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Songs of the American Civil War

Related threads:
U.S.A.'s 'Civil War Songs' (50)
Civil War Ballads (66)


JedMarum 02 Aug 04 - 04:38 PM
GUEST 03 Aug 04 - 11:33 AM
Uncle Jaque 03 Aug 04 - 07:22 PM
GUEST,Zipo 07 Aug 04 - 04:07 PM
JedMarum 31 Aug 04 - 12:06 PM
KentuckyPat 31 Aug 04 - 10:32 PM
JedMarum 31 Aug 04 - 11:57 PM
GUEST,Mingulay 01 Sep 04 - 06:20 AM
JedMarum 09 Sep 04 - 09:54 AM
GUEST,laose feerick 09 Sep 04 - 10:25 AM
JedMarum 09 Sep 04 - 03:48 PM
GUEST,WHS STUDENT 20 Jan 05 - 01:18 PM
GUEST,Gordo 01 Feb 05 - 09:29 AM
Goose Gander 01 Feb 05 - 10:36 AM
masato sakurai 01 Feb 05 - 10:45 AM
GUEST,Lighter at Work 01 Feb 05 - 11:07 AM
GUEST,Lighter at Work 01 Feb 05 - 11:10 AM
GUEST 01 Feb 05 - 11:53 AM
GUEST 01 Feb 05 - 12:03 PM
GUEST,Lighter at work 01 Feb 05 - 12:17 PM
GUEST 01 Feb 05 - 12:22 PM
GUEST,Gordo 01 Feb 05 - 03:13 PM
GUEST,saulgoldie 01 Feb 05 - 06:05 PM
GUEST,saulgoldie 01 Feb 05 - 06:07 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Feb 05 - 06:17 PM
GUEST 04 Feb 05 - 11:16 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 May 05 - 08:21 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 May 05 - 02:42 PM
JedMarum 23 May 05 - 09:18 AM
Alaska Mike 23 May 05 - 09:52 AM
Melani 23 May 05 - 02:03 PM
JedMarum 30 May 05 - 08:49 PM
JedMarum 01 Jun 05 - 09:30 AM
JedMarum 01 Jun 05 - 09:32 AM
Big Al Whittle 01 Jun 05 - 07:02 PM
Bobert 07 Dec 10 - 07:45 PM
Barbara Shaw 07 Dec 10 - 09:42 PM
GUEST,The Hebrew Maiden 14 May 11 - 03:13 AM
GUEST,The Hebrew Maiden : lyric link 14 May 11 - 03:21 AM
Amos 15 Mar 17 - 05:49 PM
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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 02 Aug 04 - 04:38 PM

Thanks Tracy for posting this info and booking this weekend for me. I am looking forward to participating!

I cannot get the website to work. Is this link correct?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Aug 04 - 11:33 AM

Web site is back up. The server was just down for maintence.

I love your music, looking forward to hearing you live!!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 03 Aug 04 - 07:22 PM

Ahoy; Saw this thread up and said; "My; we had a thread of the very same name going some 4 years ago..."

It never did achieve permathread status, did it? Pity.

Oh; The third Maine Infantry has a new web site now:

THIRD MAINE VOLUNTEERS

Check us out; We're goin' great blazes!


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Subject: Mean Mary and Frank Jamse
From: GUEST,Zipo
Date: 07 Aug 04 - 04:07 PM

Need help in finding these people.

I remember them back in 93 when they performed live at a civil war site now a state park.

They have went on I think to make more albums but you might recall Hard Times.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 31 Aug 04 - 12:06 PM

I can't find much on these folks - seems they were yound when they started recording these:

Rebel Rousers - By Mean Mary & Frank James
Hard Times - By Mean Mary & Frank James
Something To Remember - By Mean Mary and Frank James

One music review said they are

"A duet comprised of a brother and a sister, Mean Mary ably handles the vocals and the two of them have exceptional technical skills with each of the variety of instruments they play."

