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Lyr Req/Add: Songs about the Texas Rangers

DigiTrad:
TEXAS RANGERS


Related threads:
Texas Rangers melody origin (23)
(origins) ADD/Origins: the Texas Ranger (35)
Lyr Req: Texas Rangers - Battle of Walker's C (5)


Paul Jay 29 Jan 99 - 04:44 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 29 Jan 99 - 05:51 PM
Susan of DT 29 Jan 99 - 09:22 PM
Sandy Paton 29 Jan 99 - 09:31 PM
29 Jan 99 - 09:59 PM
alison 30 Jan 99 - 12:39 AM
Les B 30 Jan 99 - 01:29 AM
Paul Jay 31 Jan 99 - 01:49 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 04 - 05:04 PM
Keith A of Hertford 11 Oct 04 - 06:00 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 04 - 07:19 PM
mack/misophist 11 Oct 04 - 08:04 PM
Mark Ross 11 Oct 04 - 10:56 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Oct 04 - 11:25 PM
Big Al Whittle 12 Oct 04 - 11:30 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 04 - 01:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 04 - 09:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Oct 05 - 11:33 PM
Coyote Breath 18 Oct 05 - 02:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Oct 05 - 02:25 PM
GUEST,batgirl 05 Oct 06 - 09:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Aug 07 - 09:38 PM
GUEST,slowtrap 09 Mar 09 - 06:52 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Mar 09 - 07:41 PM
fumblefingers 09 Mar 09 - 11:51 PM
GUEST,Slowtrap 15 Apr 10 - 12:17 AM
GUEST,Slowtrap 08 Aug 10 - 09:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Aug 10 - 02:16 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Aug 10 - 02:54 PM
Nathan in Texas 09 Aug 10 - 05:04 PM
GUEST 09 Aug 10 - 09:31 PM
GUEST 09 Aug 10 - 09:46 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Aug 10 - 10:05 PM
GUEST 11 Aug 10 - 12:42 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Aug 10 - 02:06 PM
GUEST 12 Aug 10 - 12:05 AM
GUEST,Visitor 13 Aug 10 - 11:35 AM
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Subject: Texas Rangers
From: Paul Jay
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 04:44 PM

My Great Uncle was a Texas Ranger so I have been looking for Ranger songs to learn. The only 2 Ranger songs I could find were; 1. Texas Rangers (Come all you Texas Rangers, Wherever you may be, etc., 2. The Dying Ranger ("The Sun was sinking in the west, it fell with legenthing rays, 'neath the shade of a palmetto where our wounded ranger lay, etc. If anyone could help with other songs and/or(fiddle)tunes I'd greatly appreciate it.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 05:51 PM

Didn't Rossini write the most famous piece associated with a Texas Ranger?

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Susan of DT
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 09:22 PM

When I put [texas ranger*] in the blue search box in the upper right hand corner, two songs came up. Check out Sam Bass for another song in which Texas Rangers are prominant.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 09:31 PM

I don't know the song, but there is an item appearing occasionally on the FOLKDJ-L listserve titled "One Riot, One Ranger." You might find it listed on one of the Internet CD sites that offer a commission to the 'Cat.

Sandy


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From:
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 09:59 PM

RIDE, RANGER, RIDE written by Tim Spencer, recorded by the Sons of the Pioneers (only the best darn western aggregation since music was invented, but I digress). The song, originally recorded in 1936, was reissued in 1991 on MCAD10090 "Sons of the Pioneers" by MCA. Incidentally, the lead singer is pre movie Roy Rogers.---John


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: alison
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 12:39 AM

Hi,

will an Arizona Ranger do? If so "Big Iron" by Marty Robbins......

and I apologise but I can't resist....

Where does the lone ranger take his rubbish????

To the dump,To the dump, To the dump, dump, dump......

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Les B
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 01:29 AM

Look under Mustang Gray in the Data Base for a good traditional song about a ranger.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Paul Jay
Date: 31 Jan 99 - 01:49 AM

Thanks one and all for the info. Susan,thanks, I tried that first, I guess the little star at the end makes all the difference as it worked like you said. Bobby Bob I think that little ditty was about a Swiss Ranger.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BUCKSKIN SAM (SONG OF THE TEXAN RANGER)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 05:04 PM

BUCKSKIN SAM
[Song of the Texan Ranger]
(C. A. White, 1875)

Dashing o'er the prairie
Free from toil and care,
Scouting through the chaparals
Camping here and there,
Mounted on Mustangs as fleet
As ever comanche did ride,
Rifle always ready,
And Revolver by our side.

