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Lyr Add: El Mariner (Catalan sea kidnap song)

GUEST,JMC 18 Mar 06 - 11:46 AM
Joe Offer 18 Mar 06 - 12:40 PM
GUEST,JMC 18 Mar 06 - 12:59 PM
Joe Offer 18 Mar 06 - 01:21 PM
GUEST,JMC 20 Mar 06 - 06:25 AM
Lady Hillary 20 Mar 06 - 12:11 PM
GUEST,ClaireBear 20 Mar 06 - 12:45 PM
Malcolm Douglas 20 Mar 06 - 08:12 PM
Bob the Postman 20 Mar 06 - 09:06 PM
Malcolm Douglas 20 Mar 06 - 09:44 PM
GUEST,JMC 21 Mar 06 - 03:24 PM
Bob the Postman 21 Mar 06 - 09:21 PM
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Subject: Sea kidnap song?
From: GUEST,JMC
Date: 18 Mar 06 - 11:46 AM

I keep stumbling over a European folksong in various guises. The gist of the plot is that a young woman is persuaded to come aboard ship by a charming sailor, who then hoists anchor and makes off out to sea. She laments her fate. I've found two French versions and one Catalan version of this, and was wondering if it made it across the Channel, or for that matter across the Atlantic.


Catalan version

One of the French versions was from a friend, the other from Chavanee's album "Chants Marins". I don't have the full text for either.


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Subject: ADD: El mariner
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Mar 06 - 12:40 PM

To make things easier for discussion and comparision, let me copy-paste the lyrics over here. Source: http://www.xtec.es/rtee/europa/090es/partitura_esp.htm

El mariner

A la vora de la mar
hi ha una donzella,
hi ha una donzella,
que en brodava un mocador;
és per la reina,
és per la reina.

Quan en fou a mig brodar
li manca seda,
li manca seda;
gira el ulls envers la mar
veu una vela,
veu una vela.

Veu venir un galiot
tot vora terra,
tot vora terra;
en veu venir un mariner
que una nau mena,
que una nau mena.

Mariner, bon mariner:
que en porteu seda?
que en porteu seda?
De quin color la voleu,
blanca o vermella?,
blanca o vermella?

Vermelleta la vull jo,
que és millor seda,
que és millor seda.
Vermelleta la vull jo,
que és per la reina,
que és per la reina.

Pugeu a dalt de la nau
triareu d'ella
triareu d'ella.
Ai no! No hi puc pujar
no tinc moneda,
no tinc moneda.

El meu pare té les claus
de l'arquimesa,
de l'arquimesa.
No quedeu per diners no,
gentil donzella, gentil donzella.

No quedeu per diners no,
gentil donzella,
gentil donzella.
No quedeu per diners, no,
prou fio d'ella,
prou fio d'ella.

La donzella entra a la nau,
tria la seda,
tria la seda.
Mentre va mercadejant
la nau pren vela,
la nau pren vela.

Mar endins amb el botí
promte navega,
promte navega.
Marine es posa a cantar
cançons novelles,
cançons novelles.

Amb el cant del mariner
s'ha dormideta,
s'ha dormideta,
i amb el sorrol de la mar
ella es desperta,
ella es desperta.

Quan ella s'ha despertat
ja no veu terra,
ja no veu terra,
la nau és en alta mar,
pel mar navega
pel nar navega,

Mariner, bon mariner,
torneu-me a terra
torneu-me a terra,
perquè els aires de la mar
m'en donen pena
m'en donen pena.

Això si que no ho faré,
que heu de ser meva,
que heu de ser meva;
set anys que vaig pel mar
per vos donzella,
per vos donzella.

Cent llegües dins de la mar
lluny de la terra
lluny de la terra
De tres germanes que som,
sóc la més bella,
sóc la més bella.

L'una porta vestit d'or,
l'altre de seda,
l'altre de seda,
i jo pobreta de mi,
de sargil negre,
de sargil negre.

L'una es casada amb un Duc,
l'altra és princesa,
l'altra és princesa,
i jo pobreta de mi,
sóc marinera,
sóc marinera.

No sou marinera, no,
que en sereu reina,
que en sereu reina,
que sóc el fill del rei
de l'Anglaterra,
de l'Anglaterra.

Fuente: Las canciones del pueblo español. Juan de Aguila (Unión musical española) - Pàg. 122


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Subject: RE: Sea kidnap song?
From: GUEST,JMC
Date: 18 Mar 06 - 12:59 PM

Ah, not much use unless one speaks Catalan, which personally I don't. I did find a partial text and translation also:

El Mariner

A la vora de la mar
hi ha una donzella,
hi ha una donzella,
que en brodava un mocador
que és per la reina,
que és per la reina.

Quan en fou a mig brodar
Li manca seda,
Li manca seda,
Veu venir un mariner
Que una nau mena,
que una nau mena.

--Mariner bon mariner,
que en porteu seda?
Que en porteu seda?
--Pugeu a dalt de la nau
triareu d´ella,
triareu d´ella.

La donzella entrà a la nau,
Escull la seda,
Escull la seda.
Mentre va mercadejant
La nau pren vela,
la nau pren vela.



El Mariner
(The Sailor)

On the sea shore
There was a maiden,
there was a maiden,
Who was embroidering a kerchief
For the queen,
For the queen.

When she was half through
She had no more silk,
no more silk,
She saw a sailor
Bringing his ship around.
bringing his ship.

--Sailor, kind sailor,
are you carrying silk?
are you carrying silk?
--Come aboard the ship
and choose what you need,
choose what you need.

The maiden boards the vessel
To choose the silk.
choose the silk.
While she was selecting it,
The ship takes sail,
takes sail.