In 1992 one CW re-enactor described Mary as "a 14 year-old Tennessean with a gravelly whiskey-voice."

I place Mean Mary" Civil War Music into Google, and found just a couple of appropriate articles.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: KentuckyPat
Date: 31 Aug 04 - 10:32 PM

The Lester S. Levey Collection held by the library at Johns Hopkins University is wonderful---the Civil War era sheet music is all DOWNLOADABLE. Here's a blue clicky to send you to the university's library. www.jhu.edu/library
Once you hit that web site, chose the library Special Collections list. Then click on the Lester S. Levey Collection.
    Speaking of Civil War music, has anyone else commented on the similarities and differences between Stephen Foster's "Gentle, My Darling" a popular hit of 1861, the summer the War started, and "Who Will Tell his Mother, that her Poor Boy is Gone," a song sung in 1862 at the time of the Battle of Antietam (26,000 men killed, wounded or missing in action in one awful day).
    If you ever get to Sharpsburg (near the Antietam Battlefield) ask for a tour of the Christ Reform Church on Main Street. It was a field hospital for Confederates and Union soldiers after Antietam. The stained glass windows tell a war story.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 31 Aug 04 - 11:57 PM

Sharpsburg is where the first Irish-born commander of the 6th Louisiana fell, Henry Strong. The were known as an Irish Regiment and were fiercely proud of their Irish born Col. He was replaced, by another Irish born commander, Col Wm Monaghan - Monaghan gave his life at Shepardstown ...


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Mingulay
Date: 01 Sep 04 - 06:20 AM

Although it is not strictly contemporary to the era, I would recommend
hearing Les Sullivan's song "Sullivan's Farewell" the words for which are taken from a letter written by a soldier to his wife on the eve of battle and links back of course to the Irish connection. A very beautiful and moving song which is on his (plug) CD.

Pete


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 09:54 AM

APPLE FEST this weekend.

I'm looking forward to meeting you Tracy, and hope to see another Mudcatter or two!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,laose feerick
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 10:25 AM

Speaking of Irish Regiments in The Civil War, my Sister is doing some research for her PHD on an Ancestor of ours, Michael Corcoran (He might have spelled it the Irish way.."Micheal", I'm not sure.) of the Fighting 69th Irish Brigade from NY. He died shortly after the war but was involved in some rather daring deeds including a prison break while in Confederate custody. Before he set off to the War proper, Corcoran was involved in quelling the deadly draft Riots in NYC which turned into an all out uprising. We are descended not from him directly but through his family that remained in Ireland. Technically, I guess he isn't an ancestor...we share a link to his Father.

I have heard that there are several songs that reference him directly and/or his exploits in the Civil War. Does anyone know of any?

Maureen, my older sister is a Folk singer and frequent performer in Providence and surounding environs of Rhode Island and I know she'd love to include any songs about the 69th in her repetoire. She's also one of those Re-enactors who demonstrates womens' crafts, cooking and other technology of that Era.

I'd be grateful for any song titles and lyrcis.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 09 Sep 04 - 03:48 PM

Have her get a hold of Derek Warfiled's album, The Son of Erin. She'll find some lovely music there, including a song or two about Michael Cocoran. Corcoran is mentioned in a few CW songs.

Also - have her look into David Kincaid's music. I know Kincaid sings a song or two about Corcoran. Both of these guys have done extensive research and the albus inclde good notes and refereneces.