Chorus (verses 1 and 2):
Then mount my boys and away,
The trail is broad and clear,
And when you see the Reds,
Just at them with a cheer,
The alarm we have not forgot
And Texans never will,
And the Greasers they shall hear
It mingled with our yell, our yell, our yell.

Free and fearless over
Plain and wood we roam,
When night overtakes us,
There we make our home.
By the streamlets smooth green bank
Or on the canyon's dry bed,
From the Brazos Chaparals,
Away for the Reds.

Now by reds we're surrounded,
War cries fill the air,
Arrows darting round us,
Fiends in paint and hair,
Lances glistening in the sun,
The texans yell resounds,
Warriors give their dying whoop,
The Mustang his last bound.

Chorus for verse 3:
And on the Mexican border,
We dash *Cortina's band,
And drive the thieving Greasers
Into the Rio Grande.
They are gasping now in the water
And dying on the shore,
While remember the alamo,
Is heard 'bove battles roar,
While remember the alamo,
Is heard 'bove battles roar.
The roar, the roar, the roar.

This song is a reliable mirror of the years 1874-1875 in Texas and of the Rangers who fought there. The historical brief given here provides the background (From The Handbook of Texas Online).
Sheet music published by White, Smith and Company, Boston (also Chicago, New York, Montreal, Bangor, San Francisco and Sacramento City), 1875. Sheet Music at American Memory.

Brief History- When the Rangers were officially sanctioned in 1835, they did little more than serve as scouts and couriers. After the Alamo in 1836 and during the Battle of San Jacinto, they were on "escort" duty, helping refugees and rounding up stray cattle. Lamar changed the policies and his Congress provided for a company of 56 rangers; a month later added five more companies. The rangers waged all-out war against the Indians, in the Cherokee War and against the Comanches. In 1842, 150 rangers helped repel a Mexican invasion as well as protecting against Indian attacks.
In the Mexican War of 1846, they fought at the battles of Palo Alto and resaca de la Palma. They became General Taylor's eyes and ears: "superbly mounted, armed to the teeth with a large assortment of weapons. When Gen. Scott landed at Vera Cruz, the rangers fought in American victories, becoming known as "los diablos Tejanos." Following the War, the rangers had no official function.

In 1874, the period of the song "Buckskin Sam," the rangers returned to power along with the state Democrats. They were marshalled to fight both the Indians in the west and Mexican raiders along the Rio Grande.

Background to the song, "Buckskin Sam."
Two unique groups were formed. The Special Force of Rangers curbed lawlessness engendered by the Sutton-Taylor Feud. In 1875, they moved into the Nueces Strip (near the Rio Grande) to combat *Cortina's "bravos," mentioned in the song "Buckskin Sam." Therangers were ruthless, in 1875 gaining notoriety by stacking dead Mexican rustlers "like cordwood" in the Brownsville square.
The second unit, The Frontier Battalion, six companies with 75 rangers each, participated in 15 Indian battles in 1874, and, together with the U. S. Cavalry, destroyed the power of the Comanches and Kiowas by the end of 1875. The Frontier Battalion was no longer necessary after 1882.
The reduced number of rangers continued to engage in brush fights with the Mexicans. Between 1914 and 1919, the regular rangers, along with hundreds of special rangers appointed by Texas governors, killed some 5000 Hispanics, many of them not connected with the raids by rustlers and bandits. 'Greaser' was the operative word for Mexicans and 'red' for Indians.

At present, the Rangers are a highly educated force of crime fighters, many with law and law enforcement degrees.

The 'ranger' on the front of the sheet music bears a resemblance to a romantic portrait of Custer.

