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Songs of the American Civil War

Related threads:
U.S.A.'s 'Civil War Songs' (50)
Civil War Ballads (66)


dick greenhaus 04 Feb 00 - 12:25 PM
MMario 04 Feb 00 - 12:34 PM
GUEST,LEJ 04 Feb 00 - 01:15 PM
Rex 04 Feb 00 - 02:05 PM
Rex 04 Feb 00 - 02:08 PM
Rex 04 Feb 00 - 02:33 PM
Dale Rose 04 Feb 00 - 03:06 PM
Linda Kelly 04 Feb 00 - 06:13 PM
Margo 04 Feb 00 - 06:30 PM
Susan A-R 04 Feb 00 - 10:05 PM
jeffp 05 Feb 00 - 09:33 AM
Susan A-R 05 Feb 00 - 02:01 PM
GUEST,jtt 05 Feb 00 - 02:40 PM
wildlone 05 Feb 00 - 03:19 PM
Rex 07 Feb 00 - 12:01 PM
Mbo 07 Feb 00 - 12:06 PM
Amos 08 Feb 00 - 10:55 AM
richardw 08 Feb 00 - 12:04 PM
Joan 08 Feb 00 - 09:10 PM
Rex 10 Feb 00 - 01:27 PM
GUEST 10 Feb 00 - 02:36 PM
MMario 10 Feb 00 - 03:23 PM
GUEST,Walrus 10 Feb 00 - 05:57 PM
richardw 10 Feb 00 - 08:54 PM
Sandy Paton 11 Feb 00 - 05:22 PM
GUEST,Walrus 11 Feb 00 - 05:24 PM
catspaw49 11 Feb 00 - 05:55 PM
richardw 12 Feb 00 - 06:12 PM
GUEST,Neil writer@a-znet.com 12 Feb 00 - 07:24 PM
GUEST,Guest; Neil Writer@a-znet.com 12 Feb 00 - 07:50 PM
Sandy Paton 13 Feb 00 - 01:32 AM
Rex 28 Feb 00 - 04:44 PM
tar_heel 28 Feb 00 - 10:35 PM
catspaw49 28 Feb 00 - 10:48 PM
catspaw49 28 Feb 00 - 10:52 PM
kendall 21 Sep 00 - 01:50 PM
Kim C 21 Sep 00 - 02:53 PM
Mary in Kentucky 21 Sep 00 - 03:20 PM
Susan A-R 21 Sep 00 - 11:34 PM
Frankham 22 Sep 00 - 05:04 PM
GUEST,cplaem@greennet.net 22 Sep 00 - 07:50 PM
Art Thieme 22 Sep 00 - 09:06 PM
Uncle Jaque 22 Sep 00 - 09:42 PM
Lonesome EJ 22 Sep 00 - 11:05 PM
GUEST,jaze 23 Sep 00 - 01:08 AM
catspaw49 23 Sep 00 - 01:21 AM
Uncle Jaque 23 Sep 00 - 09:54 AM
mg 24 Sep 00 - 02:46 AM
JedMarum 24 Sep 00 - 12:28 PM
Frankham 24 Sep 00 - 12:41 PM
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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 12:25 PM

Dammit! Doesn't anybody refer people to the DT? If you search for @Civil @War @America you'll get about 100 hits. Without leaving the Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MMario
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 12:34 PM

sorry Dick, guess I assumed that since it was LEJ asking, he'd already done that. search for @civil yields 132 hits.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,LEJ
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 01:15 PM

Dammit! Great suggestion ,Dick! I had always searched the DT by using title keywords, and was unaware that you could search with a command like @Civil. My rather inept search has generated some interesting dialogue, though, don't you think?