And here are my songs. No references to your relative, though ...

best of luck!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,WHS STUDENT
Date: 20 Jan 05 - 01:18 PM

Hi! I have to do a project for my history class with the theme being "Communication- the key to understanding". I chose to do my project on the Music of the Civil War and how it helped the soldiers and their familes cope with what is going on. If you have any particular sources, songs, or especially educated people i could talk to, i'd really appreciate you letting me know. You can reply on this website, or e-mail me at theleighs@cox.net
Thank you so much
I really appreciate it
-T


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Gordo
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 09:29 AM

T
Remember that songs of the Civil War era come from an entirely different time. There was no TV, radio, or organized sports. Most of the soldiers in the war had never travelled more than 20 miles from home, and many were illiterate. There was no repid communication. Telegraph was being used, but primarily for the military. Singing and music were about the only form of entertainment available to many households, especially the soldiers. Most homes were still illuminated by candles, oil lamps, or hearth fires. It was difficult to read after dark, so self made entertainment was about all there was.
Most songs from the war can trace their roots to the Scots-Irish. Words may be changed, but the melodies remained. Remember, this was a time of great immigration from Ireland. Since the Union had most of the Southern ports blocaded, and due to the repressive political climate of Ireland, nearly all of the immigration was to the North. These men had no jobs, so enlisting in the army was a good way to get work. The army even had recruiting set up as the men left the boats.
By today's standards, the songs will seem overly sentimental. Marches were good for troops moving - songs like DIXIE, BONNIE BLUE FLAG, and TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP, but when the soldiers were around the campfire they would sing of home, loved ones left behing, comrades who had been killed, and the distinct possibility of being killed themselves in the near future. These would inlude such songs as LORENA, SOMEBODY'S DARLING, and JOHNNY HAS GONE FOR A SOLDIER. Some of the songs at home reflected wartime conditions, such as HARD TIMES COME AGAIN NO MORE. This referred to events such as the devistation of Sherman's march and the destruction of the Shenandoah Valley.
There are many books and recordings to obtain this era music.
I hope I have helped a bit.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Goose Gander
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 10:36 AM

Henry Belden's Songs and Ballads Collected by Missouri Folk-Lore Society has some Civil War songs collected in the early 20th century. There is some fairly obscure material, including some Yankee songs parodied with pro-Confederate lyrics.

I think the best Civil War songs are the ones that are not about the war, but about what soldiers on both sides were homesick for ("Girl I Left Behind", "Lorena", etc.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: masato sakurai
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 10:45 AM

21 audio recordings are at Digital History.

Type: Civil War

Battle Hymn of the Republic, Performed by: Thomas Chalmers
Battle Hymn of the Republic, Performed by: Richard Warrenrath
Blue and the Grey, Performed by: Harry Macdonough
Boys of the Old Brigade, Performed by: Chatauqua Preachers' Quartet
Dixie Land, Performed by: Peerless Quartet
Down Where the Swanee River Flows, Performed by: Hayden Quartet
Goodbye Dolly Gray, Performed by: Hugh Donovan
Just Before the Battle, Mother, Performed by: Harry Macdonough
Just Before the Battle, Mother, Performed by: John Young
Marching Through Georgia, Performed by: Harlan and Stanley
Maryland, My Maryland, Performed by: Herbert Stuart
My Maryland March, Performed by:
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, Performed by: S.H. Dudley
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, Performed by: John Young
Vacant Chair, Performed by: Harry Macdonough
Vacant Chair, Performed by: Hayden Quartet
War Songs, Performed by: Victor Male Chorus
War Songs March, Performed by:
When Johnny Comes Marching Home, Performed by: John Terrill
When Johnny Comes Marching Home, Performed by: John Terrill
When Johnny Comes Marching Home, Performed by: Farrar and Columbia Quartet


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Lighter at Work
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 11:07 AM

"Hard Times" was written by Stephen Foster in 1859.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Lighter at Work
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 11:10 AM

This is the first time I've seen the assertion that the "Scots-Irish" were responsible for most Civil War songs. I wonder what the evidence might be ?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 11:53 AM

Guest:
If you research many of the songs, and try to find the roots of the song and melody, you will find the evidence. You may also look in the music collected from Appalachia, the Smokey Mountains, and along the Shenandoah. The trail is there for much of the pre-Civil War music also. Just take the time. It is interesting. I have been collecting this music for over 50 years. By the way, have you ever traced the song Streets of Laredo back to its origins? It, too, has Civil War versions, but it apparently originated in England sometime in the 1600s as The Unfortunate Rake.
Gordo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 12:03 PM

