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Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)

dougie mcquillan 29 Jan 99 - 03:34 PM
Bill Sables (Inactive) 30 Jan 99 - 09:36 AM
Joe Offer 30 Jan 99 - 03:33 PM
Bill Sables (Inactive) 31 Jan 99 - 08:29 AM
Bill Sables (Inactive) 31 Jan 99 - 11:05 AM
GUEST,roguebert@hotmail.com 13 Jan 06 - 12:05 AM
shepherdlass 13 Jan 06 - 05:43 AM
Splott Man 13 Jan 06 - 07:39 AM
Charley Noble 13 Jan 06 - 07:54 AM
Ferrara 13 Jan 06 - 10:16 AM
Ferrara 13 Jan 06 - 10:21 AM
GUEST 14 Jan 06 - 04:06 AM
GUEST,Guest 18 Sep 06 - 07:41 AM
Dave Hanson 18 Sep 06 - 09:11 AM
GUEST,GUEST 24 Sep 06 - 07:37 PM
GUEST,colin reay 22 Jan 09 - 06:49 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Sep 09 - 01:01 PM
Jack Blandiver 28 Sep 09 - 01:12 PM
bill\sables 24 Feb 12 - 10:22 AM
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Subject: Oakey Strike Evictions
From: dougie mcquillan
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 03:34 PM

I require th words for the song "Oakey strike evictions" the opening track of the "Jack the Lad" CD Old straight track, anyone? many thanks dougie mcquillan @ freeserve.com.uk.


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Subject: RE: Oakey Strike Evictions
From: Bill Sables (Inactive)
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 09:36 AM

Dougie, Oakeys strike evicitions was written by Tommy Armstrong (the Pitmans Poet)from Tantoby near Stanley in Co Durham it concerns the mine on the north east corner of Stanley which was closed probably 60 or 70 years ago I will send you the words later Bill


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Subject: RE: Oakey Strike Evictions
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 03:33 PM

Sounds like a good song, Bill. I hope you'll post the lyrics here, too.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: OAKEY STRIKE EVICTIONS (Tommy Armstrong)
From: Bill Sables (Inactive)
Date: 31 Jan 99 - 08:29 AM

Dougie, I wasn't sure whether you were able to decipher the Durham dialect or not. You usually have to be born in Durham to understand it so I have written the song in dialect with phonetic pronunciation followed by a version in plain English, which will probably be handy for any singers in the U.S.A.

It was orly in Novemba, Ah niver will forget
The polises an the candy men at Oakey's hooses met
Johnny the bellman he was there squinting roond aboot
He put three men on ivory hoose te torn the pitmen oot

CHORUS: Oh, what wad a dee if aw'd the poower mesel
Aw wad hing the twenty candymen an Johnny we carries the bell

There they went from hoose te hoose an put things on the road
But mind they didn’t hort theorsells wi liftin' heavy loads
Some wid carry the poker oot the fender or the rake
But if they carried two at once, it was a great mistake

Some of these dandy candymen was dressed up like a cloon
Some had hats wivoot a flype and some wivoot a croon
Some had ne laps upon their coats but there was one chap warse
'Cos ivory time he had te stoop the wind blew up his arse

There was one chap had ne sleevs or buttons on his coat
Another had a bairnies hippin lapped aroond his throat
One chap wore a pair of breeks that belanged tiv a boy
One leg was a sort o tweed the uther was cordyroy

Next there comes the maisters aw think they shud think shem
Deprivin wives an familys of a comfortable hyem
But when they shift fre where they live aw hope they gan te hell
Alang wi the twenty candymen an Johnny that carries the bell


Non-Dialect Version

It was early in November I never will forget
The polises and the candymen at Oakey's houses met
Johnny the bellman he was there squinting round about
He put three men on every house to turn the pitmen out

CHORUS: Oh what would I do if I had the power myself
I would hang the twenty candymen and Johnny who carries the bell

There they went from house to house to put things on the road
But mind they didn't hurt themselves with lifting heavy loads
Some would carry the poker out the fender or the rake
But if they carried two at once, it was a great mistake

Some of these dandy candymen were dressed up like a clown
Some had hats without a peak and some without a crown
Some had no lapels upon their coat but there was one chap worse
'Cos every time he had to stoop the wind blew up his arse

There was one chap had no sleeves nor buttons on his coat
Another had a bairn's hippin wrapped around his throat
One chap had a pair of breeks that belonged to a boy
One leg was a sort of tweed the other was cordyroy

Next, there comes the masters I think they should think shame
Depriving wives and families of a comfortable home
But when they move from where they live I hope they go to hell
Along with the twenty candymen and Johnny who carries the bell

Polises....Police
Candymen... Bailiffs henchmen hired in for their ability to use force if need be. Their usual job was rag and bone men or scrap metal merchants who used to give sweets or candy to children in exchange for rags or scrap, hence the name candymen
Bellman...The Bailiff
Squinting... Looking around, being nosey
Bairnies Hippen...Childs nappy or diaper
Breeks.. Pants
Maisters.. the mine owners
Poker.. Iron tool used to move coals in a fire
Fender..Surround for a fireplace
Rake..Iron tool used to pull out ashes and dust when cleaning a fireplace

The events occurred during the 1885 stoppage in the North West Durham coalfield when striking miners could be evicted from their mine-owned houses. Tommy Armstrong wrote this song as a duel with another miner poet William Maguire in the Red Row Public House Tantoby.
Maguire's song is long forgotten.