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 02:05 PM

Yep, folks mentioned Para, Barton and Dyer, David Kincaid, the 97th, all good at playing the songs from "the sixties". Another I'll mention though not recorded yet so far as I know is the 4th Artillary Band. They are centered in Denver and play around the Rocky Mtn. area. Their time period is post CW but they play many of the tunes from that time. They look right and play brass instruments from the time. The trumpets that point behind the player for example. There is no one like them. Someone mentioned above the soundtrack for Burns'CW but I didn't see the CD from his followup PBS program. Anyway as the first soundtrack was instrumental the second is all (well mostly) songs and ballads. Titled: Songs of the Civil War. Columbia/Sony Records released it in 1991. All the favourites sung by the likes of the McGarrigles, Kathy Mattea, Ronnie Gilbert, John Hartford (my man!), Ritchie Havens, Judy Collins, Waylon Jennings, well you get the idea. Hopefully it's still available.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 02:08 PM

Oops, I had better mention that Hoyt Axton is on it or someone is liable to hurt me.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 02:33 PM

Well, then there's Sweet Honey in the Rock, the United States Military Academy Band, Staff Sgt. Steve Luck and Rufus Wainwright sings with the McGarrigles. Aw, and then there is Jay Ungar and Molly Mason with Fiddle Fever. Now I love what they can do with fiddles. Everything they've ever done. I love Ashokan Farewell and play it for folks almost everytime they ask for it. But I sure won't if the time is 1860 something and somebody is standing there with a camcorder! I'm not goin' to help spread this idea that the tune was around then. But it's a great tune. There. Now that's everone on that CD. I didn't leave anyone out. I'll hush now.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Dale Rose
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 03:06 PM

Hey, I did, Dick! Referred them to the lyrics to Evalina just two posts above yours. :-)


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Linda Kelly
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 06:13 PM

I have loved this thread-I became interested in the American civil war when I went to Gettysburg 10 years ago and have a complete set of the videos of Ken Burns amazing documentary. My most treasured possession is a book edited by Walter Lowenfels called Walt Whitman's Civil War -recounting his experience of tragedy and death. My personal hero is Joseph Chamberlain for his stand at Little Round Top -was there any songs specifically written about the Battle of Gettysburg???


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Margo
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 06:30 PM

Bill, we have the Tennessee Ernie Ford album on CD! I think it is out of print now, but that doesn't mean a person couldn't get it. Wow, what a voice that guy had! I love that CD. Songs of both the North and South on it.

Sorcha, you and my husband Jack would have some great conversation about the war. He is a voracious reader, and a big civil war buff. He has mentioned to me things about the illegality of West Virginia and why the war ought to have been won by the south, and why the north did win. The facts make it veeeeery interesting!

Margo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Susan A-R
Date: 04 Feb 00 - 10:05 PM

Somewhere out there there is an mp3 recording of a group called Hardtack and Homespun doing songs of the Civil War. I have me own copy now ('cause I'm on it) and it has some historically accurate material. The recording isn't even as embarrassing as I'd thought it would be. I sing E Pluribus Unum all by my lonesome if you want to figure out which voice is mine. We recorded Hard Tack Come Again No More, Weeping Sad and Lonely, We Wait Beneath the Furnace Blast, Homespun Dress, Lorena, Song Of A Thousand Years, The Blue and the Gray (one of the most beautiful post- Civil War songs) and a few other items.

Blush

Susan A-R


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: jeffp
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 09:33 AM

According to "The Life of Johnny Reb - The Common Soldier of the Confederacy" by Bell Irvin Wiley, popular songs around Southern campfires were "Home Sweet Home," "Lorena," "All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight," "Annie of the Vale," "Sweet Evelina," Lilly Dale," "The Girl I Left Behind Me," "Bell Brandon," "Her Bright Eyes Haunt Me Still," "Listen to the Mockingbird," and "Just Before the Battle, Mother." "Annie Laurie" and "Juanita" were also very popular.

jeffp


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Susan A-R
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 02:01 PM

However, there were some that were banned (Home Sweet Home, and Lorena) because they were bad for morale. I can't imagine that All Quiet Along the Patomac Tonight was looked on with much favor either, it being pretty critical of the way the war was being managed. There is a great story about Home Sweet Home being sung on both sides of a river by both armies, kind of a predecessor to Christmas in the Trenches.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,jtt
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 02:40 PM

A lot of Irish boys fought on both sides, and there's a famous story about thousands of troops camped on both sides of a river the night before one of the big battles - sorry I can't be more specific but American history isn't my strong point - and the boys on one side started to sing a plaintive song called "Ireland, Boys, Hurrah", which starts "Deep in Canadian woods we've met, from one bright island flown, great is the land we tread, and yet our hearts are with our own..."