Yes, but what about ''green" Irish songs + ballads(mid-19th century immigrants, usually Unionists), what about influence of broadside balladry / songbooks / sheet music, what about Scottish + Northumbrian dance music (not necessarily Scots-Irish). And there's probably some stuff I''ve left out, but let me just put this on the table.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Lighter at work
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 12:17 PM

What you say, Gordo, is more or less true about Ozark and Appalachian "folk songs" about the war (though descendants of the English were pretty numerous too and producing American folk sings as well). But so many of the songs sung during the Civil War were commercial products written by professionals in Boston and New York, "pop hits" really. The number of folk songs created during the war is very large, but pales in comparison with the output of the pros like George F. Root and Henry C. Work. The South also had a thriving music industry until the economy went belly up.

Just as a footnote, the well-known Yankee song "Marching Through Georgia," by Henry C. Work, didn't come out till March 1865, so it's unlikely that many soldiers got to hear it before the war was over, and probably none in Sherman's army, which was then in North Carolina.

So if you ever see a movie that has CSA soldiers playing "Marching Through Georgia" during the Civil War, it's doubly wrong!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 12:22 PM

Great!! All of this has contributed to American Folk Music and Civil War Era music. There is also German influence to be found. What I was trying to say was that the Civil War music was influenced greatly by the Scot-Irish. I did not mean to slight the other sources you named, but rather lumped them together.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Gordo
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 03:13 PM

Lighter at work:
Thanks again! By the way, you dare not sing or play MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA in Georgia to this day. Also, nearly all towns and villages in Georgia have Civil War monuments. ALL of the cannons in these monuments are facing due north.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,saulgoldie
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 06:05 PM

Glad to see "Let The Band Play Dixie mentioned. One of my favorite songs.

chords & lyrics:
(I'll sing it for anyone who needs to hear the tune. Don't yet know how to do that digital tune thingie.)

        LET THE BAND PLAY DIXIE

        C                Am               F            G
The news was run from Richmond in that fading April Sun;
        C               Am                 F               G
That Lee had handed Grant his sword, the war was finally won.
Am
Into the streets the people spilled,
D7
Feeling the excitement build,
            F
And the crowd around the Whitehouse milled,
                                G
Asking is it true, it's finally done?

*Inside the Whitehouse Lincoln heard them calling out his name.
He sat there wondering what to say to ease their years of pain.
Someone yelled, "Come out the door, tell us what you have in store
For the rebels who've lost the war, so out upon the porch Abe Lincoln came.

*He said, "We are gathered not in anger, but in celebration.
Let's be grateful we are once again a single nation.
Let's stand together reassured, now that peace has been secured,
Our nation's illness can be cured, and I suggest the overture for this ocassion...
(cho.)
C                
Let the band Play Dixie,
Am                                        G
Play that song that holds its head up high and proud,
      F                    G                   C                 Am
And let our nation once divided, bloodied but unbowed,
F                    G                        C              Am
Take the swords of war and beat them back into a plow."
        F                G                C                 Am        F/G
On the day that Lee surrendered, Mr. Lincoln told the crowd,
                        C        
"Let the band play Dixie!"

*A tired Union soldier hobbled on his only limb,
Filled with bitter memories the war had left with him.
Dragged his wooden leg and cane, his face was set and creased with pain, he stumbled, fell, and         rose again,
And he wondered what the future held for him.

*He spied a Black child kneeling there in humble gratitude.
He knelt down right beside her to share her thankful mood.
Grateful words were raised in prayer, God in your sweet loving care,
Our broken lives now please repair, let our wounded nation be renewed. And...

cho


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,saulgoldie
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 06:07 PM

Oops! Despite my best efforts, the chords didn line up. Guess you'll HAVE to suffer through my rendition if you want to hear it. I'll be in my office...