"Ranger's Command" is in the DT, sung by Woody Guthrie (written by him) and Joan Baez. It doesn't seem to have much to do with Texas Rangers; just rangers in general.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 06:00 PM

Ranger's Command. Joan Baez did a fine version.
Keith.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 07:19 PM

Ranger organizations that have not survived or have become part of the state police- Arizona (Territorial rangers, 1901), California, Colorado (earlier the Jefferson Rangers), Montana, New Mexico (had a special license plate) and possibly others.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: mack/misophist
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 08:04 PM

Trivia time:

In the War Between the States the Texas Rangers enlisted in the Confederate Army en masse, if the CSA would agree to use them as scouts and not as regular cavalry. Their terms were accepted.*

The large, horseshoe shaped belt buckle associated with western dress may not have been invented by the Texas Rangers but they all wore them and, in some areas, they are still called Ranger buckles.¤



*Learned in mandatory Texas history class.
¤Learned from Native American jeweler.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Mark Ross
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 10:56 PM

Check out TEXAS RANGERS by the Cartwright Brothers(I think). The New Lost City Ramblers recorded it, just vocal and fiddle. One of the great western ballads.


Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Oct 04 - 11:25 PM

The Texas Rangers were a limited force following the Mexican War, flowering briefly in 1858-1859, fighting Cortina's band of raiders alongside the U. S. Army. By the time of the Civil War, the force was small. Members individually rushed to Confederate colors. The Eighth Texas Cavalry, known as "Terry's Texas Rangers," was a mixed bag; the founder, Terry, never had belonged to the Texas Rangers. Your mandatory Texas history probably had as much myth as my mandatory New Mexico history.

There is a lot of fakelore about the Ranger belt. Not until the 1930s was dress provided. Until then, Rangers bought their own clothing (Handbook of Texas Online) and they bought to suit the job. Somewhere on the internet is a website by the Ranger Society showing one of the several types of fake buckles. A fancy silver one with the star, is sometimes worn by retirees. It is not wide See Buckle

The "Ranger belt" was a standard type of the times, width variable but generally 1 1/2 inches wide, with a small subsidiary 'belt' (the billets),' which carries the buckle, stitched onto the main belt. The buckle generally was no wider or only slightly wider than the base belt; its horseshoe or "U" shape was originally English (or European). Perhaps some Rangers wore them. See Ranger Belt for usual proportions, or, a better picture Belts and scroll down to the ranger belts, showing buckle and keepers.
A buckle any wider is worn only by foreigners (non-Texans), line dancers or rhinestone cowboys (and rodeo or show types).


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 12 Oct 04 - 11:30 AM

Given the apparent paucity of songs about this august body - perhaps we all ought to get to work and produce a few songs - we're obviously the guys for the job.


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Subject: RE: Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 04 - 01:40 PM

Weelittledrummer made me wonder- where are the ballads about the heroic agents of ATF (alcohol, tax and firearms), the FBI, CIA ? lots of ground to cover here.

Is "The Ranger's Song," We're All Pals Together," here somewhere?


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE DISHEARTENED RANGER
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 04 - 09:06 PM

Much fakelore surrounds the song "Texas Rangers."
It possibly refers to the Battle of Stone Houses, which took place in 1837 near present-day Windthorst, north-central Texas. This, the only engagement fought by Texas Rangers in which there was significant loss of Rangers, was the result of stupidity.
Rangers under Capt. Wm. Eastland pursued a band of Kichai Indians up the Colorado River, but lost the trail. An argument ensued between Capt. Eastland and Lt. Van Benthusen and the company separated. Van Benthusen and seventeen men headed north up the Brazos River and contacted the Indians. Cherokees and Delawares who were present tried to act as peace agents, but Ranger Felix McClusky jumped an Indian and killed him. When reprimanded, McClusky replied that he would kill any Indian for a plug of tobacco and showed one he had taken from the dead Indian's body. The angered Indians attacked and the Rangers abandoned their horses and holed up in a ravine. Fighting ensued for two hours, until the Kitchais set fire to the prairie to smoke them out. The Rangers charged through the smoke and into the woods. Four Rangers were killed in battle and six during the escape. Eight of the seventeen made it on foot to Sabine Settlement. From Handbook of Texas Online: Stone Houses

The song varys in the number of Rangers killed, six to 16 in most versions; no Captain died.
The verse in the DT about 300 noble rangers dead may refer to some action by the Eighth Texas Cavalry under Terry during the Civil War, but is certainly not the result of a Texas Rangers engagement. The cavalry unit, a mixed group, included some rangers, but Terry never had been a ranger.

The song most likely was written sometime after the Civil War. Reputedly it surfaced in 1874 (Traditional Ballad Index) and an earlier origin is claimed, but there is no proof of this. Because of the similarity of the versions, a newspaper printing is a likely source.

I would not be surprised to find that the following version, from a woman who came to Indian Territory in 1885 from Kentucky, is closer to the original than those detailing the deaths of rangers.