When the lads to one side of the river finished the first chorus the sound of the boys on the other side, and in the other army, plaintively finishing the same verse a line later, as happens when great masses of people sing together.

The next day most of those boys were dead.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: wildlone
Date: 05 Feb 00 - 03:19 PM

The re-enactors of the War between the States based in Cardiff have also found reference to the Welsh fighting on both sides and I am sure I read about Continental Europians going over to America and fighting.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 07 Feb 00 - 12:01 PM

This turned up in a CW newsgroup from a chap in Alaska. As I recall he found a hand written songbook belonging to a relative in the war:

Greetings from the tip of the nunatak...

OK - here we go with the titles that I can find this evening. I dug out the stuff my GGF left, and probably missed a BUNCH of stuff.

Here is what I've found so far:

The hand written lyrics are entitled: "Viva La America" Refrain and one chorus

"Bonnie Eloise" Appears to be 3 Choruses

"Annie Lish" One refrain

"The Continentals Farewell" 3 Parts Labelled

"Rock me to Sleep Mother" Two parts, one Chorus done twice

"Anna of the Vale" Two parts, one Chorus

"Linda Love" Seven parts

The Handwritten paper ends with: Songs as sung by "illegible" while "Prisoners of War" In the state of Louisiana and Texas. Copied from papers belonging to Lieut Geo. Johnston a.a.

Co. B, 19th Iowa Volunteers, Barrancas Florida, Sept 21st and 22nd 1864. Oscar G. Burch, Sgt Major 19th Iowa Vols. Regards, Mike Pickett, aka Gruff --------------------------------------------------------

I figure as Mr. Pickett saw fit to present this to the CW newsgroup he wouldn't object to my passing it along to this group. I'm doing so that you may see what other songs were being sung besides the "top forty" that we all know.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Mbo
Date: 07 Feb 00 - 12:06 PM

Oh yeah! Bonnie Eloise! I remember that one. I couldn't think of it's name on Friday. Knew it was Bonnie something...

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Amos
Date: 08 Feb 00 - 10:55 AM

Small degree of thread creep here:

A Catholic friend was working in the Raleigh, NC Baptist Book Store while her husband did theology at Duke.
A woman came into the store one day and announced in a very pronounced Southern that she "would like to buy an acolyte."

Kathy blinked once or twice and then told the woman that even in the South it was now illegal to sell or purchase human beings.

Turns out she was looking for "one of those long sticks with the thing on one side for lighting candles and a thing on the other side for puttin 'em out."


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 08 Feb 00 - 12:04 PM

Someone in this thread was looking for Evelina. Bobby Horton has recorded it on one of his collection of about 10 civil war cds, a great collection and an excellent resource for anyone interested in old songs. can be found at his web site. search for name or civil war music. sorry for this incomplete note. my right arm is broken.

richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Joan
Date: 08 Feb 00 - 09:10 PM

Always loved the irony in the fact that "Dixie" was written by a northerner, and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" was set to a southern hymn.

Also interesting that while lots of the popular songs ("Rally 'Round the Flag" and "Just Before the Battle..." for instance) were composed songs written by professionals like George Root, and calculated to stir up public sympathies for one side or the other. But many were just made up songs that caught on with homesick soldiers and disrupted communities. Sara Grey sings "Goin' 'Cross the Mountains" on Folk Legacy, I do "Fare Thee Well, Sweet Mary" and there are more. Joan


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 01:27 PM

Wait, there's more. I was hunting for info on the John Edwards Memorial Foundation and found this: (http://popmusic.mtsu.edu/cwardoc.htm) I'm not going in to who is on there. Just check it out. There are 3 CD's with notes. Pretty good material. 51 tracks. $30. Dang, I may have to go and get it.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 02:36 PM

Greetings,

Among the songs listed above, Mbo mentioned "Cheer Boys Cheer". This was, as far as I can recall, the "hit" song of the British Army during the Crimean War, so it's not surprising that it made its way across the Atlantic, but, I assume that the lyrics changed with this movement (I can't see American squaddies singing "So Farewll England, much as we may love thee..."). Does anybody have the American lyric to this song ?

