Don't Hesitate, Legislate!"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 03 Feb 00 - 11:57 PM

In the article I sited, mention was made of Tenting To Night. The name was familiar to me, but it wasn't until I read the lyrics in the DT and downloaded the tune that it came back to me. On long hot summer nights, my Mom's family would gather on the porch of my Grandpa's house to tell stories, play games and sing songs as the lightning bugs danced in the darkness. Tenting was one of the songs they sang. Perhaps my Grandpa learned from his Dad who served in the Rebel army. Maybe they learned it from the old player piano rolls he had. At any rate, the simple act of accessing the DT to get the words and tune connected me once again to those people, that time. I suppose that is the real magic in Folk Music..that connection.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Les B
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 01:31 AM

Some rhythm instruments not mentioned in the above posts, but used by Civil War soldiers (as seen in at least one photo from the era) are tamborine, bones, and triangle (similar to today's Cajun triangle). These three were also very common in Minstrel bands before and after the war.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sorcha
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 01:34 AM

D**N! for a "period" player, I can't believe I forgot George Root!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sourdough
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 03:58 AM

Don't forget "Bonnie Eloise, the belle of the Mohawk vale". It isn't quite as haunting as Lorena but as I was told it was one of the most popular songs in armies of both sides.

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,micca at work
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 07:52 AM

They showed the whole of the Ken Burns series on the BBc on successive days over christmas just gone and it was wonderful, i had never really understood the scale and destruction of this event until then. i am looking for the music too, but its not as easy here in the UK. thanks for all the splendid references above, BTW was Ashoan farewell the tune over the titles at the beginning and end?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 08:56 AM

LEJ -

Please check out Cathy Barton and Dave Para's website. Look through their discography. I am sure you will find some great stuf there for your research.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 09:14 AM

This has been a great thread! For someone like me with a keen interest about the Civil War era, and the impact it has had on America, I am heartened by the amount of interest in this thread - and by the knowledge people have on the subject.

Ken Burns series was a masterpiece. I am so pleased it was viewed in the UK. Not only was the history and commentary good, but the music, photos and film were artfully used to portray the stories. I know much of our worst TV gets viewed worldwide; I am glad to hear that some of our best has made beyond our borders, as well!

I have read enjoyed reading some of this history; especially Shelby Foote's narratives, and James P. Gannon's history called Irish Rebels, Confederate Tigers : The 6th Louisiana Volunteers, 1861-1865. I wrote a song about these Irish Civil War soldiers. I wrote another based upon my family research, about a young Confederate soldier from Connemara Ireland. There are so many moving stories from this era. I reckon a songwriter could spend a life's work trying to capture some of them.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Amos
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 09:53 AM

Warner does a beautiful plaintive a capella piece on Bull Run that I wil never forget. It has only four lines and is sung naked and raw (the voice, 'spaw, the voice!):

This day will be remembered by

America's noble sons.

If it hadn't 'a been for the Irish, what would the Union done?

It was hand to hand we fowt 'em, all in the broiling sun.

Stripped down to the pants, we did advance

At the Battle of Bull Run!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Pete Peterson (at work)
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 11:02 AM

If you know the fiddle tune, Swingin' on a Gate, slow it down by a factor of about 3 and see how close it is to what I have heard re-enactors call "A Joker's Farewell". I guess there aren't enough good melodies to go around. I love lots of the songs mentioned here. Lonesome EJ-- know Evalina, sweet Evalina from the singing of Critton Hollow String Band and will try to transcribe it over the weekend if I can find where I have it taped (I think it's a homemade tape from Clifftop). The Hebrew Maiden (the song McCook sang the first night of Chickamauga, right?) is one I have never seen. Jine the Cavalry is in Silber.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Mbo
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 11:12 AM

I did an intense study of the Civil War for 3 years straight, with 2 additional years of passing interest. I love the songs. "All Quiet Along The Potomac" is one great song. Other good ones are:
Who Will Care For Mother Now?
Wrap The Flag Around Me, Boys
We Are Coming, Father Abram
Cheer Boys Cheer
Grafted Into The Army
The Rose of Alabama
Stonewall Jackson's Way
Lilly Dale

Just some ones I pulled off the top o' my head.

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dale Rose
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 11:27 AM

Check here for an earlier discussion of Sweet Evelina

There is a link to the sheet music at Levy among other things, but I see it is not working anymore. Try this one instead That will take you directly to the front page of the sheet music. Clicking at the bottom of the page will get you the succeeding pages.

Also check the DT database under Sweet Evalina for the lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dale Rose
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 11:36 AM

Here is the new link to the levy search, I should have left it before. I also noticed that the version of Evelina that I linked to in my last post is a later arrangement. Use the search to find the earlier one if you care to.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 12:25 PM

Dammit! Doesn't anybody refer people to the DT? If you search for @Civil @War @America you'll get about 100 hits. Without leaving the Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MMario
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 12:34 PM

sorry Dick, guess I assumed that since it was LEJ asking, he'd already done that. search for @civil yields 132 hits.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,LEJ
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 01:15 PM

Dammit! Great suggestion ,Dick! I had always searched the DT by using title keywords, and was unaware that you could search with a command like @Civil. My rather inept search has generated some interesting dialogue, though, don't you think?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 02:05 PM

Yep, folks mentioned Para, Barton and Dyer, David Kincaid, the 97th, all good at playing the songs from "the sixties". Another I'll mention though not recorded yet so far as I know is the 4th Artillary Band. They are centered in Denver and play around the Rocky Mtn. area. Their time period is post CW but they play many of the tunes from that time. They look right and play brass instruments from the time. The trumpets that point behind the player for example. There is no one like them. Someone mentioned above the soundtrack for Burns'CW but I didn't see the CD from his followup PBS program. Anyway as the first soundtrack was instrumental the second is all (well mostly) songs and ballads. Titled: Songs of the Civil War. Columbia/Sony Records released it in 1991. All the favourites sung by the likes of the McGarrigles, Kathy Mattea, Ronnie Gilbert, John Hartford (my man!), Ritchie Havens, Judy Collins, Waylon Jennings, well you get the idea. Hopefully it's still available.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 02:08 PM

Oops, I had better mention that Hoyt Axton is on it or someone is liable to hurt me.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 02:33 PM

Well, then there's Sweet Honey in the Rock, the United States Military Academy Band, Staff Sgt. Steve Luck and Rufus Wainwright sings with the McGarrigles. Aw, and then there is Jay Ungar and Molly Mason with Fiddle Fever. Now I love what they can do with fiddles. Everything they've ever done. I love Ashokan Farewell and play it for folks almost everytime they ask for it. But I sure won't if the time is 1860 something and somebody is standing there with a camcorder! I'm not goin' to help spread this idea that the tune was around then. But it's a great tune. There. Now that's everone on that CD. I didn't leave anyone out. I'll hush now.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dale Rose
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 03:06 PM

Hey, I did, Dick! Referred them to the lyrics to Evalina just two posts above yours. :-)


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Linda Kelly
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 06:13 PM

I have loved this thread-I became interested in the American civil war when I went to Gettysburg 10 years ago and have a complete set of the videos of Ken Burns amazing documentary. My most treasured possession is a book edited by Walter Lowenfels called Walt Whitman's Civil War -recounting his experience of tragedy and death. My personal hero is Joseph Chamberlain for his stand at Little Round Top -was there any songs specifically written about the Battle of Gettysburg???


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Margo
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 06:30 PM

Bill, we have the Tennessee Ernie Ford album on CD! I think it is out of print now, but that doesn't mean a person couldn't get it. Wow, what a voice that guy had! I love that CD. Songs of both the North and South on it.

Sorcha, you and my husband Jack would have some great conversation about the war. He is a voracious reader, and a big civil war buff. He has mentioned to me things about the illegality of West Virginia and why the war ought to have been won by the south, and why the north did win. The facts make it veeeeery interesting!

Margo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Susan A-R
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 10:05 PM

Somewhere out there there is an mp3 recording of a group called Hardtack and Homespun doing songs of the Civil War. I have me own copy now ('cause I'm on it) and it has some historically accurate material. The recording isn't even as embarrassing as I'd thought it would be. I sing E Pluribus Unum all by my lonesome if you want to figure out which voice is mine. We recorded Hard Tack Come Again No More, Weeping Sad and Lonely, We Wait Beneath the Furnace Blast, Homespun Dress, Lorena, Song Of A Thousand Years, The Blue and the Gray (one of the most beautiful post- Civil War songs) and a few other items.

Blush

Susan A-R


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: jeffp
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 09:33 AM

According to "The Life of Johnny Reb - The Common Soldier of the Confederacy" by Bell Irvin Wiley, popular songs around Southern campfires were "Home Sweet Home," "Lorena," "All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight," "Annie of the Vale," "Sweet Evelina," Lilly Dale," "The Girl I Left Behind Me," "Bell Brandon," "Her Bright Eyes Haunt Me Still," "Listen to the Mockingbird," and "Just Before the Battle, Mother." "Annie Laurie" and "Juanita" were also very popular.

jeffp


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Susan A-R
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 02:01 PM

However, there were some that were banned (Home Sweet Home, and Lorena) because they were bad for morale. I can't imagine that All Quiet Along the Patomac Tonight was looked on with much favor either, it being pretty critical of the way the war was being managed. There is a great story about Home Sweet Home being sung on both sides of a river by both armies, kind of a predecessor to Christmas in the Trenches.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,jtt
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 02:40 PM

A lot of Irish boys fought on both sides, and there's a famous story about thousands of troops camped on both sides of a river the night before one of the big battles - sorry I can't be more specific but American history isn't my strong point - and the boys on one side started to sing a plaintive song called "Ireland, Boys, Hurrah", which starts "Deep in Canadian woods we've met, from one bright island flown, great is the land we tread, and yet our hearts are with our own..."

