Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4]


Songs of the American Civil War

Related threads:
U.S.A.'s 'Civil War Songs' (50)
Civil War Ballads (66)


Uncle Jaque 24 Sep 00 - 09:48 PM
Burke 27 Sep 00 - 06:11 PM
Burke 27 Sep 00 - 06:13 PM
Robby 28 Sep 00 - 10:46 AM
Robby 28 Sep 00 - 10:48 AM
Robby 28 Sep 00 - 11:01 AM
Kim C 28 Sep 00 - 11:12 AM
Rex 03 Oct 00 - 03:30 PM
bob schwarer 04 Oct 00 - 02:27 PM
Kim C 04 Oct 00 - 02:36 PM
richardw 04 Oct 00 - 02:44 PM
MV 04 Oct 00 - 05:03 PM
Lonesome EJ 04 Oct 00 - 06:10 PM
kimmers 04 Oct 00 - 11:51 PM
MartinRyan 05 Oct 00 - 10:14 AM
Rex 05 Oct 00 - 05:31 PM
Lonesome EJ 05 Oct 00 - 05:45 PM
SINSULL 25 Sep 01 - 11:55 PM
wysiwyg 26 Sep 01 - 02:42 PM
GUEST,Genie 26 Sep 01 - 03:36 PM
Andrew S 26 Sep 01 - 11:15 PM
JohnInKansas 27 Sep 01 - 02:49 AM
wysiwyg 30 May 02 - 12:42 PM
Hrothgar 31 May 02 - 04:11 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 31 May 02 - 05:11 PM
Irish sergeant 31 May 02 - 07:56 PM
wysiwyg 01 Jun 02 - 01:21 AM
wysiwyg 01 Jun 02 - 12:52 PM
GUEST,Bruce, Melbourne Australia 01 Jun 02 - 08:29 PM
Irish sergeant 01 Jun 02 - 09:31 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Jun 02 - 10:21 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Jun 02 - 10:25 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Jun 02 - 10:27 PM
Uncle Jaque 01 Jun 02 - 10:53 PM
Hrothgar 02 Jun 02 - 08:06 AM
GUEST,Eileen Smith 03 Jun 02 - 03:51 AM
wysiwyg 03 Jun 02 - 10:26 AM
masato sakurai 03 Jun 02 - 11:03 AM
wysiwyg 03 Jun 02 - 11:30 AM
GUEST,Diane 27 Jun 02 - 03:14 PM
Irish sergeant 27 Jun 02 - 04:24 PM
GUEST 05 Apr 04 - 12:38 PM
GUEST,"Buckland races" ? 05 Apr 04 - 12:41 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Apr 04 - 02:14 PM
JedMarum 06 Apr 04 - 01:45 PM
JedMarum 06 Apr 04 - 05:35 PM
JedMarum 06 Apr 04 - 05:38 PM
GUEST,smlanna@msn.com 31 May 04 - 05:34 PM
GUEST,Tracy 02 Aug 04 - 11:31 AM
masato sakurai 02 Aug 04 - 01:27 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 09:48 PM

Cpl. Andy: The Lyrics for the "Irish Volunteer" are in the cover booklet contained in David KINCAID'S excellent CD by the same title.
"My name is Tim McDonald, I'm a native of the Isle,
Was born among old Erin's bogs when I was just a child.
My Father fought in "'98" for liberty so dear;
He fell upon old Vinegar Hill like an Irish Volunteer.
Then raise the harp of Erin, boys, the flag we all revere;
We'll fight and fall beneath it's folds, like Irish volunteers!"
For the other 5 verses, Lad, ye'll have ter save up yer tin and buy the CD! I doubt ye'll regret it; it's one of my favorites! A contemporary composition of Davie's on that CD is one that'll make yer hair stand on end; "Free and Green". There's a pretty eerie story behind it as well! For God & Country: "Uncle Jaque" 3rd ME Field Music


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Burke
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 06:11 PM

While looking for something else entirely, I found a hymn book (no music) published in North Carolina during the Civil War. Unfortunately they did not include any tune names.