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: MMario
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 03:23 PM

I don't have time to transcribe right now, but on the Lester Levy sheet Music site, there are both northern and southern versions. There is very little difference and they were both published in 1861.

and I used cheer and boys as parameters in the search.

northern = box 90 item 21 southern = box 94 item 111


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Walrus
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 05:57 PM

MMario,

Great stuff, thanks, it was just what I was looking for. I must say it's VERY different from the British version Which seems to be about emigration to Canada (I assume. If I can find the complete lyrics I'll post them here.

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:54 PM

walrus;

Where did you find the british version? I am, iterested as it was used as a basis for a pro-confederation song in BC, Canada,

cheer boys cheer , for the Dominion Nation....

richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 11 Feb 00 - 05:22 PM

For reenactors in Blue uniforms who desire a bit of infantryman's authenticity, check out "Marching On" in the DT. I recorded this from Frank Proffitt in 1960 and put it on the Folkways album I made of his songs the year before I started Folk-Legacy. (Frank Warner wrote the notes that accompanied that album.) Frank Proffitt had the song from his grandfather, who left his North Carolina home, walked over the mountain to the west, and joined the Union volunteers in Tennessee. Frank explains: "He was an admirer of Abraham Lincoln, and he had no truck with slavery."

And I must correct Joan's memory a bit: "Going Across the Mountain," the story of the grandfather's venture, also learned by Frank Proffitt from his worthy grandfather, is sung by Frank himself on Folk-Legacy's very first release: Frank Proffitt of Reese, North Carolina. Frank accompanies the song on his home-made fretless banjo. I plan to have this recording available as a compact disc within a few months. In the meantime, however, it's available as one of our "custom cassettes." Sara Grey does sing the song, but it isn't on her Folk-Legacy album, which is also available as a custom cassette.

Sandy (resident folk fogey)


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Subject: Lyr Add: CHEER, BOYS, CHEER! (Mackay, Russell)
From: GUEST,Walrus
Date: 11 Feb 00 - 05:24 PM

Richard,

I found the lyrics in a book called "Songs and Music of the Redcoats" by Lewis Winstock (Leo Cooper Ltd, London, 1970)

CHEER, BOYS, CHEER!
(Words: C Mackay. Music: H Russell)

Cheer, boys, cheer! No more of idle sorrow.
Courage, true hearts, shall bear us on our way.
Hope points before, and shows the bright tomorrow,
Let us forget the darkness of today.

So farewell, England, much as we may love thee.
We'll dry the tears that we have shed before.
Why should we weep, who sail in search of fortune?
So farewell, England. Farewell for evermore!

Cheer, boys, cheer! For country, mother country.
Cheer, boys, cheer! The willing strong right hand.
Cheer, boys, cheer! There's wealth for honest labour.
Cheer, boys, cheer! For the new and happy land.

Cheer, boys, cheer! The steady breeze is blowing,
To float us freely o'er the ocean's breast.
The world shall follow in the track we're going.
The star of empire glitters in the west.

Here we had toil and little to reward it,
But there shall plenty smile upon our pain.
And ours shall be the prairie and the forest,
And boundless meadows, ripe with golden grain.

Cheer, boys, cheer! For country, mother country,
Cheer, boys, cheer! For united heart and hand.
Cheer, boys, cheer! There's wealth for honest labour.
Cheer, boys, cheer! For the new and happy land.

Good luck

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 11 Feb 00 - 05:55 PM

Great thread.....And not to let it stray, but the Frank Proffitt album that Sandy referred to really is good. After I got it a few months ago, I drove to Cincy to meet Mick one evening and played it almost exclusively down there and back. It took me a week to convince myself that I DID NOT NEED a fretless banjo.

And now, back to the war...........