THE DISHEARTENED RANGER

Come, listen to a ranger, you kindhearted stranger,
This song, though a sad one, you are welcome to hear;
He has kept the Comanches away from your ranches,
And followed them far on the Texas frontier.

He is weary of scouting, of traveling and routing
The bloodthirsty brutes o'er prairie and wood;
No rest for the sinner, no breakfast, no dinner,
No rest from his suffering bed in the mud.

No corn nor potatoes, no beets nor tomatoes,
The jerked beef's as dry as the sole of your shoes;
All day without drinking, all night without winking,
I'll tell you, kind stranger, this never will do.

Those great alligators, the state legislators,
Are puffing and blowing two-thirds of the time,
But windy ovations about rangers and rations
Never put in our pockets one-tenth of a dime.

They do not regard us, they will not reward us,
Though hungry and haggard with holes in our coats;
But the election is coming, and they will be drumming
And praising our valor to purchase our votes.

For glory and payment, for victuals and rainment,
No longer I'll fight on the Texas frontier;
So guard your own ranches, and mind the Comanches
Or surely they'll scalp you in less than a year.

Though sure it may grieve you, the ranger must leave you
Exposed to the arrow and knife of the foe;
So look to the cattle and fight your own battle,
For home to the States I am determined to go.

Where churches have steeples and laws are more equal,
Where churches have people and ladies more kind,
Where work is regarded and worth is rewarded,
Where pumpkins are plentiful and pockets relined.

Thanks for listening to the ranger, you kindhearted stranger,
This song, like the ranger is now at an end;
So guard your own ranches, and mind the Comanches
Or surely they'll scalp you in less than a year.

The song seems to refer to the Frontier Battalion of the Texas Rangers, 1874-1882, composed of six companies with 75 rangers each, which, under Maj. John B. Jones, participated in 15 Indian battles in 1874. Together with the United States Cavalry, they ended the Commanche-Kiowa threat in 1875, and "thinned out" more than 3000 Texas desperados, including Sam Bass and John Wesley Hardin. The Frontier Battalion was no longer necessary after 1882. Information from Handbook of Texas Online.
With music, sung by Mrs. Lula Sublet of Fort Gibson, OK; born in Kentucky and came to Indian Territory in 1885. Ethel and Chauncey O. Moore, 1964, "Ballads and Folk Songs of the Southwest," no. 151, pp. 315-316.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: THE FRONTIER RANGER
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Oct 05 - 11:33 PM

THE FRONTIER RANGER
Words by M. B. Smith, of the Second Texas.

Come, list to a Ranger, you kind-hearted stranger,
A song, tho' a sad one, you are welcome to hear-
He kept the Comanches away from your ranches,
And follow'd them far on the Texas Frontier.

He's weary of scouting, of riding and rustling-
The blood-thirsty brutes thro' the prairies and woods:
No rest for the sinner, no breakfast or dinner-
No rest for a Ranger but a bed in the mud.

No corn nor potatoes, nor beets nor tomatoes:
The jerk beef as dry as the sole of your shoe-
All day without drinking, all night without winking;
I tell you, kind stranger, this never will do.

These great alligators- the State Legislators-
Are puffing and blowing two-thirds of their time-
But windy orations about Rangers and rations
Never put in our pockets one-tenth of a dime.

They do not regard us, they will not reward us,
Tho' hungry and haggard, with holes in our coats:
But Election is coming, when they will be running,
And praising our valor, to purchase our votes.

Altho' it may grieve you, the Ranger must leave you,
Expos'd to the arrow and knife of the foe;
So guard your own cattle, and fight your own battles,
For home to the States, I'm determin'd to go.

Where churches have steeples, and things are more equal,
Where churches have people, nd ladies more kind-
Where worth is regarded, and work is rewarded-
Where pumpkins are plenty, and pockets lined!