Here you go: Hymns for the Camp. 1862


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Burke
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 06:13 PM

while looking for something else entirely, I found a hymn books (no music) published in North Carolina during the Civil War. Unfortunately they did not include any tune names.

Here you go: Hymns for the Camp. 1862

Dupe to fix link.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Robby
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 10:46 AM

If I missed these, I'm sure I'll hear about it. But, what about Battle Cry of Freedom, a march claimed by both sides. Also, what about John Brown's Body, which uses the same melody that was later used for the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

Maybe someone else can shed some more light on this, but I was once told that The Bonnie Blue Flag was the most hated Confederate song of the war in the North. So much so that for many years after the end of the war it was banned by an Act of Congress. Just curious to learn if I am remembering correctly.

As for Dixie, one of the local high schools around Pittsburgh, and one of the more ethnically diverse ones at that, recently found out just how controversial that song is and how divisive it was among the students and the community.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Robby
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 10:48 AM

As soon as I clicked on "submit message' I realized that I might have erred on the melody used for John Brown's Body. If I did, I know you all will let me know about it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Robby
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 11:01 AM

I have one last question on this general topic, which I neglected to ask earlier. I understand that Garry Owen was the Regimental Song of the U.S. 7th Cavalry under George Armstrong, and perhaps was also popular among troops during the Civil War (now that's an oxymoron), but I had alway thought that the title should be spelled as one word, Garryowen, in reference to the suburb(?) of the City of Limerick (check the lyrics to Jackets Green. Otherwise, how does one make any sense to the line of the chorus: No man for debt shall go to jail from Garryowen in glory?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Kim C
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 11:12 AM

Mary Danced With Soldiers is a modern song written by Emmylou's ex-husband Paul Kennerly. Good tune, though.

Alexander Stephens was a Politician. I do not believe that his "famous speech" adequately represented the views of the working class people of the South, as he was trying to pander to the planter aristocracy, because that's where the money was, and the South was going to need money if they were going to fight a war. And that's all I'm going to say about that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 03 Oct 00 - 03:30 PM

Sorry to get into this a little late. Thanks to Uncle Jaque for some good info. About the four string banjo. Folks like to think that it came before the five stringer. Not so, that is the tenor banjo and it's longer necked cousin, the plectrum. The tenor came about in the 20's when folks were hunting around for a string instrument loud enough to hold up to the brass in jazz bands. Proof of the five string during the Civil War? Look at almost any photo of a crew on a war ship of that time. There will be a banjo player there with the five stringer.

Rex


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: bob schwarer
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 02:27 PM

I did not read all of the items in this thread so if this is a duplicate, sorry.

Go to: http://users.enols.com/kfraser/index.html

A nice collection of songs of the period.

Bob S.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Kim C
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 02:36 PM

Rex is right about the banjo. Also lots and lots of paintings of the period depict banjos. The Atlanta History Center has a nice banjo on display in their Civil War exhibit - and it has frets. Mister thinks that maybe it was modified after the war to have frets as CW-era banjos typically did not have them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 02:44 PM

For banjo evolvement and it's use go to www.drhorsehair.com.

A great site.

Richard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MV
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 05:03 PM

The First Brigade Band, a nationally known performance group using all authentic period instruments and costumed in appropriate garb has CDs and tapes of Civil War tunes and songs. Arrangements are typical of the period.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 06:10 PM

Silly question? There are quite a few mentions of "bones" players in bands of the era.Did they play actual bones,or was this a term for sticks or blocks?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: kimmers
Date: 04 Oct 00 - 11:51 PM

For all of the words to "Irish Volunteer" you can go to David Kincaid's Haunted Field music web site. Here is the address for the page that contains the lyrics: http://www.hauntedfieldmusic.com/Lyrics.html

I have yet to buy the CD myself, but I intend to.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MartinRyan
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 10:14 AM

I'm afraid I haven't been through this thread - but I just came across THIS which may be of interest if it hasn't been covered already.

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 05:31 PM

Why sure EJ, the first bones that were played were real bones. Rib bones. I have a nice set that I borrowed from a mule that was skattering them to the four winds anyway. I like that Dr. Horsehair site. Love the Flesher minstral banjos.