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: richardw
Date: 12 Feb 00 - 06:12 PM

thanks walrus;

much appreciated. Sounds like a great book. I'll have to try and find it.

richard


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Neil writer@a-znet.com
Date: 12 Feb 00 - 07:24 PM

To all interested readers: I am also in the process of researching Civil War music for a song book I am putting together. Some of the music I have been introduced to recently as a Civil War reenacto includes Kent Courtney's "Garryowen", the Second South Carolina String Band's "Southern Soldier" and songs of the Civil War by Various artists. Jerry Silverman's Folk Song Encyclopedia Volumes 1 & 2 has been a splendid resource. And the Civil War Midi web site was quite helpful. Reenacting in A Union Regular regiment has been an education. As one correapondent stated, literally thousands of songs were sung in that period. Some that I haven't seen mentioned but never the less popular; "The girl I left behind me", "The minstrel boy", and of course "Hard times" by Stephen Foster. Soldiers on both sides modified that one to a tune called "Hard Tack" with the same music and modified lyrics. PLease contact me at writer@a-znet.com if I can be of assistance or if you come across any more neat information, Neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,Guest; Neil Writer@a-znet.com
Date: 12 Feb 00 - 07:50 PM

Richard: If all the well informed people haven't flooded you with information let me offer you some more. I am a Civil War reenactor and there are several sources of music available. Let's adress the instruments first. All of the instruments we take for granted today with the exception of electric ones existed 140 years ago. While it would have been unusual to see soldiers carrying guitars or even fiddles on the march, in camp behind the lines guitars and such could be rented. The individual soldier carried mouth organ(Harmonica), tin whistles, fifes and the ever present Jaw harp. Almost all regiments had drummers assigned to them, and it was a safe bet you could find a fair number of men who played the bones. Also, without radio, the people in those days wqere not adverse to singing. As to the music, I recommend Kent Courtney, the Second South Carolina String Band and Bobby Horton You migfht also look into Ritchie Haven's stuff and a singer by the name of Sparky Rucker for the African-American music in vogue then. For Sheet music , Jerry Silverman's Folk Music Encyclopedia Vol. 1&2, Mel Bay puts out several books of Folk Music and there is also the Civil War Songbook compiled by Richard Crawford. Three songs that were sung and are under represented in Civil War music books: "The Girl I Left Behind me" was the favorite marching song for the Regulars (The standing army of 1861, "The Bonny Light Horseman" dates to the Napoleonic wars and was brought over by English and Irish immigrants and in the Navy on both sides the sea chantey "Santy Anno was popular(Remember the Mexican War had only been over for 13 years at the start of the Civil War. I hope this information helps. Don't hesitate to contact me at writer@a-znet.com if I can be of further assistance, Neil


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 13 Feb 00 - 01:32 AM

Turns out "Marching On" doesn't get you there, if you try to search by that. Try entering (in brackets) [Old Abe] and scroll down to MARCHING ON. That's where you'll find the genuine soldier song to which I referred above. Sorry to have misled you about the way to find it.

Sandy


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Rex
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 04:44 PM

Sorry to drag out this dusty old thread again. I was chatting with one of the members of the 4th Artillery Band (see above) and while they have no recordings (YET, they are working on it) they do have a web site. I should have known.

(www.4thartillerybrassband.org/)

You will want to check out their fine array of links and while no tapes or CD's are offered yet, you can play their music off the web site.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: tar_heel
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:35 PM

WE HAVE A SONG ON OUR NEW CD,FROM THE KEN BURNS...PBS SPECIAL,CALLED,"THE VACANT CHAIR". THE MELODY IS THE SAME AS,LIFE IS LIKE A MOUNTAIN RAILROAD. OR LIFE'S RAILWAY TO HEAVEN,AS USUALLY KNOWN. CONTACT ME IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN A COPY...LOTS OF OLD-TIME MUSIC ON TH CD...18 SONGS.... REGARDS,CHUCK HEMRICK chuck_peggi@yahoo.com or chuck hemrick


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:48 PM

In another C-W thread, kat ran across an excellent poetry and song site that is well worth the reading.

Poetry and Music of the War Between the States--CLICK HERE

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:52 PM

Well, I whupped up!!!!!

Try THIS

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: kendall
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:50 PM

Actually, the mans name was JOSHUA Chamberlain, hero of Little Round top. It has been said that the 20th Maine won the Civil War for this action. Joshua Chamberlain was a professor of rhetoric at Bowdoin College. He asked for a leave of absence to fight in the war, but, he was turned down. So, he asked for a leave of absence to study in Europe. This he was granted, so, he joined the army and fought anyway..(stubborn Mainer) When he returned a hero the powers that be didnt dare mess with him for his little ploy.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Kim C
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 02:53 PM

Yeah, and he got elected Governor of Maine for his trouble. :)


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:20 PM

Read all about Chamberlain in one of my favorite books, Killer Angels.