Although similar to the "Disheartened Ranger," above, and in John A. Lomax, 1910, "Cowboy Songs," I have copied it here from Allan because it is the earliest appearance in print of what is truly a Texas Ranger song. Throughout the first 50 years of their existence, the Texas Rangers were short of pay and equipment. Not until they were re-organized after the Civil War in c. 1875 did conditions slowly improve.
This song was collected during or before the Civil War, and may have been published in Allan's "Lone Star Ballads No. 1." The author's property was burnt by Major G. W. Smith and the Federal soldiers in Brenham, Texas. Allan rebuilt his collection, and it was finally published by Burt Franklin, New York, in 1874. Francis D. Allan, 1874, "Lone Star Ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs," p. 92, lyrics only.
Not yet verified, this song probably was first published in the "Lone Star and Texas Ranger," a newspaper printed by Joseph Lancaster, located in Brenham, Texas during the 1850s.
I can find nothing on M. B. Smith.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: the Texas Ranger
From: Coyote Breath
Date: 18 Oct 05 - 02:04 PM

A footnote: In the film "The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez" (starring a young Edward James Olmos) the tune is played on a button accordion (in the background) as the Texas Rangers were getting their horses up into the railway cars as they commenced their "manhunt" of Gregorio Cortez. It was the last such operation of the Texas Rangers and ultimately proved to be an embarassment to the "noble band".

There is a corrida (actually more than one) which recounts the events surrounding the manhunt and the incredibly stupid actions of the Rangers.

Worth watching.

CB


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: the Texas Ranger
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Oct 05 - 02:25 PM

Masato posted a version of the corrido, "Gregorio Cortez," in thread 55039: Gregorio Cortez
More comments there.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Texas Rangers (from Ian & Sylvia)
From: GUEST,batgirl
Date: 05 Oct 06 - 09:25 PM

THE DISHEARTENED RANGER; THE FRONTIER RANGER

Q

Wow. Thanks for the history lesson and the lyrics!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: the Texas Ranger
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Aug 07 - 09:38 PM

The unrelated song, "I Was a Texas Ranger," has been posted in thread 6681:
All Around the World
cf. Roving Gambler?
Thread #6681   Message #2117001
Posted By: Q
01-Aug-07 - 09:24 PM
Thread Name: Lyr Req: Been All Around This World (Grateful Dead
Subject: Lyr Add: I WAS A TEXAS RANGER

Now sing this to "Roving Gambler."
    I WAS A TEXAS RANGER

    I was a Texas Ranger sixteen long years ago;
    I ranged through all of Texas and a part uv Mexico.

    Ef I was a gambler, westward I would go;
    I'd gamble with the Englishmen en there I'd win my dough.

    My children they'll go naked; my wife will have to plough;
    Along came an officer en drove off my last caow.

Coll. from East Tennessee mountain whites; sung by F. Le Tellier, 1910.
No 11, from Part VI, Songs Connected with Drinking and Gambling.
E. C. Perrow, Songs and Rhymes from the South, 1915, Jour. American Folklore, vol. 28, p. 159ff.

In the old days, remittance men came from England to Canada and the western U. S., some had money. Some were younger sons who couldn't inherit the 'manor,' others were sent out by their family because they were 'wild,' or avoiding the consequences of some action or crime. Some made good investments or bought ranchland and prospered, others threw their remittances away.


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Subject: ADD: Ballad of Bigfoot Wallace
From: GUEST,slowtrap
Date: 09 Mar 09 - 06:52 PM

Here's a ranger song:

THE BALLAD OF BIGFOOT WALLACE


Gather all ye people, a story I will tell,
About a famous ranger, in Texas he did dwell.
Called Bigfoot Wallace to the end of his life,
He loved women and children, but never had a wife.

Bigfoot came to Texas in old republic days,
And with his trusty rifle served in many ways.
In every little skirmish and bloody battle ground,
There never was a tougher ranger found.

Riding into Austin in eighteen-thirty-nine,
Here he found a name, no one could malign.
Mistaken for an Indian in a dawn attack,
He took the chief's name and never gave it back.

Texas was invaded in eighteen-forty-two,
So Bigfoot joined the rangers to get a better view.
They had a little battle east of San Antone,
Rangers sent that army running for its home.

Craving Texas vengence for the invasion slight,
Rangers rode to Mier to give 'em another fight.
Captured and sentenced according to the law,
From a jar of beans all were forced to draw.

Bigfoot drew a white, while others drew the blacks,
They had another reason with the rifle cracks.
Swearing vows of vengence for the martyred few,
This execution, their guards would one day rue.

Freed from Perote Castle in eighteen-forty-four,
Bigfoot and the rangers, now heroes of Texas lore.
Returning to their families and their hard fought lands,
Bigfoot and the Texans joined new ranger bands.