Rex


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 05:45 PM

Thanks Rex,I owe you a beer for that.Actually,I think that makes two beers I owe you.We'll catch up.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: SINSULL
Date: 25 Sep 01 - 11:55 PM

No mention here of the classic tear jerkers "Faded Coat Of Blue" and Somebody's Darling".The latter became a source of a somewhat bitter black humor with soldiers on burial detail referring to the dead as somebody's darlings.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 26 Sep 01 - 02:42 PM

Spirituals.

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Genie
Date: 26 Sep 01 - 03:36 PM

Robby mentioned " John Brown's Body, which uses the same melody that was later used for the Battle Hymn of the Republic."
I have read that Julia Ward Howe wrote the words (all umpteen stanzas) of "Battle Hymn" because she was awakened in the middle of the night in 1860 (?) by a large band of folks marching through the street singing "John Brown's Body." (I guess if you can't get back to sleep you might as well write a song!) I think that's why it was set to that music.
Does anyone know more of the story?

Also, while Lonesome EJ seems to be focusing on songs "of" the Civil War, there are some stirring songs written "about" the Civil War.
On one of The Limelighters' albums they have a medley that has excerpts from these three songs: The First Battalion
Two Brothers
Yes, I See

I don't know when these songs were written or by whom, but they are all powerful songs.

BTW, wasn't "Lorena" sort of the "Lili Marlene" of the Civil War (or the other way around?)? On the Ken Burns PBS series (either the Civil War series or the Songs Of The Civil War program) I believe he says that "Lorena" holds a special place as a War Between The States song, because soldiers on both sides would sing it together across the battlefield at night.

I would also like to mention Longfellow's poem (not the song, because the music came later)

I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day

I contains two verses specifically about the Civil War, because he wrote it during the Civil War, partly as a response to the irony of hearing Christmas bells while the cannon were thundering on Christmas Day.
There are two recently active threads that contain the lyrics and discussions of the poem.

Genie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Andrew S
Date: 26 Sep 01 - 11:15 PM

If you want a modern blues and civil war historian, there is only one name that comes to mind. Sparky Rucker or Colonel Sparky Rucker. He is a great musician and storyteller with a great sense of humor and wit. The best recomendation for his music is "The Blue And Grey In Black and White" by Sparky and Rhonda Rucker. It is a cd entirely of old civil war songs. It will definately be something you should look in to.

Andrew


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 27 Sep 01 - 02:49 AM

I picked up a book last May at Barnes and Noble that might be of interest. It appears to be one of those "made for discount" books that appear on the "sale" tables, and I picked it up mainly because it was cheap.

War Songs and Poems of the Southern Confederacy
By an Ex-Confederate
Castle Books
ISBN 0-7858-1273-3

I paid $9.95 (US) for it.

The "Fore-Word" and title pages identify the "ex-confederate" as one H. M. Wharton DD, a "private in General Lee's Army, and are dated 1904. There is a dedication to "General John B. Gordon." There is no indication that I can find that the book was published prior to this (Castle Books) edition, year 2000.

Tunes (melody line only) are given for about a half-dozen songs. The book is almost entirely lyrics and poems. There appear to be about 200 individual poem/lyrics in the book, along with a fair amount of commentary.

As I am not much of a Civil War "buff" I don't have much of a way to judge how useful this book would be. The tone of the book is rather "preachy," and my first impression was that the individual selections were based on their "moral value" as much as on what the troops might have sung. This may just be the difference between then and now. At least a couple of the songs cited above in this thread are there. Lorena shows 6 verses.

It's hard to find a book that cheap these days, though; and it's nicely bound....

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 30 May 02 - 12:42 PM

Several to the tune of GIDEON'S BAND (not the DT song at all) are in THIS THREAD.

IMO we need a permathread on US Civil War songs. Using filter search I turned up a bunch that are titled "civil war songs." Be nice to pull it together....

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Hrothgar
Date: 31 May 02 - 04:11 AM

I hadn't even heard of the Mudcat when this thread started!

Has anybody ever come across the words of the hymn that William Steffe wrote, the tune of which was used for "John Brown's Body," "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," and a million other things since?