And LEJ - I heard Tenting Tonight when I was only about 4 years old, and was so mesmerized by the tune, I picked it out on the piano.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Susan A-R
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 11:34 PM

Although the quality on this varies a lot, there is some interesting civil war material on this one, some of which isn't done often. The Blue and the Gray is lovely, and E Pluribus is pretty funny, although the author probably didn't intend it to be so. Just so you know, I'm the lady in lavender, and the voice on E Pluribus. http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/63/hardtack_and_homespun.html


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Frankham
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 05:04 PM

"Dixie's Land" written by Daniel Emmett, member of the Christy Minstrels was popular on the New York stage as part of a "walkaround". Emmett got as far as Cincinatti but never into the deep south. The tune was "appropriated" by a publisher from New Orleans (read stolen) and as a result found popularity in the south. Unfortunately, the song has been appropriated by the Klan and by Southern Confederate organizations and is immensely offensive to African-American people who know that it's intent is racist as it has been recently used.

As a result, I refuse to sing the song in the way that I would refuse to sing the "Wesselhorst Song" from the era of the Nazis.

It is associated with the battle flag of the Confederacy. The Confederacy was intended as an attempt to furthur the "cause" of slavery and to unite southerners as a body to advocate the superiority of the white race. If you don't believe this, then read Alexander Stephens (Vice President of the Confederacy) and his mission statement.

Frank


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,cplaem@greennet.net
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 07:50 PM

I Need some help with a song.I am a guitar player in cwar string band(not lookin for blantant plugola) and i need the lyrics for a song. "The Irish Volunteer" based on "The Bonnie Blue Flag" would be a blessing if I could find them manny thanks cpl andy


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Art Thieme
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 09:06 PM

Frank,

It was our old friend, Bob Gibson, who wrote a song called "LET THE BAND PLAY DIXIE" about Abraham Lincoln, as a healing move right after the war, having the band at the White House play "Dixie".