The message of this story is very clear to me,
Whether you're a ranger or a wannabe.
Rangers are tough and rangers are true,
But Bigfoot was the toughest Texas ever knew.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Mar 09 - 07:41 PM

Presumably the Wallace song was written by Roger 'Strap' Kennedy.
There are some inaccuracies. Wallace moved to Austin in 1840, but 1839 rhymes with malign, etc.

About 200 Mier prisoners were incarcerated at Perote. They joined those few not yet released in 1842 of the 300 or so captured in the extremely stupid "Santa Fe" expedition.

Wallace told a lot of tall tales; the bean story may have been one of them.

See articles on Wallace and Perote Prison in the Handbook of Texas online.
Handbook of Texas


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: fumblefingers
Date: 09 Mar 09 - 11:51 PM

Here's some more info about the Texas Rangers:

Former Texas Rangers Association I'm a member of this outfit.

Texas Ranger Hall of Fame in Waco, Texas.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST,Slowtrap
Date: 15 Apr 10 - 12:17 AM

Actually Bigfoot described arriving in Austin while the public buildings were being constructed for the new capital city, so this would place him in Austin in mid 1839. His biographer A. J. Sowell was just off by several months. Bigfoot told some tall tales, but you're all wrong on the Black Bean Episode at Hacienda Salado. Bigfoot was there and he was a documented prisoner of Perote Prison until his release in late 1844. I've done my research. Adios.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST,Slowtrap
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 09:23 PM

No response Q to my corrections on your Bigfoot Wallace mistakes. Oh, well here is another great song about a Texas Ranger. It's called Sundown and was written by Bobby Sykes. Marty Robbins sang Sundown in his distinctive and haunting way, but it reads well too. Enjoy.

SUNDOWN


Bill Thaxton was an ex-ranger,
One of the bravest by far.
It's said that old Bill was the fastest man ever,
To pin on a ranger star.

Stories about him were legends,
Bill was the best of the bold.
Bad men all feared him way back in his day,
But he was now growing old.

Into Bill's town rode an outlaw,
He wore his gun low and tied down.
He reigned in his horse and announced to the crowd,
"If you speak to me call me Sundown".

His clothes were all dark and fancy,
And topped by a black leather vest.
Somebody asked how he came by his name,
And if he was one of the best.

The eyes of the tall stranger narrowed,
He grinned like the devil possessed.
"I never fight till the sun's going down,
And my back is facing the West.

Said he wouldn't be with us tomorrow,
He only rode in for one thing.
He only stopped by to make Bill Thaxton die,
So he could add to his fame.

"Go give Bill Thaxton a message,
And tell him a killer's in town,
Tell him we'll meet at the end of the street,
Just as the sun's going down".

Somebody said it had been years,
Since old Bill had toted a gun.
Sundown replied that wasn't his hide,
Killing old Bill would be fun.

The old ranger sent back his answer,
"Tell him I'm on my way,
I've never ran and I'll meet this young man,
At any time of the day".

Bill got there just about sunset,
It still hung like fire in the sky.
In just a few moments out there in the street,
Old Bill or the outlaw would die.

Slowly Bill slid from the saddle,
And started to make his advance.
The sun hit the old ranger square in the eyes,
The shadows had started to dance.

Bill started talking to Sundown,
Judging his distance that way,
Their stride was the same and at just thirty feet,
Both of the men made their play.

Bill's gun slipped leather like lightning,
His forty-four spoke with a whine.
The sun didn't bother Bill Thaxton at all,
Because the old ranger was blind.

Six shots delivered their message,
The ranger had emptied his gun.
Bill gave a sigh when when there was no reply,
He knew once more he had won.

The old ranger lowered his six gun,
He just stood there staring ahead.
Watching you'd think that old Bill didn't know,
In front of him Sundown was dead.

Bill has been gone for a long time,
But old timers still can recall.
The day the old ranger stood up to the test,
And proved he was best of them all.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 02:16 PM

Guest Slowtrap, I quoted from the article on W. W. A. Wallace (Bigfoot) in "The Handbook of Texas," which says he came to Austin in the spring of 1840, and the article on Perote Prison.
The last 105 prisoners were released from Perote Prison in 1844.

Your quarrel, if any, is with "The Handbook of Texas," put out by the Texas State Historical Association.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 02:54 PM

A Capt. William Thaxton was with the Texas Rangers, 31st Brigade, Texas State Troops, 1861-1862, San Saba County. This was a Confederate Group.