When the lads to one side of the river finished the first chorus the sound of the boys on the other side, and in the other army, plaintively finishing the same verse a line later, as happens when great masses of people sing together.

The next day most of those boys were dead.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wildlone
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 03:19 PM

The re-enactors of the War between the States based in Cardiff have also found reference to the Welsh fighting on both sides and I am sure I read about Continental Europians going over to America and fighting.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 07 Feb 00 - 12:01 PM

This turned up in a CW newsgroup from a chap in Alaska. As I recall he found a hand written songbook belonging to a relative in the war:

Greetings from the tip of the nunatak...

OK - here we go with the titles that I can find this evening. I dug out the stuff my GGF left, and probably missed a BUNCH of stuff.

Here is what I've found so far:

The hand written lyrics are entitled: "Viva La America" Refrain and one chorus

"Bonnie Eloise" Appears to be 3 Choruses

"Annie Lish" One refrain

"The Continentals Farewell" 3 Parts Labelled

"Rock me to Sleep Mother" Two parts, one Chorus done twice

"Anna of the Vale" Two parts, one Chorus

"Linda Love" Seven parts

The Handwritten paper ends with: Songs as sung by "illegible" while "Prisoners of War" In the state of Louisiana and Texas. Copied from papers belonging to Lieut Geo. Johnston a.a.

Co. B, 19th Iowa Volunteers, Barrancas Florida, Sept 21st and 22nd 1864. Oscar G. Burch, Sgt Major 19th Iowa Vols. Regards, Mike Pickett, aka Gruff --------------------------------------------------------

I figure as Mr. Pickett saw fit to present this to the CW newsgroup he wouldn't object to my passing it along to this group. I'm doing so that you may see what other songs were being sung besides the "top forty" that we all know.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Mbo
Date: 07 Feb 00 - 12:06 PM

Oh yeah! Bonnie Eloise! I remember that one. I couldn't think of it's name on Friday. Knew it was Bonnie something...

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Amos
Date: 08 Feb 00 - 10:55 AM

Small degree of thread creep here:

A Catholic friend was working in the Raleigh, NC Baptist Book Store while her husband did theology at Duke.
A woman came into the store one day and announced in a very pronounced Southern that she "would like to buy an acolyte."

Kathy blinked once or twice and then told the woman that even in the South it was now illegal to sell or purchase human beings.

Turns out she was looking for "one of those long sticks with the thing on one side for lighting candles and a thing on the other side for puttin 'em out."


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 08 Feb 00 - 12:04 PM

Someone in this thread was looking for Evelina. Bobby Horton has recorded it on one of his collection of about 10 civil war cds, a great collection and an excellent resource for anyone interested in old songs. can be found at his web site. search for name or civil war music. sorry for this incomplete note. my right arm is broken.

richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Joan
Date: 08 Feb 00 - 09:10 PM

Always loved the irony in the fact that "Dixie" was written by a northerner, and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" was set to a southern hymn.

Also interesting that while lots of the popular songs ("Rally 'Round the Flag" and "Just Before the Battle..." for instance) were composed songs written by professionals like George Root, and calculated to stir up public sympathies for one side or the other. But many were just made up songs that caught on with homesick soldiers and disrupted communities. Sara Grey sings "Goin' 'Cross the Mountains" on Folk Legacy, I do "Fare Thee Well, Sweet Mary" and there are more. Joan


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 01:27 PM

Wait, there's more. I was hunting for info on the John Edwards Memorial Foundation and found this: (http://popmusic.mtsu.edu/cwardoc.htm) I'm not going in to who is on there. Just check it out. There are 3 CD's with notes. Pretty good material. 51 tracks. $30. Dang, I may have to go and get it.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 02:36 PM

Greetings,

Among the songs listed above, Mbo mentioned "Cheer Boys Cheer". This was, as far as I can recall, the "hit" song of the British Army during the Crimean War, so it's not surprising that it made its way across the Atlantic, but, I assume that the lyrics changed with this movement (I can't see American squaddies singing "So Farewll England, much as we may love thee..."). Does anybody have the American lyric to this song ?

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MMario
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 03:23 PM

I don't have time to transcribe right now, but on the Lester Levy sheet Music site, there are both northern and southern versions. There is very little difference and they were both published in 1861.

and I used cheer and boys as parameters in the search.

northern = box 90 item 21 southern = box 94 item 111


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Walrus
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 05:57 PM

MMario,

Great stuff, thanks, it was just what I was looking for. I must say it's VERY different from the British version Which seems to be about emigration to Canada (I assume. If I can find the complete lyrics I'll post them here.

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:54 PM

walrus;

Where did you find the british version? I am, iterested as it was used as a basis for a pro-confederation song in BC, Canada,

cheer boys cheer , for the Dominion Nation....

richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 11 Feb 00 - 05:22 PM

For reenactors in Blue uniforms who desire a bit of infantryman's authenticity, check out "Marching On" in the DT. I recorded this from Frank Proffitt in 1960 and put it on the Folkways album I made of his songs the year before I started Folk-Legacy. (Frank Warner wrote the notes that accompanied that album.) Frank Proffitt had the song from his grandfather, who left his North Carolina home, walked over the mountain to the west, and joined the Union volunteers in Tennessee. Frank explains: "He was an admirer of Abraham Lincoln, and he had no truck with slavery."

And I must correct Joan's memory a bit: "Going Across the Mountain," the story of the grandfather's venture, also learned by Frank Proffitt from his worthy grandfather, is sung by Frank himself on Folk-Legacy's very first release: Frank Proffitt of Reese, North Carolina. Frank accompanies the song on his home-made fretless banjo. I plan to have this recording available as a compact disc within a few months. In the meantime, however, it's available as one of our "custom cassettes." Sara Grey does sing the song, but it isn't on her Folk-Legacy album, which is also available as a custom cassette.

Sandy (resident folk fogey)


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Subject: Lyr Add: CHEER, BOYS, CHEER! (Mackay, Russell)
From: GUEST,Walrus
Date: 11 Feb 00 - 05:24 PM

Richard,

I found the lyrics in a book called "Songs and Music of the Redcoats" by Lewis Winstock (Leo Cooper Ltd, London, 1970)

CHEER, BOYS, CHEER!
(Words: C Mackay. Music: H Russell)

Cheer, boys, cheer! No more of idle sorrow.
Courage, true hearts, shall bear us on our way.
Hope points before, and shows the bright tomorrow,
Let us forget the darkness of today.

So farewell, England, much as we may love thee.
We'll dry the tears that we have shed before.
Why should we weep, who sail in search of fortune?
So farewell, England. Farewell for evermore!

Cheer, boys, cheer! For country, mother country.
Cheer, boys, cheer! The willing strong right hand.
Cheer, boys, cheer! There's wealth for honest labour.
Cheer, boys, cheer! For the new and happy land.

Cheer, boys, cheer! The steady breeze is blowing,
To float us freely o'er the ocean's breast.
The world shall follow in the track we're going.
The star of empire glitters in the west.

Here we had toil and little to reward it,
But there shall plenty smile upon our pain.
And ours shall be the prairie and the forest,
And boundless meadows, ripe with golden grain.

Cheer, boys, cheer! For country, mother country,
Cheer, boys, cheer! For united heart and hand.
Cheer, boys, cheer! There's wealth for honest labour.
Cheer, boys, cheer! For the new and happy land.

Good luck

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 11 Feb 00 - 05:55 PM

Great thread.....And not to let it stray, but the Frank Proffitt album that Sandy referred to really is good. After I got it a few months ago, I drove to Cincy to meet Mick one evening and played it almost exclusively down there and back. It took me a week to convince myself that I DID NOT NEED a fretless banjo.

And now, back to the war...........

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 12 Feb 00 - 06:12 PM

thanks walrus;

much appreciated. Sounds like a great book. I'll have to try and find it.

richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Neil writer@a-znet.com
Date: 12 Feb 00 - 07:24 PM

To all interested readers: I am also in the process of researching Civil War music for a song book I am putting together. Some of the music I have been introduced to recently as a Civil War reenacto includes Kent Courtney's "Garryowen", the Second South Carolina String Band's "Southern Soldier" and songs of the Civil War by Various artists. Jerry Silverman's Folk Song Encyclopedia Volumes 1 & 2 has been a splendid resource. And the Civil War Midi web site was quite helpful. Reenacting in A Union Regular regiment has been an education. As one correapondent stated, literally thousands of songs were sung in that period. Some that I haven't seen mentioned but never the less popular; "The girl I left behind me", "The minstrel boy", and of course "Hard times" by Stephen Foster. Soldiers on both sides modified that one to a tune called "Hard Tack" with the same music and modified lyrics. PLease contact me at writer@a-znet.com if I can be of assistance or if you come across any more neat information, Neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Guest; Neil Writer@a-znet.com
Date: 12 Feb 00 - 07:50 PM

Richard: If all the well informed people haven't flooded you with information let me offer you some more. I am a Civil War reenactor and there are several sources of music available. Let's adress the instruments first. All of the instruments we take for granted today with the exception of electric ones existed 140 years ago. While it would have been unusual to see soldiers carrying guitars or even fiddles on the march, in camp behind the lines guitars and such could be rented. The individual soldier carried mouth organ(Harmonica), tin whistles, fifes and the ever present Jaw harp. Almost all regiments had drummers assigned to them, and it was a safe bet you could find a fair number of men who played the bones. Also, without radio, the people in those days wqere not adverse to singing. As to the music, I recommend Kent Courtney, the Second South Carolina String Band and Bobby Horton You migfht also look into Ritchie Haven's stuff and a singer by the name of Sparky Rucker for the African-American music in vogue then. For Sheet music , Jerry Silverman's Folk Music Encyclopedia Vol. 1&2, Mel Bay puts out several books of Folk Music and there is also the Civil War Songbook compiled by Richard Crawford. Three songs that were sung and are under represented in Civil War music books: "The Girl I Left Behind me" was the favorite marching song for the Regulars (The standing army of 1861, "The Bonny Light Horseman" dates to the Napoleonic wars and was brought over by English and Irish immigrants and in the Navy on both sides the sea chantey "Santy Anno was popular(Remember the Mexican War had only been over for 13 years at the start of the Civil War. I hope this information helps. Don't hesitate to contact me at writer@a-znet.com if I can be of further assistance, Neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 13 Feb 00 - 01:32 AM

Turns out "Marching On" doesn't get you there, if you try to search by that. Try entering (in brackets) [Old Abe] and scroll down to MARCHING ON. That's where you'll find the genuine soldier song to which I referred above. Sorry to have misled you about the way to find it.

