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Lyr Add: Take Me Back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)

GUEST,Pato de argentina 07 Sep 06 - 12:38 AM
Azizi 26 Mar 06 - 11:29 AM
Charley Noble 26 Mar 06 - 09:33 AM
Azizi 25 Mar 06 - 09:53 PM
chico 25 Mar 06 - 09:33 PM
Charley Noble 25 Mar 06 - 06:29 PM
chico 24 Mar 06 - 07:45 PM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Take Me Back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)
From: GUEST,Pato de argentina
Date: 07 Sep 06 - 12:38 AM

Gracias, estube buscando en toda la web la letra y no la podia encontrar, de nuevo gracias.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Take me back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)
From: Azizi
Date: 26 Mar 06 - 11:29 AM

You're welcome Charley, though there's no need to thank me for
doing what Mudcatters do-sharing info on folk music.

For instance, I just found this website http://www.jamaicans.com/music/folk.htm

It includes song clips on Jamaican music from an online Jamaican radio station.

Here's the introduction to that website:

"When most people think of music in Jamaica, they think Reggae. And while Reggae music has been one of Jamaica's great exports, there was a definite evolution to reach that point. Many people also know of Reggae's 'grandfather' Ska and Reggae's predecessor Rock Steady. But before those 2 genres...there was more. First and foremost was Jamaican Folk music. It's evolution saw this folk music used at certain social functions. For example - the music of the Pocomania church, the fife and drum sound of Junkanoo, the European influence Quadrille and the plantation influence 'work songs'. The first music that was recorded in Jamaica was Mento which drew heavily from these various forms of Folk music, not only with its repetoire, but also from the instrumentation. Compared to Calypso, Mento was a distinctive style that still has influence today. This winter of 2001 - 2002 marks the 50th anniversary of recording facilities in Jamaica. What's that hair-colouring commercial that used to say "You've come a long way Baby"? Jamaican music surely has."
-snip-

Speaking of online radio stations, I often turn to http://www.shoutcast.com/.
It includes musical genres other than pop and R&B ;0}

You might want to check it out.

Enjoy!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Take me back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 26 Mar 06 - 09:33 AM

Thanks, Azizi, for the additional info.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Take me back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)
From: Azizi
Date: 25 Mar 06 - 09:53 PM

For comprehensive online history of Mento music including the the Jolly Boys and other vocalists & groups, click

http://www.mentomusic.com/TheJollyBoys.htm

Here's an excerpt from that website:

"If you should ever visit Port Antonio, they still talk about how back in the 1950s, The Jolly Boys would play at Hollywood parties that film star Errol Flynn would throw at his Port Antonio estate. Some accounts have the beginnings of the Jolly Boys dating back to the 1940s, though this may be inaccurate. Unfortunately, I have not been able to find any personnel info from this era beyond the fact that Moses Deans was a member, playing banjo and singing. This lineup does not appear to have recorded...

..disregarding the recordings by reggae artists with the same same, the first true Jolly Boys recording was the 1972 single:

Take Me Back To Jamaica
- Allan Swimmer and The Jolly Boys, b/w

Thousand Of Children
- Donald Davidson and The Jolly Boys

When this 45 was released in Great Britton, on the Fab Records label, the songs were credited to Allan Swimmer and to Dee Davidson, with the words Jolly Boys totally absent from the label. The A-side was remade 18 years later on The Jolly Boys LP, "Sunshine 'n' Water". The B-side was included on the 1977 Jolly Boys album, The Roots of Reggae"...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Take me back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)
From: chico
Date: 25 Mar 06 - 09:33 PM

Probably dates from 1960s? Can't tell.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Take me back to Jamaica (Jolly Boys)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 25 Mar 06 - 06:29 PM

Is this one contemporary or does it go back a ways?

Charley Noble


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Subject: Lyr Add: TAKE ME BACK TO JAMAICA (Jolly Boys)
From: chico
Date: 24 Mar 06 - 07:45 PM

Sound sample at http://www.thejollyboys.com/main.html



C                                       
Take me back to Jamaica where I were born
(7)                                  G7
Take me back to Jamaica where I were born, mon
            C             7          F          F#°
Where the green bananas grow and the Rio Grandee flow
C                G7                C
Take me back to Jamaica where I were born

Take me back to the island in the sun
Take me back to the sunny land of fun
Where we all can sit and dine, and off in the sunny sunny land of mine
Take me back to Jamaica where I were born

Take me back to the land of the coconut palms
Take me back to where de young girl have de charms
Where the green bananas grow and the Rio Grandee flow, mon
Take me back to Jamaica where I were born

(1st verse)

"Tell them my friends, tell them"

Take me back and me have some good fun
Take me back to Jamaica in the sun
Where we all can sit and dine, and off in the sunny sunny land of mine
Take me back to Jamaica where I were born



["The Jolly Boys are the foremost performers of Mento, the ribald, witty first cousin of Jamaican reggae. Like reggae, Mento is marked by a shuffling, syncopated guitar strum, an irreverent attitude, and a lazy, swaying danceability. Unlike reggae, Mento has no sacramental roots, nor does it strain after profundity. Instead, Mento makes a religion of sexual braggadocio, drinking, and good times. The Jolly Boys have been composing and performing Mento for decades; indeed, they used to perform for Errol Flynn when he stayed at his Jamaican villa. Their sound is derived from rhythmic bongo playing, along with solos by the banjo and kalimba (finger piano). http://www.thejollyboys.com/history.html]


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