It's very easy to find any number of places that attribute the tune to Steffe, and mention the hymn, but I have never found it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 31 May 02 - 05:11 PM

I noticed last night that Detroit PBS is going to have the series The Civil War replayed in the fall.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 31 May 02 - 07:56 PM

WYSIWYG; That is a splendid idea! How do you separate though? For example "Listen to the Mockingbird" Is a Civil War period song but not one many people associate with the Civil War unless they also know that U.S. Grant's troops parodied the song and gave it lyrics pertaining to the siege of Vicksburg. (A good portion of people only know it as the closing theme to the three stooges movies) Do you include all the music extant during the time? I ask because i believe it's a good idea and just trying to get a feel for the scope of the project. I'm open for ideas on it Kindest regards, neil


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 01:21 AM

First thing would be to check with Joe Offer. If he OKs it, I'd sugggest that the permathread serve first as an index to the other existing threads on Civil War songs, and then you could search up the ones that have been posted, individually, like I did for the permathread on spirituals, and list those too. (One thing that would help is if people runnning index-threads like that could have edit authorization to go back into old threads without making a new post in them, to insert keywords (such as @civil war) to help harvestors or researchers later.)

As far as where to draw the line on the time period or the cultural criteria-- if you start with the ones you KNOW fit, and work from there, soon you will develop a taste and sense for the criteria, as you go along. In my case I have been SO LUCKY to have a GREAT bunch of folks working on the spirituals project, who have a keen sense of the cultural and musical sensibilities.... it seems to me that we amount to a de facto consensus, and we sometimes have discussed such matters offthread to get an understanding.

So if Joe OKs the idea, your next step (IMO) would be to recruit a Mudcat volunteer to do the thread-edits, and a group of people who care about this sub-genre and who will take on specified parts of the job and work well together.

~Susan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 12:52 PM

Neil, see this:

http://www.stephen-foster-songs.de/Archiv01.htm

You might want to download a bunch of text and MIDI files from there before it vanishes.

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Bruce, Melbourne Australia
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 08:29 PM

For a good recording of Civil War song the National Geographic Society release a one called "Songs of the Civil War" (00789 Sterro) many years ago, using various artists but some of the names are Elizabeth Corrigan, Tommy Thomspon, rolan breed, Raymond Bazemore and other.

This recording was part of a collection that included, Steamboat's A-Comin', (07787 Sterro), Songs & Sounds of the Sea (705 Sterro)and Rebels and Redcoats (07788 Sterro).

I know there was a lot more in this series but ther were not obtainable in Australia.

Bruce D


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 09:31 PM

Cool! Susan, thanks by the by, somebody mentioned parlour guitars and the possibility that Martin might be manufacturing them, Any info would be appreciated as to availability and cost. Neil


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:21 PM

Civil War songs that touch on the war are obvious for the list, as WYSIWYG says, but all of the popular songs, composed or folk, secular and religious, were sung around the fires at night or while marching or waiting between marches. Some would have been put together many years before. Largely Irish units would sing songs of the auld sod along with the new ones that they were learning. Officers on leave would sing more sophisticated songs with families and friends. Irish Sergeant mentioned this, and I agree with his drift- where do you cut this off?

Early in this thread someone asked for the camp-meeting song whose tune was taken for John Brown's Body and The Battle Hymn. There is so much here that I don't know if he got an answer. It was composed by George Pullen Jackson of South Carolina, "Say, Brother, Will You Meet Us?" Rex posted the song in thread 20569: Say Brother


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:25 PM

OPPS! Say brother


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:27 PM

Could one of the gods that be cut this thread at 100 and put the rest in a part 2? If practicable.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 10:53 PM

We have a motion on the floor from WYSIWYG to permathread a CW Music "room", if you will.
Neil; was that a "Second" to that motion, or more of a "Discussion"?
Point well taken, however; how about "Music of the American Civil War (era?)" which it seems to me would cover about anything being sung, hummed, plucked, or warbled during those pivotal four years?

Do we hear a "Second"? Heck I'll second that!

All in favor say "Aye!".

AYE!!!