Sandy


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 04:44 PM

Sorry to drag out this dusty old thread again. I was chatting with one of the members of the 4th Artillery Band (see above) and while they have no recordings (YET, they are working on it) they do have a web site. I should have known.

(www.4thartillerybrassband.org/)

You will want to check out their fine array of links and while no tapes or CD's are offered yet, you can play their music off the web site.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: tar_heel
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:35 PM

WE HAVE A SONG ON OUR NEW CD,FROM THE KEN BURNS...PBS SPECIAL,CALLED,"THE VACANT CHAIR". THE MELODY IS THE SAME AS,LIFE IS LIKE A MOUNTAIN RAILROAD. OR LIFE'S RAILWAY TO HEAVEN,AS USUALLY KNOWN. CONTACT ME IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN A COPY...LOTS OF OLD-TIME MUSIC ON TH CD...18 SONGS.... REGARDS,CHUCK HEMRICK chuck_peggi@yahoo.com or chuck hemrick


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:48 PM

In another C-W thread, kat ran across an excellent poetry and song site that is well worth the reading.

Poetry and Music of the War Between the States--CLICK HERE

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:52 PM

Well, I whupped up!!!!!

Try THIS

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: kendall
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:50 PM

Actually, the mans name was JOSHUA Chamberlain, hero of Little Round top. It has been said that the 20th Maine won the Civil War for this action. Joshua Chamberlain was a professor of rhetoric at Bowdoin College. He asked for a leave of absence to fight in the war, but, he was turned down. So, he asked for a leave of absence to study in Europe. This he was granted, so, he joined the army and fought anyway..(stubborn Mainer) When he returned a hero the powers that be didnt dare mess with him for his little ploy.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Kim C
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 02:53 PM

Yeah, and he got elected Governor of Maine for his trouble. :)


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:20 PM

Read all about Chamberlain in one of my favorite books, Killer Angels.

And LEJ - I heard Tenting Tonight when I was only about 4 years old, and was so mesmerized by the tune, I picked it out on the piano.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Susan A-R
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 11:34 PM

Although the quality on this varies a lot, there is some interesting civil war material on this one, some of which isn't done often. The Blue and the Gray is lovely, and E Pluribus is pretty funny, although the author probably didn't intend it to be so. Just so you know, I'm the lady in lavender, and the voice on E Pluribus. http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/63/hardtack_and_homespun.html


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Frankham
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 05:04 PM

"Dixie's Land" written by Daniel Emmett, member of the Christy Minstrels was popular on the New York stage as part of a "walkaround". Emmett got as far as Cincinatti but never into the deep south. The tune was "appropriated" by a publisher from New Orleans (read stolen) and as a result found popularity in the south. Unfortunately, the song has been appropriated by the Klan and by Southern Confederate organizations and is immensely offensive to African-American people who know that it's intent is racist as it has been recently used.

As a result, I refuse to sing the song in the way that I would refuse to sing the "Wesselhorst Song" from the era of the Nazis.

It is associated with the battle flag of the Confederacy. The Confederacy was intended as an attempt to furthur the "cause" of slavery and to unite southerners as a body to advocate the superiority of the white race. If you don't believe this, then read Alexander Stephens (Vice President of the Confederacy) and his mission statement.

Frank


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,cplaem@greennet.net
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 07:50 PM

I Need some help with a song.I am a guitar player in cwar string band(not lookin for blantant plugola) and i need the lyrics for a song. "The Irish Volunteer" based on "The Bonnie Blue Flag" would be a blessing if I could find them manny thanks cpl andy


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Art Thieme
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 09:06 PM

Frank,

It was our old friend, Bob Gibson, who wrote a song called "LET THE BAND PLAY DIXIE" about Abraham Lincoln, as a healing move right after the war, having the band at the White House play "Dixie".

\Art


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 09:42 PM

For those interested in continuing this discussion, I invite you to visit "my" Civil-War Music Forum at: Where a number of subtopics are covered, including songs, instruments, fife & Drum, and events.
Commenting on previous postings: For the Teacher working on the ACW project with children; you might want to have them learn (perhaps give individual students a verse to memorize and sing in turn, while all join in on the chorus) "Richmond am a Hard Road to Travel", which is a parody song of the several bungled Union attempts to take the Confederate Capitol. The tune is the popular Minstrel tune "Jordan am a Hard Road..." and is a lively air which lends itself well to syncopated hand-clapping, and spoon/tamborine rythm. It is also a musical history lesson!
A couple of resources mentioned which I would add my testimonial to include the SILBER book, which I consider my "Civil-War Music 101 Text". It contains a good cross section of military and popular music in do-able arrangements and (mostly) reasonable keys, with guitar chords provided. If you can do 1/4 of the songs in there reasonably well, especially with authentic instrument accompaniment, you should be welcome around any CW Reenacting campfire, and your dipper will likely stay full!
Of the many albums, probably my favorite is David KINCAID's "The Irish Volunteer". It's a fairly limited genre, but his voice stands head & shoulders above the vast majority of the other Reenactors who fancy themselves as "Musicians" and promply go about selling tapes and CDs. Sgt.K's instrumentation is done with homestyle virtuosity on authentic period or replica instruments, unlike the "97th String Band" who use flat-top steel-strung guitars and modern bluegrass banjos. Oh how I wish that David K. would start rolling out MORE!!
Somebody mentioned that banjos were all 4-string or "tenor" units during the CW; to my studied understanding, the more common banjos were 5-string (gut) with fretless necks, friction pegs, calfskin heads, and larger (up to 14" dia.) hoops than we have nowadays. The banjo was much more popular in America at the time than was the guitar, which was just becoming accepted thanks largely to the efforts of Mr. Justin HOLLAND whose performance and teaching of an "Americanized" version of the Classical technique of guitar was just catching on about the time of the ACW. I have a later (1880) printing of his Instruction Book from which I try to develop a "period" fingerpicking technique. Guitars were of the small-bodied "Parlor" type which remained popular in the U.S. through the 1930s. It seems that a few Luthiers are starting a "comeback" of the little "Parlors" which should be good news to Reenactors, as originals in any kind of condition are getting hard to come by. I'm not sure but what Martin may have re-introduced one of it's earlier models. My Parlor guitar is also gut-strung, as were most guitars back then. It has a unique feel and tone, especially on the little guitar, and anyone wishing to reproduce that authentic sound would be well advised to invest in and string up with a good set.
I also notice mention of "Rock Me to Sleep, Mother" in a period diary; The lyrics of this piece were written by a Portland ME woman, Elizabeth Akers ALLAN, who was a CW Correspondant as well as a Poetess and Sculptress. She never got credit for her work in the publications of the song, and went through an arduous and generally fruitless court case to try to recover royalties. We dug up a copy of the music (there are several versions, some of which can be found in the LEVY Collection)in the attic of the 5th ME Regimental Retreat on Peak's Island in Casco Bay, and it is a lovely, haunting lullaby which was apparantly quite popular in it's day, but which has been heard by very few currently alive today. If it's not on the DB, drop me e-mail and I can post you a scanning or transcription. I thrashed out chords to it which seem to work pretty well, but it is not a particularly easy piece. Another interesting song written by a Mainer is "The Corporal's Musket" which surfaced at the Redmond Museum along with other family artifacts. A Mr. LOCKE from Bethel ME wrote "Marching on to Richmond" early in the War - a fairly catchy, albiet prematurely optomistic - patriotic theme.
I have accumulated a modest collection of American music in various forms - mostly books and hymnals - from 1800 to around the turn of the Century, including some CW - themed songs that I've never heard of before. Many of these are pretty nondescript and probably deserved their plunge into obscurity.. but every now and then we uncover a pretty neat little tune! If there is a way to post scanned scores on here, let me know, as I wouldn't mind sharing some of these discoveries with fellow Folkies who share an interest in that period of History and it's music. Most of you could do them a lot more justice, I suspect, than can I. Perhaps we can schedule a "Civil War Hearme" Night - perhaps Nov. 11, Memorial Day? What thinkest Thou?
For God and Country:
John "Uncle Jaque" Clarke, Fifer
3rd Regiment MAINE Volunteer Infantry