\Art


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 09:42 PM

For those interested in continuing this discussion, I invite you to visit "my" Civil-War Music Forum at: Where a number of subtopics are covered, including songs, instruments, fife & Drum, and events.
Commenting on previous postings: For the Teacher working on the ACW project with children; you might want to have them learn (perhaps give individual students a verse to memorize and sing in turn, while all join in on the chorus) "Richmond am a Hard Road to Travel", which is a parody song of the several bungled Union attempts to take the Confederate Capitol. The tune is the popular Minstrel tune "Jordan am a Hard Road..." and is a lively air which lends itself well to syncopated hand-clapping, and spoon/tamborine rythm. It is also a musical history lesson!
A couple of resources mentioned which I would add my testimonial to include the SILBER book, which I consider my "Civil-War Music 101 Text". It contains a good cross section of military and popular music in do-able arrangements and (mostly) reasonable keys, with guitar chords provided. If you can do 1/4 of the songs in there reasonably well, especially with authentic instrument accompaniment, you should be welcome around any CW Reenacting campfire, and your dipper will likely stay full!
Of the many albums, probably my favorite is David KINCAID's "The Irish Volunteer". It's a fairly limited genre, but his voice stands head & shoulders above the vast majority of the other Reenactors who fancy themselves as "Musicians" and promply go about selling tapes and CDs. Sgt.K's instrumentation is done with homestyle virtuosity on authentic period or replica instruments, unlike the "97th String Band" who use flat-top steel-strung guitars and modern bluegrass banjos. Oh how I wish that David K. would start rolling out MORE!!
Somebody mentioned that banjos were all 4-string or "tenor" units during the CW; to my studied understanding, the more common banjos were 5-string (gut) with fretless necks, friction pegs, calfskin heads, and larger (up to 14" dia.) hoops than we have nowadays. The banjo was much more popular in America at the time than was the guitar, which was just becoming accepted thanks largely to the efforts of Mr. Justin HOLLAND whose performance and teaching of an "Americanized" version of the Classical technique of guitar was just catching on about the time of the ACW. I have a later (1880) printing of his Instruction Book from which I try to develop a "period" fingerpicking technique. Guitars were of the small-bodied "Parlor" type which remained popular in the U.S. through the 1930s. It seems that a few Luthiers are starting a "comeback" of the little "Parlors" which should be good news to Reenactors, as originals in any kind of condition are getting hard to come by. I'm not sure but what Martin may have re-introduced one of it's earlier models. My Parlor guitar is also gut-strung, as were most guitars back then. It has a unique feel and tone, especially on the little guitar, and anyone wishing to reproduce that authentic sound would be well advised to invest in and string up with a good set.
I also notice mention of "Rock Me to Sleep, Mother" in a period diary; The lyrics of this piece were written by a Portland ME woman, Elizabeth Akers ALLAN, who was a CW Correspondant as well as a Poetess and Sculptress. She never got credit for her work in the publications of the song, and went through an arduous and generally fruitless court case to try to recover royalties. We dug up a copy of the music (there are several versions, some of which can be found in the LEVY Collection)in the attic of the 5th ME Regimental Retreat on Peak's Island in Casco Bay, and it is a lovely, haunting lullaby which was apparantly quite popular in it's day, but which has been heard by very few currently alive today. If it's not on the DB, drop me e-mail and I can post you a scanning or transcription. I thrashed out chords to it which seem to work pretty well, but it is not a particularly easy piece. Another interesting song written by a Mainer is "The Corporal's Musket" which surfaced at the Redmond Museum along with other family artifacts. A Mr. LOCKE from Bethel ME wrote "Marching on to Richmond" early in the War - a fairly catchy, albiet prematurely optomistic - patriotic theme.
I have accumulated a modest collection of American music in various forms - mostly books and hymnals - from 1800 to around the turn of the Century, including some CW - themed songs that I've never heard of before. Many of these are pretty nondescript and probably deserved their plunge into obscurity.. but every now and then we uncover a pretty neat little tune! If there is a way to post scanned scores on here, let me know, as I wouldn't mind sharing some of these discoveries with fellow Folkies who share an interest in that period of History and it's music. Most of you could do them a lot more justice, I suspect, than can I. Perhaps we can schedule a "Civil War Hearme" Night - perhaps Nov. 11, Memorial Day? What thinkest Thou?
For God and Country:
John "Uncle Jaque" Clarke, Fifer
3rd Regiment MAINE Volunteer Infantry

Fife & Drum Corps


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 11:05 PM

Jaque,excellent post.Please list your web site address so we can visit!


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: GUEST,jaze
Date: 23 Sep 00 - 01:08 AM

On "Will The Circle Be Unbroken" II, Emmylou Harris does a beautiful song called "Mary Danced With Soldiers"


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: catspaw49
Date: 23 Sep 00 - 01:21 AM

I'm with Leej there Unk!!! Howzabout some more info?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 23 Sep 00 - 09:54 AM

Tried to post a "Link", but it apparantly failed to make it through the censors(?) Lets try again: 3rd Maine Website:
http://www.powerlink.net/mcgill/
Civil War Musician's Forum:
http://www.delphi.com/cwmusic/messages/


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: mg
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 02:46 AM

actually Memorial Day is in May and NOvember 11 is Veterans' Day....I think it is a great idea but would probably pick another day...Memorial Day which has Civil War origins or another day that has meaning to the Civil War, as people might want to honor veterans of all wars (what a thought) on Veterans' Day...mg


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: JedMarum
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 12:28 PM

It always surprises (and pleases) me, the interest people have in the American Civil War era and subject songs. I play several and they go over well with Celtic and Folk audiences, and they work in Pubs too. Not surprisingly, the history of this era produced some memorable stories and songs.


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Subject: RE: Songs of the American Civil War
From: Frankham
Date: 24 Sep 00 - 12:41 PM

Art,

Bob probably couldn't have forseen the adoption on the song Dixie by the Klan and as associated with the battle flag. A better healing would be to place the song in it's present perspective and not sing it. There's nothing healing about presenting this song to black people. It's divisive.

Frank


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