The French versions begin:

M'y promenant le long de ces verts près
J'ai entendu la voix d'un marinier

and

Me promenant au dessus des bords de l'eau
J'ai apercu un charmant matelot


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Subject: RE: Sea kidnap song?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Mar 06 - 01:21 PM

What title do they use for the French versions, JMC? Any others?
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Sea kidnap song?
From: GUEST,JMC
Date: 20 Mar 06 - 06:25 AM

My friend's version is titled "La Belle et Le Marinier".

Damn it, everywhere I look on the internet I find different versions of this song now - I've just found another titled "Sur les bords de la Loire":

1. La belle se promène, au fond de son jardin, (bis)
Au fond de son jardin, sur les bords de la Loi-oi-re,
Au fond de son jardin, sur les bords du ruisseau,

Tout auprès du vaisseau, charmant matelot

2. Sur le grand fleuve passe un brick de marinier (bis)
Un brick de marinier sur les bords de la Loi-oi-re,
Un brick de marinier, sur les bords du ruisseau,

3. Le plus jeune des mousses chantait une chanson, (bis)

4. "Je voudrais, dit la belle, savoir votre chanson, (bis)

5. "Montez dedans le brick(e) et je vous l'apprendrai, (bis)

6. Quand ell' fut sur le brick(e), ell' se mit à pleurer, (bis)

7. "Qu'avez-vous donc, la belle, qu'avez-vous à pleurer? (bis)

8. "Je pleure mon puc'lage qu'un gabier m'a volé, (bis)

9. "Ne pleurez pas, la belle, je vous le retrouv'rai, (bis)

10. "Ca n' se rend pas, dit-elle, comm' de l'argent prêté (bis)

11. "Sans ça, toutes les filles trouv'raient à se marier, (bis)



And now I also find it in the Mudcat database as "Isabeau s'y promène", which is French Canadian, so yes it did cross the Atlantic. There's also a thread about its translation here

The business about the embroidered handkerchief seems to be specific to the Catalan version. In others it's just the sailor's charm and good looks that entice the heroine on board ship, or the beauty of the song he's singing. (The perils of being a dedicated female folksong collector, eh?) Also, in the French Canadian version it's a ring she's lost, whereas in "Sur les bords de la Loire" it's more frankly her virginity.


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Subject: RE: Sea kidnap song?
From: Lady Hillary
Date: 20 Mar 06 - 12:11 PM

The initial description suggests a relationship with the Child Ballad, "The House Carpenter."


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Subject: RE: Sea kidnap song?
From: GUEST,ClaireBear
Date: 20 Mar 06 - 12:45 PM

The Child ballad "Maid on the Shore (here in DT) is on this theme, but the maid triumphs in the end.


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Subject: RE: Sea kidnap song?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 20 Mar 06 - 08:12 PM

No relation at all to House Carpenter, so far as can be told. The basic scenario is common in French tradition, but develops in various ways depending on the song-group involved. Most have been discussed here before.

It's my (purely personal) feeling that the Canadian Maid on the Shore is not really related to the Broomfield Hill group at all, as received wisdom would have it; nor does it derive from some putative Irish ballad as has also been suggested. I don't see how it can be other than an English-language redaction of a French song.


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Subject: RE: El Mariner - Sea kidnap song?
From: Bob the Postman
Date: 20 Mar 06 - 09:06 PM

Another song in this family might be one called "Belle embarquez!" on the CD "Par Monts Et Par Vaux" by the Quebec trad group La Volee D'Castors. A girl accepts a boat ride and, when the sailors get fresh, she says, "By the way, my dad's the hangman." They order her off the boat and she taunts them, "Did I say hangman? I meant to say he's the richest merchant in town." The chorus goes

Sur l'bord de l'eau, sur l'bord du vaisseau
Sur l'bord de la riviere
Sur l'bord de l'eau, sur l'bord du vaisseau
Sur l'bord de la Gatineau


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Subject: RE: El Mariner - Sea kidnap song?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 20 Mar 06 - 09:44 PM

Yes, that one is quite well-known in various forms. What was their traditional source?


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Subject: RE: El Mariner - Sea kidnap song?
From: GUEST,JMC
Date: 21 Mar 06 - 03:24 PM

The Maid on the Shore is Canadian?


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Subject: RE: El Mariner - Sea kidnap song?
From: Bob the Postman
Date: 21 Mar 06 - 09:21 PM

The liner notes on the Volee d'Castors CD say they learned "Belle, embarquez!" off a record that was older than all the band members put together.

Barbeau's 1982 collection "En Roulant Ma Boule" contains a verion of "Belle, embarquez!" collected in Gaspesie in 1923 with the refrain

Le long de la mer
La joli' mer
Le long de la mer jolie

In a lengthy discussion of the song, Barbeau points out that "Belle, embarquez!" is one of many songs in the same lineage and cites by name "Isabeau s'y promene", "L'embarquement de la fille aux chansons", and "La belle a pris l'epee". In this last, the would-be ravisher can't get naked fast enough because of a tangled lace. He asks his victim to cut the lace with his epee, which she instead plunges into his heart. This epee puts me in mind of the broad sword which the maid on the shore uses as an oar.

Barbeau also cites a version of "Maid On The Shore" called "The Sea Captain" which was collected in Nova Scotia by W. Roy Mackenzie in the 1920s and again from the same informant by Creighton in 1953 (Maritime Folk Songs, 1961).

Barbeau speculates inconclusively on the origins of "Belle, embarquez!", alluding to 17th century colonists from the Loire, a (16th century?) collection called "Vaux-de-Vire", and folkloristic research in France, Italy, and Spain.

Finally, all these songs of foiled ravishers and Isabeau remind me of "Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight". Isabel or Isabeau, the bad guy gets drownded.


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