Fife & Drum Corps


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 11:05 PM

Jaque,excellent post.Please list your web site address so we can visit!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,jaze
Date: 23 Sep 00 - 01:08 AM

On "Will The Circle Be Unbroken" II, Emmylou Harris does a beautiful song called "Mary Danced With Soldiers"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 23 Sep 00 - 01:21 AM

I'm with Leej there Unk!!! Howzabout some more info?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 23 Sep 00 - 09:54 AM

Tried to post a "Link", but it apparantly failed to make it through the censors(?) Lets try again: 3rd Maine Website:
http://www.powerlink.net/mcgill/
Civil War Musician's Forum:
http://www.delphi.com/cwmusic/messages/


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: mg
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 02:46 AM

actually Memorial Day is in May and NOvember 11 is Veterans' Day....I think it is a great idea but would probably pick another day...Memorial Day which has Civil War origins or another day that has meaning to the Civil War, as people might want to honor veterans of all wars (what a thought) on Veterans' Day...mg


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 12:28 PM

It always surprises (and pleases) me, the interest people have in the American Civil War era and subject songs. I play several and they go over well with Celtic and Folk audiences, and they work in Pubs too. Not surprisingly, the history of this era produced some memorable stories and songs.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Frankham
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 12:41 PM

Art,

Bob probably couldn't have forseen the adoption on the song Dixie by the Klan and as associated with the battle flag. A better healing would be to place the song in it's present perspective and not sing it. There's nothing healing about presenting this song to black people. It's divisive.

Frank


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 09:48 PM

Cpl. Andy: The Lyrics for the "Irish Volunteer" are in the cover booklet contained in David KINCAID'S excellent CD by the same title.
"My name is Tim McDonald, I'm a native of the Isle,
Was born among old Erin's bogs when I was just a child.
My Father fought in "'98" for liberty so dear;
He fell upon old Vinegar Hill like an Irish Volunteer.
Then raise the harp of Erin, boys, the flag we all revere;
We'll fight and fall beneath it's folds, like Irish volunteers!"
For the other 5 verses, Lad, ye'll have ter save up yer tin and buy the CD! I doubt ye'll regret it; it's one of my favorites! A contemporary composition of Davie's on that CD is one that'll make yer hair stand on end; "Free and Green". There's a pretty eerie story behind it as well! For God & Country: "Uncle Jaque" 3rd ME Field Music


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Burke
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 06:11 PM

While looking for something else entirely, I found a hymn book (no music) published in North Carolina during the Civil War. Unfortunately they did not include any tune names.

Here you go: Hymns for the Camp. 1862


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Burke
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 06:13 PM

while looking for something else entirely, I found a hymn books (no music) published in North Carolina during the Civil War. Unfortunately they did not include any tune names.

Here you go: Hymns for the Camp. 1862

Dupe to fix link.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Robby
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 10:46 AM

If I missed these, I'm sure I'll hear about it. But, what about Battle Cry of Freedom, a march claimed by both sides. Also, what about John Brown's Body, which uses the same melody that was later used for the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

Maybe someone else can shed some more light on this, but I was once told that The Bonnie Blue Flag was the most hated Confederate song of the war in the North. So much so that for many years after the end of the war it was banned by an Act of Congress. Just curious to learn if I am remembering correctly.

As for Dixie, one of the local high schools around Pittsburgh, and one of the more ethnically diverse ones at that, recently found out just how controversial that song is and how divisive it was among the students and the community.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Robby
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 10:48 AM

As soon as I clicked on "submit message' I realized that I might have erred on the melody used for John Brown's Body. If I did, I know you all will let me know about it.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Robby
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 11:01 AM

I have one last question on this general topic, which I neglected to ask earlier. I understand that Garry Owen was the Regimental Song of the U.S. 7th Cavalry under George Armstrong, and perhaps was also popular among troops during the Civil War (now that's an oxymoron), but I had alway thought that the title should be spelled as one word, Garryowen, in reference to the suburb(?) of the City of Limerick (check the lyrics to Jackets Green. Otherwise, how does one make any sense to the line of the chorus: No man for debt shall go to jail from Garryowen in glory?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Kim C
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 11:12 AM

Mary Danced With Soldiers is a modern song written by Emmylou's ex-husband Paul Kennerly. Good tune, though.

Alexander Stephens was a Politician. I do not believe that his "famous speech" adequately represented the views of the working class people of the South, as he was trying to pander to the planter aristocracy, because that's where the money was, and the South was going to need money if they were going to fight a war. And that's all I'm going to say about that.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 03 Oct 00 - 03:30 PM

Sorry to get into this a little late. Thanks to Uncle Jaque for some good info. About the four string banjo. Folks like to think that it came before the five stringer. Not so, that is the tenor banjo and it's longer necked cousin, the plectrum. The tenor came about in the 20's when folks were hunting around for a string instrument loud enough to hold up to the brass in jazz bands. Proof of the five string during the Civil War? Look at almost any photo of a crew on a war ship of that time. There will be a banjo player there with the five stringer.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: bob schwarer
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 02:27 PM

I did not read all of the items in this thread so if this is a duplicate, sorry.

Go to: http://users.enols.com/kfraser/index.html

A nice collection of songs of the period.

Bob S.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Kim C
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 02:36 PM

Rex is right about the banjo. Also lots and lots of paintings of the period depict banjos. The Atlanta History Center has a nice banjo on display in their Civil War exhibit - and it has frets. Mister thinks that maybe it was modified after the war to have frets as CW-era banjos typically did not have them.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 02:44 PM

For banjo evolvement and it's use go to www.drhorsehair.com.

A great site.

Richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MV
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 05:03 PM

The First Brigade Band, a nationally known performance group using all authentic period instruments and costumed in appropriate garb has CDs and tapes of Civil War tunes and songs. Arrangements are typical of the period.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 06:10 PM

Silly question? There are quite a few mentions of "bones" players in bands of the era.Did they play actual bones,or was this a term for sticks or blocks?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: kimmers
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 11:51 PM

For all of the words to "Irish Volunteer" you can go to David Kincaid's Haunted Field music web site. Here is the address for the page that contains the lyrics: http://www.hauntedfieldmusic.com/Lyrics.html

I have yet to buy the CD myself, but I intend to.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MartinRyan
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 10:14 AM

I'm afraid I haven't been through this thread - but I just came across THIS which may be of interest if it hasn't been covered already.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 05:31 PM

Why sure EJ, the first bones that were played were real bones. Rib bones. I have a nice set that I borrowed from a mule that was skattering them to the four winds anyway. I like that Dr. Horsehair site. Love the Flesher minstral banjos.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 05:45 PM

Thanks Rex,I owe you a beer for that.Actually,I think that makes two beers I owe you.We'll catch up.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: SINSULL
Date: 25 Sep 01 - 11:55 PM

No mention here of the classic tear jerkers "Faded Coat Of Blue" and Somebody's Darling".The latter became a source of a somewhat bitter black humor with soldiers on burial detail referring to the dead as somebody's darlings.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 26 Sep 01 - 02:42 PM

Spirituals.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Genie
Date: 26 Sep 01 - 03:36 PM

Robby mentioned " John Brown's Body, which uses the same melody that was later used for the Battle Hymn of the Republic."
I have read that Julia Ward Howe wrote the words (all umpteen stanzas) of "Battle Hymn" because she was awakened in the middle of the night in 1860 (?) by a large band of folks marching through the street singing "John Brown's Body." (I guess if you can't get back to sleep you might as well write a song!) I think that's why it was set to that music.
Does anyone know more of the story?

Also, while Lonesome EJ seems to be focusing on songs "of" the Civil War, there are some stirring songs written "about" the Civil War.
On one of The Limelighters' albums they have a medley that has excerpts from these three songs: The First Battalion
Two Brothers
Yes, I See

I don't know when these songs were written or by whom, but they are all powerful songs.

BTW, wasn't "Lorena" sort of the "Lili Marlene" of the Civil War (or the other way around?)? On the Ken Burns PBS series (either the Civil War series or the Songs Of The Civil War program) I believe he says that "Lorena" holds a special place as a War Between The States song, because soldiers on both sides would sing it together across the battlefield at night.

I would also like to mention Longfellow's poem (not the song, because the music came later)

I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day

I contains two verses specifically about the Civil War, because he wrote it during the Civil War, partly as a response to the irony of hearing Christmas bells while the cannon were thundering on Christmas Day.
There are two recently active threads that contain the lyrics and discussions of the poem.

Genie


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Andrew S
Date: 26 Sep 01 - 11:15 PM

If you want a modern blues and civil war historian, there is only one name that comes to mind. Sparky Rucker or Colonel Sparky Rucker. He is a great musician and storyteller with a great sense of humor and wit. The best recomendation for his music is "The Blue And Grey In Black and White" by Sparky and Rhonda Rucker. It is a cd entirely of old civil war songs. It will definately be something you should look in to.

Andrew


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 27 Sep 01 - 02:49 AM

I picked up a book last May at Barnes and Noble that might be of interest. It appears to be one of those "made for discount" books that appear on the "sale" tables, and I picked it up mainly because it was cheap.

War Songs and Poems of the Southern Confederacy
By an Ex-Confederate
Castle Books
ISBN 0-7858-1273-3

I paid $9.95 (US) for it.

The "Fore-Word" and title pages identify the "ex-confederate" as one H. M. Wharton DD, a "private in General Lee's Army, and are dated 1904. There is a dedication to "General John B. Gordon." There is no indication that I can find that the book was published prior to this (Castle Books) edition, year 2000.