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Subject: RE: Oakey Strike Evictions
From: Bill Sables (Inactive)
Date: 31 Jan 99 - 11:05 AM

Dougie, give me a call at bill@sables48.freeserve.co.uk


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: GUEST,roguebert@hotmail.com
Date: 13 Jan 06 - 12:05 AM

If anyone's interested, there's a version of this on Lenahan's "Hooligans In Suits" album.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: shepherdlass
Date: 13 Jan 06 - 05:43 AM

Try to find the Bob Fox and Stu Luckley version (not the re-recording on the Hush album, which is fine but lacks the bite of the earlier track) from the late 70s or early 80s - it's fantastic.

Bill S - great translation of the dialect! But I think the Red Row pub is actually in Beamish. It's now called the Black Horse and lies between Beamish Museum and the Tanfield Railway.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: Splott Man
Date: 13 Jan 06 - 07:39 AM

There's a fine version by The Happy End who are/were a collective of brass players. Vocals by the woman who sang on Don't Leave Me This Way by The Communards whose name escapes me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 13 Jan 06 - 07:54 AM

It's a fine song about a hard time.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstro
From: Ferrara
Date: 13 Jan 06 - 10:16 AM

Bill Sables, Thanks! Norman and Betty MacDonald recorded it on their "Doon the Lang Stairs" CD. I've always loved it and of course couldn't quite decipher a lot of the words.

Rita Ferrara


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstro
From: Ferrara
Date: 13 Jan 06 - 10:21 AM

Hmmm.... Just realized that Bill's post was in 1999. Still very happy to have it! Never understood the "Candymen" reference, use to wonder whether Betty and Norman were singing "county men" or what? Good to know.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Jan 06 - 04:06 AM

Quoted from "One Hundred Songs of Toil" by Karl Dallas:
Tradition has it that this song was written by Tommy Armstrong, the redoubtable Tyneside bard,as part of a bardic "cutting contest" in the Red Roe public house in Tanfield. The subject set for the contest was the situation of the men at Oakley Colliery in nearby Annfield Plain, who had been evicted during the strike then in progress. Tommy won and this is the last we hear of his opponent, one William McGuire. A Candyman is a specially recruited bailiff. In his "Northumberland Words", R.O. Heslop explains: "During the great strike of 1884 men were served with notices of ejectment all round. To do this, the services of 'vagrom men' were impressed. In these the pitmen recognised several as the itinerant vendors who called "Dandy-candy, three sticks a penny". Thus the term Candyman became generally applied in pit villages to those who served and carried out notices of ejectment."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 18 Sep 06 - 07:41 AM

I've heard this song on the Tommy Armstrong of Tyneside CD, which was put together by some of the High Level Ranters with Louis Killen and Maureen Craig. The tune sounds familiar - does anyone know what it is (Tommy tended to use existing tunes...)

Thanks,
Andrew


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstro
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 18 Sep 06 - 09:11 AM

Maureen Craik actually.

eric


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: GUEST,GUEST
Date: 24 Sep 06 - 07:37 PM

Sorry Erig, typo!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: GUEST,colin reay
Date: 22 Jan 09 - 06:49 PM

a great version of this song is available by a local north east band beggars bog http://www.cycast.co.uk/mp3.php?par=Yj03NTc2


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Sep 09 - 01:01 PM

THE OAKEY STRIKE EVICTIONS can be found in The Urban & Industrial Songs of the Black Country and Birmingham by Jon Raven (Wolverhampton: Broadside, 1977), page 71, where it appears with musical notation for one voice.

Here's the credit, as it is given there:

"Source: From the singing of Tommy Armstrong. A. L. Lloyd, Folk Song in England, pub. Lawrence & Wishart, 1968. Noted A. L. Lloyd, Durham, 1952."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 28 Sep 09 - 01:12 PM

The source note is misleading as Tommy wrote the song. I would think it highly unlikely A.L.Lloyd heard him singing it, as Tommy Armstrong died in 1920 when A.L.Lloyd would have been 12. According to the 1954 Definition Oakey Strike Evictions is not a folk song, though of course Tommy was a master of his vernacular craft. Credit where credit is due!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Oakey Strike Evictions (Tommy Armstrong)
From: bill\sables
Date: 24 Feb 12 - 10:22 AM

Regarding the Guest post on 14th Jan 2006;
Oakey's colliery was not at Anfield Plain it was between Stanley and Tanfield. Perhaps he was thinking of another song "Oakey's Keeker" also by Armstrong. Oakey's Keeker worked at Oakey's pit but was nicknamed "Maiden Law Joe" from where he used to work, and Maiden Law is situated between Anfield Plain and Lanchester. The pit at Anfield Plain was called the "Morrison Busty"
Shepherdlass the "Red Row" pub prounounced "Reed Raa" was in Tantobie but has closed many years ago in the 20's I believe.


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