The Texas Ranger Research Center, Texas State Library and Archives.

He may never have been a member of the enforcement group.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: Nathan in Texas
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 05:04 PM

This one is about the outlaw, not the rangers, but they're included.

CROSS THE BRAZOS AT WACO
(Written by Kay Arnold, 1964)

On the Chisholm Trail it was midnight
Carmela was strong on his mind
Because of the life he had chosen
Carmela had left then behind
Too long he'd been El Bandito
Carmela had left him alone
But today someone brought a message
She'd been seen in old San Antone

Cross the Brazos at Waco
Ride hard and I'll make it by dawn
Cross the Brazos at Waco
I'm safe when I reach San Antone

He glanced back over his shoulder
The posse was nowhere in sight
He'd sent for Carmela to meet him
At the banks of the Brazos tonight
She was waiting and he kept the promise
He'd made such a long time ago
As he dropped the guns that she hated
In the muddy Brazos below

Cross the Brazos at Waco
Ride hard and I'll make it by dawn
Cross the Brazos at Waco
I'm safe when I reach San Antone

Then the night came alive with gunfire
He knew that at last he'd been found
As the ranger's badge shone brightly
El Bandito laid on the ground
Carmela knew he was dying
That all of her dreams were in vain
As she kissed his lips for the last time
She heard him whisper again.

Cross the Brazos at Waco
Ride hard and I'll make it by dawn
Cross the Brazos at Waco
I'm safe when I reach San Antone
I'm safe when I reach San Antone


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 09:31 PM

Well Q, it didn't look like a quote. It sounded like a personal statement on alleged inaccuracies in the Bigfoot poem. You also implied that the Black Bean Episode might be a tall tale and I've never heard anyone even mildly refute this factual execution. I have no quarrel with you, but I wouldn't trust everything you read on history, especially in the Handbook of Texas or on the internet. I'm a mite touchy on real ranger history.

Guest Slowtrap


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 09:46 PM

I've seen that Texas ranger commander's link, but Capt. William Thaxton's San Saba Co. Company of the 31st Brigade District never formed because of this Thaxton's early war illness. Regardless, the company was clearly Confederate Militia and not actually a ranger unit. Nice work finding that link though and assessment of Old Bill Thaxton's ambiguous ranger service. Stiil a great tune.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 10:05 PM

Guest, provide your references. I accept the Handbook of Texas (Texas State Historical Assn.), and the Texas State Library, unless valid contrary evidence is shown.

The Black Bean episode is well-known; my comment was poorly stated and was meant to question Wallace's story of bean size, which sounds like embroidery.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Aug 10 - 12:42 AM

Ahhhh!, no thanks. I've fallen into that prove someone wrong scenario before. I've stated the facts and challenge anyone to prove me wrong.I initially only came onto this little forum to view ranger songs and not cause trouble. So you were referencing Bigfoot's single comment on the slight difference in individual bean sizes and not the Black Bean Incident as whole? You're right, that is an outlandish way to pick a bean out of jar when you can't see it. Adios.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Aug 10 - 02:06 PM

They were not beans but black peas and dried green peas (which turn white). Now prove me wrong!

I like the ballad of Bigfoot! What music do you use?


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Aug 10 - 12:05 AM

Peas! Never heard that before in all the primary or contemporary accounts, but I'm sure you're correct. I just wonder why it wasn't called The Black Pea Episode. Maybe the prisoners were afraid their estates would be sued by the Black-Eyed Peas band. ;D

I'm not musical. Later.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Songs about the Texas Rangers
From: GUEST,Visitor
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 11:35 AM

Ride, Ranger, Ride (Tim Spencer)

Ride, ranger, ride,
From the river to the sea you have written history,
Ride, ranger, ride,
You're a loyal Texas son and she needs you every one,
Ride, ranger, ride!

Ride, ranger, ride,
You have conquered every foe since a hundred years ago
Ride, ranger, ride,
For the ranger that is gone you are pledged to carry on,
Ride, ranger, ride!

Texas knows you're true, ranger,
Your watchword die or do, ranger,
There's courage in the beat of your faitful mustang's feet,
Ride, ranger, ride!

Ride, ranger, ride,
You have conquered every foe since a hundred years ago
Ride, ranger, ride,
For the ranger that is gone you are pledged to carry on,
Ride, ranger, ride!


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