Tunes (melody line only) are given for about a half-dozen songs. The book is almost entirely lyrics and poems. There appear to be about 200 individual poem/lyrics in the book, along with a fair amount of commentary.

As I am not much of a Civil War "buff" I don't have much of a way to judge how useful this book would be. The tone of the book is rather "preachy," and my first impression was that the individual selections were based on their "moral value" as much as on what the troops might have sung. This may just be the difference between then and now. At least a couple of the songs cited above in this thread are there. Lorena shows 6 verses.

It's hard to find a book that cheap these days, though; and it's nicely bound....

John


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 30 May 02 - 12:42 PM

Several to the tune of GIDEON'S BAND (not the DT song at all) are in THIS THREAD.

IMO we need a permathread on US Civil War songs. Using filter search I turned up a bunch that are titled "civil war songs." Be nice to pull it together....

~S~


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Hrothgar
Date: 31 May 02 - 04:11 AM

I hadn't even heard of the Mudcat when this thread started!

Has anybody ever come across the words of the hymn that William Steffe wrote, the tune of which was used for "John Brown's Body," "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," and a million other things since?

It's very easy to find any number of places that attribute the tune to Steffe, and mention the hymn, but I have never found it.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 31 May 02 - 05:11 PM

I noticed last night that Detroit PBS is going to have the series The Civil War replayed in the fall.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 31 May 02 - 07:56 PM

WYSIWYG; That is a splendid idea! How do you separate though? For example "Listen to the Mockingbird" Is a Civil War period song but not one many people associate with the Civil War unless they also know that U.S. Grant's troops parodied the song and gave it lyrics pertaining to the siege of Vicksburg. (A good portion of people only know it as the closing theme to the three stooges movies) Do you include all the music extant during the time? I ask because i believe it's a good idea and just trying to get a feel for the scope of the project. I'm open for ideas on it Kindest regards, neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 01:21 AM

First thing would be to check with Joe Offer. If he OKs it, I'd sugggest that the permathread serve first as an index to the other existing threads on Civil War songs, and then you could search up the ones that have been posted, individually, like I did for the permathread on spirituals, and list those too. (One thing that would help is if people runnning index-threads like that could have edit authorization to go back into old threads without making a new post in them, to insert keywords (such as @civil war) to help harvestors or researchers later.)

As far as where to draw the line on the time period or the cultural criteria-- if you start with the ones you KNOW fit, and work from there, soon you will develop a taste and sense for the criteria, as you go along. In my case I have been SO LUCKY to have a GREAT bunch of folks working on the spirituals project, who have a keen sense of the cultural and musical sensibilities.... it seems to me that we amount to a de facto consensus, and we sometimes have discussed such matters offthread to get an understanding.

So if Joe OKs the idea, your next step (IMO) would be to recruit a Mudcat volunteer to do the thread-edits, and a group of people who care about this sub-genre and who will take on specified parts of the job and work well together.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 12:52 PM

Neil, see this:

http://www.stephen-foster-songs.de/Archiv01.htm

You might want to download a bunch of text and MIDI files from there before it vanishes.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Bruce, Melbourne Australia
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 08:29 PM

For a good recording of Civil War song the National Geographic Society release a one called "Songs of the Civil War" (00789 Sterro) many years ago, using various artists but some of the names are Elizabeth Corrigan, Tommy Thomspon, rolan breed, Raymond Bazemore and other.

This recording was part of a collection that included, Steamboat's A-Comin', (07787 Sterro), Songs & Sounds of the Sea (705 Sterro)and Rebels and Redcoats (07788 Sterro).

I know there was a lot more in this series but ther were not obtainable in Australia.

Bruce D


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 09:31 PM

Cool! Susan, thanks by the by, somebody mentioned parlour guitars and the possibility that Martin might be manufacturing them, Any info would be appreciated as to availability and cost. Neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:21 PM

Civil War songs that touch on the war are obvious for the list, as WYSIWYG says, but all of the popular songs, composed or folk, secular and religious, were sung around the fires at night or while marching or waiting between marches. Some would have been put together many years before. Largely Irish units would sing songs of the auld sod along with the new ones that they were learning. Officers on leave would sing more sophisticated songs with families and friends. Irish Sergeant mentioned this, and I agree with his drift- where do you cut this off?

Early in this thread someone asked for the camp-meeting song whose tune was taken for John Brown's Body and The Battle Hymn. There is so much here that I don't know if he got an answer. It was composed by George Pullen Jackson of South Carolina, "Say, Brother, Will You Meet Us?" Rex posted the song in thread 20569: Say Brother


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:25 PM

OPPS! Say brother


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:27 PM

Could one of the gods that be cut this thread at 100 and put the rest in a part 2? If practicable.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:53 PM

We have a motion on the floor from WYSIWYG to permathread a CW Music "room", if you will.
Neil; was that a "Second" to that motion, or more of a "Discussion"?
Point well taken, however; how about "Music of the American Civil War (era?)" which it seems to me would cover about anything being sung, hummed, plucked, or warbled during those pivotal four years?

Do we hear a "Second"? Heck I'll second that!

All in favor say "Aye!".

AYE!!!

And regardless of the outcome of that vote, I'll also second friend Dicho's brilliant motion to move this thread along, one way or another! It's one that would draw a lot more attention, methinks, if it didn't keep sinking out of sight into the archival abyss.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Hrothgar
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 08:06 AM

If "Say, Brother, Will You Meet Us?" whose tune was taken for "John Brown's Body" and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" was composed by George Pullen Jackson of South Carolina, why do all the sources I remember cite William Steffe as the composer of the tune for JBB and TBHOTR?

The one most immediately to hand is "Singing Soldiers - A History of the Civil War in Song," put out by Paul Glass and Louis C. Singer. I think it has some claims to authority.

The sheet music published by Oliver Oilson & Co described the song as being "adapted to the favourite melody of 'Glory Hallelujah,'" of which I have not heard elsewhere.

Should I post a copy of this in the "Say, Brother, Will You Meet Us?" thread?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Eileen Smith
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 03:51 AM

I realize it has been two years since the question was asked about the tune "Dear Evalina, Sweet Evalina" but I have the answer. Actually the coincidence is astounding. A friend tonight sent me a URL that eventually led me to this web site. Following another path from the URL a few minutes earlier led me to a midi of Dear Evalina, which happened to be my father's favorite song. The only copy of the sheet music I have ever seen was in the Library of Congress in Washington.

So here's the URL for the midi/lyrics to Dear Evalina, Sweet Evalina. http://www.contemplator.com/america/evelina.html

My father grew up on the prairies of Saskatchewan, born in 1909. I suspect he learned the song from a traveling minstrel show.

This is a wonderful web site. I've learned a lot tonight.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 10:26 AM

LET'S CONTINUE HERE

.

That's another already-existing thread that only has 6 posts in it right now, so it has LOTS of room. (There is a third general "Civil War Songs" thread with 40 posts.) Let's see if Neil and Joe get together about a permathread-- Neil can pull from all the existing threads for it if that goes forward. For now, let's just keep posting in the existing threads to we don't create MORE places for Neil, or others, to look.

~Susan


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Subject: Lyr Add: SWEET EVELINA
From: masato sakurai
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 11:03 AM

I know the thread is too long, but this is a continuation from Eileen Smith's post above.

I didn't know that "Dear Evelina, Sweet Evelina" had been asked for. I remember singing the song more than 20 years ago; it was in a songbook for schools published in Japan. The original title is "Sweet Evelina". Sheet music at the Levy Collection is:

Title: Sweet Evelina.
Composer, Lyricist, Arranger: Words by M. Melody by T. Composed and Arranged for the Piano Forte, By Mrs. Parkhurst.
T. Mrs. Parkhurst Publication: New York: Horace Waters, 481 Broadway, 1863.
Form of Composition: strophic with chorus
Instrumentation: piano and voice
First Line: 'Way down in the meadow where the lily first blows
First Line of Chorus: Sweet Evelina, dear Evelina, my love for thee shall never, never die
Performer: As Sung by all the Minstrel Bands.
Dedicatee: To Mr. C.M. Tremaine, of Brooklyn, L.I.
Engraver, Lithographer, Artist: Stackpole, Sc.
Subject: Courtship & love
Subject: Moonlight
Subject: Country life
Call No.: Box: 131 Item: 121

SWEET EVELINA

1.
Way down in the meadow where the lily first blows,
Where the wind from the mountain ne'er ruffles the rose;
Lives fond Evelina, the sweet little dove,
The pride of the valley, the girl that I love.

CHORUS
Sweet Evelina, dear Evelina,
My love for thee shall never, never die.
Dear Evelina, sweet Evelina,
My love for thee shall never, never die.

2.
She's fair as a rose, like a lamb she is meek,
And she never was known to put paint on her cheek;
In the most graceful curls hangs her raven-black hair,
And she never requires perfumery there.

(CHORUS)

3.
Evelina and I, one fine evening in June,
Took a walk all alone by the light of the moon;
The plants all shone for the heavens were clear,
And I felt round the heart, oh! most mightily queer.

(CHORUS)

4.
Three years have gone by and I've not got a dollar,
Evelina still lives in the green valley holler,
Altho' I am fated to marry her never,
I'll love her I'm sure for ever and ever.