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Feb 05 - 06:17 PM

Let the Band Play is a 20th c. composition by Gibson and North, not a Civil War era song. The story is apocryphal, as noted elsewhere by Joe Offer. Thread 17279: Let the band

It is a good song, though.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Feb 05 - 11:16 PM

I don't think this one has been posted.

My Name It Is Dan Martin
Cat. #0900 (MFH #447) - As sung by Jimmy (Driftwood) Morris, Timbo, Arkansas on August 30, 1969



VERSE 1
My name it is Dan Martin
I was raised in Arkansas
Jined up with th rebels
Just t' spite my mother-in-law
T'was on th seventh day of March
In eighteen sixty two
We fought th yankees on Pea Ridge
Till we were black an' blue

CHORUS:
O who's Price a fighting
Somebody I do know
It surely is th fed-er-als
For I hear their cannous roar
Whos' Price a fighting
Somebody I do know
It surely is th fed-er-als
For I hear their cannous roar

VERSE 2
Th yankees gathered 'round us
In th darkness of th night
They planted all their batteries
An' waited till daylight
Earli in th morning
We had to leave th ground
Th bullets an' th cannonballs
Were cuttin' thousands down

VERSE 3
Some took up th left hand road
Some took to their right
McCullock took th straightest course
An' led us int' th fight
Price came dashing down th road
His horse was a sweeping pace
An' when he heard of McCullock's death
Th tears rolled down his face

VERSE 4
Th bullets whistled thru th air
Brave Van Dorr, lost his hat
For about a mile and a half
He laid th bushes flat
Price jumps up an' scattered fence
All this he did not dread
But all that lay upon his mind
Was a little lump of lead

VERSE 5
Price said, boys I never shall
Surrender to th foe
Before I'll bow to Abraham
I'll go to Mexico (an' he did)
I got a bullet in th leg
Another one in my craw
An' I thought I never would get home
T' my dear old mother-in-law


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 05 - 08:21 PM

Way, way up above, was mentioned the popularity of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" with soldiers during The War Between the States.
Confederate troops samg it, much like the DT version "The Girl I left Behind Me" (no modifiers), but with this chorus:

But if ever I get thro' this war,
And Lincoln's boys don't bind me,
I'll make my way right back again
To the girl I left behind me.

P. 16, Allan, Francis D., 1874, "Allan's Lone Star Ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made During Confederate Times," 200 pp., Burt Franklin, New York (Reprint 1970). Burt Franklin: Research and Source Works Series 578; American Classics in History and Social Science 153 (Lenox Hill).
A good source of Confederate Songs

The fifth couplet is:
The bees shall lavish, make no store,
And the dove become a ranger.
The falling water cease to roar,
Before I'll ever change her.

Many sing 'the bees shall languish,' destroying the meaning.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 May 05 - 02:42 PM

"That Bugler, or the Up-I-Dee Song," Civil War version of the Upidee Song, is attributed to "the late Sergeant A. G. Knight, Second Company Battallion Washington Artillery [CSA], New Orleans, LA."
The lyrics and attribution are given in thread 55144: Youkaida

p. 144, in Francis D. Allan, 1874, "Allan's Lone Star Ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made During Confederate Times. Burt Franklin, New York. Reprint Lenox Hill (Burt Franklin), 1970.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 23 May 05 - 09:18 AM

I've begun work on a second Civil War collection. It'll be a few months before I record any, but have much it planned out - and a few songs written. This will be a Confederate collection. I love what I've done so far.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Alaska Mike
Date: 23 May 05 - 09:52 AM

I have a new CD coming out this summer with an original song about the CSS Shanandoah which was sent to Alaska to harass the Yankee Whaling fleet towards the end of the Civil War. Although Lee surrendered in April 1865, Captain Waddell continued to plunder Yankee commerce until August when he finally learned of the war's end. So the final battles of the war were actually fought in Alaskan waters.