And regardless of the outcome of that vote, I'll also second friend Dicho's brilliant motion to move this thread along, one way or another! It's one that would draw a lot more attention, methinks, if it didn't keep sinking out of sight into the archival abyss.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Hrothgar
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 08:06 AM

If "Say, Brother, Will You Meet Us?" whose tune was taken for "John Brown's Body" and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" was composed by George Pullen Jackson of South Carolina, why do all the sources I remember cite William Steffe as the composer of the tune for JBB and TBHOTR?

The one most immediately to hand is "Singing Soldiers - A History of the Civil War in Song," put out by Paul Glass and Louis C. Singer. I think it has some claims to authority.

The sheet music published by Oliver Oilson & Co described the song as being "adapted to the favourite melody of 'Glory Hallelujah,'" of which I have not heard elsewhere.

Should I post a copy of this in the "Say, Brother, Will You Meet Us?" thread?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Eileen Smith
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 03:51 AM

I realize it has been two years since the question was asked about the tune "Dear Evalina, Sweet Evalina" but I have the answer. Actually the coincidence is astounding. A friend tonight sent me a URL that eventually led me to this web site. Following another path from the URL a few minutes earlier led me to a midi of Dear Evalina, which happened to be my father's favorite song. The only copy of the sheet music I have ever seen was in the Library of Congress in Washington.

So here's the URL for the midi/lyrics to Dear Evalina, Sweet Evalina. http://www.contemplator.com/america/evelina.html

My father grew up on the prairies of Saskatchewan, born in 1909. I suspect he learned the song from a traveling minstrel show.

This is a wonderful web site. I've learned a lot tonight.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 10:26 AM

LET'S CONTINUE HERE

.

That's another already-existing thread that only has 6 posts in it right now, so it has LOTS of room. (There is a third general "Civil War Songs" thread with 40 posts.) Let's see if Neil and Joe get together about a permathread-- Neil can pull from all the existing threads for it if that goes forward. For now, let's just keep posting in the existing threads to we don't create MORE places for Neil, or others, to look.

~Susan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SWEET EVELINA
From: masato sakurai
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 11:03 AM

I know the thread is too long, but this is a continuation from Eileen Smith's post above.

I didn't know that "Dear Evelina, Sweet Evelina" had been asked for. I remember singing the song more than 20 years ago; it was in a songbook for schools published in Japan. The original title is "Sweet Evelina". Sheet music at the Levy Collection is:

Title: Sweet Evelina.
Composer, Lyricist, Arranger: Words by M. Melody by T. Composed and Arranged for the Piano Forte, By Mrs. Parkhurst.
T. Mrs. Parkhurst Publication: New York: Horace Waters, 481 Broadway, 1863.
Form of Composition: strophic with chorus
Instrumentation: piano and voice
First Line: 'Way down in the meadow where the lily first blows
First Line of Chorus: Sweet Evelina, dear Evelina, my love for thee shall never, never die
Performer: As Sung by all the Minstrel Bands.
Dedicatee: To Mr. C.M. Tremaine, of Brooklyn, L.I.
Engraver, Lithographer, Artist: Stackpole, Sc.
Subject: Courtship & love
Subject: Moonlight
Subject: Country life
Call No.: Box: 131 Item: 121

SWEET EVELINA

1.
Way down in the meadow where the lily first blows,
Where the wind from the mountain ne'er ruffles the rose;
Lives fond Evelina, the sweet little dove,
The pride of the valley, the girl that I love.

CHORUS
Sweet Evelina, dear Evelina,
My love for thee shall never, never die.
Dear Evelina, sweet Evelina,
My love for thee shall never, never die.

2.
She's fair as a rose, like a lamb she is meek,
And she never was known to put paint on her cheek;
In the most graceful curls hangs her raven-black hair,
And she never requires perfumery there.

(CHORUS)

3.
Evelina and I, one fine evening in June,
Took a walk all alone by the light of the moon;
The plants all shone for the heavens were clear,
And I felt round the heart, oh! most mightily queer.

(CHORUS)

4.
Three years have gone by and I've not got a dollar,
Evelina still lives in the green valley holler,
Altho' I am fated to marry her never,
I'll love her I'm sure for ever and ever.