(CHORUS)

Two song sheet editions (texts only) are at America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets (Library of Congress). Another song to the same tune ("The retreat of the grand army from Bull Run." Air.- "Sweet Evelina." Baltimore, Md. [n. d.]) is also there (Click here); this is a song about the Civil War.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 11:30 AM

Thanks, Masato. Another good way to do that would be to make a clicky back to this thread's relevant post, in the other thread-- when a thread goes to a Part Two, it's not at all uncommon to have answers in Part Two, for requests made in Part One.

LET'S CONTINUE HERE

.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Diane
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 03:14 PM

I would like to buy a copy of Tennessee Ernie Ford's Civil Wr Songs of the South. I haven't been able to find it anywhere. can anyone help me--PLEASE!!!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 04:24 PM

A very late second on the Civil War Thread All in Favor SHout Huzzah! Neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Apr 04 - 12:38 PM

I am looking for a song about the battle of buckland mills or the battle of chestnut hill. This was a cavalry battle that the south won so it is probably a southern song. lyrics may have been added to song
similar to jine the cavalry. The generals involved were3 jeb Stuart, buford Custer and kilpatrick. Battle occured on October 19, 1863. The song also contains words "Buckland races" . Whoever is first to find it will make a generous contribution or pay you a more than fair amount for song and music
Thanks
Bill Fletcher


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,"Buckland races" ?
Date: 05 Apr 04 - 12:41 PM

my e-mail is fletcherlaw@earthlink.net if you find anything please contact me


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Apr 04 - 02:14 PM

There are a bunch of fine CDs containg songs of what dome of my southern friends still rfer to "The Recent Unpleasantness". Bobby Horton, who must be the buffiest Civil War buff in existence has six CDs of "Songs of the CSA" and four pf "Songs of the Union Army/"

David Kincaid's "The Irish Volunteer" is, IMO, superb. He's followed it up with "The Irish-American's Song"--songs of Irish troops on both sides of the conflict.
Folk-Legacy's Barton and Para Civil War CDs are fine stuff, too.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 06 Apr 04 - 01:45 PM

There's also This one


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 06 Apr 04 - 05:35 PM

There are a few sets of lyrics to several of the tunes popular during the era. Does this one work?

Buckland Races

On a march with Master Lee
In October sixty three
With the tears of Bristoe Station in our eyes
Took a turn at Centerville
Made a stand at Buckland Mills
Where the "Rebel yell" rose upward to the skies

Chorus:

Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The Buckland Races;
Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The day is won!
Drink a health to General Stuart
And the Rebel boys who knew it
Sent Kilpatrick and his Yankees on the run!

On the road to Warrenton
Stuart's battle plans begun:
Sheild the rebels at Manassas on the move
At a place called Chestnut Hill
Drew the Yankees there to kill
And we sent the rest a runnin' ballyhoo

Chorus:

Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The Buckland Races;
Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The day is won!
Drink a health to General Stuart
And the Rebel boys who knew it
Sent Kilpatrick and his Yankees on the run!

{repeat chorus}


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 06 Apr 04 - 05:38 PM

melody and old lyrics here


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,smlanna@msn.com
Date: 31 May 04 - 05:34 PM

Trying to find words to poem "the Blue and The Gray" forgot who wrote it, but it started, By the flow of the inland river
                         Where fleets of       have fled
                         Where the blands of the grave grass quiver
                         Asleep are the ranks of the died
                         Under the sod and the drew
                         Awaiting the judgement day
                         Under the the Blue
                         Under the other the Gray.
There also is another old CW poem I don't remember much but the name "The Black Regigment" would like any info you can supply. thanks


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Tracy
Date: 02 Aug 04 - 11:31 AM

Grinter Place Friends are still accepting bands for Apple Fest. Please call Tracy at 913.568.3686 or e-mail grinterplacefriends@yahoo.com or visit us on the web at www.grinterplacefriends.bravepages.com.
All preformers will be allowed to sell merchandise and may also consign it in the gift shop the rest of the year.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: masato sakurai
Date: 02 Aug 04 - 01:27 PM

"The Blue and the Gray" lyrics, posted in forum.

Five editions of sheet music are at American Memory, and 8 editions are at The Levy Sheet Music Collection.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 02 Aug 04 - 04:38 PM

Thanks Tracy for posting this info and booking this weekend for me. I am looking forward to participating!

I cannot get the website to work. Is this link correct?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Aug 04 - 11:33 AM

Web site is back up. The server was just down for maintence.

I love your music, looking forward to hearing you live!!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 03 Aug 04 - 07:22 PM

Ahoy; Saw this thread up and said; "My; we had a thread of the very same name going some 4 years ago..."

It never did achieve permathread status, did it? Pity.

Oh; The third Maine Infantry has a new web site now:

THIRD MAINE VOLUNTEERS

Check us out; We're goin' great blazes!


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Subject: Mean Mary and Frank Jamse
From: GUEST,Zipo
Date: 07 Aug 04 - 04:07 PM

Need help in finding these people.

I remember them back in 93 when they performed live at a civil war site now a state park.

They have went on I think to make more albums but you might recall Hard Times.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 31 Aug 04 - 12:06 PM

I can't find much on these folks - seems they were yound when they started recording these:

Rebel Rousers - By Mean Mary & Frank James
Hard Times - By Mean Mary & Frank James
Something To Remember - By Mean Mary and Frank James

One music review said they are

"A duet comprised of a brother and a sister, Mean Mary ably handles the vocals and the two of them have exceptional technical skills with each of the variety of instruments they play."

In 1992 one CW re-enactor described Mary as "a 14 year-old Tennessean with a gravelly whiskey-voice."

I place Mean Mary" Civil War Music into Google, and found just a couple of appropriate articles.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: KentuckyPat
Date: 31 Aug 04 - 10:32 PM

The Lester S. Levey Collection held by the library at Johns Hopkins University is wonderful---the Civil War era sheet music is all DOWNLOADABLE. Here's a blue clicky to send you to the university's library. www.jhu.edu/library
Once you hit that web site, chose the library Special Collections list. Then click on the Lester S. Levey Collection.
    Speaking of Civil War music, has anyone else commented on the similarities and differences between Stephen Foster's "Gentle, My Darling" a popular hit of 1861, the summer the War started, and "Who Will Tell his Mother, that her Poor Boy is Gone," a song sung in 1862 at the time of the Battle of Antietam (26,000 men killed, wounded or missing in action in one awful day).
    If you ever get to Sharpsburg (near the Antietam Battlefield) ask for a tour of the Christ Reform Church on Main Street. It was a field hospital for Confederates and Union soldiers after Antietam. The stained glass windows tell a war story.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 31 Aug 04 - 11:57 PM

Sharpsburg is where the first Irish-born commander of the 6th Louisiana fell, Henry Strong. The were known as an Irish Regiment and were fiercely proud of their Irish born Col. He was replaced, by another Irish born commander, Col Wm Monaghan - Monaghan gave his life at Shepardstown ...


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Mingulay
Date: 01 Sep 04 - 06:20 AM

Although it is not strictly contemporary to the era, I would recommend
hearing Les Sullivan's song "Sullivan's Farewell" the words for which are taken from a letter written by a soldier to his wife on the eve of battle and links back of course to the Irish connection. A very beautiful and moving song which is on his (plug) CD.

Pete


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 09:54 AM

APPLE FEST this weekend.

I'm looking forward to meeting you Tracy, and hope to see another Mudcatter or two!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,laose feerick
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 10:25 AM

Speaking of Irish Regiments in The Civil War, my Sister is doing some research for her PHD on an Ancestor of ours, Michael Corcoran (He might have spelled it the Irish way.."Micheal", I'm not sure.) of the Fighting 69th Irish Brigade from NY. He died shortly after the war but was involved in some rather daring deeds including a prison break while in Confederate custody. Before he set off to the War proper, Corcoran was involved in quelling the deadly draft Riots in NYC which turned into an all out uprising. We are descended not from him directly but through his family that remained in Ireland. Technically, I guess he isn't an ancestor...we share a link to his Father.

I have heard that there are several songs that reference him directly and/or his exploits in the Civil War. Does anyone know of any?

Maureen, my older sister is a Folk singer and frequent performer in Providence and surounding environs of Rhode Island and I know she'd love to include any songs about the 69th in her repetoire. She's also one of those Re-enactors who demonstrates womens' crafts, cooking and other technology of that Era.

I'd be grateful for any song titles and lyrcis.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 03:48 PM

Have her get a hold of Derek Warfiled's album, The Son of Erin. She'll find some lovely music there, including a song or two about Michael Cocoran. Corcoran is mentioned in a few CW songs.

Also - have her look into David Kincaid's music. I know Kincaid sings a song or two about Corcoran. Both of these guys have done extensive research and the albus inclde good notes and refereneces.