Best wishes,
Mike


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Melani
Date: 23 May 05 - 02:03 PM

Mike, I am right this minute re-reading a book titled, "Confederate Raider in the North Pacific," by Murray Morgan--a very pleasantly written and entertaining book. I'm guessing you know it.
I was also bemoaning the fact that I know a song about the Alabama, but none about the Shenandoah. Please let us know as soon as your CD is available and how to get it.

I have been seriously considering joining the Confederate Navy as a reenactor--like I have time for that! Oh, well, life's too short for sleeping!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 30 May 05 - 08:49 PM

Mike - I'd love to hear the song. Any chance you can send me a "preview" of the track? What can you tell me about the song? What inspired you to write it?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 01 Jun 05 - 09:30 AM

Re: the CSS Shenadoah, I found a nice, brief on-line history here and another one here.

It looks like as a Confederate war ship, the Shenandoah had a short but interesting run (little over a year). I juts now ordered a book from Amazon called The Voyage of the CSS Shenandoah : A Memorable Cruise. It looks like a good history, based upon the Captain logs. I'll follow up on this thread once I've read it.

Here is the book at Amazon.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 01 Jun 05 - 09:32 AM

... on a musician's salary, I bought from 'used book' category.

;-)


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 01 Jun 05 - 07:02 PM

Terrific thread. I've really enjoyed reading this!   Thankyou to all the contributors!

all the best

big Al Whittle


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Bobert
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 07:45 PM

Haven't read this entire thread but there is a song I used to do that was written by Fred Dobbs and recorded by a Georgia (US) band that went by the name of Harts Field... The song title is "Drummer Boy" and I recommend that anyone lookin' for a very powerful song about the "Civil War" to find it...

B~


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 09:42 PM

Interesting to see this again. Since this thread was started (1999) our band did a "Songs of the Civil War Era" concert in 2003 and released the live recording as a CD minus all the thunderous applause and scintillating commentary! We covered songs popular during the "War Between the States" as well as a few songs written about the war in later years. There are familiar soldier songs from the period along with sentimental ballads, hymns and popular songs of the past and present, representing both the Union and the Confederacy.

Here's the song list and partial liner notes:

ShoreGrass Songs of the Civil War Era

1. Soldier's Joy (Traditional, 1760) 2:18 First published as sheet music in 1760, this song was a popular marching tune during the Revolutionary War, continued during the Civil War and people still play it today.

2. Hard Times (Stephen Foster, 1855) 4:23 Foster was an ardent unionist from Pennsylvania who lived from 7/4/1826 to 1/13/1864. His songs were popular through this period. Vocals: Paul Pozzi, the Shaws (harmony).

3. Battle Cry of Freedom (George F. Root, 1862) 1:59 George Root was a prolific writer from Sheffield, MA who wrote this widely popular song in 1862. It was parodied and also sung in the South in 1864. Both North ("union forever") and South ("rights forever") versions are sung here.

4. Dixie (Daniel Decatur Emmett, 1859) 3:40 Written in 1859 for the Northern minstrel stage, it was an instant hit on both sides. It was played at Jefferson Davis' inauguration in 1861, and Emmett, a unionist, was not pleased.

5. Two Little Boys (Edward Madden, Theodore Morse, 1903) 2:44 This song was possibly based on an earlier poem about the Civil War. A contemporary version was done by Charlie Waller.

6. Lorena (J.P. & H.D. Webster, 1857) 4:33 This song was popular in both the north and the south during the Civil War because it carried soldiers away from the drudgery and nightmare of the war. It was banned by generals on both sides because it made the men so homesick they didn't want to fight. The sad lyrics were originally written as a poem by a jilted Universalist pastor named Henry DeLafayette Webster, and the melody was supplied by his friend Joseph Philbrick Webster (no relation). After the war, Southern girls were frequently named Lorena.

7. Battle Hymn of the Republic (William Steffe & Julia Ward Howe, 1862) 2:51 Originally a Methodist song "Say brothers will you meet us on Canaan's happy shore?" Then came "John Brown's Body" about an abolitionist from VA hung for starting a slave uprising in Harpers Ferry. Next two verses were sung by the 1st Arkansas black regiment. Last two verses came to Julia Ward Howe in 1862 in a dream.