(CHORUS)

Two song sheet editions (texts only) are at America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets (Library of Congress). Another song to the same tune ("The retreat of the grand army from Bull Run." Air.- "Sweet Evelina." Baltimore, Md. [n. d.]) is also there (Click here); this is a song about the Civil War.

~Masato


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 11:30 AM

Thanks, Masato. Another good way to do that would be to make a clicky back to this thread's relevant post, in the other thread-- when a thread goes to a Part Two, it's not at all uncommon to have answers in Part Two, for requests made in Part One.

LET'S CONTINUE HERE

.

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Diane
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 03:14 PM

I would like to buy a copy of Tennessee Ernie Ford's Civil Wr Songs of the South. I haven't been able to find it anywhere. can anyone help me--PLEASE!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 04:24 PM

A very late second on the Civil War Thread All in Favor SHout Huzzah! Neil


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Apr 04 - 12:38 PM

I am looking for a song about the battle of buckland mills or the battle of chestnut hill. This was a cavalry battle that the south won so it is probably a southern song. lyrics may have been added to song
similar to jine the cavalry. The generals involved were3 jeb Stuart, buford Custer and kilpatrick. Battle occured on October 19, 1863. The song also contains words "Buckland races" . Whoever is first to find it will make a generous contribution or pay you a more than fair amount for song and music
Thanks
Bill Fletcher


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,"Buckland races" ?
Date: 05 Apr 04 - 12:41 PM

my e-mail is fletcherlaw@earthlink.net if you find anything please contact me


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Apr 04 - 02:14 PM

There are a bunch of fine CDs containg songs of what dome of my southern friends still rfer to "The Recent Unpleasantness". Bobby Horton, who must be the buffiest Civil War buff in existence has six CDs of "Songs of the CSA" and four pf "Songs of the Union Army/"

David Kincaid's "The Irish Volunteer" is, IMO, superb. He's followed it up with "The Irish-American's Song"--songs of Irish troops on both sides of the conflict.
Folk-Legacy's Barton and Para Civil War CDs are fine stuff, too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 06 Apr 04 - 01:45 PM

There's also This one


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 06 Apr 04 - 05:35 PM

There are a few sets of lyrics to several of the tunes popular during the era. Does this one work?

Buckland Races

On a march with Master Lee
In October sixty three
With the tears of Bristoe Station in our eyes
Took a turn at Centerville
Made a stand at Buckland Mills
Where the "Rebel yell" rose upward to the skies

Chorus:

Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The Buckland Races;
Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The day is won!
Drink a health to General Stuart
And the Rebel boys who knew it
Sent Kilpatrick and his Yankees on the run!

On the road to Warrenton
Stuart's battle plans begun:
Sheild the rebels at Manassas on the move
At a place called Chestnut Hill
Drew the Yankees there to kill
And we sent the rest a runnin' ballyhoo

Chorus:

Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The Buckland Races;
Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!
The day is won!
Drink a health to General Stuart
And the Rebel boys who knew it
Sent Kilpatrick and his Yankees on the run!

{repeat chorus}


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 06 Apr 04 - 05:38 PM

melody and old lyrics here


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,smlanna@msn.com
Date: 31 May 04 - 05:34 PM

Trying to find words to poem "the Blue and The Gray" forgot who wrote it, but it started, By the flow of the inland river
                         Where fleets of       have fled
                         Where the blands of the grave grass quiver
                         Asleep are the ranks of the died
                         Under the sod and the drew
                         Awaiting the judgement day
                         Under the the Blue
                         Under the other the Gray.
There also is another old CW poem I don't remember much but the name "The Black Regigment" would like any info you can supply. thanks


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Tracy
Date: 02 Aug 04 - 11:31 AM

Grinter Place Friends are still accepting bands for Apple Fest. Please call Tracy at 913.568.3686 or e-mail grinterplacefriends@yahoo.com or visit us on the web at www.grinterplacefriends.bravepages.com.
All preformers will be allowed to sell merchandise and may also consign it in the gift shop the rest of the year.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: masato sakurai
Date: 02 Aug 04 - 01:27 PM

"The Blue and the Gray" lyrics, posted in forum.

Five editions of sheet music are at American Memory, and 8 editions are at The Levy Sheet Music Collection.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 8 August 7:03 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.