And here are my songs. No references to your relative, though ...

best of luck!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,WHS STUDENT
Date: 20 Jan 05 - 01:18 PM

Hi! I have to do a project for my history class with the theme being "Communication- the key to understanding". I chose to do my project on the Music of the Civil War and how it helped the soldiers and their familes cope with what is going on. If you have any particular sources, songs, or especially educated people i could talk to, i'd really appreciate you letting me know. You can reply on this website, or e-mail me at theleighs@cox.net
Thank you so much
I really appreciate it
-T


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Gordo
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 09:29 AM

T
Remember that songs of the Civil War era come from an entirely different time. There was no TV, radio, or organized sports. Most of the soldiers in the war had never travelled more than 20 miles from home, and many were illiterate. There was no repid communication. Telegraph was being used, but primarily for the military. Singing and music were about the only form of entertainment available to many households, especially the soldiers. Most homes were still illuminated by candles, oil lamps, or hearth fires. It was difficult to read after dark, so self made entertainment was about all there was.
Most songs from the war can trace their roots to the Scots-Irish. Words may be changed, but the melodies remained. Remember, this was a time of great immigration from Ireland. Since the Union had most of the Southern ports blocaded, and due to the repressive political climate of Ireland, nearly all of the immigration was to the North. These men had no jobs, so enlisting in the army was a good way to get work. The army even had recruiting set up as the men left the boats.
By today's standards, the songs will seem overly sentimental. Marches were good for troops moving - songs like DIXIE, BONNIE BLUE FLAG, and TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP, but when the soldiers were around the campfire they would sing of home, loved ones left behing, comrades who had been killed, and the distinct possibility of being killed themselves in the near future. These would inlude such songs as LORENA, SOMEBODY'S DARLING, and JOHNNY HAS GONE FOR A SOLDIER. Some of the songs at home reflected wartime conditions, such as HARD TIMES COME AGAIN NO MORE. This referred to events such as the devistation of Sherman's march and the destruction of the Shenandoah Valley.
There are many books and recordings to obtain this era music.
I hope I have helped a bit.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Goose Gander
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 10:36 AM

Henry Belden's Songs and Ballads Collected by Missouri Folk-Lore Society has some Civil War songs collected in the early 20th century. There is some fairly obscure material, including some Yankee songs parodied with pro-Confederate lyrics.

I think the best Civil War songs are the ones that are not about the war, but about what soldiers on both sides were homesick for ("Girl I Left Behind", "Lorena", etc.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: masato sakurai
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 10:45 AM

21 audio recordings are at Digital History.

Type: Civil War

Battle Hymn of the Republic, Performed by: Thomas Chalmers
Battle Hymn of the Republic, Performed by: Richard Warrenrath
Blue and the Grey, Performed by: Harry Macdonough
Boys of the Old Brigade, Performed by: Chatauqua Preachers' Quartet
Dixie Land, Performed by: Peerless Quartet
Down Where the Swanee River Flows, Performed by: Hayden Quartet
Goodbye Dolly Gray, Performed by: Hugh Donovan
Just Before the Battle, Mother, Performed by: Harry Macdonough
Just Before the Battle, Mother, Performed by: John Young
Marching Through Georgia, Performed by: Harlan and Stanley
Maryland, My Maryland, Performed by: Herbert Stuart
My Maryland March, Performed by:
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, Performed by: S.H. Dudley
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, Performed by: John Young
Vacant Chair, Performed by: Harry Macdonough
Vacant Chair, Performed by: Hayden Quartet
War Songs, Performed by: Victor Male Chorus
War Songs March, Performed by:
When Johnny Comes Marching Home, Performed by: John Terrill
When Johnny Comes Marching Home, Performed by: John Terrill
When Johnny Comes Marching Home, Performed by: Farrar and Columbia Quartet


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Lighter at Work
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 11:07 AM

"Hard Times" was written by Stephen Foster in 1859.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Lighter at Work
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 11:10 AM

This is the first time I've seen the assertion that the "Scots-Irish" were responsible for most Civil War songs. I wonder what the evidence might be ?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 11:53 AM

Guest:
If you research many of the songs, and try to find the roots of the song and melody, you will find the evidence. You may also look in the music collected from Appalachia, the Smokey Mountains, and along the Shenandoah. The trail is there for much of the pre-Civil War music also. Just take the time. It is interesting. I have been collecting this music for over 50 years. By the way, have you ever traced the song Streets of Laredo back to its origins? It, too, has Civil War versions, but it apparently originated in England sometime in the 1600s as The Unfortunate Rake.
Gordo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 12:03 PM

Yes, but what about ''green" Irish songs + ballads(mid-19th century immigrants, usually Unionists), what about influence of broadside balladry / songbooks / sheet music, what about Scottish + Northumbrian dance music (not necessarily Scots-Irish). And there's probably some stuff I''ve left out, but let me just put this on the table.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Lighter at work
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 12:17 PM

What you say, Gordo, is more or less true about Ozark and Appalachian "folk songs" about the war (though descendants of the English were pretty numerous too and producing American folk sings as well). But so many of the songs sung during the Civil War were commercial products written by professionals in Boston and New York, "pop hits" really. The number of folk songs created during the war is very large, but pales in comparison with the output of the pros like George F. Root and Henry C. Work. The South also had a thriving music industry until the economy went belly up.

Just as a footnote, the well-known Yankee song "Marching Through Georgia," by Henry C. Work, didn't come out till March 1865, so it's unlikely that many soldiers got to hear it before the war was over, and probably none in Sherman's army, which was then in North Carolina.

So if you ever see a movie that has CSA soldiers playing "Marching Through Georgia" during the Civil War, it's doubly wrong!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 12:22 PM

Great!! All of this has contributed to American Folk Music and Civil War Era music. There is also German influence to be found. What I was trying to say was that the Civil War music was influenced greatly by the Scot-Irish. I did not mean to slight the other sources you named, but rather lumped them together.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Gordo
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 03:13 PM

Lighter at work:
Thanks again! By the way, you dare not sing or play MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA in Georgia to this day. Also, nearly all towns and villages in Georgia have Civil War monuments. ALL of the cannons in these monuments are facing due north.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,saulgoldie
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 06:05 PM

Glad to see "Let The Band Play Dixie mentioned. One of my favorite songs.

chords & lyrics:
(I'll sing it for anyone who needs to hear the tune. Don't yet know how to do that digital tune thingie.)

        LET THE BAND PLAY DIXIE

        C                Am               F            G
The news was run from Richmond in that fading April Sun;
        C               Am                 F               G
That Lee had handed Grant his sword, the war was finally won.
Am
Into the streets the people spilled,
D7
Feeling the excitement build,
            F
And the crowd around the Whitehouse milled,
                                G
Asking is it true, it's finally done?

*Inside the Whitehouse Lincoln heard them calling out his name.
He sat there wondering what to say to ease their years of pain.
Someone yelled, "Come out the door, tell us what you have in store
For the rebels who've lost the war, so out upon the porch Abe Lincoln came.

*He said, "We are gathered not in anger, but in celebration.
Let's be grateful we are once again a single nation.
Let's stand together reassured, now that peace has been secured,
Our nation's illness can be cured, and I suggest the overture for this ocassion...
(cho.)
C                
Let the band Play Dixie,
Am                                        G
Play that song that holds its head up high and proud,
      F                    G                   C                 Am
And let our nation once divided, bloodied but unbowed,
F                    G                        C              Am
Take the swords of war and beat them back into a plow."
        F                G                C                 Am        F/G
On the day that Lee surrendered, Mr. Lincoln told the crowd,
                        C        
"Let the band play Dixie!"

*A tired Union soldier hobbled on his only limb,
Filled with bitter memories the war had left with him.
Dragged his wooden leg and cane, his face was set and creased with pain, he stumbled, fell, and         rose again,
And he wondered what the future held for him.

*He spied a Black child kneeling there in humble gratitude.
He knelt down right beside her to share her thankful mood.
Grateful words were raised in prayer, God in your sweet loving care,
Our broken lives now please repair, let our wounded nation be renewed. And...

cho


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,saulgoldie
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 06:07 PM

Oops! Despite my best efforts, the chords didn line up. Guess you'll HAVE to suffer through my rendition if you want to hear it. I'll be in my office...


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 06:17 PM

Let the Band Play is a 20th c. composition by Gibson and North, not a Civil War era song. The story is apocryphal, as noted elsewhere by Joe Offer. Thread 17279: Let the band

It is a good song, though.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Feb 05 - 11:16 PM

I don't think this one has been posted.

My Name It Is Dan Martin
Cat. #0900 (MFH #447) - As sung by Jimmy (Driftwood) Morris, Timbo, Arkansas on August 30, 1969



VERSE 1
My name it is Dan Martin
I was raised in Arkansas
Jined up with th rebels
Just t' spite my mother-in-law
T'was on th seventh day of March
In eighteen sixty two
We fought th yankees on Pea Ridge
Till we were black an' blue

CHORUS:
O who's Price a fighting
Somebody I do know
It surely is th fed-er-als
For I hear their cannous roar
Whos' Price a fighting
Somebody I do know
It surely is th fed-er-als
For I hear their cannous roar

VERSE 2
Th yankees gathered 'round us
In th darkness of th night
They planted all their batteries
An' waited till daylight
Earli in th morning
We had to leave th ground
Th bullets an' th cannonballs
Were cuttin' thousands down

VERSE 3
Some took up th left hand road
Some took to their right
McCullock took th straightest course
An' led us int' th fight
Price came dashing down th road
His horse was a sweeping pace
An' when he heard of McCullock's death
Th tears rolled down his face

VERSE 4
Th bullets whistled thru th air
Brave Van Dorr, lost his hat
For about a mile and a half
He laid th bushes flat
Price jumps up an' scattered fence
All this he did not dread
But all that lay upon his mind
Was a little lump of lead

VERSE 5
Price said, boys I never shall
Surrender to th foe
Before I'll bow to Abraham
I'll go to Mexico (an' he did)
I got a bullet in th leg
Another one in my craw
An' I thought I never would get home
T' my dear old mother-in-law


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 05 - 08:21 PM

Way, way up above, was mentioned the popularity of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" with soldiers during The War Between the States.
Confederate troops samg it, much like the DT version "The Girl I left Behind Me" (no modifiers), but with this chorus:

But if ever I get thro' this war,
And Lincoln's boys don't bind me,
I'll make my way right back again
To the girl I left behind me.