8. He Leadeth Me (Joseph Gilmore, 1862 & William Bradbury, 1864) 2:10 Based on the 23rd Psalm, these words were written during the darkest hours of the war.

9. Shall We Gather at the River (Robert Lowry, 1864) 2:25 Lowry was a Baptist minister from Brooklyn, NY who wrote this and 500 other songs.

10. The Yellow Rose of Texas (J.K., 1853) 2:07 They say the original Yellow Rose was an indentured servant, the "high yellow" Emily Morgan from New Haven, CT. She kept the Mexican general Santa Ana dallying so long that his leaderless men lost the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836 to Sam Houston, during the Mexican-American war for Texas independence. No one knows who J.K. was.

11. Oh Susanna (Stephen Foster, 1848) 1:41 Foster wrote this popular minstrel song in 1848 and it remains standard folk fare.

12. Goober Peas (Traditional) 1:44 This popular Confederate camp song is about old-fashioned peanuts, which were the short rations on which the rebel soldiers often subsisted in the waning days of the war.

13. Vacant Chair (G.F. Root & H.S. Washburn, 1861) 5:06 Henry Washburn wrote a poem about Lt. John William Grout ("our noble Willie") of the 15th MA Volunteer Infantry, who died at the Battle of Balls Bluff, VA in October, 1861. His death turned into an allegory at Thanksgiving the following month, when this poem laid bare the anguish of Grout's family at his absence from the family dinner. Washburn's verse found a sympathetic melody at the hands of the prolific songwriter George Root.

14. When the Roses Bloom Again (Cobb & Edwards, 1901) 4:19 Written long after the Civil War, but the uniform was blue and could have been about this war.

15. Follow the Drinking Gourd (Traditional) 3:00 A code song based on the Underground Railroad activities of Peg Leg Joe, a "conductor." He traveled to plantations as a handy man and gave secret instructions about a trail he marked with his peg leg for heading north by following the handle of the Big Dipper (the drinking gourd) pointing north to the Ohio River and ultimately freedom in the north.

16. Boston Boy (Traditional, 1885) 2:38 This traditional song was collected in Kentucky and Arkansas, and was also known as "Two Soldiers," recorded by many.

17. Faded Coat of Blue (J.H. McNaughton, 1865) 4:34 This mournful dirge, also known as "The Nameless Grave," was written in the waning days of the war in 1865. It expressed the feelings of tens of thousands of families throughout the war-torn land.

18. Have Someone Play Dixie For Me (Pete Roy) 4:07 This is a contemporary song written about the war from a southern perspective, showing the undying loyalty to the homeland.

19. I'm A Good Old Rebel (Major Innes Randolph, 1865) 1:44 This song was written by an officer in the CSA in the style of a semiliterate "unreconstructed" rebel. It is a song of defiance and bitter resentment toward Reconstruction, to the tune of the old wild western melody "Joe Bowers."

20. Home Sweet Home Theme (Payne & Bishop, 1823) :27 One of the most popular songs ever written, this was a continuing favorite during the Civil War. One night during the war, along the banks of the Potomac River, a group of soldiers took up this refrain. Suddenly this melody, so popular and familiar to both sides, came drifting from both sides of the Potomac. The two armies stopped their killing for the length of a song to share a common emotion.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,The Hebrew Maiden
Date: 14 May 11 - 03:13 AM

Google:

" When Israel of The Lord Beloved"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,The Hebrew Maiden : lyric link
Date: 14 May 11 - 03:21 AM

Link:

http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/w/i/wiolobel.htm


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Amos
Date: 15 Mar 17 - 05:49 PM

The ballad of Dan Martin, referring to the Battle of Pea Ridge in Missouri was posted upthread by a Guest. It is part of the Max Hunter collection and you can hear Jimmy Driftwood singing it at this page in the Collection.

Regards,

A


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