P. 16, Allan, Francis D., 1874, "Allan's Lone Star Ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made During Confederate Times," 200 pp., Burt Franklin, New York (Reprint 1970). Burt Franklin: Research and Source Works Series 578; American Classics in History and Social Science 153 (Lenox Hill).
A good source of Confederate Songs

The fifth couplet is:
The bees shall lavish, make no store,
And the dove become a ranger.
The falling water cease to roar,
Before I'll ever change her.

Many sing 'the bees shall languish,' destroying the meaning.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 May 05 - 02:42 PM

"That Bugler, or the Up-I-Dee Song," Civil War version of the Upidee Song, is attributed to "the late Sergeant A. G. Knight, Second Company Battallion Washington Artillery [CSA], New Orleans, LA."
The lyrics and attribution are given in thread 55144: Youkaida

p. 144, in Francis D. Allan, 1874, "Allan's Lone Star Ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made During Confederate Times. Burt Franklin, New York. Reprint Lenox Hill (Burt Franklin), 1970.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 23 May 05 - 09:18 AM

I've begun work on a second Civil War collection. It'll be a few months before I record any, but have much it planned out - and a few songs written. This will be a Confederate collection. I love what I've done so far.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Alaska Mike
Date: 23 May 05 - 09:52 AM

I have a new CD coming out this summer with an original song about the CSS Shanandoah which was sent to Alaska to harass the Yankee Whaling fleet towards the end of the Civil War. Although Lee surrendered in April 1865, Captain Waddell continued to plunder Yankee commerce until August when he finally learned of the war's end. So the final battles of the war were actually fought in Alaskan waters.

Best wishes,
Mike


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Melani
Date: 23 May 05 - 02:03 PM

Mike, I am right this minute re-reading a book titled, "Confederate Raider in the North Pacific," by Murray Morgan--a very pleasantly written and entertaining book. I'm guessing you know it.
I was also bemoaning the fact that I know a song about the Alabama, but none about the Shenandoah. Please let us know as soon as your CD is available and how to get it.

I have been seriously considering joining the Confederate Navy as a reenactor--like I have time for that! Oh, well, life's too short for sleeping!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 30 May 05 - 08:49 PM

Mike - I'd love to hear the song. Any chance you can send me a "preview" of the track? What can you tell me about the song? What inspired you to write it?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 01 Jun 05 - 09:30 AM

Re: the CSS Shenadoah, I found a nice, brief on-line history here and another one here.

It looks like as a Confederate war ship, the Shenandoah had a short but interesting run (little over a year). I juts now ordered a book from Amazon called The Voyage of the CSS Shenandoah : A Memorable Cruise. It looks like a good history, based upon the Captain logs. I'll follow up on this thread once I've read it.

Here is the book at Amazon.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 01 Jun 05 - 09:32 AM

... on a musician's salary, I bought from 'used book' category.

;-)


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 01 Jun 05 - 07:02 PM

Terrific thread. I've really enjoyed reading this!   Thankyou to all the contributors!

all the best

big Al Whittle


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bobert
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 07:45 PM

Haven't read this entire thread but there is a song I used to do that was written by Fred Dobbs and recorded by a Georgia (US) band that went by the name of Harts Field... The song title is "Drummer Boy" and I recommend that anyone lookin' for a very powerful song about the "Civil War" to find it...

B~


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 09:42 PM

Interesting to see this again. Since this thread was started (1999) our band did a "Songs of the Civil War Era" concert in 2003 and released the live recording as a CD minus all the thunderous applause and scintillating commentary! We covered songs popular during the "War Between the States" as well as a few songs written about the war in later years. There are familiar soldier songs from the period along with sentimental ballads, hymns and popular songs of the past and present, representing both the Union and the Confederacy.

Here's the song list and partial liner notes:

ShoreGrass Songs of the Civil War Era

1. Soldier's Joy (Traditional, 1760) 2:18 First published as sheet music in 1760, this song was a popular marching tune during the Revolutionary War, continued during the Civil War and people still play it today.

2. Hard Times (Stephen Foster, 1855) 4:23 Foster was an ardent unionist from Pennsylvania who lived from 7/4/1826 to 1/13/1864. His songs were popular through this period. Vocals: Paul Pozzi, the Shaws (harmony).

3. Battle Cry of Freedom (George F. Root, 1862) 1:59 George Root was a prolific writer from Sheffield, MA who wrote this widely popular song in 1862. It was parodied and also sung in the South in 1864. Both North ("union forever") and South ("rights forever") versions are sung here.

4. Dixie (Daniel Decatur Emmett, 1859) 3:40 Written in 1859 for the Northern minstrel stage, it was an instant hit on both sides. It was played at Jefferson Davis' inauguration in 1861, and Emmett, a unionist, was not pleased.

5. Two Little Boys (Edward Madden, Theodore Morse, 1903) 2:44 This song was possibly based on an earlier poem about the Civil War. A contemporary version was done by Charlie Waller.

6. Lorena (J.P. & H.D. Webster, 1857) 4:33 This song was popular in both the north and the south during the Civil War because it carried soldiers away from the drudgery and nightmare of the war. It was banned by generals on both sides because it made the men so homesick they didn't want to fight. The sad lyrics were originally written as a poem by a jilted Universalist pastor named Henry DeLafayette Webster, and the melody was supplied by his friend Joseph Philbrick Webster (no relation). After the war, Southern girls were frequently named Lorena.

7. Battle Hymn of the Republic (William Steffe & Julia Ward Howe, 1862) 2:51 Originally a Methodist song "Say brothers will you meet us on Canaan's happy shore?" Then came "John Brown's Body" about an abolitionist from VA hung for starting a slave uprising in Harpers Ferry. Next two verses were sung by the 1st Arkansas black regiment. Last two verses came to Julia Ward Howe in 1862 in a dream.

8. He Leadeth Me (Joseph Gilmore, 1862 & William Bradbury, 1864) 2:10 Based on the 23rd Psalm, these words were written during the darkest hours of the war.

9. Shall We Gather at the River (Robert Lowry, 1864) 2:25 Lowry was a Baptist minister from Brooklyn, NY who wrote this and 500 other songs.

10. The Yellow Rose of Texas (J.K., 1853) 2:07 They say the original Yellow Rose was an indentured servant, the "high yellow" Emily Morgan from New Haven, CT. She kept the Mexican general Santa Ana dallying so long that his leaderless men lost the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836 to Sam Houston, during the Mexican-American war for Texas independence. No one knows who J.K. was.

11. Oh Susanna (Stephen Foster, 1848) 1:41 Foster wrote this popular minstrel song in 1848 and it remains standard folk fare.

12. Goober Peas (Traditional) 1:44 This popular Confederate camp song is about old-fashioned peanuts, which were the short rations on which the rebel soldiers often subsisted in the waning days of the war.

13. Vacant Chair (G.F. Root & H.S. Washburn, 1861) 5:06 Henry Washburn wrote a poem about Lt. John William Grout ("our noble Willie") of the 15th MA Volunteer Infantry, who died at the Battle of Balls Bluff, VA in October, 1861. His death turned into an allegory at Thanksgiving the following month, when this poem laid bare the anguish of Grout's family at his absence from the family dinner. Washburn's verse found a sympathetic melody at the hands of the prolific songwriter George Root.

14. When the Roses Bloom Again (Cobb & Edwards, 1901) 4:19 Written long after the Civil War, but the uniform was blue and could have been about this war.

15. Follow the Drinking Gourd (Traditional) 3:00 A code song based on the Underground Railroad activities of Peg Leg Joe, a "conductor." He traveled to plantations as a handy man and gave secret instructions about a trail he marked with his peg leg for heading north by following the handle of the Big Dipper (the drinking gourd) pointing north to the Ohio River and ultimately freedom in the north.

16. Boston Boy (Traditional, 1885) 2:38 This traditional song was collected in Kentucky and Arkansas, and was also known as "Two Soldiers," recorded by many.

17. Faded Coat of Blue (J.H. McNaughton, 1865) 4:34 This mournful dirge, also known as "The Nameless Grave," was written in the waning days of the war in 1865. It expressed the feelings of tens of thousands of families throughout the war-torn land.

18. Have Someone Play Dixie For Me (Pete Roy) 4:07 This is a contemporary song written about the war from a southern perspective, showing the undying loyalty to the homeland.

19. I'm A Good Old Rebel (Major Innes Randolph, 1865) 1:44 This song was written by an officer in the CSA in the style of a semiliterate "unreconstructed" rebel. It is a song of defiance and bitter resentment toward Reconstruction, to the tune of the old wild western melody "Joe Bowers."

20. Home Sweet Home Theme (Payne & Bishop, 1823) :27 One of the most popular songs ever written, this was a continuing favorite during the Civil War. One night during the war, along the banks of the Potomac River, a group of soldiers took up this refrain. Suddenly this melody, so popular and familiar to both sides, came drifting from both sides of the Potomac. The two armies stopped their killing for the length of a song to share a common emotion.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,The Hebrew Maiden
Date: 14 May 11 - 03:13 AM

Google:

" When Israel of The Lord Beloved"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,The Hebrew Maiden : lyric link
Date: 14 May 11 - 03:21 AM

Link:

http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/w/i/wiolobel.htm


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Amos
Date: 15 Mar 17 - 05:49 PM

The ballad of Dan Martin, referring to the Battle of Pea Ridge in Missouri was posted upthread by a Guest. It is part of the Max Hunter collection and you can hear Jimmy Driftwood singing it at this page in the Collection.

Regards,

A


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